Caps & Other Hockey Thoughts on the Eve of the Stanley Cup Finals

May 29, 2012 | Ed Frankovic

Caps & Other Hockey Thoughts on the Eve of the Stanley Cup Finals

Now that it has been over two weeks and the dust has settled on another crushing playoff defeat, Capitals fans can look forward to the Stanley Cup Finals and the exciting things to come for their team following it. This Caps off-season will be like no other in the recent past because General Manager George McPhee not only has to select a new coach, he has two first round choices in the 2012 NHL draft (11th and 16th overall picks), and he also has a lot of salary cap room to work with for the first time since perhaps the summer of 2008. With the Alexander Semin departure freeing up $6.7M on the books and Dennis Wideman’s $3.5M hit expiring along with some other smaller contracts that have ended (see Mike Knuble and Tomas Vokoun), GMGM has some flexibility to reshape the team and hopefully fill the holes that has prevented the club from advancing past the second round of the playoffs over the last five years.

So with that as a stage setter, here are 10 thoughts on the Caps, the NHL, the Memorial Cup, as well as my Stanley Cup Finals prediction:

- With the Finals starting Wednesday (8 pm on NBC), Tuesday was media day at “The Rock” in New Jersey. One of my favorite quotes of the afternoon came from Kings coach Darryl Sutter when he was talking about what turned it around for his club after it struggled during much of the regular season. He began by talking about guys starting to understand his system but then focused on center Mike Richards ability to find his game again in mid March after suffering a concussion earlier in the campaign. He then said the addition of Jeff Carter from Columbus at the trade deadline was the final piece needed since it allowed him to spread the offensive wealth. Specifically, he was talking about Kings superstar forward Anze Kopitar, who was having a hard time scoring goals. “At that position, you can’t be great all by yourself,” said Sutter. That excellent quote, which explains a lot, could easily be uttered by several other teams in the league who struggle to win consistently without two true scoring lines (see the Caps and Alexander Ovechkin).

- It is always tough to watch the playoff round following the one in which your team is eliminated and that was truly the case this spring once Washington was bounced by the Rangers in seven games. I fully expected the Caps to knock off the Rags but the bounces did not go the Capitals way at all in games three and five and Henrik Lundqvist was superb in net. Coach John Tortorella also received excellent play from defensemen Michael Del Zotto and forward Marian Gaborik in that series. Against the Devils, it was a different story and New Jersey dominated the Blueshirts before dispatching them in six games. Del Zotto was terrible against Peter DeBoer’s club and Gaborik disappeared like Jimmy Hoffa. On Frozen Blog’s John Keeley, before the Devils series against New York, penned a super blog on Lou Lamoriello’s club. John was spot on about the Devils talent and style of play and had the Caps beaten the Rangers, I don’t think they would’ve have been able to defeat the three time Stanley Cup Champions, but I sure would have liked to have seen Dale Hunter and company try!

- Speaking of Tortorella, there is no doubt that he is a super hockey mind but his abrupt and abrasive press conferences following playoff defeats became a hot topic in the Washington and then the New Jersey series. It got so bad that super NHL Network analysts’ Kevin Weekes and Craig Button finally called him out on it. Everyone knew Torts was trying to deflect criticism of his club and put the heat on himself, but the Rangers bench boss clearly took it too far. However, the man who has a very classy side, as was displayed on HBO’s 24/7 series, smartly changed his ways and was insightful and more patient with the media even while his team lost the last three contests to give away a chance to play in the Stanley Cup Finals. He was even more revealing and truly honest this past Monday during his club’s breakdown day. He talked about how certain players get what the team is trying to do while others do not. He said it would be up to the organization to get rid of those not on board. You can’t be much more up front than that and it was certainly refreshing to hear a truthful assessment of a team following their defeat with no excuses offered (such as Phoenix blaming the referees in the Western Conference Finals). Kudos to Tortorella, who also FULLY endorsed assistant coach Mike Sullivan for any NHL head coaching opening. Well done John, I was tough on you this post season but you’ve gone way up again in my book with your late playoff changed ways with the media, who work hard to promote the game many of us truly love. Perhaps I’ll take a cue from Torts and go easier on the referees next season??!! On second thought, I will have to think a little bit more on that one. ;)

- As for Sullivan, it is rumored that Calgary is the leading destination for the former Boston Bruins bench boss given his past relationship with Flames GM Jay Feaster in Tampa. Many once fired coaches learn and improve the second time around (see Bill Belichick and Joe Torre) and “Sully” seems to be the hot prospect this spring. I imagine the Capitals have strong interest in the New York assistant too given that the style Washinton played under Hunter is similar to what Sullivan and Tortorella were using in New York. With all of the moving pieces McPhee has going on this summer it will be interesting to see if Washington’s GM sets up his roster first before picking a head coach (the patient route that New Jersey took last summer with DeBoer) or he selects a coach and shapes the roster to fit the new coach’s style. Put me in the first category as I think the Capitals need to play a style like they played this post season. They need to continue to be responsible in their own end. Now if GMGM adds some offensive talent, and there is no doubt he has top six forwards in mind, then the club can be more aggressive offensively like New Jersey and Los Angeles are doing now, but both teams still have a STRONG defensive foundation at the root of their respective systems.

- When it comes to defense, I have to wonder what the heck happened to the Pittsburgh Penguins this spring?! That club was most people’s pick to go to and win the Finals this June but Coach Dan Bylsma’s squad fell flat on their faces. The Pens clearly lost their focus down the stretch and their play away from the puck, especially in their own end, was just awful. They had the most talented roster in the Eastern Conference and laid an egg in the first round. It is more proof that you have to be responsible defensively if you want to win the Stanley Cup and Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, and company seemed to have forgotten all of the good defensive lessons former coach Michel Therrien taught them before being dismissed during their 2008-09 Cup winning season. Wide open hockey does not work in the post season, plain and simple, just ask the 1983-84 Edmonton Oilers and they will confirm that axiom.

- After Hunter left his post here in Washington, he immediately went to sit in the press box and watch his London Knights battle for the Memorial Cup, which is the championship tournament featuring a pre determined host city and the three winners of Canada’s top junior leagues (the Western Hockey League (WHL), the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMHJL), and the Ontario Hockey League (OHL)). London won from the OHL, Edmonton represented the WHL, while the defending Memorial Cup champs, the Saint John Sea Dogs, represented the QMHJL. The host city, Shawinigan, was the fourth club. The host Cataractes ended up defeating Hunter’s club in overtime of the final game to capture the Cup in a 2-1 thriller. Both goalies (Michael Houser of London and Gabriel Girard of Shawinigan) were impressive in the final match as were several other already NHL drafted players. Jarred Tinordi (Montreal), Austin Watson (Nashville), and Brandon Gormley (Phoenix) really stood out for me and seem poised to have good NHL careers. Russian Krill Kabanov (Islanders), who had one crazy junior career, did some nice things as well but it remains to be seen if he turns out to be an every day NHLer. The undrafted player that was high on my radar was Max Domi of London, son of former Leafs and Rangers tough guy, Tie. The 17 year old, who is draft eligible in 2013, was all over the ice with his speed and tenacious play. He isn’t big right now size wise, but he plays large and I have to think many teams will be very interested in him next June.

- Stan Galiev, of the Caps, played again for Saint John in the Memorial Cup, and the 2010 third round pick seems to have a bright future. He projects to be a top six offensive player but personally I think it would be wise for Washington to let him get at least a year in Hershey to properly develop and gain size and confidence.  The Russian forward will definitely help the Bears next season, who will not have former AHL Calder Cup MVP Chris Bourque back next year. Bourque, who very recently became a first time father, was traded on Sunday to Boston for center Zach Hamill. Hamill was the 8th overall pick in the 2007 draft and is still just 23 years old. He should help Hershey next season, as well.

- After last February’s NHL trade deadline I asked an NHL scout, with over 20 years in the business, why Tampa didn’t get a goalie this season when it was clear that it was their biggest hole and was certain to prevent them from making the playoffs despite the great goal scoring year Steven Stamkos was having. The scout said something that was quite telling. “It is not as easy as it seems to find what you need.” I expect Tampa to go after Vokoun or some other veteran goalie this summer to go along with youngster Dustin Tokarski, who won the 2008 Memorial Cup with Spokane.

- By the way, that scout’s quote is clearly relevant to what McPhee has been dealing with when it comes to second line center. GMGM knows he needs a center, but he’s been unable to get one for many reasons. As I said above, this summer might be his best chance, given the flexibility he finally has in terms of salary cap room. However, it takes two to tango and you can bet that other GM’s may not be willing to give what the Capitals desperately need without getting something significant back. Recent history shows though, that getting the superstar player while sacrificing lesser players, draft picks, and prospects is a recipe for success. Los Angeles, who did that to get Richards and Carter, and New Jersey, who did the same in acquiring Ilya Kovalchuk, both went that route and have been rewarded with a shot at the Cup. Pittsburgh did the same when it plucked Marian Hossa from Atlanta back in 2008. So it seems to make sense for GMGM to be aggressive and try and hit the home run on the center position this summer by giving up some assets to finally get an elite player to complement Nicklas Backstrom up the middle and alleviate some of the pressure on Ovechkin.

- Finally, I am going with the Kings in five games in the Stanley Cup Finals. Los Angeles is just rolling right now and my only concern with them is their eight day layoff. I can’t see their power play continuing to struggle the way it has to date in the post season. I love the way the Devils play the game and Zach Parise is one of the best players in the NHL right now. However, I think they are over matched in this series and if they don’t win game one, then this thing could be over quick. However, if New Jersey holds serve at home against a LA squad that is perfect on the road this post season, then anything can happen. That is why they play the games. Enjoy!

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3 Comments For This Post

  1. Hale Says:

    I think it’s a shame not to try to re-sign Semin. Emphasis on try, at the right amount and term to allow for some other things (2C, for him, remember?) IF he wants it and IF the organization can offer him the proper scope for his role on the team.

    It’s baffling to me that no one has really talked about the claim by Gandler that the organization at the beginning of the season said that Semin’s time and role would be reduced. Is this really true and, if so, why would they do that? Many of us have said Semin works well on the PK and should be a regular. He should be first unit PP all the time. No two players are better at passing the puck into position than he and Backstrom. They have had much success together on the PP.

    So, why would the Caps purposely script a lesser role for an expensive player who had proven himself in certain areas? I don’t get it. Semin was horribly misused this year, and I really don’t understand why.

    Clearly, some weird juju was going on with him, BB, and penalties prior to BB’s firing. Whatever Hunter did after that for the penalties to subside, I don’t know — did anyone ever ask? It seems a shame to take all of the strides that were made this year in his game and not capitalize on them in a new year with a new coach who, hopefully, adds some offensive flow back to the Caps while maintaining the defensive posture.

    If Semin is not re-signed, the Caps will miss what he brings. I thought much of Vogs’ piece on him was pretty shallow, only really focusing on the reduced goals this year without any of the other stats I’m sure Greenberg could supply, such as scoring chances. How many chances or goals by Chimera and others happened because of Semin’s play, often not getting an assist, but because he worked the boards and kept the puck in?

    Vogs said, “They likely won’t be able to replace Semin’s talent level, but there are other attributes that can and do have a positive impact on the goal differential bottom line.” Funny, it’s exactly his talent level that produced those other attributes which already contributed to the goal bottom line. He may not have scored them, but he made the plays happen.

    His playmaking really picked up, especially with Backstrom’s absence. Much of this is being missed, and will be without him. He and the Caps could really take the next leap. Look at Kovy. Agree or not, but Semin also fits the not trading away your stars meme.

    (Note from Ed: Thanks for the excellent comment. I think any chance the Caps had of re-signing Semin went by the way side thanks to 28′s agent taking to the airwaves to air his grievances. GMGM does not like it when agents do that so any bridge left between the team and Semin was likely blown up when that happened. Semin has not been a dominant player since October of 2008 when he was NHL player of the month. Since that time he has regressed and been injury prone. He had a chance to play with the #1 center, Nicklas Backstrom, all playoffs and couldn’t produce, especially against the Rangers. The Caps need to make a major change this offseason to their core and Semin is the easiest one to let go given that Ovechkin, Backstrom, and Laich are signed long term. This core has had 5 years to produce in the post season and it hasn’t done it yet. Semin is the most easily expendable given his contract and the fact that he is a winger.)

  2. Sydneyfromparkville Says:

    @Hale, Semin can’t be on the PK because he’s the one in the penalty box!

    @Ed, is Semin’s exit speculation or is it a fait accompli? I wouldn’t bring him back either, but this puts us on a scary rebuilding trajectory now.

    (Note from Ed: Semin’s agent has said he is leaving, will be testing the market, and that 28 wants a bigger role on a different team. The way the Caps have acted it is clear they are fine with him leaving. They’d rather spend the money Semin wants elsewhere.)

  3. Monty Says:

    Have not had time to read all the blog comments and articles since the Devils advance to the Finals, so maybe this has been written or discussed, but two observations are telling.
    First, the Devils were the other expansion team along with the Caps in 1974. The K.C. Scouts became the Colorado Rockies became the Devils. The Devils have three Cup wins, been to the Finals now six times, and been in the conference finals at least seven times. In contrast, the Caps have no Cup wins, been to the Finals once and been to the conference finals twice. What a pathetic comparison from the Caps perspective.

    Second, with the Kings now in the Finals, with a Cup victory they can now join the Black Hawks and the Pens as a lottery-level team shortly after the lockout season that rebuilt and won the Cup. The Caps are also in that small group, except, of course, they haven’t come close to sniffing a Cup.

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