What to expect from Ravens’ 2018 draft picks

April 29, 2018 | Luke Jones

The picks are in for the 2018 draft, so what can we now expect from the Ravens’ 12 selections?

Below is the early look at how each rookie fits:

TE Hayden Hurst
Drafted: First round (25th overall) from South Carolina
2018 projected role: Tight ends generally struggle in their rookie season, but the 24-year-old will have every chance to become the primary guy with Nick Boyle and Maxx Williams better suited as blockers.
Long-term view: His 6-foot-5, 250-pound frame and good hands offer hope that he can become Baltimore’s best all-around tight end since Todd Heap with the ability to move around formations. He will be critical in helping Joe Flacco now and aiding in Lamar Jackson’s development for the future.

QB Lamar Jackson
Drafted: First round (32nd overall) from Louisville
2018 projected role: The quarterback of the future will need time to develop as a backup, but the Ravens would be wise to pick their spots to utilize his athleticism and expose him to some game action.
Long-term view: Jackson’s throwing mechanics and ability to function with pressure in an NFL pocket are significant questions, but his tools make him an intriguing talent the Ravens have never had at the position. The hope is he ushers in a new era for the organization, but there is much work to be done.

OT Orlando Brown Jr.
Drafted: Third round (83rd overall) from Oklahoma
2018 projected role: The son of former Ravens right tackle Orlando Brown will compete with veteran James Hurst for the starting right tackle job.
Long-term view: A historically-poor combine performance didn’t wipe out how the organization felt about his strong game tape, but questions about his weight, strength, and foot speed cannot be dismissed. You love the pedigree, but Brown has much to prove to reward the Ravens’ faith in him.

TE Mark Andrews
Drafted: Third round (86th overall) from Oklahoma
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5 target will compete for situational snaps in the passing game as a big slot option and should have a real chance to make an impact inside the red zone.
Long-term view: Andrews is a wide receiver trapped in a tight end’s body and is not considered much of a blocker, meaning he’ll need to make substantial contributions in the pass game. In a perfect world, he slides into the old Dennis Pitta role, which was a big part of the Ravens’ success in the past.

CB Anthony Averett
Drafted: Fourth round (118th overall) from Alabama
2018 projected role: The 5-foot-11, 183-pound defensive back has a slew of names ahead of him on the depth chart, meaning he’ll need to be a good special-teams player to see the field as a rookie.
Long-term view: Being a two-year starter for the Crimson Tide speaks for itself, but Averett lacks the physicality of Marlon Humphrey and has more to prove. Eventually becoming a No. 2 starting cornerback isn’t out of the question, but Averett can provide valuable depth at the very least.

LB Kenny Young
Drafted: Fourth round (122nd overall) from UCLA
2018 projected role: Young has the athleticism to compete with Patrick Onwuasor for the weak-side inside linebacker spot next to C.J. Mosley, a position that wasn’t stellar for the Ravens last season.
Long-term view: A full-time starter for three seasons with the Bruins, Young has coverage skills that could add a dimension the Baltimore defense sorely needs. He should contribute on special teams immediately with the chance to eventually move into a starting role.

WR Jaleel Scott
Drafted: Fourth round (132nd overall) from New Mexico State
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5 receiver will compete for situational snaps and could get looks as a contributor inside the red zone if he shows enough during the spring and summer.
Long-term view: You love the size and Scott made some acrobatic catches last year, but he lacks speed and is the kind of raw prospect the Ravens have rarely had success developing into anything of consequence. Baltimore has lacked a jump-ball threat for years, so Scott has a chance to be just that.

WR Jordan Lasley
Drafted: Fifth round (162nd overall) from UCLA
2018 projected role: Lasley will compete for a roster spot and will need to play special teams, but he showed the big-play ability in college to potentially earn some chances at the receiver position.
Long-term view: Off-field issues and bad hands led to Lasley’s slide down the draft board, but he averaged 18.3 yards per catch and accumulated 1,264 yards and nine touchdowns in nine games last season. He’s the proverbial boom-or-bust prospect, making him a decent gamble in the fifth round.

S DeShon Elliott
Drafted: Sixth round (190th overall) from Texas
2018 projected role: Much like Chuck Clark a year ago, the first-team All-American safety will need to shine on special teams to secure a roster spot in a deep secondary.
Long-term view: Opinions are mixed, but many seem to view Elliott as more of a box safety needing to play closer to the line of scrimmage to succeed. He’ll have a difficult time carving out a defensive role early, but he has the potential to eventually develop into a hybrid option.

OT Greg Senat
Drafted: Sixth round (212th overall) from Wagner
2018 projected role: The former college basketball player has good length and will compete for a roster spot or an opportunity on the practice squad.
Long-term view: Senat needs to get stronger and unsurprisingly needs to improve his blocking technique, but this is the kind of prospect that makes perfect sense late in the sixth round. At the very least, offensive line coach Joe D’Alessandris has a good athlete with which to work.

C Bradley Bozeman
Drafted: Sixth round (215th overall) from Alabama
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5, 315-pound lineman will compete for a roster spot or a place on the practice squad at a position lacking a long-term answer.
Long-term view: You like the pedigree of someone who made 31 career starts for the Crimson Tide, but Bozeman’s lack of athleticism and strength explain him lasting until the sixth round. His instincts and success in the SEC make him a decent developmental option with limited upside.

DE Zach Sieler
Drafted: Seventh round (238th overall) from Ferris State
2018 projected role: The Division II All-American selection will compete for a roster spot or a place on the practice squad with the defensive line being so deep.
Long-term view: Ozzie Newsome taking a defensive lineman from a small school as his final draft choice is fitting, but Sieler’s 6-foot-6, 290-pound frame fits the mold of an NFL 5-technique lineman. With Brent Urban and Carl Davis not signed beyond 2018, Sieler is at least worth keeping an eye on.