How did Ravens cornerbacks stack up to rest of NFL in 2017?

January 29, 2018 | Luke Jones

The Ravens failed to make the postseason for the fourth time in five years, but where exactly did their players stack up across the NFL in 2017?

Whether it’s discussing the Pro Bowl or picking postseason awards, media and fans spend much time debating where players rank at each position, but few put in the necessary time and effort to watch every player on every team extensively enough to develop any kind of an authoritative opinion.

Truthfully, how many times did you closely watch the offensive line of the Los Angeles Chargers this season? What about the Detroit Lions linebackers or the Miami Dolphins cornerbacks?

That’s why I can appreciate projects such as Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 and the grading efforts of Pro Football Focus. Of course, neither should be viewed as the gospel of evaluation and each is subjective, but I respect the exhaustive effort to grade players across the league when so many of us watch only one team or one division on any kind of a consistent basis. It’s important to note that the following PFF rankings are where the player stood at the conclusion of the regular season.

Below is a look at where Ravens cornerbacks ranked across the league, according to those outlets:

Running backs
Defensive linemen
Tight ends

Jimmy Smith
2017 defensive snap count: 599
NFL1000 ranking: 2nd among outside cornerbacks
PFF ranking: 14th
Skinny: The talented and oft-injured Smith was having the best season of his career and was arguably the team MVP before tearing his Achilles tendon. It’s now fair to wonder if his best days are behind him as he turns 30 in July and will also carry cap numbers north of $15 million in each of the next two years.

Brandon Carr
2017 defensive snap count: 1,024
NFL1000 ranking: 22nd among outside cornerbacks
PFF ranking: 68th
Skinny: Carr struggled down the stretch, but he was still a solid No. 2 corner playing all 16 games and did well with Baltimore’s emphasis on press coverage. His $7 million cap hit for 2018 isn’t outrageous, but the Ravens will have quite a decision on their hands with so many moving parts at the position.

Marlon Humphrey
2017 defensive snap count: 596
NFL1000 ranking: 17th among outside cornerbacks
PFF ranking: 34th
Skinny: The Alabama product being taken in the first round wasn’t popular with fans, but the 21-year-old didn’t play like a rookie, excelling while spelling Smith and then taking his place when the veteran’s Achilles finally gave out. Humphrey isn’t just ready to be a starter, but he looks like a future No. 1 corner.

Maurice Canady
2017 defensive snap count: 319
NFL1000 ranking: 24th among slot cornerbacks
PFF ranking: 76th
Skinny: Despite not playing a single defensive snap as a rookie and injuring his knee in training camp, Canady returned midseason and soon took over as the nickel corner, using his size and physicality effectively. His ability to play outside, inside, or at safety is an intriguing skill set moving forward.

Lardarius Webb
2017 defensive snap count: 377
NFL1000 ranking: n/a
PFF ranking: 105th
Skinny: Transitioning to a reserve role after years as a starter, the 32-year-old was miscast as a slot corner to begin the season after the long-term injuries to Tavon Young and Canady. It had become apparent in recent years that Webb was no longer a corner, so he predictably struggled in this role.

Jaylen Hill
2017 defensive snap count: 16
NFL1000 ranking: n/a
PFF ranking: n/a
Skinny: Arguably the best story of the summer as a rookie free agent who made the 53-man roster, Hill missed multiple weeks with a hamstring injury and couldn’t carve out a role on defense before tearing his ACL late in the season. He remains an interesting name to watch once he’s healthy again.

2018 positional outlook

Even with Smith, Young, and Hill coming back from serious injuries, the Ravens remain in pretty good shape at this position with the rapid emergence of Humphrey being the biggest reason why. One of the most interesting decisions of the offseason might be what to do with Carr since the Ravens need cap space to address a number of holes on the offensive side of the ball. General manager Ozzie Newsome could cut Carr or trade him to a corner-needy team, but that may depend on Smith’s progress as well as the status of Young, who looked the part of a starting-caliber player as a rookie. If Smith is ready to return by Week 1, Carr could turn out to be a very expensive backup. Webb looks to be a likely cap casualty with a $2.15 million salary scheduled for 2018. Ultimately, a healthy Smith and Humphrey as the starting corners with Young and Canady working in sub packages would be quite a foursome.