Tag Archive | "baltimore sun"

The day that David Bowie and I talked about spirituality, God and Ziggy Stardust

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The day that David Bowie and I talked about spirituality, God and Ziggy Stardust

Posted on 12 January 2016 by Nestor Aparicio

I had just turned 23 years old and David Bowie was calling on my home phone.

He called “collect.”

It was November 1991 – about six weeks before I began my sports radio career.

Many of you don’t know about my previous “Almost Famous” life where I spent lots of time with rock and roll musicians at The Baltimore Sun. Here’s some evidence. I have more than 125 of these Cameron Crowe-esque gems in my personal vault that I’ll be unveiling in summer of 2016. I’ll list them below the audio so you can send along some requests.

The Thin White Duke and I discussed spirituality, god and Ziggy Stardust. His band, Tin Machine, was doing the heaviest music of his career.

Strangely enough, I call him “nasty” ten minutes into it.

Bowie was happy, playful and this thing was a joy to listen to a quarter of a century later. My interviewing style was far too jumpy and green, so please pardon my inexperience (and red-faced embarrassment) in presenting this #Nestalgia25 moment.

At one point, David Bowie called me a journalist.

He was being very, very kind…

 

Listen here:

 

Coming this July:

Steve Whiteman (Kix)

Billy Joel

Daryl Hall

Beat Farmers & Billy Squier

Bodeans, T.G. Brown, John Anderson (Yes)

ZZ Top & Aimee Mann

Randy Travis, Social Distortion & Michael Murphey

Child’s Play

Kyf Brewer E Fish & Red Hot Chili Peppers

Gregg Allman, Scatterbrain & kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin)

Mighty Lemon Drops, Diving For Pearls & Enuff Znuff

Wasserman & Billy Squier (Part 2)

Paul Stanley (Kiss) & Heart (Mark Andes)

Ace Frehley & Heaven’s Edge

Fresh Prince (Will Smith), Tommy Shaw & Kevn Kinney, Karl Wallenberg, The Connells

Violent Femmes (Gordon Gado) & Aldo Nova

XYZ, Engelbert Humperdinck & Mike Mesaros (Smithereens)

Faith No More & Lou Gramm

Cinderella & Replacements, Divinyls, Megadeath

Pat Benatar & John Denver

David Bowie

Mick Jones (Big Audio Dynamite), Extreme & Gerardo, Jani Lane (Warrant)

Reeves Gabrels

Pat Dinizio (Smithereens) & Ocean Blue

Mike Campbell (Tom Petty & Heartbreakers) & Brad Delp (Boston, Return To Zero)

David Cassidy & White Trash

Geoff Tate (Queensryche) & Dan Fogelberg

Sonic Youth, Colin James & Phil Johnstone (Robert Plant)

Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Enuff Znuff & The Fixx

Edie Brickell & Jonathan Cain (Journey)

Black Crowes & Britney Fox

L.A. Guns & Michael Damien

Richard Barone, Kid Creole & Smithereens

Jim Kerr (Simple Minds), White Lion, Manhattan Transfer & Dave Koz, Fifth Dimension

Steve Vai & Bruce Dickinson (Iron Maiden)

Paddy Maloney (Chieftains), Kix & Indigo Girls

Jon Butler, Ratt & Judas Priest, Every Mother’s Nightmare

Howard Hewett

The Rembrandts & Dennis DeYoung (Styx)

Slaughter & Great White, Tragically Hip, Steelheart

Joan Jett & McAuley Schenker Group & Jack Bruce (Cream)

Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Belinda Carlisle

Jon Bon Jovi

Chris Whitley & Marc Cohn

Modern English, Justin Hayward (Moody Blues) & Aerosmith (Joe Perry), Sleez Beaz

Peter Buck (R.E.M.)

Oingo Boingo, Fabulous T-Birds, Earth, Roman & Harry Connick Jr., The Church

George Thorogood, Mick Ronson & Alvin Lee, Debbie Harry (Blondie)

Sandy Saraya, The Hooters & Karla Bonoff

Daniel Lanois & Soundgarden, D.A.D.

Kurt Newmann (Bodeans) & Dennis DeYoung (Styx)

Jason Bonham, Tommy Conwell & Clarence Clemons, The Cult

Psychedelic Furs, Pretty Boy Floyd & Mike Peters (The Alarm)

 

 

 

 

Comments Off on The day that David Bowie and I talked about spirituality, God and Ziggy Stardust

maxresdefault

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MASN Money For Dummies (Part 2): Understanding MASN, Orioles history and big money for Chris Davis

Posted on 07 January 2016 by Nestor Aparicio

“When we bought this team we paid $173 million for it and we owe approximately $75 or $80 million on it. In other words, we put up about $90 million in cash and the rest of it was mortgaged – like you get a mortgage on a business or a home or property you might own. We have to pay roughly $9 or $10 million a year in principal and interest on this franchise. And that hasn’t stopped us from being one of the top-spending clubs in the American League or for that matter Major League Baseball. The reason we are is because, basically, it’s the support of the fans that come to see the Orioles. Now in a way, it’s self-perpetuating. If you give the fans, particularly Orioles fans, a winning team, a team that’s competitive you’re going to get supported completely. I believe in that. Along with that ballpark that’s the gem of all ballparks, I believe that if we put a potential winner on that field every year, which is what we intend to do, we will be successful. And eventually we’ll make some money, and also we’ll pay off the mortgage which is also an important proposition.”

Peter G. Angelos

The Barn

March 1997

 

 

SOMETIMES, THE MISINFORMATION AND PROPAGANDA that Peter G. Angelos and his minions at the Baltimore Orioles spin regarding money, affordability and profit seems inconceivable to anyone who has been paying attention for almost a quarter of a century and doing the math.

It’s been a generation of mostly awful baseball and an extremely poor commitment to a winning product on the field for the fans of the Orioles.

Meanwhile, it’s been an absolute goldmine of riches for the Angelos family.

The results, the actions, the promises, the facts, the lies – it all speaks for itself.

The team’s record on the field since 1994 is 1665-1829. That’s four playoff appearances in 22 seasons. The team spent the first decade of the century finishing more than 20 games out of first place in the AL East race every season – and more than 30 games back in five of those 10.

Peter G. Angelos contributed $29 million toward the purchase of the Baltimore Orioles in the summer of 1993. Now, almost 23 years later, the empire has totaled up nearly $3 billion in total value – recent earnings totaling nearly $1 billion plus the current value of the properties.

But it’s almost like following the Donald Trump campaign with a fact checker. For many with a clear view, the “truths” are self-evident. But in the local media, no amount of promises or lies is ever held to accountability. The sports journalism done here is softer than the bottom of the current Orioles 2016 rotation – or maybe even the batting order, for that matter.

In this six-part series, “MASN Money For Dummies,” I’m here to fact check for Orioles and Nationals fans. This is Chapter 2 outlining the history of the local television network and its purpose and links to creating revenue for the local baseball franchises.

Chapter 1 outlines the goal of the series and is available here.

Last month at the team’s Fan Fest, former 50-home run king and current high-ranking Orioles executive Brady Anderson continued to spread the fallacy through the local media that the franchise is a “small to mid-market” team.

That is – very simply – a lie. It’s a myth from another era.

All of the numbers and profits will bear that out.

And if you judge the history of spending, winning, litigating and profiteering – it’s very clear the owner isn’t sincerely committed to winning and competing with other Major League Baseball teams for the best talent available and putting the best players possible into an Orioles uniform each spring.

And why should Angelos spend money or raise the payroll when the real money arrives via the MASN television network long before any commitment to winning is necessary?

In the old days, MLB teams needed to sell tickets and put asses in the seats to make money. Winning and having star players doing it was the formula to making money – or at least the prayer of turning an annual profit on a baseball team.

Angelos is now making between $75 and $100 million in profit per year with the current system of a low baseball payroll for the Orioles and a quiet, widely misunderstood cable television annuity that last year grossed MASN – and Angelos currently owns 83% of that entity – over $200 million from your living room according to SNL Kagan.

It guarantees this to be – by far – the most profitable investment in local sports franchise history.

I’ve done the math. Per Forbes, the Orioles made $197 million in profit between 2005 and 2014. The Angelos portion of MASN has made $397 million in profit since 2009. There was another undocumented chunk between 2005 and 2008 that was at least $100 million in total profit plus the $75 million in cash that MLB gifted him in two payments at the start of the deal.

His initial $29 million personal investment in the Orioles during the summer of …

Comments (1)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Peter Principles (Ch. 1): So, just how did Angelos become ‘King’ of Baltimore baseball?

Posted on 19 March 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

(Author note: This is Chapter 1 of future book “The Peter Principles” that I was working to finish in March 2014 when my wife was diagnosed with leukemia. I have released the first three chapters of the book, which chronicles the history of Peter G. Angelos and his ownership of the Baltimore Orioles. I think you’ll find much of this already-reported information to be illuminating.)

Chapter 2 is available here.

Chapter 3 is available here.

Chapter 12 is available here.

 

 

IT WAS HOT AS HADES in that lower Manhattan federal courtroom. Jam-packed with bidders, curiosity seekers and baseball fans, the Baltimore Orioles franchise was up for grabs on August 2, 1993, and the bidding was as steamy as the air in the room once the price began to rapidly accelerate into the stratosphere.

The fact that there was any bidding at all was somewhat surprising to Peter G. Angelos, a Baltimore attorney who had begun a power play five months earlier to purchase the Major League Baseball franchise that was being sold off via an auction nearly 200 miles away from its home on the Chesapeake Bay. In the hours leading up to the auction, Angelos managed to turn his sole competitor from a previous suspended bid for the team during June into a partner. William DeWitt Jr., a Cincinnati native whose father once owned the St. Louis Browns in the 1940s and a minority investor in the Texas Rangers, joined Angelos’ celebrity-led local group from Maryland just hours before the bidding was to begin in the sweltering Custom House. DeWitt was promised a role in the operations and management of the club.

It was an amazing coup for Angelos to pull DeWitt from being a worthy, legitimate competitor into a teammate that morning, after convincing him that he’d be involved and an influential part of the eventual winning group. It was shocking that DeWitt had pulled out because several times over the previous eight months, he was convinced that he was already the winning bidder and new owner of the Orioles.

In February 1993, after six months of lengthy, arduous negotiations on a fair price, DeWitt had entered into a deal with Orioles majority owner Eli Jacobs to buy the team for $141.3 million. Jacobs, who was in his final days of semi-liquidity and quietly on the verge of bankruptcy, didn’t have the legal authority to close the deal with DeWitt once the banks seized his assets in March. Instead, the Orioles wound up at auction five months later and suddenly Angelos – with DeWitt now shockingly a member of his ownership team – believed he would emerge victorious without breaking a sweat in the summer heat of The Big Apple.

But that afternoon, after entering the courtroom in what he believed would be a rubber-stamped win, instead he found himself embroiled in a bidding war with a stranger he never strongly considered to being a worthy foil in the fray.

Jeffrey Loria, a New York art dealer and Triple-A baseball team owner, wanted badly to be a Major League Baseball owner. Baltimore native and former NFL player Jean Fugett represented a group led by TLC Beatrice, which featured a rare minority bid for an MLB franchise on that day in New York. One bidder, Doug Jemal of Nobody Beats The Wiz electronics stores, had early interest but bowed out before the steamy auction.

That August day, the bidding began at $151.25 million, which included a “stalking fee” of $1.7 million which was originally awarded to DeWitt’s team because of his vast due diligence and legal work done months earlier when he thought he had won a deal to secure the Orioles in the spring.

George Stamas, who represented Angelos’ group during the bidding process, opened the bidding at $153 million, which was seen as a good faith gesture from the combined bid with DeWitt, which could’ve been perceived as artificially deflating the sale price by judge Cornelius Blackshear. Loria, who was a stranger to the Angelos group, immediately raised it by $100,000. Stamas barked out, “One million more – $154.1!”

And for the next 30 minutes, the bids drew north from the $150 millions into the $160s. With every bid, Loria would raise by $100,000. Stamas, on behalf of Angelos, raised it by $1 million at a time. After 13 rounds of back and forth money, Angelos had the leading bid $170 million. Fugett, who had been completely silent during the auction, asked the judge for a recess.

The request was granted and the judge headed to his chambers.

And, suddenly, it got even hotter in a blazing courtroom on a sweltering day in The Big

Comments (6)

Tags: , , , , ,

Pimlico press box renamed to honor Kelly

Posted on 21 April 2013 by WNST Staff

PIMLICO PRESS BOX RENAMED SUNDAY AFTERNOON

 

BALTIMORE, 04-21-13—Before Sunday’s first race, the Pimlico Race Course press box was renamed to include Joe Kelly, who covered horse racing for nearly 70 years prior to his passing in November at the age of 94. The Red Smith-Joe Kelly Press Box will be at full capacity next month for the 138th running of the Preakness Stakes.

 

Kelly began his career at the Baltimore Sun in the 1940s then moved to the Washington Star in 1955 where he spent the next 26 years. After retiring, he became the publicity director for the Maryland Million and was Pimlico Race Course’s historical consultant until his death.

“Nobody spent more time in the Pimlico press box,” said Mike Gathagan, Pimlico’s vice president of communications. “We felt it was important to honor Mr. Kelly, so the next generations of turf writers know what he meant to this place. He was a tremendous resource and positive influence. We just finished our third week of the spring meet and it is weird not to see him in his office or in the chair where he sat while wagering each afternoon.”

On October 30, 1947 Kelly was part of Baltimore’s first live remote television broadcast on WMAR-TV, when he called the fifth and sixth races at Pimlico with his then colleague Jim McKay. He is also the only two-time winner of the Old Hilltop Award for excellence in horse racing coverage, winning in 1979 and 2000.

Twenty-members of the Kelly family, including five of his six children and four of his five grandchildren attended the dedication.

 

“This truly is a great honor for him,” said Kelly’s son Jacques. “He spent 69 years in this press box and adored Pimlico. For him Pimlico was a very personal place. Joe had a fabulous memory and always had stories to tell about it. Just when you thought you heard them all, you heard one more. This is also where my parents courted. Not only did they court here but they also brought all their friends. This is very emotional for me. I hate to say it but it is the truth, more so than the funeral or other honors (since his passing) because this is his home turf.”

 

Smith covered the Preakness Stakes for more than 40 years, first with the New York Herald Tribune and then for the New York Times. In 1976, Smith was one of the initial winners of Pimlico Race Course’s Old Hilltop Award for covering Thoroughbred Racing with excellence and distinction. The Pimlico press box was named in his honor on May 14, 1982, four months after his death.

ORTIZ INJURED IN SUNDAY SPILL

Apprentice rider Yomar Ortiz was injured when he fell from his mount during the stretch run in today’s fifth race at Pimlico. Ortiz was riding Badon when his mount broke down closing in on the finish in the five furlong turf race for $35,000 claimers. Ortiz was on the ground when he was struck by Gator Gone Wild, a trailing horse. The 21-year old was taken to nearby Sinai Hospital for x-rays near the hip and femur areas on his left leg, according to Pimlico medical director Dr. Harry Harris.

 

Ortiz leads the rider standings after three weeks of the spring meeting with 13 trips to the winners’ circle, after capturing the Laurel Park winter meet title earlier this year.

 

Badon suffered a right ankle injury and was humanely euthanized, according to Maryland Racing Commission veterinarian Dr. David Zipf.

Comments Off on Pimlico press box renamed to honor Kelly

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Part 3: Which Baltimore sports media entities suck? Here’s my report card…

Posted on 23 October 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

It’s been nearly three years since I started publicly examining the “State of Baltimore Sports Media” at WNST.net. As I predicted, the way you get your local sports news, information and analysis has seamlessly changed and now sits in the palm of your hands.

Three years ago when I wrote this in depth look at where the Baltimore sports media universe was heading, Twitter was truly at the dawn of its existence. The ability of mobile devices was far more limited and far less distributed. And the access to the genie of instant information in the palms of our hands that we’ve quickly become accustomed to will never go backward into the narrow bottle of the limited access of newspapers, television and radio waves.

Today, I will examine the current state of the Baltimore sports media experience and as much as many local journalists like to give “report cards” on the Ravens every Sunday night and Monday morning, I’m sure some folks will get their feelings hurt today.

I’ll tell you what I think about our competitors and the intentions of their bosses and their corporate, money-making media machines. Honesty. Candidly. Openly. As usual…

And, we’d love to hear what you think here in our “2012 State Of Baltimore Sports Media Survey” here.

One lucky survey entrant will win a trip next weekend to Cleveland on our Miller Lite Orange Roadtrip powered by Jiffy Lube.

As I’ve said over the past month, we’re trying to make WNST.net better every minute of every day so that we can be your primary source of Baltimore sports news and information on your mobile device.

Examining the Baltimore sports media business is the most important thing I do on a daily basis and while I rarely write about this stuff, it’s been my life’s mission to improve your experience as a local sports fan.

I find it almost hilarious and/or pathetic that anyone would listen to the radio station that calls itself  “The Fan” when the entire concept was drawn up in a board room in New York and never factors the actual “fans” into the equation when they assembled their corporate radio station team.

But competition is good. It sets the bar. At WNST.net, we’ve never ducked the obvious or taken Baltimore sports fans for granted – we know you’re judging us and comparing us every day because you utilize more than one outlet for your sports media consumption on a daily basis in 2012.

But we’re always striving to the be the FIRST place you go to get Baltimore sports information on your IPhone, Droid or mobile device.

In an effort to encourage you to give your feedback on the local Baltimore sports media scene, it’s only fair that I file my own report card.

So, who are the competitors and players on the local scene and where do you turn when breaking news happens in Baltimore?

My general overview of this is candidly clear: Baltimore is a lazy market on the new media end. I know how hard we work at WNST.net and I know what our resources are. I know the strengths and weaknesses of all of our competitors in the marketplace and many of the assembled group of “journalists” in the market have either been on my team, interviewed to be on my team or have cross-pollinated in something I’ve touched because I’ve been doing Baltimore sports media longer than virtually anyone in the marketplace.

My journey began almost 29 years ago in January 1984 at age 15 when Baltimore had three newspapers, three TV stations and a handful of AM radio stations that did local sports of any kind.

In 2012, there has been a mass fracturing in the way and convenience in which we consume media so many of the entities have “loose ends” in their coverage or holes in the strategy. Some of their portals to garner attention, feedback and building a trusted community of information are very old world and “lazy” for my tastes.

And before I begin defecating on all of our competitors – and that will be prevalent below – no less than two of these fossilized radio stations have the arrogance to call themselves “the only station that matters.”

It’s hilarious. And the truth is that WNST.net is kicking all of their asses in the only place that really matters – the internet and on your mobile device via instant access.

Here’s a report card from two weeks ago via Twitter:

Some will get their feelings hurt, but if you click to Page 2 you’ll see what I think of our “competition” at WNST.net…

Comments (22)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Maryland makes Aronhalt transfer official

Posted on 22 May 2012 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Logan Aronhalt, a 6-foot-3 guard who has graduated from the University of Albany, has signed a financial-aid agreement and will transfer to play his final season at the University of Maryland, Terps head coach Mark Turgeon announced Tuesday.

Aronhalt, a native of Zanesville, Ohio, averaged 13.8 points per game during the 2011-12 season. He scored 13 points and had six rebounds when the Great Danes lost at Maryland, 83-72, on Dec. 28, 2011.

The guard said the matchup in Comcast Center was memorable for him.

“From a basketball standpoint, [there’s] no one with more tradition than Maryland,” Aronhalt told The Baltimore Sun. “The facilities are incredibly amazing. The opportunity to play up there on a national stage and playing against the best competition in the country, just about every single night, is something that’s really great about the university.”

Aronhalt started 74 consecutive games in his three seasons at Albany, finishing with 1,091 career points. He has hit 169 3-pointers, shooting 35 percent from 3-point range and 83 percent from the free-throw line. He was a third team All-America East Conference pick in 2011.

“We are thrilled to add Logan to our basketball family,” said Turgeon. “Logan’s values are closely aligned with the expectations we have in our program. I’m impressed with his high level of success in the classroom while being an all-league player in the American East. We have a world-class kinesiology graduate program, and he really wanted to be a part of that.

“I am impressed with Logan’s toughness, leadership, and basketball IQ. He’s a coach’s son and his game reflects that. Logan had a great career at Albany scoring almost 1,100 points in three years. His experience and ability will really be helpful on a team that will feature so many underclassmen.”

Aronholt missed all but two minutes of the 2008-09 season with a series of foot injuries, but recovered to play in 94 games over the next three years.

He was Albany’s team captain twice and was a second-team selection in the 2012 Capital One Academic All-America program. He graduated summa cum laude from Albany.

Aronhalt will have one season of eligibility remaining at Maryland.

Comments Off on Maryland makes Aronhalt transfer official

Tags: , , , , ,

Sun writer Korman says local horse Done Talking could make noise in Derby

Posted on 04 May 2012 by WNST Audio

Comments Off on Sun writer Korman says local horse Done Talking could make noise in Derby

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Maryland Officially Inks PF Mitchell

Posted on 12 April 2012 by WNST Staff

Mitchell Signs to Play for Terps

Georgia power forward heading to College Park

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Charles Mitchell, a 6-foot-8 power forward from Marietta, Ga., has signed a National Letter of Intent to play men’s basketball at the University of Maryland, head coach Mark Turgeon announced Thursday.

Mitchell, who attended Wheeler High School, has become the fourth prospect to sign a NLI to play with the Terrapins in the 2012-13 season.

Mitchell is listed by Rivals.com as the No. 12 prospect in the nation at his position. A four-star recruit by Rivals, Mitchell is ranked 92nd nationally in the Rivals150.

Combined with early signees Shaquille Cleare (6-9, C, Houston, Texas), Jake Layman (6-8, SF, Wrentham, Mass.) and Seth Allen (6-1, SG, Fredericksburg, Va.), Scout.com currently has Maryland rated as the 13th-best recruiting class nationally.

CHARLES MITCHELL (6-7, 250, PF, Marietta, Ga., Wheeler HS)

A four-star recruit by Rivals.com, who was listed as the 12th-best center prospect nationally… Averaged 17 points and 12 rebounds for Wheeler that reached the Sweet 16 of the Georgia Class 5A state tournament… Ranked 92nd nationally by Rivals.com… Informed the Terrapin staff of his commitment just before the Terps played Wake Forest in the ACC Tournament… Chose Maryland over Seton Hall, Cincinnati, Florida State, Tennessee and Florida.

Turgeon on Mitchell: “It’s a great day for our program to be able to add Charles Mitchell to the Maryland basketball family. We have recruited Charles hard since we got to Maryland. His mom did a lot of things right while raising Charles to be a respectful kid and extremely hard worker. He is going to be a great addition to our frontcourt. Charles is a wide-bodied post who plays hard, is an excellent rebounder and can score around the basket. Charles fits in perfectly with the rest of our 2012 class, as he has a tremendous upside and will have a significant impact on our basketball program.“

Mitchell Quotes:

On why he chose Maryland:
“First of all it’s a great coaching staff with Coach Turgeon, Coach Bino, Coach Hill and Coach Spinelli. I have a great relationship with them. I’ve known Coach Bino since I was 14-years-old since he came to our school to recruit other players… I love the fan support and the whole history of Maryland basketball. I wanted to come to a school that supports basketball and where the team is important to the fans.”

On how excited he is about the freshmen class:
“I’m actually very excited about it because I feel like we can come in and really make a difference. We want to come in and be a real competitive program in the ACC and nationally.”

On what he wants to accomplish at Maryland:
“Some of my goals at Maryland are to build us back into a great program and hopefully compete for a national championship. I want everyone to respect us and bring us back to being a contender for the ACC championship and hopefully the national championship.”

Sandra Glass, AAU Coach: “I know for one he just loved the fan base. He enjoys playing in front of big crowds; that’s what he’s been doing all of high school. He also told me that the coaching staff has been nothing but real with him. Bino has been recruiting in our program since Charles has been here, and it was just a joy to be able to be under a coach that knew him before basketball… The sky is the limit for Charles. He has a tremendous work ethic. One thing I do like about Charles is that he’s a fast learner; he can adapt to things faster than most 17 and 18-year-olds.”

Doug Lipscomb, Wheeler HS head coach: “I knew he liked [College Park] a lot. I knew he had a good relationship with the coaching staff, too… He’s been a blessing to have around. We’re going to miss him. If you think about Wheeler basketball the last four or five years, you think Chuck’s been in high school a long time. He’s been on varsity a long time.”

Dave Telep, ESPN.com: “There are no secrets about Charles, you know what you’re going to get. He’s a presence in the lane is going to be a blue-collar post player. When he finds a strength and conditioning program, he’ll have a chance for his game to take a notch up. Mark Turgeon is a laser-focused coach when it comes to working with bigs. I have a strong belief in Mark as a developer of post guys.”

Some quotes courtesy The Baltimore Sun

Comments Off on Maryland Officially Inks PF Mitchell

Nasty and John Steadman, March 1998

Tags:

Chapter 8: Catching a break with John Steadman at The News American

Posted on 12 March 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

(Originally published as a prelude to “Free The Birds” in Sept. 2006, this is Part 8 of a 19 Chapter Series on How Baseball and the Orioles berthed WNST.net. This is one of my favorite chapters of the book because this is when I started dreaming of making a career in journalism as a 15-year old kid and committing my life to reporting about Baltimore sports.)

It’d be nice to say that having the last name “Aparicio” would’ve opened some doors for me in the sports media business over the past 22 years.

There aren’t a whole lot of names in the world that are so unique in our culture that there’s only been one really famous person who’s ever had it.

If my name would have been Smith or Jones, things might have been different, who knows?

But clearly, APARICIO is synonymous with one thing: BASEBALL!

And the truth in the real world is this: no one hires incompetent people based on their last name. Sure, it’s nice to have a door opened if your last name is Buck or Albert or Carey, but if you stink at doing your job, it’ll be the only job you’ll ever get.

Most of those “prodigy” guys are VERY, VERY good at what they do and the bar was set so high by their fathers that it’s hard to achieve anything that surpasses what their last name already represents.

I know because the reason I went into this radio business was because of an invitation from Kenny Albert — son of the great Marv Albert — who I knew from covering the Baltimore Skipjacks of the American Hockey League in 1990 and 1991 for The Evening Sun.

 

The first time I met Kenny was at the NHL All-Star Game in Pittsburgh in 1989. He doesn’t remember that league party at a downtown hotel, but I do. We were both born in 1968, both absolutely loved sports but we had completely different paths to finding each other.

I was just an East Baltimore kid who was a fan of sports — a major sports fan whose Pop would run around with me on MTA buses to go to games downtown at the Civic Center and out on 33rd Street.

Kenny Albert was the son of one of the most famous broadcasters in sports. Marv Albert had taken Kenny to games almost since berth. Kenny had been not only to most major sporting events in New York — his Dad was the voice of the Rangers AND the Knicks — but his Dad also did NBA playoff games, NFL games and the MLB Game of the Week each Saturday on NBC.

In the broadcasting business, unless your name was Cosell or

Comments (1)

17041_1076131640448_1740947610_151525_2585804_n

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Part 2 of 5: How does WNST measure up to other Baltimore media?

Posted on 28 January 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

This blog was originally published two years ago. We’ll be revisiting this with a three-part series and updating these thoughts with a new WNST “State of Baltimore Sports Media” survey next week while we broadcast live from Indianapolis all week. This is Part 2 of 5: The State of Baltimore Sports Media (circa 2010).

A friend of mine in San Franciscio has an awesome bar called Tommy’s Mexican Restaurant on Geary Street in the Richmond District. It’s one of my favorite places on earth. Full of chips, salsa, guacamole and stiff margaritas, the night before the AFC Championship Game in 2001 we hung out there with more Ravens fans than the place can hold. I was there three weeks ago and have shot several video segments for wnsTV from Tommy’s Mexican Restaurant over the years.

Over the Bay Area’s largest tequila bar, my pal Julio Bermejo (the U.S. Ambassador & world expert on 100% agave tequila) has a bunch of fun signs with slogans and axioms.

Here’s my favorite:

“Tommy’s encourages you to visit our competitors!”

I just love that. Because it’s exactly how we feel at WNST.net. Go ahead and scan the dial, surf the web, Facebook and Twitter away with our competitors – you’ll come back to us.

It’s our solemn goal and daily mission to make it mandatory that you come back to WNST.net every day for your Baltimore sports news, information and conversation because we think our content and observations are the best in the market.

The sign at Tommy’s is a symbol of excellence and the ultimate statement of self-confidence in one’s own product/expertise/value. It ain’t bragging if you can back it up, right?

It says we’re so good, you’ll remember us — and you’ll be back because we have the best information, the most accurate information and the most informed opinion, analysis and insights in the marketplace.

Oh, and unlike the others who are being paid “hush money” to cough and look the other way by the teams that they’re ostensibly asked to assess, evaluate and analyze with “integrity,” you always know you’re always going to get the truth from us.

For the first time in the history of WNST as a company dating back to 1998, we’re finally getting a fair shake on the measurement of our product on the web to know just how many people really are “coming back” each day.

I’ve been doing sports radio for 18 years. I have never read an Arbitron report that says we have more than 500 listeners. Most times, it lists us as the 52nd radio station in the market and sometimes we’ve fallen to ZERO listeners in their antiquated and useless monthly surveys. One local advertising agent has spent the past two decades calling us a “little station with a ‘cult’ following.” (After 18 years, nothing could be more insulting or further from the truth.)

And if you check the latest Arbitron numbers – we lovingly call them the “arbitraries” – you’ll see that once again NONE of you seem to listen to WNST.

Yep, we’re back at “zero point zero” – kind of like Bluto in “Animal House.”

But to the amazement of everyone in the Baltimore media world, suddenly, we’re so far ahead of the pack in every WEB measurement that it defies all of the “millions of dollars of research” that Arbitron has invested in proving that places like WNST-AM 1570 and brands like WNST.net aren’t effective.

But somehow, we have well over 40,000 people in our sphere here in Baltimore (at least that’s how many we’ve been able to account for so far) and displaced local sports fans across the country who’ve been kind and trusting enough to give us their email, mobile number, Facebook or Twitter access. We’ve got over 10,000 on our registration to the website and more 12,000 in our Facebook sphere alone! And there are certainly thousands of other folks who just “lurk” in our sphere, reading but never commenting, registering or playing any of our games for cash and prizes. Just like the thousands of you who have been listening to WNST-AM 1570 for years and have never received a dairy to fill out.

Every day thousands of you are coming regularly to WNST.net – via our website, Twitter, Facebook or a myriad of other connections — for any of the variety of media and information we offer.

Against the marketplace over the past dozen years, WNST has been cheated out of millions of dollars of market revenue but the game is “fixed” — at least as far as radio is concerned. Arbitron’s reporting is so fundamentally flawed and skewed that it’d be laughable if it didn’t cause me to fire people and lose money on a measurement system that is so antiquated I find it hard to believe that anyone could take it seriously.

For the first 17 years of my radio existence and as recently as last spring, Arbitron was sending out a paper diary in an envelope with a stamp via snail mail and the USPS to various (and random) home mailboxes with a $1 bill (and later $2) inside asking you

Comments Off on Part 2 of 5: How does WNST measure up to other Baltimore media?