Twelve Ravens thoughts ahead of 53-man roster cuts

August 28, 2018 | Luke Jones

With the Ravens wrapping up the preseason and poised to formulate their first 53-man roster of the 2018 season this week, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Kamalei Correa was a disappointment compared to several second-round standouts on which the Ravens passed, but Day 3 of the 2016 draft produced three projected 2018 starters as well as four others who’ve already been — or have a good chance to be — real contributors. Any team would gladly take that.

2. That said, the 2016 draft is arguably a microcosm of the last five years. The organization has done a great job finding late-round contributors, but the sixth overall selection and early second- and third-round picks should net more than a solid but not yet spectacular Ronnie Stanley. More playmakers, right?

3. Correa reunites with Dean Pees after many blamed the former defensive coordinator for moving him to inside linebacker. A former Ravens scout told me last winter Correa’s versatility was what the organization always valued the most, but he didn’t excel in any one area. Solely blaming Pees is too convenient.

4. Ignoring previous expectations, acquiring a 2019 sixth-round pick is a good return for Correa when you consider Cleveland recently netted only a 2020 seventh-round selection for former first-round receiver Corey Coleman, who was more accomplished than the reserve linebacker.

5. With Jaleel Scott already on injured reserve and fellow rookies DeShon Elliott and Greg Senat likely to follow, the Ravens could end up keeping their entire 12-man draft class in the organization. With the lengths Ozzie Newsome went to collect late choices in this draft, that’s not a bad thing.

6. After being asked if Gus Edwards leaving Monday’s practice was another “mysterious” injury — it wasn’t — I’d be remiss not to note that IR players count against the cap and are unavailable for the rest of the season. Edwards makes sense on your practice squad, but teams can’t “stash” everyone.

7. I’ve repeatedly stated my position on keeping three quarterbacks, but Robert Griffin III has done everything he could to stick. He easily could have sulked after Lamar Jackson was drafted, but he’s instead mentored the young quarterback, who will hopefully have an easier career path to navigate as a result.

8. Thursday’s distribution of playing time between Jackson and Griffin could offer a clue to the direction the Ravens lean. If Griffin plays sparingly, perhaps the coaches don’t want their primary backup exposed to injury. A lengthier outing may mean he’s being allowed to audition for another job. We’ll see.

9. Longtime special-teams standout Albert McClellan is perceived to be on the bubble, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see him coaching whenever he’s done playing. I was reminded recently that former Raven Bennie Thompson immediately took a Baltimore coaching role upon being cut from the roster in 2000.

10. Coaches have been in the ear of Jordan Lasley all summer, which is often a sign of a staff being invested in a player’s development. However, his effort has been inconsistent, which hurts his case. Cutting him wouldn’t exactly be a great look after the disappointing Scott went to IR.

11. John Harbaugh said Orlando Brown Jr. has proven himself as a “viable” player, but describing the rest of the offensive line depth as “developing” isn’t a glowing endorsement. Adding a veteran reinforcement should be a priority, but there isn’t enough offensive line depth to go around in today’s NFL.

12. Draft standing matters when comparing similar young bubble players. Is a former fourth-rounder such as Nico Siragusa or a late sixth-rounder like Bradley Bozeman more likely to clear waivers for the practice squad? Why else has former second-rounder Stanley Jean-Baptiste been with six organizations despite playing in five NFL games?