Your Monday Reality Check-We’d Be Defensive And We’d Be Wrong

March 05, 2012 | Glenn Clark

Your Monday Reality Check-We’d Be Defensive And We’d Be Wrong

I’ll just say this up front and deal with the consequences of the comment at some other.

I know-as a fact-that at least one high profile Baltimore Ravens player has been involved with a “Pay For Play” scheme of some sort. That discovery was confirmed to me by both a current and former teammate.

This column isn’t about the details of that revelation, as I have not found the details to be particularly newsworthy. If that changes in the future, I will fully accept the responsibility of sharing them publicly. Instead I bring the note up only to make it known that such schemes are not so particularly unique and it is easy for others around the game of football to offer perspective and commentary.

I also share this to set the tone for an answer to a question asked many times since the “Bountygate” saga surrounding the New Orleans Saints and former Defensive Coordinator Gregg Williams broke days ago.

“How would we react if it had been the Ravens?”

The question has been asked in the face of sharp criticism levied in the direction of Williams and company. National writers and local analysts alike have cried for severe punishment for both the individuals and the organization. Amongst the penalties suggested have been the loss of draft picks, six to seven figure fines, firings, suspensions and even the forfeiture of the Saints’ Super Bowl XLIV title.

We’ll find out reasonably soon what the actual penalties will be, but the down time between the release of the National Football League’s findings and sentencing has certainly allowed for sports media driven by the NFL to run wild with questions/comments.

There don’t appear to be great numbers of supporters of the Saints’ sins, but there certainly appears to be more than a few football fans who have been willing to suggest “everyone does this” or “injuries are a part of the game” as a response.

There is a sense of relevancy at least to the latter. There is an awkward nature about every football game played at every level. Every competitor in every game lines up knowing their chances of victory would be greatly improved if their opponents’ best players weren’t on the field.

It doesn’t mean players have regularly worked to ensure their opponents left the field early, it just means the thought is always very much in their minds.

It certainly doesn’t mean it is okay for a coach/organization to pay players as a bonus for injuring opponents.

The other question regularly asked by the small group of Saints defenders is “how would you feel if it was your favorite team?” As I’ve already noted, I’ve wavered on this since first being asked.

Here’s my gut feeling. If the circumstances were either the same (or at least in some way similar), Charm City would be likely to be supportive of the Ravens. If Gregg Williams was Rex Ryan or Chuck Pagano and Sean Payton was John Harbaugh and the players involved were actually Terrell Suggs, Haloti Ngata and Jarret Johnson-we’d be much less likely to call for a death penalty-caliber punishment.

We’d be way more likely to be defensive of the persons involved, suggesting “the bounty wasn’t the reason the unit was successful” or reminding fans that bounties have existed throughout football history.

We’d do it for the same reason San Francisco Giants fans continued to support slugger Barry Bonds despite the escalating evidence suggesting Major League Baseball’s all-time home run king perhaps cheated en route.

I’m not suggesting a football bounty in any way compares to steroid use. I’m only suggesting that it is easier to support players/coaches from your own favorite team because even if you don’t agree with their methods at heart, you believe something more significant.

Those players were trying to help your favorite team win.

When a player accepted money from a Saints assistant to go after an opposing player (or for simple on-field achievement), they did so as part of an attempt to win. Not only were they successful, they were so successful they turned a perennially miserable franchise into a Super Bowl champion.

If the Baltimore Ravens were accused of something similar, it would be much too easy for us to just say “I don’t necessarily like it, but I’m glad they did whatever necessary to win.”

It does not in any way alter the actual facts.

The facts here are very simple. The New Orleans Saints broke the rules and perhaps risked permanently altering the lives of men who were friends, former teammates and simply “brothers” on the gridiron.

There is nothing that can be said that will ever make that acceptable in any way. I won’t attempt to tell you what sort of penalty that should bring with it, I will only tell you I too believe it should be significant.

I will also suggest again that asking “what would you think if it was your favorite team” is not a defense Saints fans should even consider in conversation.

I would probably be supportive. I would DEFINITELY be wrong.

-G

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4 Comments For This Post

  1. gorav114 Says:

    I think u nailed it, if it was James Harrison I would cry foul and bully but if it was Ngata I would say it is part of the game and people need to stop whining. So, as usual, my fan goggles cloud my judgement.

  2. Sam Says:

    Well I suppose it has to do with the level of maturity of the person being asked.

    Our sense of right or wrong should not be dictated by a tribal sense of ethics.

  3. unitastoberry Says:

    When Todd Heap was cut by Joey Porter and basically sidelined for most of a season there was retribution. I dont know if anyone got paid off. When Carol Rosenbloom saw one of his players make a great hit he would stuff money in a guys pocket the next time he saw them.This stuffs been going on for years in the NFL but this time it leaked out kinda like Joe Valachi on the mob.

  4. Jonny Y Says:

    You certainly are right about the biased nature of allegations against your own teams, but there has to be a stern line set to differentiate between performance bonuses and bounty hunting with the intent to injure a player. I see what unitastoberry is saying about the retribution factor, but I feel like that is seperate from bounty hunting. When Ravens are hunting heads on Steelers to get payback on an injury, that’s personal. That’s a pitcher beaning a batter because the opposing pitcher nailed his teammate last inning, and in a violent, physical game like football it’s hard to spot all but the most blatant of hits.In reality, unless you have a player come forward and say that he and his teammates were paid to injure others, I can’t see how you can say the Saints were out of line. Without looking at stats, I couldn’t tell you if there were more serious injuries against Saints opponents than others over the last few seasons. I am sure a lot of this will come up over the next few weeks, until Draft Day takes the attention away, but lets calm down and see what the investigation turns up.

    How ’bout them O’s?

    (Edit from Glenn: I’d hate to be labeled a headhunter in dodgeball…)

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