Tag Archive | "Art Modell"

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Report: Modell gravely ill in Baltimore hospital

Posted on 06 September 2012 by WNST Staff

WKYC-TV (Cleveland) reporter Jim Donovan reported Wednesday night former Baltimore Ravens owner Art Modell had been hospitalized in Baltimore and his condition “was worsening.”

According to the report, Modell’s vital organs are “failing” and his sons John and David had gathered with him in the hospital.

Modell moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 and remained majority owner of the team until 2004 when purchase of the team was completed by current owner Steve Bisciotti.

Modell was majority owner of the Ravens in 2001 when they defeated the New York Giants 34-7 to win Super Bowl XXXV, the franchise’s only Super Bowl title and the first for the city since the Baltimore Colts beat the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl V.

Pat Modell, Art’s wife since 1969, died in October 2011 of pancreatitis.

WNST will have more on this story as it becomes available.

Comments (2)

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

March 29 a significant day in history of Baltimore football

Posted on 29 March 2012 by Luke Jones

Ask any Baltimore football fan over the age of 35 the significance of the morning of March 29, 1984 and you’ll see their expression change as a flood of memories rushes over their countenance.

Thursday marked the 28th anniversary of Robert Irsay and the Baltimore Colts sneaking out of town in the middle of the night, leaving countless grown men and women — like my father and grandparents — to only sob when learning the news that morning.


(Video package courtesy of WMAR-TV in Baltimore)

Many say they’re over the bitterness of the Colts’ departure while others will take that anger to their graves. And younger fans, such as those of my generation and younger, either aren’t that terribly interested or will never fully grasp the emotions of that night and morning and the days and years that followed.

All of those perspectives are perfectly acceptable as long as the feelings of each person invested in Baltimore football are respected.

It took time, but Baltimore wound up better in the long run as the city secured another team and won a championship before the Indianapolis Colts ever tasted Super Bowl glory. The Ravens have become ingrained in the community as much as a franchise can be in the modern and more lucrative era of professional sports.

What I didn’t realize, or perhaps had simply forgotten over the last 16 years, was March 29 also being a more positive day in the history of Baltimore football. Twelve years after those Mayflower trucks pulled out of Owings Mills, Art Modell announced his newly-relocated franchise would be renamed the Ravens — the Marauders and the Americans were the other two finalists — in the first tangible step of establishing a distinct identity for a new NFL team in Baltimore.

Modell

The team’s move from Cleveland had been announced several months earlier, but learning the result of a fan poll to name the franchise somehow granted more authenticity to the idea of NFL football once again being played at Memorial Stadium that fall.

A plethora of detailed accounts by more talented, authoritative writers can easily be found, so I don’t feel the need to rehash the circumstances or emotions surrounding each relocation at length.

But I do believe in the importance of remembering and respecting the city’s football heritage, recognizing where we once were and how those events impacted our lives as well as our loved ones, many of whom are no longer with us.

March 29 represents both the darkest day in the history of Baltimore football and part of a new beginning.

And it’s why I’ll remember and think about my father and grandparents a little more than usual on this day.

Comments (3)

luck

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The 15-7-0 Might Be Tricky, But It’s Always A Treat

Posted on 31 October 2011 by Glenn Clark

You know how it works. 15 positive football observations, 7 “not so” positive football observations and one “oh no” moment from outside the world of football.

(As a reminder, we don’t do Baltimore Ravens analysis here. We do PLENTY of that elsewhere. This is about the rest of the world of football.)

15 Positive Observations…

1. With the entire country winning, Andrew Luck looked like a Heisman Trophy winner and future #1 pick Saturday night in Los Angeles.

It’s a shame the USC Trojans gave the ball away just outside the endzone in overtime number three against Stanford. Not only because I picked the Cardinal to lose last Thursday when I played John Allen (of Charm City Devils fame) in “Everybody Beats Glenn”, but also because it was a hell of a game.

I’ll go ahead and move Luck ahead of Boise State QB Kellen Moore on my Heisman Watch list. Yeah, I guess I’m a sellout. But it’s hard not to like what you see with this kid. Alabama RB Trent Richardson is third on my list; which now ends at three because one of those guys will be your winner.

Going back to Saturday night, Andrew Luck also did this…

luck

2. Marvin Lewis is (very deservingly) the winningest coach in Cincinnati Bengals history.

I get more and more concerned about the Ravens’ pending matchups with the Bengals every time I watch them…

They did all of that without Cedric Benson and they were playing the Seahawks IN Seattle.

By the way, did you know Adam “Pacman” Jones was still in the NFL? Me neither.

3. I’ll assume Frank Gore is particularly happy to no longer be thought of as “the best player on a bad team.”

Also part of the San Francisco 49ers’ win over the Cleveland Browns? Joe Staley playing the role of “Offensive Lineman” in “Offensive Lineman makes catch, runs with football”….

Just beautiful. By the way, I guess the Niners have to be number two in my new NFL power rankings, right? How’s that possible?

4. Penn State controls their own destiny to reach the Big Ten Championship Game, but their schedule leads you to believe Ohio State is still very much in the mix.

Joe Paterno passed Eddie Robinson as the all-time winningest coach in Division I history as Penn State beat Illinois. It was the only time the word “pass” was used in Happy Valley Saturday. I don’t care for much of anything about the Nittany Lions, but I respect their students for packing in behind the goalposts to try to make the Illini’s tying field goal try harder…

Things get VERY difficult for PSU now, as they host Nebraska in State College next week before finishing conference play with trips to Columbus and Madison. Speaking of which…

Wisconsin fans were once again hoping a penalty flag could save them, but Braxton Miller did NOT cross the line of scrimmage before throwing the game winner to Devin Smith. Russell Wilson’s Heisman hopes are totally up in smoke, and the Badgers are now a long shot (at best) for the Rose Bowl, while the Buckeyes are still very much in the picture.

5. Nebraska is firmly back in the race for the Other spot in the Big Ten title game, and Michigan is by no means out of the picture.

Michigan State had no magic left after an incredible two weeks-or more realistically had no answer for some dude named Rex Burkhead, who reportedly plays for the Cornhuskers…

Elsewhere in the world of bizarre football names, the Wolverines stomped Purdue thanks to a running back whose name is (seriously) Fitzgerald Toussaint. Shouldn’t he be playing for Dartmouth?

Not part of the Big Ten title picture? Iowa. They lost to Minnesota. Yes. That Minnesota.

6. Stephen Tulloch may have shut down the internet after sacking Tim Tebow in the Detroit Lions’ win over the Denver Broncos.

We’ll start with the highlights…

And now for those that missed it in the video…

tulloch

I like Tim Tebow. I also like this. It is what it is.

7. I guess we can assume the Philadelphia Eagles are just fine at this point.

The Eagles DESTROYED the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday Night Football. Sadly the highlight of the game was a Laurent Robinson catch that didn’t count at all…

The SNF broadcast was obsessed with Philly O-Line coach Howard Mudd. I actually have no issue with that. Howard Mudd is awesome. Otherwise they’d have been obsessed with Rob Ryan, and I’m about done with that.

Also of note, Jason Kelce snapped the ball off his own ass at one point…

kelce

Comments Off on The 15-7-0 Might Be Tricky, But It’s Always A Treat

Pat Modell

Tags: , , ,

Ravens to honor the late Pat Modell with patch Sunday versus Texans

Posted on 14 October 2011 by Ryan Chell

The Ravens will have a decal with the initials “PBM” on the back of their helmets when they play the Houston Texans this Sunday, Oct. 16, at M&T Bank Stadium. The initials stand for Patricia Breslin Modell, the wife of former Ravens and Browns owner Art Modell. Mrs. Modell passed away on Wednesday (10/12).

Pat Modell

“Spending time with Pat was always special. Renee and I loved everything about her. There was a spark about Pat that was visible. She lit up a room when she entered. Conversations and dinners with her were electric and exciting. She made you feel good by being with her. And, the love she and Art had for each other… We’ve talked about it, and it was inspiring. Art and Pat bragged about each other, delighted in each other’s company. Their love was so visible. We already miss her terribly, and our thoughts and prayers are with Art and his family,” Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti said.

The team will also pay tribute to Mrs. Modell with a moment of silence prior to the singing of the National Anthem.

“So, so gracious and kind. Pat was one of the special people put in your life. She knew football and was not afraid to ask the tough questions. We’ll miss those, and we miss her now,” Ravens GM Ozzie Newsome said.

“The first time I met Pat, she squeezed my face with her hands and brought me closer to her. It made me feel special. She had that ability to do that for people. She treated Ingrid and my family with kindness; she was so welcoming. She enjoyed life, helping others and loved Art so much. She was Art’s protector, and their love for each other stood out every time we got together. Her intelligence was impressive, and I loved to have serious discussions with her on politics, the economy and which plays we should run. Classy, glamorous, but most of all generous and loving – that was Pat Modell,” Ravens coach John Harbaugh said in a statement.

Via a team release-

Comments Off on Ravens to honor the late Pat Modell with patch Sunday versus Texans

Pat Modell

Tags: , , ,

Pat Modell-wife of former Ravens owner Art Modell-passes away at the age of 80

Posted on 12 October 2011 by Ryan Chell

Patricia Breslin Modell, the wife of former Baltimore Ravens and Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell, passed away at 1:30 p.m. today at the age of 80-the team announced today.

Pat Modell


She is survived by Art, their two sons, John and David, and six grandchildren.

Patricia Breslin Modell, born March 17, 1931 in New York City, was an accomplished actress who performed on the New York stage, motion pictures and television.

During her 22-year acting career, Mrs. Modell starred in the People’s Choice television series with actor Jackie Cooper and was cast in more than 400 motion pictures and television shows. Perhaps her most widely known role was as Meg Baldwin in the daytime series General Hospital. She also played Laura Brooks on the prime-time soap opera Peyton Place.

Patricia made her TV debut as “Juliet” in the NBC-TV production of Romeo & Juliet in 1952. Among her many television roles, Patricia Breslin was a regular on Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Perry Mason, and Maverick.

At one point, Patricia Breslin had appeared in more television shows than any other woman in U.S. history. Her record was eventually broken by one of her best friends, the late Lucille Ball.

Pat Modell

After her marriage in 1969 to Art Modell, former owner and president of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens, Mrs. Modell retired from acting and immersed herself in her family and community improvement.In Cleveland, Mrs. Modell served on the board at Ursuline College and was active in the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the Cleveland Musical Arts Association, the Cleveland Ballet, the Playhouse Square Foundation and the Cerebral Palsy Association. She actively supported the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and she started and funded, along with her husband, the Hospice of the Western Reserve (Cleveland, OH).

In Baltimore, Pat served on served on several boards, including: House of Ruth, Gilchrist Hospice, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, The Walters Art Museum, and she was a major contributor to the St. Vincent’s Center and the Baltimore Museum of Art. The Modells contributed $3.5 million to the Lyric Opera House, which was recently renamed the Patricia and Arthur Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric.

The Modells pledged $5 million to help start a public boarding school for disadvantaged students. The SEED School, which opened in the fall of 2008, recruits middle and high school students from around the state. The gift is believed to have been one of the largest private contributions to a single public school in Maryland.

Pat and Art Modell were honored as the 2009 Outstanding Philanthropists of the Year for the millions of dollars and the time donated to charitable causes by the Association of Fundraising Professionals Maryland Chapter.

Born in New York, Pat was the daughter of Edward and Marjorie Breslin. Her father was a Special Sessions Judge in New York City. Monsignor Patrick Breslin, for whom she was named, was Judge Breslin’s eldest brother.

Mrs. Modell graduated from the Academy of Mt. St. Ursuline and the College of New Rochelle.

The Modells have two sons, John and David, and six grandchildren.

-(Via a team release)

WNST passes along our condolences and prayers to the Modell family for the loss of one of their own-and for the Ravens community and family…

Comments Off on Pat Modell-wife of former Ravens owner Art Modell-passes away at the age of 80

Peter...Peter, Pocket Feeder, Profit Bleeder, Dirty Deeder

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Peter…Peter, Pocket Feeder, Profit Bleeder, Dirty Deeder

Posted on 15 September 2011 by Thyrl Nelson

One or two of you may recognize part of this from something I wrote a long time ago. Almost 5 years later and with a few new tweaks:

 

Peter…Peter, Pocket Feeder, Profit Bleeder, Dirty Deeder

2011 like 13 years before

The theme is decidedly tragic

Gone are the days of the Oriole Way

Forgotten is Oriole Magic

 

It seems with this team there’s a singular theme

But the owner’s not solely to blame

This fire’s been burning for 20+ years

But now he’s the one fanning the flames

 

Not here to defend what I can’t comprehend

So I’ll stop short of calling him devil

I will say quite surely he’s run the team poorly

And taken losing to a whole ‘nother level

 

He sure had me snowed when he first bought the O’s

And finally brought players to town

He wasn’t a bad man, and spent like a madman

For Alomar, Raffy and Brown

 

In Gillick he got a pro to call shots

Or at least that’s the way that it seemed

But with Gillick in place and the O’s in the race

Pete decided that he’d run the team

 

The day it began is when Pete took a stand

And squashed the trade of Bobby Bo

When it didn’t go down the Birds turned it around

And Pete figured that he’d run the show

 

It seems since that day he has been in the way

And preventing the team from success

GMs and agents on numerous occasions

Won’t take our calls due to this mess

 

It seems that our slide also coincides

When the Ravens showed up on the spot

The great deal Pete had was suddenly bad

Compared to what Art Modell got

 

A team in DC brought on more “Woe is me”

And it seems he’s conceded defeat

And I just can’t explain my unthinkable pain

As I fear we may never compete

 

A sweet deal with MASN brings boatloads of cash in

And should give the O’s hope at winning

Instead what we’ve seen is the revenue stream

Go to Pete who’s collecting and grinning

 

He can leach from the Nats and let them but the bats

A concept too true to be funny

Let them grow the arms and let them stock the farms

While Pete collects risk free cash money

 

To him it’s just business to others a game

For some an unfortunate passion

Who’ve watched in dismay as the Oriole Way

Has been bashed in and smashed in and cashed in

 

So what’s left for us the unfortunate few

Who are stuck in our Orioles ruts?

Whose undying patience and mild expectations

Are met with punch after punch in the gut

 

What do we do if we still give a damn?

Too sick with the owner to be a good fan

Where do we turn for the help that we need

To combat this owner’s compulsion for greed?

 

What do we think as the door still revolves

On GMs and skippers and problems to solve?

While turnstiles go silent and seats go unsat

And the owner and his wallet are still getting fat

 

Do we simply concede that the Oriole Way

Of today isn’t what it was back in the day?

And that this IS the Oriole Way of today

Where fans get back nothing and owners get paid

 

As long as old Peter is running the show

He’ll press us and test us and drive us all whacko

Instead of just sticking to that which he knows

Law suits, asbestos and freaking tobacco!!!

Comments Off on Peter…Peter, Pocket Feeder, Profit Bleeder, Dirty Deeder

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stover Ring Of Honor No-Brainer, But Who Will Join Him?

Posted on 27 May 2011 by Glenn Clark

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Former Baltimore Ravens kicker Matt Stover formalized his retirement Thursday in a press conference at 1 Winning Drive.

“Playing for the Baltimore Ravens, I think I’ve always said that it’s a privilege” said Stover. “Being in the league has been a privilege-more than you can imagine.”

Stover had not kicked for the Ravens since the end of the 2008 season, he had not kicked in the National Football League at all since spending the end of the 2009 season with the Indianapolis Colts.

Stover, 43, spent 13 seasons in Charm City after coming to the city when the Cleveland Browns moved following the 1995 season. He was the only remaining player who came from Cleveland until he left after ’08.

During his 13 seasons in Baltimore, Stover made 354 of his 418 field goal attempts (84.6%), finishing 471/563 (83.7%) for his career. He was named the AFC’s Pro Bowl kicker twice in his career, including once in Baltimore (2000), the same season he played a significant role in helping the Ravens win Super Bowl XXXV, the only Super Bowl title in the team’s brief history.

It came with no surprise that Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti announced that the team would induct Stover into their Ring of Honor on November 20th when the team hosts the Cincinnati Bengals.

“The thing about being in the Ring of Honor is that I meant to much to my team, the community” said Stover. “That to me is an awesome, awesome privilege. I can’t imagine any greater honor that an organization can give to a player, and I appreciate the Ravens doing that. I’ll be proud to do it…to retire as a Raven with some other great players.”

Stover’s on-field role would have been enough to guarantee his inclusion, but his community involvement (most notably with the local Fellowship of Christian Athletes) set him apart from other successful players in franchise history. Stover was a beloved figure during his time in Baltimore, even amongst fans who wouldn’t be considered amongst the most passionate.

Clearly Stover meets all qualifications to join OT Jonathan Ogden, LB Peter Boulware, DE Michael McCrary, Former Owner Art Modell, RB/Contributor Earnest Byner and the Hall of Fame Baltimore Colts as being featured prominently at M&T Bank Stadium to be remembered for the eternity of the franchise’s existence.

The question moving forward for me is now “who will join him?”

The Ravens have been very fortunate to have a number of great players/contributors in recent years, many of whom are worthy of consideration.

Here is the explanation of the criteria used by the Ravens when selecting players to their Ring of Honor…

“Character: The induction into the Ravens Ring of Honor represents the highest honor for a career of individual accomplishment resulting in team success. Teams constructed with character reduce uncertainty and stay on their purpose Ravens of Honor maintain direction with intense focus character is at the beginning of the cycle and takes them all the way to a successful ending.

Gratitude: Ravens of Honor carry forth a special attitude of gratitude, to those around them, they are always a fountain rather then a drain. Each is different but all keep those around them on the path of progression. Their basic ability to enjoy their talents and gifts of others help them to continually contribute as opposed to contaminate.

Vision: Fueled by self-knowledge, great character and an appreciation for everything available to them. Ravens of Honor visualize short and long term successes in Technicolor. They are, through vision, great connectors. Those around them are energized and they use all that surrounds them to create an inspirational bigger picture.

Passion: Passionate Ravens have an unusual ability to face failure, physical setbacks and exhaustion. They have an internal tenacity that helps them get back up when knocked down. Their passion motivates teammates to join in on the pursuit of the team dream. Passion breeds conviction and turns mediocrity into excellence. With passion, we can overcome all obstacles.

Faith & Courage: Ravens of Honor stand tall in the good times as well as the rough times. They are help up by their deep faith in themselves, their teammates and their fans. Inspired by belief in a great destiny, these champions never waver from their victorious path. Faith is belief in what you cannot see. Great vision matched with unbridled passion sets up absolute faith. Faith evokes a special courage and confidence. When matched with action, faith kills worry and procrastination, the two traits which produce regular failure.

Competitive Spirit: True competitors want to be put on the line and measured. They thrive on adversity and use it to achieve a special edge. They know the easy lakes get fished out first, thus they skip the easy. Persistence, determination, tenacity and sportsmanship are the hallmarks of this warrior mentality. Ravens of Honor need character, gratitude, vision, passion and faith to become a championship caliber competitor. There are no shortcuts and they do not look for them, because their competitive fire will not allow them to.

Humility: Humility in oneself inspires the best of others and feeds our character. A vital aspect of the true leadership is the willingness of others to follow.”

Nowhere on that list does it state that a player has to have reached a Pro Bowl as a Raven, which has been believed to be a bit of an unwritten rule within the franchise. In fact, a Ravens executive told me Thursday the qualifications could really be stated as “extraordinary contributions to the NFL, the Ravens and the community.” The same executive was willing to admit however that “it will be more difficult to make our Ring of Honor if the player was never recognized as a Pro Bowler, but it could happen.”

There are a number of current Ravens whose inclusion in the Ring of Honor seems to be as simple a decision as Stover’s. LB Ray Lewis, S Ed Reed and TE Todd Heap all seem to be easy choices after their careers conclude. WR Derrick Mason certainly has an argument. LB Terrell Suggs and DT Haloti Ngata have laid the groundwork for what could ultimately become Ring of Honor careers.

Perhaps a bit more interesting in the list of former Ravens who have not yet been honored. RB Jamal Lewis, CB Chris McAlister, DT Tony Siragusa, OL Edwin Mulitalo  and former Coach Brian Billick (full disclosure-Billick is now a part owner of WNST.net) have all moved on from their careers but have not been honored. General Manager Ozzie Newsome would seem to be a potential future honoree, and LB/contributor O.J. Brigance was the subject of a recent Facebook campaign seeking his induction.

There is an argument as to why any of the above names should be in. The reality is that in the next ten years, the team’s Ring of Honor could grow exponentially.

There’s certainly nothing wrong with being an organization that has a number of great players/contributors afforded significant recognition. An argument could be made that it simply reflects the greatness of the organization to have such an expansive number of ROH honorees.

At the same time, the Ravens do face a dilemma as they consider the future of the way they recognize players. In thirty years, these names will all represent the finest players/contributors in franchise history. The organization must at least be willing to ask the question “will this player’s inclusion still make sense when we look back in 30 years?”

It is a more significant honor than the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, where a player is simply noted on a tough to find outfield plaque at Oriole Park at Camden Yards after honored at a pregame ceremony and luncheon. Fans don’t have to stare at the names for decades and debate the merit of their inclusion during games the way fans do at M&T Bank Stadium.

We’ve all experienced the moment where someone sitting near us says “did they REALLY put Earnest Byner in the Ring of Honor?” The answer is yes, and we’re all equally uncomfortable about despite our great respect for Mr. Modell.

As the team considers other candidates, they must keep in mind those questions. “Is ______ really in the Ring of Honor? Didn’t he only play here for like four seasons?” “You guys put ______ in the Ring of Honor? Did he ever even get to the Pro Bowl?”

They’ll be relevant questions that Ravens fans will have to answer.

The team doesn’t want to make the requirements for induction more stringent, as they want to be able to make their own decisions about who to induct instead of limiting themselves by instituting additional requirements.

Make no mistake. Ray Lewis, Jamal Lewis, Chris McAlister, Brian Billick, Ozzie Newsome and Todd Heap really should all be in no matter how the team defines the requirements. Ravens fans should always be see those names honored for the greatness they contributed to the franchise and city.

But as far as the others are concerned, the team will have to truly make difficult decisions.

Hear Stover’s press conference-including comments from Bisciotti, Newsome and Head Coach John Harbaugh in the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault here at WNST.net! Stover joined Drew Forrester on “The Morning Reaction” Friday on AM1570 WNST, that chat is in the Audio Vault as well!

Comments Off on Stover Ring Of Honor No-Brainer, But Who Will Join Him?

calverthallloyola

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morning Reaction Tuesday Top 7: Things You Need To Do To Consider Yourself a “Baltimore Sports Expert”

Posted on 25 May 2011 by Glenn Clark

In honor of the fact that the “reporter” from the FM sports station in town had trouble finding Towson University yesterday, we thought we’d put together a bucket list for our Tuesday Top 7, which came on a Wednesday this week.

Today’s Tuesday Top 7 topic was “The Top 7 Things You Need To Do To Consider Yourself a Baltimore Sports Expert.” As always, I hope it’s self explanatory.

Glenn Clark’s list…

7. Attend relevant high school football, basketball and lacrosse games

calverthallloyola

6. Get genuinely pissed off while watching an Orioles game at Camden Yards

osfans

5. Listened to Colts stories from Art Donovan (or someone for whom the Colts meant equally as much)

4. Bring your own beer to a duckpin bowling alley

duckpin

3. Attend a nighttime Johns Hopkins-Maryland game at Homewood Field

http://postinspostcards.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/homewood-field-at-johns-hopkins.jpg

2. Travel on the road WITH Ravens fans

1. Morgan State-Coppin State basketball

Drew Forrester’s list…

7. Get to know Pete Caringi, Jim Margraff, Tony Seaman, Mike Gottlieb, Randy Monroe, Phil Stern, other Charm City college coaches

seaman

6. Watch old guys play bocce in Little Italy

boccelittleitaly

5. Emerse yourself in Baltimore Catholic League basketball

bcl

4. Know and be able to talk to former Baltimore Colts

3. Spend a day at Pimlico and appreciate what horse racing means to Maryland

Pimlico, horse Racing

2. Take in golf/tennis at Clifton Park

clifton

1. Have a 20 minute chat with Art Modell

If you missed the explanation the list on “The Morning Reaction” Wednesday on AM1570 WNST, hit the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault here at WNST.net!

Flexing my mic muscles since 1983…

-G

Comments Off on Morning Reaction Tuesday Top 7: Things You Need To Do To Consider Yourself a “Baltimore Sports Expert”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Counterpoint: Bordick not amongst Orioles’ best, but I’m fine with induction

Posted on 20 March 2011 by Glenn Clark

Upon hearing that former SS Mike Bordick had been elected to the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame Saturday morning, I will admit that at first I thought to myself, “huh?”

But after a few minutes of thinking about it, it struck me that Mike Bordick is a fine choice for what isn’t a particularly significant honor.

Many Baltimore sports fans are particularly disappointed when they look towards the Baltimore Ravens’ Ring of Honor at M&T Bank Stadium and see the name Earnest Byner listed with the young franchise’s best players (Jonathan Ogden, Peter Boulware, Michael McCrary); the man who returned football to Charm City (Art Modell) and the players who represented the Baltimore Colts franchise that captivated this city for over 30 years.

Earnest Byner was a marginal contributor for two seasons and an assistant coach for a few years after that. It is well known that Modell wanted to honor Byner and decided the Ring of Honor was the way to do just that.

When Ravens fans in ten years see the names of Ray Lewis, Todd Heap, Jamal Lewis, Chris McAlister, Matt Stover and Brian Billick honored at their “Purple Palace”, Byner’s inclusion will seem out of place at best, but could be somewhat embarrassing when opposing fans visiting town ask “Byner? Why don’t you go ahead and put Kyle Boller up there too?”

The reality of Bordick’s induction to the Orioles Hall of Fame is that the honor itself isn’t significant enough to warrant such opposition. The Orioles honor their greatest players in franchise history by retiring their numbers and featuring them with figures outside Orioles Park at Camden Yards and commemorative signs inside OPACY as well.

As an organization, the O’s do a good job of separating the all-time greats (Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Jim Palmer, Earl Weaver, Eddie Murray, Cal Ripken) from those who simply warrant a “thank you” for their time in orange and black (BJ Surhoff, Harold Baines, Rick Dempsey, Mark Belanger).

Make no mistake. Mike Bordick does not deserved to be remembered in the same way as some other Birds who have received Hall of Fame status. Ken Singleton, Boog Powell, Dave McNally, Mike Flanagan and others had a much more significant impact on the franchise than Bordick.

Instead of being featured prominently at The Yard, Bordick will only receive mention on a small Eutaw Street wall plaque. The Orioles will hold their annual luncheon and pre-game ceremony for fans to thank Bordick, then he will mostly be a name on a list.

They’re not trying to compare Bordick to Ripken-even if Bordick was the player to replace the “Iron Man” at shortstop.

With the only criteria for induction being that the player must have played for the team for at least three seasons, Bordick (parts of six seasons) qualifies. He’ll be remembered for his All-Star Game appearance in 200 and a stellar defensive season in 2002. He’ll be remembered by myself as being the piece that brought Melvin Mora to Baltimore from the New York Mets.

For these reasons, I applaud Bordick’s election. It will be nice for me to clap for one of the few players I have enjoyed watching during these dreadful 13 seasons of Orioles baseball.

-G

Comments Off on Counterpoint: Bordick not amongst Orioles’ best, but I’m fine with induction

Follow BaltimoreLuke on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reliving Super Bowl XXXV glory means so much more to Baltimore

Posted on 23 October 2010 by Luke Jones

We’re always told not to live in the past in all walks of life, and the devotion to our sports teams is no exception.

It’s the same accusation we spew toward our adversaries in western Pennsylvania who constantly bring up their team’s six Super Bowl rings — particularly the four won in the 1970s — as a measure to claim their superiority over Baltimore and its fans. We should always be looking forward instead of celebrating past achievements in the rear-view mirror, right?

In contrast, Baltimoreans tend to romanticize the 2000 season in which the Ravens rose from relative anonymity in their fifth season to capture the Vince Lombardi Trophy. The feat emphatically recaptured Baltimore’s place in the National Football League after a 12-year absence had left the tradition-rich city without an identity — or professional football.

The lackluster offense and poor quarterback play that led to a five-game touchdown drought left those Ravens with a mortal 5-4 record before embarking on an 11-game winning streak to close the season as the top team in the NFL. It’s the ultimate case study that has provided hope in nearly every season since, as fans overlook the Ravens’ deficiencies — such as the current team’s lack of a pass rush and offensive struggles against the cover-2 defense — and point to the midseason struggles of the 2000 edition as reason for optimism.

Never mind that the 2000 team was perhaps the anomaly of all abnormalities in terms of NFL greatness, with a record-setting defense and an offense that simply succeeded in staying out of its own way. In many Baltimoreans’ minds, if lightning struck once, it can happen again, and the Ravens’ decade-long run of defensive dominance certainly contributes to that rationale.

But 10 years later, it’s clear to see how much that Super Bowl title really meant to the Charm City, in terms of short-term elation and the writs of passage it provided for generations of Baltimore football fans.

Entering the 2000 season, the Ravens had existed for four years but were more a civic novelty than an entrenched part of the local community. That’s not to say Baltimore hadn’t adopted the new football team immediately, but it was a new and different passion that had yet to be fully cultivated. Needless to say, the Ravens weren’t exactly a juggernaut in their early seasons and were just coming off their first non-losing season (8-8) under new coach Brian Billick in 1999.

Baltimore was still very much a baseball town as the Orioles were just finishing up their third straight losing season since playoff appearances in 1996 and 1997. The city had not experienced a major professional title — with apologies to the USFL’s Stars and the CFL’s Stallions — since 1983.

As we know, Baltimore’s feel-good story over the time period was the individual achievements of Cal Ripken, Jr., the local son and Hall of Fame shortstop who helped save baseball in 1995. It was a remarkable story in which the city took an immense pride, but it did not coincide with the championship success we all craved.

In retrospect, the timing of the Ravens’ championship march would prove perfect as the football team took its place as the toast of the town, with Ripken retiring less than nine months later and the Orioles slipping further into the abyss they’ve now painfully occupied for 13 years.

A new love affair was officially born on Jan. 28, 2001. (Video courtesy of the official site of the Baltimore Ravens)

The memorable plays and players have been immortalized through the magic of NFL Films and the current era of media in which we live, at times skewing our initial perspective because we’ve watched those moments again and again.

What we will never forget, however, is how that team and that championship made us feel — as a city and as individuals.

Watching Billick, owner Art Modell, quarterback Trent Dilfer, and Super Bowl MVP Ray Lewis standing on that podium in Tampa to receive the trophy from NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue — a major antagonist in Baltimore’s struggle to regain a team — was the ultimate source of restitution. It was a scene older generations of Baltimore fans thought they would never again witness and younger generations never thought they would enjoy at all.

It was for our grandfathers and fathers — or even ourselves — who had wept in the early morning of March 29, 1984 as the Mayflower vans left Owings Mills on their trek to Indianapolis. That championship did not erase the intense pain of losing the Colts, but it signified that Baltimore would be more than alright in the years to come.

Follow BaltimoreLuke on Twitter

Ten years later, the Ravens’ Super Bowl XXXV championship also reminds us of our own mortality. Two members of that team, fullback Chuck Evans and offensive lineman Orlando Bobo, are no longer with us. Linebacker and special teams standout O.J. Brigance now suffers from ALS, but still inspires the current Ravens and the entire community with his immense courage.

On a personal level, we reflect on those we’ve lost in the 10 years since that wonderful experience. More than the dominating defense or the bruising running style of Jamal Lewis, I remember the giant bear hug shared with my father during the final seconds of that game as two generations celebrated the accomplishments of the Ravens.

Our football team.

Sadly, Dad passed away less than four years later, but that moment is forever entrenched in my soul, as I’m sure similar moments are shared by others throughout the region.

Other than the heartwarming story of last year’s Super Bowl champion Saints and what it meant to the city of New Orleans after the devastating fallout from Hurricane Katrina, you’d have a difficult time arguing that a Super Bowl title ever meant more to a city than that championship meant to Baltimore 10 years ago.

It connected generations of old Colts loyalists to younger fans who relished the stories but were desperate to have their own legacy in Baltimore football history.

As we celebrate the 10th anniversary of Super Bowl XXXV this weekend and welcome back that cast of characters that brought us so much joy, hopefully we cherish just how special that championship really was.

We’ll remember the upper deck shaking at then-PSINet Stadium as the Ravens completed an early-season 39-36 comeback victory over Jacksonville (a team they had never beaten in four years), an early precursor of glory to come later that season.

Flashing before our eyes will be the image of Jermaine Lewis running down the sideline — pointing to the heavens after losing his infant son Geronimo only weeks earlier — and removing any doubt that the New York Giants could stage a comeback.

Perhaps we’ll even remember the raindrops falling on our heads as more than 200,000 people flocked downtown for the victory parade just two days after the Super Bowl triumph.

Or maybe we’ll simply think of that long, euphoric hug like I will, perhaps shedding a few tears.

A decade later, it seems like only yesterday watching one of the greatest defenses in the history of the NFL do their thing.

But more than anything, we’ll never forget how that team made us feel.

To relive memories of the Ravens’ Super Bowl XXXV victory, visit the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault to hear interviews with countless members of the championship team including Peter Boulware, Michael McCrary, Jamal Lewis, Matt Stover, Rod Woodson, Jamie Sharper, and many others!

Comments Off on Reliving Super Bowl XXXV glory means so much more to Baltimore