Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

August 23, 2012 | Nestor Aparicio

Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

As Mike Mussina makes his triumphant return to Baltimore this weekend for the Orioles Hall of Fame activities it’s certainly a thought-provoking time to be a long-time observer and fan of the franchise.

Sure, the Orioles are once again relevant — playing meaningful and exciting games every night — which harkens to the days of 1996 & 1997 when “Moose” was an integral part of the magic of being an Orioles fan every fifth day during the zenith of Camden Yards’ passion and Inner Harbor energy.

Mussina has been gone from Baltimore – except for three visits a year in New York Yankees pinstripes – for 12 years now. So long ago that time has seemingly dimmed the glory of his deeds and his departure serves as a truly seminal moment in the awfulness of the Orioles franchise under the stewardship of Peter Angelos since 1993.

In the 1970’s it was routine for the Orioles to lose players to owners, markets and franchises that had more wealth, population and revenue. Many members of the franchise “Hall of Fame” and “Oriole Way” stalwarts left like Mayflowers in the middle of the night for greener pastures including Don Baylor, Bobby Grich, Reggie Jackson, Wayne Garland and Doug DeCinces and later Eddie Murray, Mike Boddicker, Mike Flanagan, B.J. Surhoff and Mike Bordick were all dealt away to save cash and get younger players.

But in the 1980’s and 1990’s, replete with a fan base from six states that pumped unprecedented money into the franchise and reached into the state’s funds to build Camden Yards and turn Baltimore into a spigot for Major League Baseball profitability, the Orioles never lost a player they wanted to keep.

Not until they lost the best player and pitcher of his generation of Baltimore baseball when Mike Mussina wore the “turncoat” label and bolted for the New York Yankees.

After the 2000 season, tired of three years of losing and Angelos’ low-balling and obvious meddling and mismanagement, Mussina simply took the advice of his agent Arn Tellem and played out his option and walked. On Dec. 7, 2001 after years of eschewing the notion of playing in big, bad New York he signed a six-year, $88.5 million deal to play for the Evil Empire.

I’ll share my many personal memories and my friendship with Mussina later in this blog but I can remember the surreal nature of watching that press conference from The Bronx from Chicago’s Sporting News Radio studios with my jaw open. It was the definitive signal that quality Major League Baseball players simply didn’t want to be in Baltimore anymore and it had little to do with crab cakes or the American League East.

Mussina was thought to be “irreplaceable” at the time and 11 years later time has borne out that diagnosis.

Mussina left the Baltimore Orioles because the owner stunk. He knew it and everyone in baseball knew it.

So, Mussina will finally return and don Orioles colors this weekend for the final time and he’ll find a few fresh statues on the veranda, a team in the midst of its first pennant run in 15 years and a seemingly soulless shell of a former love affair for baseball in Baltimore.

There’ll be plenty of empty seats and shoulder shrugs at his mostly sweet and sour induction into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame this weekend. Certainly a worthy candidate if there ever were one, Mussina’s time as a starter for the Birds is only eclipsed by the deeds of Jim Palmer, who as I’ve said many times is the greatest (and most underappreciated) Oriole of all time by any measurement.

Palmer let loose with a haughty pronouncement on a MASN broadcast earlier this week in promoting this weekend’s festivities. “The Moose is going to Cooperstown – at least I hope. He’s got 270 wins,” said Palmer, who went on to proclaim that in the steroid era to win all of those games and Gold Gloves and remain a “clean figure” in the needle witch hunt of the Mitchell Report should get him a Hall of Fame ballot punched in 2014.

For “real” Orioles fans, he’ll always be known as the Benedict Arnold of the modern generation for leaving the

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6 Comments For This Post

  1. Steve Says:

    Thanks for linking the eras together and putting in the perspective that we need to be reminded of. As one of those people who grew up with the orioles and went to 25 games a year up until the current regime chased me away from baseball, it’s good to be reminded that it happened to us, not because of us. Mussina was basically my last orioles hero so thanks for sharing your story about him. This year I have been back into baseball but I am not back in the stadium much. They will have to do a lot more to get us all back and win over a new generation. I doubt it’s actually possible but we will see.

  2. radar303 Says:

    Mussina was a bulldog. Tough and smart pitcher who never had the size and sheer power of Clemens and Randy Johnson. He left here for numerous reasons. Money and the chance to be part of a WS winner were at the top, I would think that Peter Angelos was far down the list as far as reasons.

    Fact checking.. Don Baylor did not leave the Orioles as a Free Agent, he left Oakland for the the Angels.. he was traded for Reggie. He cried when he was traded, so he may have stayed. DeCinces was also traded for “Disco” Dan Ford. AS far as not being able to keep everyone that they wanted in the 80′s and 90′s due to the cash machine of OPACY, it is clear that they wanted to keep Palmeiro and probably Eric Davis after his monster year.

  3. Steve from Sandpoint Says:

    No hard feelings toward the MOOSE he did what he had to do, he might have stayed if he wasn’t low balled by Angelos & Co.

  4. Will Says:

    You said he signed with New York on December 7, 2001. However it was really November 30, 2000.

  5. unitastoberry Says:

    Great pitcher. Arrogant and aloof. Go back to NY.

  6. bill Says:

    He will never be as talented as his mind tells him he was…The guy is and was a jerk. I saw him around kids and other fans. He was an arrogant douchebag almost in the Eric Bedard class.

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