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Ravens offense trying to turn potential into production in 2016

Posted on 07 September 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — This Ravens offense looks promising on paper.

Some observers have even dared to say this is the most talented collection of skill players in the history of the franchise. Of course, we know that bar isn’t all that high with Baltimore being much more known for its defense over the last two decades.

But that doesn’t mean ninth-year quarterback Joe Flacco is ready to call this the deepest group he’s had around him, either.

“I think that has yet to be seen,” Flacco said. “We have to go out there and prove that we’re weapons and that we can do it in live games on Sundays. I think it’s a very promising group and I’m very excited about it, but we have to go out there and prove it.”

It’s easy to be excited about the healthy returns of Steve Smith, Breshad Perriman, and Dennis Pitta as well as the additions of veteran free agent Mike Wallace and rookie fourth-rounder Chris Moore, but the most critical factor will be how well the offensive line performs with two new pieces on Flacco’s blindside. From the moment he arrived in Owings Mills this spring, first-round pick Ronnie Stanley has looked the part of a starting left tackle, but the regular season brings an even faster speed to which he’ll need to adjust.

Fellow rookie Alex Lewis may join him in the starting lineup after third-year guard John Urschel missed much of the summer with a shoulder injury. For either option at left guard, replacing the accomplished Kelechi Osemele won’t be easy and will make life for Stanley even more challenging.

That left side of the offensive line is sure to be tested right away by a Buffalo defense that looks undermanned but will try to throw the kitchen sink at inexperienced linemen. Bills head coach and former Ravens defensive coordinator Rex Ryan was very complimentary of both Stanley and Lewis on Wednesday, but he’s also aware of their inexperience and will try to exploit it.

“I’ve never seen it before where two [rookies] start on the offensive line because that is tough,” Ryan said in a conference call with the Baltimore media. “There’s so much to it. But those two guys I’m sure have done a great job studying and things. But it’s not easy, that’s for sure.”

The offensive line protecting Flacco in the pocket is a nonnegotiable prerequisite for success, but opening holes in the running game proved to be a problem last season as the Ravens rushed for an underwhelming 3.9 yards per carry. An offense regularly trailing in most of its games a year ago was predictably going to lean more on the pass, but offensive coordinator Marc Trestman struggled to commit to the ground attack even when opportunities were there.

We know Flacco is at his best as a passer when he has the support of a strong running game, and head coach John Harbaugh has made it clear that improving in that area is a must.

Trying to figure out how the carries will be distributed will be interesting as veteran Justin Forsett is still expected to begin the year as the starter, but both Terrance West and the presently-injured Kenneth Dixon figure to factor more heavily into the equation as the season progresses. It sounds fine to say you’ll use a by-committee approach, but there’s a fine line between giving multiple backs opportunities and allowing the right one to get into a rhythm.

That trio of backs along with 2014 fourth-round pick Buck Allen all have their strengths and weaknesses, but at least one will need to prove capable of being a No. 1 kind of talent when it matters most.

“In the end, wisdom is in the results,” Harbaugh said. “We will all be judged how well we run the ball as a group. My goal is for all those guys to have success running the ball. I think they all bring something different to the table, style-wise [and] ability-wise.”

The same general thought process applies at wide receiver and tight end where health is clearly a factor for the 37-year-old Smith coming off an awful Achilles injury last November and for the 31-year-old Pitta, who hasn’t played in a game in nearly two years and missed most of training camp with a broken finger this summer. Even if those two stay healthy to go along with the rest of the bunch, the challenge is there for Trestman and Flacco to spread the ball around in a way that’s most productive for the overall offense.

More options in the vertical passing game will ideally open up the short-to-intermediate portion of the field for Smith, Pitta, Kamar Aiken, and Crockett Gillmore, but that comes with the understanding that there will be times when the Ravens want to best utilize that speed with certain substitution packages.

Whether you’re a talented first-year player or a 16th-year receiver with Hall of Fame credentials, there’s no room for ego when trying to bounce back from a 5-11 season.

“You know you are going to get your plays, but you are also ecstatic to be able to clear it out and open it up for other guys,” Smith said. “[If] I go down and run a route to open it up for Mike and Mike catches it, then I’m on the hunt. I get to peel back on somebody and knock the s–t out of them. That is what I am excited about, so I can play my role for Mike and Mike can play his role.

“Anyone can catch the ball, but can you be a team player to clear it out and understand the integrity of the play and what you are supposed to be doing for the other guy? That is the ultimate team player right there.”

The Ravens signed Wallace to provide an established speed presence on the outside that the offense sorely lacked a year ago, but the wild card for the aerial attack is Perriman, who is finally healthy after two different knee injuries and flashed his ability in the preseason finale last week.

With a 6-foot-2, 215-pound frame and blinding speed, Perriman is the type of talent at the wide receiver position that the Ravens have lacked throughout their history. We still have no idea whether his talent and size will translate to NFL success, but general manager Ozzie Newsome selected him in the first round last year to help take this offense to a different level.

Patience will be key, but the Ravens hope Perriman can eventually be a major factor in transforming a solid offense into a great one.

“We haven’t had a ton of work together, but [we] just have to keep it simple,” Flacco said. “Hit him in the chest and give him the chance to make plays. I think the more plays that he’s given the chance to make, the more he’s going the make and the more his confidence is going to go up.”

It all sounds great and looks promising a few days out from the season opener, but the Bills will be the first team to give the Ravens offense a real idea of how good it is. Potential is there, but questions exist wherever you look, including with Flacco as he comes back from the first serious injury of his entire career.

The schedule sets up for a potential fast start with only one playoff team from last year on the docket before the Ravens hit their bye in Week 8. But how quickly will it all come together for an offense with several new pieces as well as familiar faces returning from injury?

“I think I know what to expect from these guys,” Flacco said. “I’m really just excited about getting out there and doing it and making sure that we do it — not just go out there and play around. I want to go out there and I want to play well. That’s what I expect from our guys, and I think that’s what everybody else expects, too.”

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dumervil

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Dumervil says he won’t be able to play in Ravens opener

Posted on 07 September 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — After suffering a setback in his recent return from offseason foot surgery, Ravens linebacker Elvis Dumervil said Wednesday that he won’t be able to play in the season opener against Buffalo.

The 32-year-old was activated from the physically unable to perform list on Aug. 22 and had practiced on a limited basis only a handful of days before being sidelined again, which had led to doubt about his Week 1 status. Dumervil described the setback as “minor” on Wednesday, but the five-time Pro Bowl selection declined to say when he’ll be ready to play.

“I won’t be able to go this week,” Dumervil said. “We’re just working at it in the training room, just getting ready. It’s a little disappointing, but sometimes you’ve just got to wait your turn and when the opportunity presents itself, take full advantage.”

Dumervil’s absence puts more pressure on returning veteran Terrell Suggs while thrusting young outside linebackers Za’Darius Smith and Matt Judon into more significant pass-rushing snaps. Veteran Albert McClellan is expected to serve as the strong-side outside linebacker in the base defense, which will allow Dumervil to return in the situational role he filled during his first two years with the Ravens.

Smith returned to practice on Wednesday after missing the final two preseason games with an ankle injury and deemed himself ready to play against the Bills on Sunday.

“No problem. A small ankle injury,” Smith said. “They kept me in the training room and got me better with that, so I’m happy to be back.”

Cornerback Jerraud Powers (ankle) and running back Kenneth Dixon (knee) were the only other players on the 53-man roster who were not present for Wednesday’s practice open to reporters. On Tuesday, Harbaugh labeled Powers “day-to-day” with an ankle injury that’s sidelined him since Aug. 20 while Dixon is expected to miss at least the first couple of weeks of the season with a torn medial collateral ligament in his left knee.

Cornerback Shareece Wright was present and working after missing a few days of practice with what was listed as a knee injury.

As is often the case at the end of the preseason, a few Ravens players have changed their jersey numbers as veteran receiver Mike Wallace has switched from No. 12 to No. 17, taking the number previously worn by Jeremy Butler. Cornerback Tavon Young is now wearing No. 36 while fellow rookie defensive back Maurice Canady will now don No. 33 in Wednesday’s workout. Powers will now wear No. 31, which was previously owned by safety Terrence Brooks.

Below is Wednesday’s injury report:

BALTIMORE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: RB Kenneth Dixon (knee), LB Elvis Dumervil (foot), CB Jerraud Powers (ankle)
FULL PARTICIPATION: TE Dennis Pitta (finger), G John Urschel (shoulder), TE Maxx Williams (knee), CB Shareece Wright (foot)

BUFFALO
FULL PARTICIPATION: S Colt Anderson (foot), CB Kevon Seymour (hamstring)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: OL Ryan Groy (ribs), QB Cardale Jones (right shoulder)
FULL PARTICIPATION: RB Jonathan Williams (ribs)

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Better for Reed to get coaching feet wet elsewhere

Posted on 14 January 2016 by Luke Jones

Former Ravens great Ed Reed may become a “phenomenal” coach as Rex Ryan predicted upon hiring him to join the Buffalo Bills staff as his assistant defensive backs coach on Wednesday.

But a Hall of Fame playing career doesn’t guarantee that he’ll be a successful coach as players in multiple sports have learned. That’s why it’s better for Reed to get his coaching feet wet elsewhere before potentially joining the Ravens staff down the line.

Even if many Ravens fans don’t like it.

Coincidentally, Reed is indirectly replacing Buffalo assistant Donnie Henderson, who was his first defensive backs coach in Baltimore and has been with eight different teams since then. It’s a reminder of the frequent turnover in the profession with many coaching changes coming in the form of termination.

It would be an awkward position for the Ravens to fire one of the best players in franchise history should he not have what it takes to be a coach. In Buffalo, fans won’t be sentimental about an assistant coach who had a Hall of Fame career in Baltimore if Ryan would need to let him go in a year or two.

Reed will be able to fly under the radar more with the Bills as he learns the craft.

How would Ravens fans react if Reed were their secondary coach and the group struggled mightily? Many fans couldn’t name Baltimore’s secondary coaches right now — Chris Hewitt and Matt Weiss — but everyone would know one of the best players in franchise history would hold the job.

The 37-year-old gaining valuable experience elsewhere first is a better plan for success.

There are also still some remnants of Reed’s playing career in Baltimore as coaches and remaining players remember the mercurial safety who wasn’t always the most coachable talent and even skipped mandatory minicamp in his final season with the Ravens. As unpredictable as he could be on the field, that same trait followed him off the field as well.

It may just be too soon.

This isn’t to suggest there’s a rift — many fans immediately concluded that Reed must be on poor terms with John Harbaugh if he’s going to work for Ryan instead — but the memories of Reed as a player are still fresh, which could have made for an awkward transition in the present. That said, Reed’s affinity for Ryan makes it unsurprising that the nine-time Pro Bowl selection would want to work with his former defensive coordinator, who was also the final head coach of his playing career with the New York Jets in 2013.

Every great player who transitions to coaching faces the challenge of relating to players who will lack the same talents and desire to be great. Reed has exceptional football intellect and has rightly been praised for mentoring younger teammates late in his career, but he was ultimately still the one in control on the field come Sunday.

The chances that Reed took — some wiser than others — because of his incredible range and ball skills will not be in play for the less-talented defensive backs he will coach. Ultimately, he’ll be the one accountable for getting them ready to play, but those players simply won’t be able to do things the same way that Reed did and he’ll need to recognize and embrace that reality to succeed.

If Reed proves capable and enjoys the extensive commitment needed to be an NFL coach — he only coached flag football for kids this past year — the Ravens should welcome the future Hall of Fame safety with open arms.

But it’s better for everyone that he begins his coaching career elsewhere.

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Ravens legend Ed Reed becoming NFL assistant coach

Posted on 13 January 2016 by Luke Jones

Future Hall of Fame safety Ed Reed has mentioned a desire to coach on more than one occasion, and a former Ravens defensive coordinator is giving him the opportunity.

The Buffalo Bills announced Wednesday that the longtime Ravens safety will join Rex Ryan’s staff as the assistant defensive backs coach. Ryan served as Reed’s defensive coordinator from 2005-2008 and was his final head coach when the safety joined the New York Jets midway through the 2013 season, his final year in the NFL.

Reed officially announced his retirement last year and was inducted into the Ravens’ Ring of Honor at M&T Bank Stadium in November. He is eligible for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame after the 2018 season.

“Ed Reed is going to be such a great asset to our team,” Ryan said in a statement released by the Bills. “Obviously, he’s played in this system and been an MVP-caliber guy in this system. He’s going to be such a great asset for players. He’s a real student of the game as well and he’s going to be a phenomenal coach.”

The 37-year-old has never coached before and didn’t always have the smoothest relationship with his many coaches through the years, but he took on more of a mentoring role with young Ravens teammates late in his playing career, drawing praise from the likes of Lardarius Webb and Cary Williams for making them better players. Reed will try to help improve a Buffalo pass defense that ranked 19th in the NFL in 2015.

The nine-time Pro Bowl selection was famous for his ability to study opponents and dissect plays, traits that were cultivated by longtime teammate and future Hall of Fame linebacker Ray Lewis when Reed entered the league in 2002.

“Having spent time with Ed in Baltimore and then New York, I can attest to the incredibly high level of professionalism he is going to bring with him to Buffalo,” Ryan said. “He’s going to teach guys how he studies film, bring the guys along, and add so much in that way.”

Reed will have the chance to coach one of his former teammates in the Baltimore secondary as Corey Graham will be entering his third year with Buffalo.

With Ryan already hiring twin brother Rob to be his new assistant head coach earlier this month, you would think HBO would be salivating at the prospects of featuring the Bills in their annual “Hard Knocks” series this summer. Buffalo is among the teams eligible to be selected this year.

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Could former Bills tight end Chandler be match for Ravens?

Posted on 12 March 2015 by Luke Jones

The Ravens need to address the tight end position following the departure of Owen Daniels, but few appealing options exist on the open market and even in this year’s draft, making the release of Buffalo Bills veteran Scott Chandler something to monitor.

The 29-year-old is far from a superstar, but he caught 43 or more passes in each of his last three seasons in Buffalo and would likely command a price that’s suitable with general manager Ozzie Newsome’s limited amount of cap space to address multiple needs. The Bills cut the 2007 fourth-round pick Wednesday to clear more cap space for their full-court press to sign free-agent tight end Charles Clay, who received the transition tag from Miami before the start of free agency. Because Chandler was released, his signing would not count against the compensatory pick formula, which is typically a major plus for the Ravens.

In 2014, Chandler caught 47 passes for 497 yards and three touchdowns in 16 games. Daniels made 48 receptions for 527 yards and four touchdowns in 15 games for the Ravens this past season.

Chandler was scheduled to make $1.95 million in base salary in 2015. Considered a strong receiver, the 6-foot-7, 260-pound tight end is not regarded as a particularly strong blocker. If the Ravens need any help in recruiting him, Pro Bowl right guard Marshal Yanda was a teammate of Chandler’s at the University of Iowa and were part of the same draft class.

The Ravens’ top two healthy tight ends on their current offseason roster are 2014 third-round pick Crockett Gillmore and former practice-squad member Phillip Supernaw. The status of veteran Dennis Pitta remains in doubt for 2015 and beyond after he suffered two serious right hip injuries in a 14-month period.

Based on many pundits’ opinions, there aren’t a slew of talented tight ends in this year’s draft, making it clear that the Ravens should add a veteran to help replace Daniels’ production if they want to feel better about the position going into training camp.

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Cornerback Graham signs four-year contract with Buffalo

Posted on 12 March 2014 by Luke Jones

While the Ravens were able to re-sign wide receiver Jacoby Jones earlier in the day, cornerback Corey Graham agreed to a four-year contract with the Buffalo Bills on Wednesday.

According to CBS Sports, the deal is worth $16 million and could rise to $19 million with playing-time incentives as Graham was looking for more money and playing time than the Ravens would provide. A Buffalo, N.Y. native, Graham came to Baltimore known primarily as a special-teams player and emerged as a starting cornerback for the Super Bowl XLVII championship team after injuries forced him into a significant role.

The 28-year-old grabbed six interceptions and made 134 tackles in 32 regular-season games for the Ravens after signing a two-year, $3.95 million contract in 2012. His biggest claim to fame came in the 2012 divisional round when he twice picked off Denver quarterback Peyton Manning, returning one for a touchdown and securing a second to set up the Ravens on a short field in overtime that eventually led to the game-winning field goal.

After struggling in the season-opening loss to the Broncos last season, Graham was replaced by Jimmy Smith as a starter and served as the No. 3 corner for the remainder of the year. His departure leaves Chykie Brown and Asa Jackson in a competition for the third spot in the nickel package, but the Ravens are likely to add another cornerback via free agency or the draft to bolster their depth.

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Hostler leaving Ravens to become senior offensive assistant for Bills

Posted on 29 January 2014 by WNST Staff

BILLS TEAM RELEASE

Jim Hostler has been named the Buffalo Bills senior offensive assistant.

Hostler comes to Buffalo with 15 years of NFL coaching experience, including the past six seasons as the Baltimore Ravens’ wide receivers coach. During his time with the Ravens, Hostler oversaw a receiving corps that played an integral role in the team’s 2012 Super Bowl championship. During the 2012 campaign, the Ravens’ wideouts finished second in franchise history for most receiving yards during a single season with 3,996.

Under Hostler’s tutelage, Ravens’ WR Torrey Smith emerged as one of the game’s top wideouts. Since entering the NFL in 2011, Smith ranks among the top 10 of AFC receivers in yards per catch (4th-17.2), touchdown receptions (6th-19) and receiving yards (8th-2,842).

In addition to Smith, Hostler helped WR Anquan Boldin make an immediate impact on the Ravens’ offense upon his arrival following a trade from Arizona. During his three seasons (2010-12) with Baltimore, Boldin led the Ravens in receptions (186), receiving yards (2,645), receiving yards per game (58.8) and first down receptions (132).

Hostler joined the Ravens in 2008 after spending three seasons (2005-07) with the San Francisco 49ers, serving as offensive coordinator in his final year (2007). During his time with the 49ers, Hostler played an important role in tutoring 2005 No. 1 overall pick QB Alex Smith.

During coaching stints with the New York Jets (2003-04) and the New Orleans Saints (2001-02), Hostler helped develop players like Santana Moss, Wayne Chrebet, Justin McCareins and Donte’ Stallworth.

A native of Bethel Park, PA, Hostler entered the NFL in 2000 with the Kansas City Chiefs as an offensive assistant/quality control coach after spending 10 years coaching collegiately at his alma mater Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Juniata College.

NFL
Buffalo Bills 2014 Senior Offensive Assistant
Baltimore Ravens 2008-13 Wide Receivers
San Francisco 49ers 2007 Offensive Coordinator
San Francisco 49ers 2005-06 Quarterbacks
New York Jets 2003-04 Wide Receivers/Quarterbacks
New Orleans Saints 2001-02 Asst. Wide Receivers/ Offensive Asst./Quality Control
Kansas City Chiefs 2000 Offensive Assistant/Quality Control

COLLEGE
IUP 1994-99 Offensive Coordinator/QBs/LBs/RBs
Juniata College 1993 Offensive Coordinator
IUP 1990-92 Running Backs

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Who helped the Jets more Sunday: Ed Reed or the 15-7-0?

Posted on 18 November 2013 by Glenn Clark

15 positive observations from the weekend of football, seven not so positive observations and we acknowledge a “zero” from outside the world of football. A reminder, there’s never any Ravens game analysis here. We do plenty of that elsewhere. It’s a trip through the weekend of football via videos, GIFs, memes, pictures, links, Tweets and shtick. This isn’t where we do Ravens stuff. You can find plenty of that…like…everywhere else on the site.

The 15-7-0 is happy to congratulate Jimmie Johnson on his 6th NASCAR title. I say that as a fellow six time NASCAR champ myself. What’s that, you don’t believe me? Then prove me wrong. Name ONE other NASCAR champion besides Jimmie Johnson.

That’s what I thought.

15 Positive Observations…

1. The Bengals are running away with the AFC North again. This would probably be a more exciting development in Cincinnati but, you know, history and all.

But don’t try to tell Cincy’s finest they shouldn’t be amped up about a big win!

2. Hey there, Terps football fan. Remember how everyone in the office was bragging about their Holiday vacations last year? Mike in finance went to St. Thomas and Jill in accounts payable went to Barbados while you just sat around and ate fruitcake? Well this year you’re going to be the talk of the water cooler because CONGRATULATIONS, YOU’RE HEADED TO BEAUTIFUL SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA! (Or Annapolis). So long, suckers!

Could someone check in to see if Randy Edsall is excited about bowl eligibility?

Elsewhere in the ACC, Florida State’s game against Syracuse was not competitive, but there WAS some competition at the game!

3. When Ed Orgeron replaces Charlie Weis at Kansas this offseason, do you think he’ll bring his sword with him? Like to take it around on recruiting trips? “Hi, I’m Ed Orgeron and this is my sword.” Damn that sounds awesome. If you haven’t picked out a wedding gift for me yet, please make it a sword.

Lee Corso kinda hopes the answer is “no”.

Another question is whether or not he’ll bring his own Doctor.

And also, will he bring his Marqise Lee?

Kansas actually won a game Saturday. This guy got to keep a piece of the goalpost everyone else threw in the lake.

4. In the span of seven days and two wins, Ben Roethlisberger went from a declaration that he’s a “Pittsburgher” to being dressed exactly like a Hamburglar.

I like Jim Schwartz. I do not like this call.

Why did the Lions lose? Because this guy showed up to the game wearing THIS.

5. Denver is the best team in the AFC West. In a related story, a bear was seen relieving himself in an area filled mostly with trees.

There were like 16 people that showed up at the game with this exact sign. I was right about everything I said about you, Denver.

Your reaction, Denver mascot?

Also…this is a thing? Although I’m not surprised Andy Reid would care so much about his postgame spreads.

There’s a big game coming up next week and Tom Brady is apparently a Batman movie villain now.

(Continued on Page 2…)

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Ravens defense slow to stop the run in recent weeks

Posted on 22 October 2013 by Luke Jones

(This blog brought to you by Atlantic Remodeling. Visit www.atlanticremodeling.com to learn about their Red Cent Guarantee!)

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — After revamping their front seven in an offseason filled with changes on both sides of the ball, the Ravens expected their run defense to be one of their biggest strengths in 2013.

With veterans such as Chris Canty, Daryl Smith, and Marcus Spears joining a nucleus that already included Pro Bowl mainstays Terrell Suggs and Haloti Ngata, the Ravens were all but assured to improve substantially from a year ago when they fielded the league’s 20th-ranked run defense and gave up 122.8 yards per game on the ground. All appeared to be going to plan early in the season as Baltimore entered its Week 4 meeting with the Buffalo Bills ranked fourth against the run.

Instead, an unexpected loss to the Bills on Sept. 29 started a disturbing trend as the Ravens have now allowed 140 or more yards on the ground in three of their last four games. That stretch continued in humbling fashion this past Sunday as the Steelers’ running game — ranked 31st out of 32 teams entering Week 7 — bullied the Ravens to the tune of 141 yards on 29 carries in a 19-16 defeat to their AFC North rivals.

“They did some new things that we haven’t seen from them,” Suggs said. “Not just this year, but ever. Pittsburgh has never come out and run the Wildcat on us. They’ve never come out with extra linemen. You just have to be able to adjust on the fly. They were able to get some runs off of that early on.”

Entering their bye week with the NFL’s 16th-ranked rush defense at 104.3 yards given up per game, the Ravens have been slow to adjust to the opponents’ running game on more than one occasion this year. In preparing for the Bills, the Ravens spent extensive time focusing on the read-option attack that had been used by quarterback EJ Manuel before Buffalo used more of a conventional approach in gaining 203 yards on 55 carries with 116 coming in the first half. Instructed to use patience in letting the play come to them when facing the read option, the Ravens were instead on their heels as Fred Jackson and C.J. Spiller had huge days on the ground for the Bills.

By the time defensive coordinator Dean Pees made the necessary adjustments at halftime, the Ravens were already behind on a day in which quarterback Joe Flacco threw a career-worst five interceptions and the Bills were able to use a conservative ground approach in the second half.

Against the Steelers, the Ravens couldn’t have been expecting such a run-heavy approach, but Pittsburgh used gadget plays as well as a steady diet of rookie Le’Veon Bell to exploit the aggressive tendencies of the front seven. It wasn’t a matter of being unable to shed blocks but a failure to play individual assignments and to read blocks longer in protecting cutbacks, according to Pees.

Other times, the defensive line was simply controlled at the line of scrimmage by a Pittsburgh line that included three backup starters due to injuries.

“The first run of the game, we got the guy stuffed in the hole, and then we just kind of jump off a block a little too quick,” Pees said. “We’re a little too impatient, and [Le’Veon] Bell is a patient runner, and he ended up cutting it all the way back on us right into a blitz. And everything was good until we just jumped off the block, and then he found the crease. That happened to us about three or four times during the course of the game that we got off blocks actually too quick.”

The 141 rushing yards surrendered against Pittsburgh followed the 140 given up the previous week in a home loss to the Green Bay Packers, who sport the league’s sixth-ranked rushing attack. Unlike the Steelers who were able to consistently grind out yards to extend drives, the Packers collected a sizable portion of their production on just a few runs when rookie Eddie Lacy ran for 47 yards on the first two plays of the game and then collected another 17-yard run in the fourth quarter.

Aside from the Steelers’ final march to kick the game-winning field goal on Sunday, no drive was more painful than the 13-play, 70-yard sequence that resulted in a 28-yard field goal and took over eight minutes off the clock in the third quarter. The Steelers gained 41 yards on the ground during that possession alone as their running game was a major factor in controlling the clock and limiting Baltimore to just seven possessions over the entire game.

“[The Pittsburgh game] wasn’t as much big plays as just as kind of bleeding us,” Pees said. “Six, seven, eight yards, which really created a second problem, and that’s third down, which we’ve been very good at. But I’ve said it before: It’s hard to be good on third down when it’s third-and-one and third-and-two.”

The defense has been far from the Ravens’ biggest problem in a disappointing 3-4 start, but Sunday marked the second straight week in which failing to stop the run was a major contributor in the opponent’s ability to put together a long drive in the second half. Against the Packers, the Ravens surrendered 36 rushing yards on a 72-yard fourth-quarter drive that lasted 7:35 and gave Green Bay a nine-point lead with just over four minutes to go. The Ravens would quickly score a touchdown to pull within two but would not get the ball back as the Packers then ran out the clock.

With an offense that’s largely struggled to simply move the ball consistently let alone score touchdowns instead of field goals, limiting its total number of possessions is a recipe for failure more often than not. And a run defense failing to meet high expectations is another reason why the Ravens have lost three of four to fall below the .500 mark for the first time this late in a season in the John Harbaugh era.

No matter what the reason in a given week, the leaky run defense is just one of several issues plaguing the Ravens as they approach the midway point of the season.

“The yardage is the same, which is not good, which we’ve got to get corrected,” Pees said. “If we’re going to be a good defense, we can’t let anybody run the ball on us.”

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The Five Plays That Determined The Game: Ravens/Bills

Posted on 01 October 2013 by Glenn Clark

Following every Baltimore Ravens game this season, Ryan Chell and I will take to the airwaves Tuesdays on “The Reality Check” on AM1570 WNST.net with a segment known as “The Five Plays That Determined The Game.”

It’s a simple concept. We’ll select five plays from each game that determined the outcome. These five plays will best represent why the Ravens won or lost each game.

This will be our final analysis of the previous game before switching gears towards the next game on the schedule.

Here are the five plays that determined the Ravens’ 23-20 loss to the Buffalo Bills Sunday at Ralph Wilson Stadium…

(Note: not all pictures are always of actual play)

Glenn Clark’s Plays…

5. Robert Woods 42 yard touchdown catch from EJ Manuel (2nd quarter)

4. Joe Flacco pass intended for Torrey Smith incomplete on 3rd & 10 from Buffalo 17 (4th quarter)

3. Joe Flacco pass intended for Ray Rice incomplete on 3rd & 5 from Buffalo 6 (4th quarter)

2. Kiko Alonso intercepts Joe Flacco pass intended for Dallas Clark at Buffalo 36 (4th quarter)

1. Kiko Alonso intercepts Joe Flacco pass intended for Marlon Brown at Buffalo 46 (3rd quarter)

(Continued on Page 2…)

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