New Ravens safety Considine excited to be reunited with Harbaugh

March 27, 2012 | Luke Jones

The last of four signings announced by the Ravens last Friday drew the softest buzz, but veteran safety Sean Considine couldn’t pass on the chance to reunite with John Harbaugh.

Signing a one-year contract to boost the Ravens’ depth at safety, Considine now has the opportunity to join his former special teams coordinator and secondary coach from their days with the Philadelphia Eagles. After being selected in the fourth round of the 2005 draft, Considine reaped the benefits from the leadership qualities shown by Harbaugh in Philadelphia that led to his hiring as the third head coach in the history of the Ravens in 2008.

Considine once showed more promise at safety in making 17 starts in four seasons with the Eagles, but the 29-year-old has settled into reserve roles while continuing to play special teams with Jacksonville, Carolina, and Arizona over the last three years. With the Ravens having lost reserve safeties Tom Zbikowski and Haruki Nakamura in free agency, Considine saw a promising opportunity with Harbaugh in Baltimore.

“He’s a heck of a leader, and I’m looking forward to playing for him again,” Considine said on AM 1570 WNST on Monday. “Relationships in the NFL always come full circle. The people you know, they trust you. I think [the Ravens] are looking for a solid backup safety, a guy with a little veteran presence, a special teams guy like myself. Harbaugh knows who I am and what I am about, so it was easy to unite with him again.”

With Emanuel Cook the only other reserve safety on the roster to back up starters Ed Reed and Bernard Pollard, Considine’s 6-foot, 212-pound frame is suited to play both safety positions if needed. The 29-year-old played in four games with Carolina last season before being released and picked up by the Arizona Cardinals following an injury to Kerry Rhodes.

Entering his eighth NFL season, Considine has played in 83 career games while notching 253 career tackles, 2 1/2 sacks, four interceptions, five fumble recoveries, and two forced fumbles. He has also made 93 special teams tackles over his career.

Much like newly-signed cornerback Corey Graham, Considine has been a regular contributor to all special teams units and embraces the phase of the game young players sometimes view as a demotion when not in the starting offense or defense.

“I play all four phases [of special teams], and I really enjoy it,” Considine said. “It’s an important part of the game and you can put in the same amount work in film study that you do if you are defensive or offensive starter. That’s what I like to do. I take it seriously, and I usually have pretty good success playing special teams.”

With veteran linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo questioning the effort of the team’s young players on special teams last season, the additions of Graham and Considine speak to a concerted effort to improve kick coverage and generate more production in the return game. The Ravens finished 30th in special teams, according to FootballOutsiders.com, while ranking 31st in kickoff coverage and 24th in punt coverage.

Considine hopes his experience and commitment to special teams will help reverse the misfortune that has placed special teams coordinator Jerry Rosburg under scrutiny for the 2012 season.

“I know coach Harbaugh, and I know how much pride he takes in the special teams units coming from his background,” Considine said. “They weren’t playing up to their standards in special teams last year, and they are looking to improve just like every other team is looking to improve in all phases. So, hopefully I’ll be a part of that solution.”

To hear Sean Considine’s entire conversation with WNST.net’s Glenn Clark, click HERE.

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