Tag Archive | "brian matusz"


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Orioles thoughts on pitching and outfield situation

Posted on 15 June 2015 by Luke Jones

Sunday was a forgettable day for Orioles rookie Mike Wright, but manager Buck Showalter was correct in pointing out the starting pitcher experienced some tough luck, especially early in the game.

The 25-year-old gave up a number of hits that weren’t exactly tattooed by the Yankees, but the biggest problem for Wright has been his inability to put hitters away — New York fouled off 13 pitches with two strikes in his four-plus innings of work — which often leads to a pitcher making a mistake. This not only drives up the pitch count, but it puts more pressure on the pitcher as Wright crumbled in the top of the fifth walking three straight hitters to conclude his afternoon.

His mid-90s fastball certainly plays at the major league level, but Wright’s slider and changeup haven’t been impressive, making you wonder if he’ll have the stuff to make it as a starting pitcher in the long run. I’m not ready to give up on the idea of Wright as a major league starter, but I do think his fastball could be very tough to handle in a late-inning relief role in which he’s only working an inning or so at a time. It wouldn’t be difficult seeing Wright eventually stepping into the role occupied by Tommy Hunter, who is a free agent at the end of the 2015 season.

Either way, Wright has work to do to improve his secondary stuff.

* I have no idea how long outfielder Nolan Reimold can continue this, but he’s provided a nice lift in his first week back with the Orioles.

I never doubted the 31-year-old’s ability early in his career, but you had to wonder whether the talent would still be there after two serious neck injuries in 2012 and 2013. Acknowledging it’s only been a handful of games, we’ve seen the combination of power, speed, and defensive ability that had the Orioles and their fans salivating about his potential years ago.

You can only cross your fingers that a guy who’s had terrible luck with injuries can stay healthy and the Orioles shouldn’t assume that he can stay on the field for the long haul, but Showalter should pencil his name into the starting lineup every day until there’s a reason not to.

* Speaking of outfielders, you probably wouldn’t have been surprised if I’d told you in February that Travis Snider would be hitting .252 in his first 150 plate appearances for the Orioles, but his lack of power has been startling.

After hitting nine home runs and slugging .524 in the second half for Pittsburgh last year, the Orioles hoped they were getting a 27-year-old and former first-round pick who was finally blooming at the plate after years of struggles, but Snider is slugging a career-low .326 with just one homer and seven extra-base hits and rarely makes sharp contact or shows the ability to drive the ball. In contrast, ex-Oriole Nick Markakis has a higher slugging percentage at .367 — still a poor mark — despite not yet hitting a home run for Atlanta this season.

You have to wonder if Snider is running out of chances as the Orioles desperately need an effective lefty-hitting outfielder and Chris Parmelee is producing at Triple-A Norfolk.

* The Orioles hope to see Bud Norris improve enough to finish out the season in the starting rotation, but I wouldn’t be keen on the idea of re-signing him this winter.

A club will likely overpay for the right-hander based on his 2014 season, but Norris hasn’t been able to duplicate his success against left-handed hitters this season. Relying on an effective changeup to hold lefties to a .255 average and .753 on-base plus slugging percentage in 2014, Norris has been lit up by lefty bats this season to the tune of a 1.035 OPS as he’s been unable to command the off-speed pitch as effectively.

Norris has always handled right-handed hitters, but his problems against lefties have plagued him for most of his career, which is the biggest reason why he’s been nothing more than an average starting pitcher other than last season. In reality, he’d probably be better suited for the bullpen on a competitive club, but Norris would hardly embrace such a role in a contract year.

* You get the sense that Showalter is beginning to use Delmon Young more and more like he did last season, which isn’t a bad thing for the Orioles.

Young has shown little power (a .358 slugging percentage), but he does sport a .327 average against left-handed pitching, making him an obvious start against southpaws. It was interesting to see David Lough hit for Young against right-hander Sergio Santos on Saturday night — Showalter said he wanted to give the young outfielder an at-bat even though the Orioles only led by three runs at the time — and then Matt Wieters was sent to the plate in Young’s place to face Dellin Betances in the ninth inning on Sunday.

It would be helpful if Dan Duquette could at least find an effective platoon partner for Young for the rest of the season.

* With southpaws Brian Matusz and T.J. McFarland both struggling to throw strikes this season, the Orioles are hoping that Wesley Wright can settle into the lefty specialist role upon completing his minor-league rehab assignment.

On the disabled list since the first week of the season with a left trapezius strain, Wright is expected to join an affiliate any day now and could make Matusz expendable if he proves he’s healthy and can throw strikes.

* Adam Jones is a four-time Gold Glove center fielder and certainly doesn’t need validation, but there have been a couple points in his career when he was probably a little overrated as a defender.

But strictly going off the eyeball test — his fielding metrics have been good, for what it’s worth — Jones has never played better defense than what we’ve seen from him this year. The 29-year-old has not only been steady and consistent, but he’s made countless sensational plays — just ask the Boston Red Sox about last week’s series — running down balls in the gap or making exceptional throws to gun down runners trying to take an extra base.

Comments Off on Orioles thoughts on pitching and outfield situation


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Orioles recall Wilson to reinforce burdened bullpen

Posted on 14 June 2015 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Needing to reinforce a bullpen that’s carried a heavy load over the last week, the Orioles recalled right-handed pitcher Tyler Wilson prior to Sunday’s series finale with the New York Yankees.

Despite winning six straight games to move back over the .500 mark, the Orioles have gone seven consecutive games without a starting pitcher completing six innings, which has placed a great burden on the bullpen. Orioles relievers have more than been up to the task — allowing only one run in 19 1/3 innings in the first five games of the current homestand — but manager Buck Showalter can’t continue to ask his bullpen to pitch roughly four innings per contest if he wants the group to remain effective.

To make room for Wilson on the 25-man roster, the Orioles optioned lefty reliever T.J. McFarland to Triple-A Norfolk. McFarland had pitched on Friday and Saturday and has been struggling with his command, allowing eight walks in 9 1/3 innings with Baltimore this season. Showalter wants to see the 26-year-old work out of the bullpen with the Tides, focusing on entering in the middle of innings with runners on base.

“We want to get him in the bullpen there and simulating situations he’s coming into here in the middle of an inning,” said Showalter, who added that McFarland is also dropping down to the side too much with his arm slot. “He’s had a little problem in the middle of an inning compared to starting an inning. I think some of that’s our fault.”

On the surface, McFarland’s 1.93 ERA suggests his performance has been strong, but walking 7.7 hitters per nine innings and a 2.14 WHIP (walks and hits per inning pitched) tell the real story of how he’s fared this season.

Left-hander Brian Matusz also rejoined the bullpen Sunday after serving the final game of his suspension on Saturday night. With rookie Mike Wright starting the series finale, the Orioles maintained a seven-man bullpen with Wilson and Matusz replacing Wright and McFarland.

In three appearances for the Orioles earlier this season, Wilson posted a 3.38 ERA in eight innings. His one start in Baltimore came on May 28 when he allowed two runs in six innings of work in a 3-2 loss to the Chicago White Sox.

Comments Off on Orioles recall Wilson to reinforce burdened bullpen

Screen Shot 2015-06-07 at 12.27.40 PM

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Orioles go with short bench to activate Norris from DL

Posted on 07 June 2015 by Luke Jones

With Bud Norris being activated to make his first start since May 10, the Orioles optioned infielder Rey Navarro to Triple-A Norfolk prior to Sunday’s game in Cleveland.

Since left-handed reliever Brian Matusz is in the midst of serving an eight-game suspension, the Orioles are playing a man short until next Sunday and will use a short bench as a result. Infielders J.J. Hardy and Ryan Flaherty are feeling better after recent health issues, so the Orioles could use Steve Pearce at second base with Flaherty backing up Hardy at shortstop.

The Orioles could shuffle their roster some more over the next week since left-handed pitcher T.J. McFarland possesses minor-league options in the bullpen.

Right-hander Kevin Gausman made the first start of his rehab assignment on Saturday, pitching four scoreless innings while allowing one hit, striking out four, and walking none. He threw 40 pitches, 32 of them strikes.

His next rehab start will come Thursday for Double-A Bowie where he’s expected to pitch four or five innings. Gausman could become an option for the Baltimore starting rotation at any point after that outing or he could continue to pitch in the minor leagues.

Comments Off on Orioles go with short bench to activate Norris from DL


Tags: , , , , , ,

MLB upholds eight-game ban for Orioles lefty Matusz

Posted on 05 June 2015 by Luke Jones

Despite Milwaukee relief pitcher Will Smith seeing his eight-game suspension reduced earlier in the day, Orioles left-handed pitcher Brian Matusz saw his ban upheld by Major League Baseball on Friday.

Matusz began serving his eight-game suspension for having a foreign substances on his right forearm in a May 23 game in Miami. His appeal hearing took place in Houston on Wednesday with executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette and manager Buck Showalter in attendance.

He will be eligible to return on June 14 in a game against the New York Yankees.

The Orioles will now play a player down on their 25-man roster as Matusz sits for the next eight games. Showalter told reporters in Cleveland that the lefty pitcher will likely go to Sarasota to stay in shape over the next week.

To say the least, it’s curious that Smith saw his suspension reduced to six games while Matusz still received eight games from MLB. Showalter had expressed optimism earlier in the week that his pitcher’s discipline would be lessened.

In 18 1/3 innings in 2015, Matusz has posted a 1-2 record with a 3.44 ERA, but he has walked 11 batters compared to 14 strikeouts. The southpaw has allowed four of eight inherited runners to score this season.

The Orioles promoted relief pitcher Cesar Cabral from Triple-A Norfolk to give themselves another left-hander in the bullpen.

Comments Off on MLB upholds eight-game ban for Orioles lefty Matusz


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Orioles make series of roster moves for Cleveland series

Posted on 05 June 2015 by Luke Jones

The long-awaited return of All-Star catcher Matt Wieters headlined a series of roster moves for the Orioles prior to the start of a three-game series in Cleveland this weekend.

In addition to the activation of Wieters from the 60-day disabled list, the Orioles recalled infielder Rey Navarro and selected the contract of left-handed relief pitcher Cesar Cabral from Triple-A Norfolk. To make room on the 25-man roster for those three, Baltimore optioned right-handed pitcher Mike Wright and catcher Steve Clevenger to Norfolk and designated veteran infielder Everth Cabrera for assignment.

In the Orioles lineup for the first time since May 10, 2014, Wieters was catching and batting fifth on Friday night. The 29-year-old underwent Tommy John surgery last June 17 and is expected to catch every other day for the time being, sharing starting duties with Caleb Joseph.

The promotion of Cabral was in response to left-handed reliever Brian Matusz beginning his eight-game suspension that was upheld after Wednesday’s appeal hearing. Baltimore will now play a man down during his ban, but the 26-year-old Cabral hasn’t allowed a run this season in 21 2/3 innings split between Norfolk and Double-A Bowie.

The 25-year-old Navarro is beginning his third stint with the Orioles this season. He is 8-for-29 with a home run and three RBIs with Baltimore in 2015.

The decision to demote Wright is a clear indication that manager Buck Showalter will give the ball to right-handed pitcher Bud Norris for Sunday’s finale in Cleveland. Norris is currently on the 15-day disabled list after coming down with bronchitis last month and sports a 9.88 ERA in 2015, leading many to wonder if this will be his final chance in the starting rotation despite him winning 15 games a year ago.

Wright would figure to be called upon by the Orioles again at some point after pitching extremely well in his first two starts and posting a 2.96 ERA in four outings. It’s clear that the 25-year-old needs to continue working on his secondary pitches, but he could be a real factor as a bullpen arm if not asked to return to the Orioles rotation later this season.

Cabrera becomes the second veteran player to be designated for assignment in the last two weeks after outfielder Alejandro De Aza was designated and eventually dealt to Boston earlier this week. Signed to a one-year, $2.4 million contract in late February, Cabrera batted only .208 with a .479 on-base plus slugging percentage. In 29 games while primarily filling in for the injured J.J. Hardy in April, Cabrera posted minus-0.7 wins above replacement, according to BaseballReference.com.

In addition to Wieters, Hardy made his return to the Orioles lineup on Friday after a four-game absence, batting eighth and playing shortstop.

Comments Off on Orioles make series of roster moves for Cleveland series

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 8.57.53 PM

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Orioles send De Aza to Boston for minor-league pitcher, cash

Posted on 03 June 2015 by Luke Jones

After designating Alejandro De Aza for assignment last week, the Orioles announced Wednesday that they had traded the veteran outfielder to the Boston Red Sox.

Baltimore received minor-league pitcher Joe Gunkel and cash considerations in return as Boston is dealing with outfielder concerns of its own so far in 2015. De Aza was hitting .214 with three home runs and seven RBIs this season and carries a $5 million salary for the 2015 season.

The 23-year-old Gunkel is from nearby Hershey, Pa. and was an 18th-round selection in the 2013 draft. He carries a 12-7 career record with a 3.05 ERA in 54 appearances — 20 of them starts — over three professional seasons while fanning 178 over 165 innings.

In 2015, Gunkel is a combined 3-2 with a 2.90 ERA split between Single-A Salem and Double-A Portland. He will be assigned to Double-A Bowie in Baltimore’s farm system.

In other news, right-handed pitcher Bud Norris completed his final rehab start pitching for Triple-A Norfolk, completing four hitless innings and retiring 12 of the 13 hitters he faced. He could be activated from the 15-day disabled list to make Sunday’s start in Cleveland, but it remains to be seen whether he will pitch effectively enough to stay in the starting rotation after a nightmarish beginning to the 2015 campaign.

Sunday would be rookie Mike Wright’s turn in the rotation.

Catcher Matt Wieters went 3-for-5 with a homer, two singles, a walk, and one RBI for the Tides in the final two games of his minor-league rehab assignment as he caught the opener and served as the designated hitter in the nightcap of Norfolk’s doubleheader. He is expected to be activated from the 60-day DL on Friday to play in his first game for the Orioles since May 10, 2014.

Lefty reliever Brian Matusz had his appeal hearing for his eight-game suspension on Wednesday afternoon with manager Buck Showalter and executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette in attendance. It remains unclear when a decision will be rendered on whether he will serve the full suspension for having a foreign substance on his right forearm while pitching in a game at Miami on May 23.

To prepare for Matusz’ absence and to give themselves extra length in the bullpen, the Orioles recalled left-handed pitcher T.J. McFarland from Norfolk and optioned right-hander Oliver Drake to the Tides. Baltimore will be forced to play a man short on the active roster during the suspension.

Shortstop J.J. Hardy was out of the lineup for the third straight game Wednesday night as he deals with a left oblique issue. The Orioles hope he can avoid the 15-day DL, but it remains unclear when he will return to the lineup.


Comments Off on Orioles send De Aza to Boston for minor-league pitcher, cash


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Fruitless use of resources costing Orioles dearly so far in 2015

Posted on 02 June 2015 by Luke Jones

This isn’t about the three names who’ve been discussed over and over and over in assessing the Orioles’ offseason and disappointing start to the 2015 campaign.

Frankly, it’s not my place to say the organization should have invested more than $34 million in those three players for the 2015 season, which doesn’t include the $102.75 million that departing trio will command from their new clubs in future years. At the same time, I won’t applaud the Orioles for showing the restraint to allow them to walk away, either, when it was clear what value they provided to the 2014 club.

What we do know is it would have been naive to expect the franchise to increase its payroll by tens of millions of dollars, meaning executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette had difficult decisions to make. In fact, lost in the handwringing over a disappointing offseason is that the payroll is actually higher than it was a year ago.

And that’s where we come to the real problem plaguing manager Buck Showalter’s club as it continues to hover below the .500 mark in early June. For all of the discussion about who the Orioles didn’t keep, not enough attention has been paid to the ones they did choose to retain who haven’t provided a return in 2015.

Because of the timing, we often forget the big-name free agent that the Orioles did retain when they re-signed J.J. Hardy to a three-year, $40 million contract on the eve of the American League Championship Series last October. Injuries have limited the Gold Glove shortstop to just 23 games as he’s batted only .190 when he has been in the lineup.

Time will tell whether the Orioles made the right decision in extending the 32-year-old shortstop, but there’s no way to sugarcoat the biggest indictment of the offseason:

It’s the overwhelming portion of the $57.51 million paid to arbitration-eligible players this winter that looks like a sunk investment in early June. The Orioles invested just under $38 million in Chris Tillman ($4.32 million), Bud Norris ($8.8 million), Tommy Hunter ($4.65 million), Brian Matusz ($3.2 million), Steve Pearce ($3.7 million), Alejandro De Aza ($5 million), and the injured Matt Wieters ($8.3 million), and what exactly have they gotten in return?

Of course, that’s not to say the Orioles shouldn’t have tendered any of the aforementioned players as no one would have predicted Tillman or Norris struggling as dramatically as they have thus far and Pearce still looked like a huge bargain after leading the 2014 Orioles in on-base plus slugging percentage. There was cautious optimism that Wieters might be ready by Opening Day, but the club knew it was possible that he’d need a couple more months to rehab as has turned out to be the case.

But what about the others?

Designated for assignment last week, De Aza’s name was mentioned by many as a candidate to be non-tendered over the winter, but the Orioles were fooled into thinking what they saw last September and in the postseason was what they would get this year. His struggles over the last few years with the Chicago White Sox spelled out why he was available last August, but the organization forked over $5 million for him anyway.

It’s understandable that the Orioles didn’t want to invest a long-term contract in a relief pitcher, but was it wise to pay a total of $7.85 million to two middling relievers like Hunter and Matusz? Was it a good use of resources to tender Matusz and sign left-hander Wesley Wright for an additional $1.7 million?

Non-tendering De Aza and Matusz and passing on the Everth Cabrera signing — which has been another $2.4 million investment providing no return — would have created an additional $10.6 million to spend on other players if they’d kept the same payroll. Think of the possibilities of what could have been done with that money with just a hint of creativity.

The Orioles showed little interest this winter in outfielder Nori Aoki, who is essentially a present-day Nick Markakis clone and signed a one-year, $4 million contract with San Francisco that includes a $5.5 million option for 2016. He alone wouldn’t fix the current offense, but he’d sure look good hitting in the leadoff spot for Baltimore right now and hadn’t shown the same inconsistency of De Aza in Chicago the last couple years. A signing like that still would have left Duquette more money with which to work.

That’s only one simple example, of course.

As much as critics have labeled it a “cheap” offseason for the Orioles, it was an unimaginative one more than anything else. Even if the departures of Nelson Cruz, Markakis, and Miller were unavoidable from a financial standpoint, the Orioles still had plenty of resources to tinker and try to improve the club while continuing to remind everyone that Wieters, Manny Machado, and Chris Davis would be rejoining what remained of a playoff roster.

Instead, the Orioles lost significant pieces and paid too much of the money they did have to role players to fill in the cracks. To borrow a line from “Jurassic Park” uttered by Dr. Ian Malcolm, the Orioles were “so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should” pay all of their arbitration-eligible players.

Fans can only wonder how much the flirtation between Duquette and the Toronto Blue Jays might have contributed to an inactive offseason in which the most significant additions were Travis Snider, Wright, and Cabrera.

Meanwhile, the Orioles continue to wait and hope for the players in which they did invest this winter to finally provide a positive return.

Comments (4)


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Orioles lineup continues firing blanks in month of May

Posted on 27 May 2015 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Buck Showalter rarely dwells on the negatives after a loss.

It’s just not his style — at least publicly anyway — as he prefers focusing on the positive after any given contest over a 162-game schedule. But his reaction to Tuesday’s 4-1 loss to the Houston Astros was a little different.

While recognizing the strong performance of starter Chris Tillman that was spoiled by a few suspect pitches in the seventh inning and the failures of reliever Brian Matusz an inning later, Showalter continued coming back to the same theme that has plagued the Orioles throughout the month of May.

“We obviously haven’t been giving our pitchers much margin for error,” Showalter said, “but [Tillman] gave us a real good chance to win tonight. Probably even a little bit better than that.

“Once again, we can sit here and talk about [other factors] and rightfully so, but until we start getting some things going offensively, it really makes for a tough atmosphere to pitch in.”

The Orioles have scored just seven runs over their last 40 innings.

They’ve produced three or fewer runs in 13 of their 23 games this month and two or fewer in 11 of those.

Tuesday night’s cleanup man (Chris Davis) sports a .208 average and the No. 5 hitter (Steve Pearce) is batting .188. Delmon Young — who’s spent plenty of time in the heart of the order — is slugging a paltry .333 despite a respectable .287 average.

Beyond the white-hot Jimmy Paredes, Manny Machado, Adam Jones, and Caleb Joseph, the Orioles haven’t gotten nearly enough production from the rest of the lineup. And with Jones struggling recently — he was 0-for-3 Tuesday and has just three hits in his last 25 at-bats — the run shortage has been even more magnified.

“I just think we’ve got to slow the game down,” said Davis, who struck out two more times and hit a sacrifice fly in the sixth for the only Baltimore run on Tuesday. “When you’re not scoring a lot of runs, you’re not swinging the bats like you know you can, the tendency is to press and try to overdo it. I think you’ve seen that in the last few games, just guys getting out of their approach, out of their rhythm and trying to do too much with pitches that aren’t good pitches to hit.”

The Orioles were counting on Davis to look more like the force he was in 2013 — or at least in 2012. Instead, he’s looked just like the frustrated hitter we saw a season ago and has struck out 64 times in 170 plate appearances, registering the highest strikeout rate of his career by a substantial margin.

You keep waiting for veterans like of J.J. Hardy and Alejandro De Aza to start swinging the bat like they have in the past and for Young to start showing a little bit of power. Aside from a couple key home runs in the last week, Pearce hasn’t come close to approaching his 2014 production. Travis Snider hasn’t been the young replacement for the declining Nick Markakis that the Orioles envisioned.

The many clamoring for some change are justified, but Triple-A Norfolk doesn’t have many appealing options to even try at the moment. Former Minnesota Twins first-round pick Chris Parmelee has an .818 on-base plus slugging percentage and Nolan Reimold has begun heating up recently, but that’s about it.

Perhaps a returning Matt Wieters provides a spark as early as next week, but can you realistically expect him to offer much more offense than Joseph after not playing in the majors in more than a year?

The Orioles hope Jonathan Schoop can return sometime next month, but there’s no guarantee how soon that will be.

For now, Showalter has little choice but to ride out the storm — or the drought — by continuing to mix and match in hopes of finding some semblance of consistent production beyond the top three spots in the order. And executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette needs to be exploring what might be out there on the trade market over the next two months.

At 20-23, the Orioles still find themselves in the thick of the American League East and are just one game out in the loss column behind first-place New York. There are 119 games remaining in the 2015 regular season for Baltimore.

But much more is needed from the offense than it’s provided all month if the Orioles want to remain within striking distance.


Comments (2)


Tags: , , , ,

Matusz receives eight-game ban for foreign substance on arm

Posted on 25 May 2015 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Orioles pitcher Brian Matusz has received an eight-game suspension from Major League Baseball for having a foreign substance on his arm during Saturday’s loss to the Miami Marlins.

The suspension was announced prior to Monday’s series opener against the Houston Astros.

The lefty reliever will appeal the suspension and will be allowed to continue to pitch until his case is heard. The Orioles would play a player short on their 25-man roster should Matusz’s suspension — or any part of it — be upheld.

“I’m not going to try to justify anything. It’s a deeper issue,” manager Buck Showalter told reporters before Sunday’s game in Miami. “It’s the same reason why hitters have pine tar. Why is there rosin on the field? Why do we put mud on the ball? We all understand that the crux of the problem is gripping the ball.”

Matusz was ejected in the bottom of the 12th inning of Saturday’s 1-0 loss after Marlins manager Dan Jennings requested that the umpiring crew take a look at the pitcher’s right forearm. It is believed that Matusz had rosin on his arm with some sunscreen potentially mixed with the substance.

While a clear violation of the rulebook, it’s no secret that many major league pitchers use substances to help improve their grip of the baseball. Showalter defended New York Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda last year when he was suspended for using pine tar against Boston, citing the need for pitchers to be able to better grip the baseball for safety concerns. The Baltimore manager has periodically cited the tacky covering on Japanese baseballs as an example of what MLB should use rather than the traditional mud to rub down baseballs.

Matusz had never been ejected from a game in his career. He is the second major league pitcher this week to be suspended eight games for having a foreign substance on his arm, joining Milwaukee left-hander Will Smith.

NOTES: Right-hander Bud Norris (bronchitis) will continue his minor league rehab assignment with a start at Double-A Bowie on Wednesday. Originally a candidate to be activated for Thursday’s doubleheader, Norris will continue rebuilding his strength after surrendering nine runs and 12 hits in 2 2/3 innings for Triple-A Norfolk on Friday. … Right-handed pitcher Tyler Wilson remains a candidate to be called up on Thursday and pitched an abbreviated start for Norfolk on Monday. Lefty T.J. McFarland is another candidate to start one of Thursday’s games. Mike Wright will start one of the two games against the Chicago White Sox. … Still recovering from right shoulder tendinitis, right-handed pitcher Kevin Gausman will throw a bullpen session Tuesday, face live hitters on Friday, and pitch two innings in a simulated game on June 2. … Matt Wieters (right elbow) will catch pitching prospect Dylan Bundy as he finally begins his rehab assignment on Tuesday. … Infielder Ryan Flaherty (groin) began a rehab assignment at Norfolk on Monday.

Comments Off on Matusz receives eight-game ban for foreign substance on arm

Screen Shot 2015-05-22 at 9.59.38 AM

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Five questions pondering Yanda, Matusz, others

Posted on 22 May 2015 by Luke Jones

Every Friday, I’ll ponder five topics related to the Orioles or Ravens (or a mix of both).

Five questions …

1. Is it just me or do you still enjoy seeing Marshal Yanda receive league-wide recognition? I’ve made no secret about my disdain for the annual NFL Network top 100 players list over the years, but I did enjoy seeing the four-time Pro Bowl guard appear 79th overall on this year’s version — even if he should be higher. Ozzie Newsome is in a tough spot with Yanda and Kelechi Osemele both scheduled to become free agents after the 2015 season. If you can only sign one — the Ravens believe young linemen John Urschel and Robert Myers could be starters in the near future — conventional wisdom might say to keep the younger Osemele, but would Baltimore really let the best guard in the NFL and one of the better players in franchise history leave? It isn’t an easy call as Yanda turns 31 in September, but his play has shown no signs of slowing down and he’s the leader of an offensive line that was very good in 2014.

2. Is it just me or do you think the Orioles regret not trading Brian Matusz in the spring? It’s been a difficult start for the lefty specialist, who sports a 3.77 ERA that doesn’t tell the story of just how ineffective he’s been. Matusz owns a 5.85 Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP) mark, is walking as many hitters per nine innings as he’s striking out (6.3), and has allowed an .864 on-base plus slugging percentage against right-handed hitters, which includes 10 walks in 41 plate appearances. After a two-hour rain delay on Thursday, Matusz entered to face a lineup that sported six left-handed hitters and could have given the Orioles a lift by handling a couple innings. Instead, he labored through a 39-pitch frame by giving up two runs, three hits, and a walk. Meanwhile, right-hander Ryan Webb sports a 1.42 ERA for Cleveland after the Orioles elected to jettison him at the start of the season.

3. Is it just me or are you interested to see how John Harbaugh handles the new extra-point rule? Despite expressing my skepticism over how much the changes will really impact the game, I am intrigued to see how the Ravens coach approaches the new rules from a strategic standpoint considering he hasn’t been afraid to go against the conventional — and ultraconservative — nature of many NFL coaches as we saw with his key decision to go for it on fourth down in his own territory in Miami last season. Speaking to reporters after delivering the commencement address at Stevenson University on Thursday, Harbaugh endorsed the changes and believes they will lead to more two-point conversions, particularly when weather conditions are harsh. Of course, it certainly helps that he has one of the best kickers in the league to handle what will now become 33-yard extra points.

4. Is it just me or does Buck Showalter need to rethink the heart of the order? No, this isn’t a rant about Chris Davis striking out way too much — you don’t need me to tell you that — but it’s a look at Delmon Young, who has hit fourth in nine of the Orioles’ last 13 games. On the surface, Young’s .287 average is respectable, but his .330 slugging percentage is lower than the likes of struggling hitters such as Alejandro De Aza and Steve Pearce. Young’s lack of patience at the plate isn’t helping with only a 2.1 percent walk rate. This isn’t supposed to be a knock on Young as much as it shows how underwhelming the Orioles have been at the corner outfield spots, which has forced him to become an everyday player. Young is a better fit as a part-time player and pinch hitter, but he’s already played more innings in the field in 2015 than he did all last season, something that isn’t helping the Baltimore defense, either.

5. Is it just me or should the Ravens take a suggestion or two from the Uni Watch assessment of their uniforms? I don’t shy away from being a uniform geek as I enjoy using the “#FashionTweets” hashtag on Twitter and I generally like the Ravens’ duds, but the subtle tweaks suggested by Paul Lukas wouldn’t be bad ideas. The black pants that have become a major part of home and away uniform combinations could use a purple and white stripe on the sides similar to what we saw in 1997 (see below) before the black pants disappeared for years. More than that, I’d like to see the Ravens bring back the black and purple striped sock design worn before changing to the current — and boring — solid black ones in 2004. I admire the organization for making few uniform changes since 1999, but a couple tweaks would freshen up the look, especially if they insist on wearing black pants so often.



BALTIMORE - DECEMBER 28:  Jamal Lewis #31 of the Baltimore Ravens leaves Dewayne Washington #20 of the Pittsburgh Steelers in his wake as he goes 26 yards for a first quarter touchdwon to give the Ravens a 7-0 lead over the Steelers during NFL action on December 28, 2003 at the M and T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)


Comments (1)