Rice’s first public comments fall short with glaring omission

May 23, 2014 | Luke Jones

Rice’s first public comments fall short with glaring omission

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Ray Rice was never going to win when he finally broke his silence on Friday.

Making his first public comments since a domestic incident in an Atlantic City casino in February forever changed his life, the Ravens running back wasn’t going to find words to brighten the opinions of the many who are justifiably angry and he may never improve the feelings of some. The parameters of declining to answer questions and scheduling the session on a Friday afternoon entering a holiday weekend created skepticism before Rice and his wife, Janay, ever stepped in front of cameras at the Ravens’ training facility in Owings Mills.

The missteps have already been picked apart, ranging from Rice fumbling with his phone to look at notes and offering an ill-suited analogy of getting up after being knocked down to his wife taking some responsibility for what happened — a public relations nightmare for a domestic violence incident — and the couple appearing distant with one another throughout the proceedings. What may have been a respectable desire to speak from the heart instead of reading a prepared statement was poorly executed as Rice has been known to occasionally ramble and speak in circles in his press conferences over the years.

But it was what he failed to say from the very beginning that ultimately doomed his first attempt to begin rebuilding his public image.

Oversight or not, Rice failed to directly and publicly apologize to his wife — the woman who sat next to him and in front of the entire world on Friday — while he expressed sorrow to others and spoke of his relationship with her growing stronger since the events of February 15. That’s not to assume the 27-year-old hasn’t apologized profusely to his wife in private, but if the goal of Friday’s event was to show his remorse and begin rehabilitating his image in the public eye, it needed to start with a direct appeal to the person impacted most by what happened at the Revel Casino.

Before apologizing to owner Steve Bisciotti, general manager Ozzie Newsome, head coach John Harbaugh, or anyone else, Rice needed to show the world how much he loved the woman sitting next to him and how deeply sorry he was to her. Perhaps the intent was to present a strong and composed partnership between the two, but his lack of an immediate and personal apology to his wife at the beginning made the rest of his words ring hollow.

“As me and Janay wish we could take back 30 seconds of our life,” Rice said, “we definitely sit here today and tell you that we are better parents, we are better lovers, and we are also better friends throughout the situation. And as our families sit here today, we want to just thank you for encouraging us.”

Even with the harsh criticism over what transpired Friday, Rice is fully capable of rehabilitating his image, but that won’t happen overnight. His actions over time and how they impact his wife, family, and others close to him will be the deciding factor while his words on Friday — awkward as they were — carry little weight in the big picture.

Some may eventually forgive him and others will not, but Rice has the ability to make things right in his own life by simply following through on his vows of being a better husband, father, and role model. If he does that in the coming years, lingering criticism from the outside world won’t really matter.

The image of Rice dragging what appeared to be his unconscious fiancée from an elevator will never disappear — reports swirled on Friday afternoon that the seventh-year running back is expected to receive a multi-game suspension from the NFL — but the details about what preceded the events in that disturbing video may never fully come to light.

“There were a lot of tears shed, but me and Janay can truly say that we’re in a better place,” Rice said. “Hopefully, one day, I’ll gain back everyone’s trust to let you all know that we’re still the same people, and I’m still the same person. I really treat my job as a very special job, and I failed miserably. But I wouldn’t call myself a failure, because I’m working my way back up.”

Rice only needs to look to former teammate and close friend Ray Lewis as a notable example of rebuilding one’s image and regaining that trust.

It can be done, but his first attempt to begin that process on Friday was an obvious setback.

The other missteps were always going to be picked apart, but his failure to publicly and directly apologize to his wife from the very beginning was the colossal gaffe that will be difficult to forget.

 

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6 Comments For This Post

  1. Chuck Says:

    It’s becoming very difficult to be a fan of the Ravens if you have any ethics or morals.

  2. unitastoberry Says:

    He’s put himself in a pressure cooker for sure now. Coming off his worst season ever rushing and then this drunken assault on his now wife. As far as the law is concerned he will get a slap on the wrist as most first time offenders do. But if he lays a turd on the field again this year its bye bye for him.

  3. Rich Says:

    People in society do dumb or immoral things everyday and we only seem to be overly concerned when they are notable people like athletes, entertainers, or politicians. As I see it, I’m a Baltimore sports fan and I am entertained by them when I watch them play just like when I watch a good actor or hear a good musician. (I don’t know any good politicians so I’ll let that lie.). Ray Rice isn’t watching my kids or hanging out with me on weekends. I don’t care what he does off the field as long as he shows up on Sunday. As far as I’m concerned he’s #27 in the program … until he’s not. Next?

  4. Kolo Jezdec Says:

    People in society do wonderful and important things everyday and we only seem to be overly concerned when they are notable people like athletes, entertainers, or politicians.

    “I don’t care what he does off the field as long as he shows up on Sunday.” Really? That is an amazing statement.

  5. Kolo Jezdec Says:

    Sorry, hit submit too early.

    “I don’t care what he does off the field as long as he shows up on Sunday.”

    So, Mr. Rich, you would not care if a Ravens player got falling down drunk and while driving home he wiped out a family? Or if a Ravens player was found to have sexually abused his 10 year old daughter? So long as the players help bring back that shiny Lombardi trophy, so what…

  6. Eddie Says:

    Yes , He could have said to his wife , – Janay , I’m sorry that I was in the elevator when you became uncontrollable and stated hitting me . I should have taken the stairs and none of this would have happened . Striking out in violence when having an argument is never a good thing. I hope this never happens again .

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