Tag Archive | "Buck Showalter"

Orioles name Coolbaugh as new hitting coach

Tags: , , , , ,

Orioles name Coolbaugh as new hitting coach

Posted on 19 December 2014 by Luke Jones

The Orioles announced the hiring of new hitting coach Scott Coolbaugh on Friday night to complete manager Buck Showalter’s coaching staff for the 2015 season.

The 48-year-old was interviewed by Showalter and vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson earlier in the day and will leave the Texas Rangers organization where he spent the last eight years. He was most recently the Rangers’ minor league hitting coordinator, but he spent parts of two seasons as their major league hitting coach from 2011 through 2012.

In 2012, the Rangers led the major leagues in runs scored and ranked second in the American League in total bases and batting average.

Showalter is familiar with his new hitting coach dating back to his days with the Arizona Diamondbacks when Coolbaugh served as a player, coach, and manager in their minor-league system. Coolbaugh also worked closely with Chris Davis in Texas and is held in high regard by the Orioles first baseman.

Originally selected by Texas in the third round of the 1987 amateur draft after a standout career at the University of Texas, Coolbaugh played in 167 major league games and was a career .215 hitter over four seasons with Texas, San Diego, and St. Louis. He also spent two years playing in Japan.

He is the older brother of the late Mike Coolbaugh, who died after being struck by a line drive while serving as the first base coach in a minor league game in 2007.

Coolbaugh replaces Jim Presley, who was reassigned by the organization earlier this offseason due to personal reasons.

Comments (0)

Orioles first baseman Davis receives approval for Adderall

Tags: , , , ,

Orioles first baseman Davis receives approval for Adderall

Posted on 16 December 2014 by Luke Jones

The Orioles hope first baseman Chris Davis can bounce back from a nightmarish 2014 campaign that ended with him being suspended 25 games for testing positive for Adderall.

It now appears that he’s been approved to use the drug for the 2015 season. Manager Buck Showalter told reporters Tuesday that Davis recently told him that he received a therapeutic use exemption from Major League Baseball to use the drug commonly prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Davis reportedly had an exemption to use the drug when he was a member of the Texas Rangers, but it’s believed that growing concern over the high use of Adderall has led to baseball creating a more stringent process for issuing approval in recent years. Roughly 10 percent of players on 40-man rosters in the major leagues presented notes from doctors for Adderall use last year.

Even if the newly-secured exemption may bring some closure to the disappointment of last season, trying to determine how much Adderall might impact Davis’ performance is difficult. He allegedly didn’t have an exemption to use it in 2013 when he hit a franchise-record 53 home runs. In contrast, he tested positive for the second time in his career — the first failed test reportedly came when he was still a member of the Rangers and didn’t carry a suspension — in the midst of a season in which he hit .196 and saw his long-ball total fall to 26.

The 28-year-old still has one game remaining on his 25-game suspension that began on Sept. 12 and made him ineligible for the Orioles’ 2014 postseason run.

Entering his final season before hitting free agency, Davis will look to prove he’s more like the player who was the major league home run king in 2013 and not the player who struggled throughout 2014 and saw his season end in disgrace. The Orioles would gladly take a compromise resembling his first full season with the Orioles in 2012 when he hit .270 with 33 homers, 85 runs batted in, and an .827 on-base plus slugging percentage.

Davis posting numbers in that neighborhood would go a long way in helping replace the void left behind by Nelson Cruz, who departed via free agency earlier this month to sign a four-year, $57 million contract with Seattle.

Comments (0)

Will trust become issue between Duquette, Angelos?

Tags: , , , , ,

Will trust become issue between Duquette, Angelos?

Posted on 08 December 2014 by Luke Jones

After Orioles owner Peter Angelos made his stance perfectly clear on what he expects to be a long future for Dan Duquette in Baltimore, the executive vice president of baseball operations didn’t exactly squash the rumors and reports linking him to the Toronto Blue Jays on Monday.

Speaking to reporters gathered in San Diego for the MLB winter meetings, Duquette reaffirmed what he said Sunday about being under contract with the Orioles, but his words did little to negate reports of him being interested in becoming the new president and chief executive officer of the Toronto Blue Jays. The 56-year-old is under contract with Baltimore through the 2018 season, but the Blue Jays position would represent the kind of promotion any general manager around baseball would be intrigued to at least explore.

“I’m here with the Orioles, and my focus is with the Orioles and helping the Orioles put together the strongest team that they can have in 2015,” Duquette told reporters Monday afternoon. “We have a lot of the pieces here. We have a good farm system, we have established people in the big leagues and we have a good pitching staff, so to me it’s really a matter of adding some pieces and we can contend again.”

According to the Toronto Sun, Paul Beeston is expected to remain in the position through the 2015 season, so it’s a mystery why the Blue Jays would be reaching out to potential replacements at this early stage. It’s believed that Toronto hasn’t requested permission to talk to Duquette about the position, and Angelos made it clear in interviews with local media Sunday that the Orioles won’t be willing to “relinquish” their rights.

It isn’t difficult to understand either side’s position, regardless of whether there are real legs to Duquette being a top candidate for the Blue Jays job. In any career field, you can understand a person being interested in the possibility of a lucrative promotion — even if they’re happy with their current job. By all accounts, Duquette has been happy in Baltimore and appreciative of the long-term commitment, but the opportunity to be in charge of all facets of an entire organization — not just baseball operations — has to be intriguing.

On the flip side, the Orioles can’t appreciate the timing of the news on the eve of the winter meetings, a critical juncture in the offseason when they’re trying to make signings or trades to improve your club. And it was the Orioles who hired Duquette after he spent nearly a decade away from the majors and then Angelos offered him a six-year commitment after only one year on the job.

It may be considered industry protocol to allow an executive to interview for a promotion, but how far does that go when you’re already deep into the offseason and that promotion is potentially coming with a division rival?

Even if the talk of the last couple days doesn’t lead anywhere, it’s fair to wonder if the trust between Duquette and Angelos will be harmed moving forward.

Duquette deserves plenty of credit for the work he’s done in his three years with the Orioles, but will his heart be in finishing the job of building a championship club if the organization ultimately denies him permission to at least explore the kind of promotion that doesn’t appear to be available with the current ownership structure in Baltimore?

And by all accounts, Angelos has put his trust in Duquette to run the baseball side of the organization without any significant whispers of the owner meddling. The decision to let outfielder Nick Markakis — one of Angelos’ favorites — leave via free agency appeared to be a prime example of Duquette’s autonomy, but would his flirtation with the Blue Jays prompt the owner to rethink that trust and that long-term commitment he made prior to the 2013 season?

With so many needs to address on the field between now and Opening Day, the Orioles hardly needed their infrastructure to come into question at the start of one of the more important weeks of the winter.

You can only hope there isn’t long-term fallout, regardless of the outcome.

Comments (0)

Cold, hard numbers prevail over emotion with Markakis’ departure

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Cold, hard numbers prevail over emotion with Markakis’ departure

Posted on 03 December 2014 by Luke Jones

The Orioles faced difficult free-agent decisions entering the offseason after winning their first American League East title in 17 years.

The anticipated departures of slugger Nelson Cruz and shutdown lefty reliever Andrew Miller certainly hurt from an on-field standpoint, but both were hired guns for the 2014 season with little emotional attachment.

But longtime right fielder Nick Markakis?

That one hurts. It hurts a lot.

It stings fans, teammates who adore him and respect his everyday approach, and manager Buck Showalter, who has often said Markakis is the kind of player whose value isn’t fully felt until you don’t have him anymore.

That sentiment now becomes reality, and we’ll learn how true the manager’s words ring.

The organization’s longest-tenured player departing to sign a four-year, $44 million deal with the Atlanta Braves on Wednesday hurts as much as any Oriole to leave via free agency since longtime ace Mike Mussina joined the New York Yankees 14 years ago. After making his home in Monkton, Markakis was supposed to spend his entire career with the Orioles.

One of the lasting images of a wonderful 2014 season was watching Markakis, after enduring years of losing in Baltimore, celebrate the Orioles’ first division title since 1997 when they clinched in mid-September. After he could only watch the Orioles in the 2012 playoffs because of a season-ending thumb injury sustained a month earlier, the 2003 first-round pick finally earned his first taste of postseason play in his ninth major league season.

So, how did it get to this point after nearly everyone assumed that Markakis would be back?

Both local and national outlets reported a month ago that the Orioles and Markakis were working toward a four-year deal in the neighborhood of what the Braves ultimately paid the veteran outfielder. Concerns over a herniated disc in his neck discovered in 2013 reportedly prompted the Orioles to hedge on a guaranteed fourth year as the weeks progressed while Atlanta offered no such trepidation in bringing Markakis back to his home state.

Frustrated fans will understandably question the Orioles’ loyalty in how they negotiated and in ultimately failing to retain their longest-tenured player, but how much responsibility should Markakis hold? If he were truly committed to staying, why not sign a month ago when a similar offer was allegedly on the table instead of holding out for more and giving the Orioles the opportunity to rethink their position?

For as much as Markakis has been valued for his durability and consistency throughout his tenure in Baltimore, let’s not pretend the $30 million he earned in his final two seasons with the Orioles was reciprocated with similar value in production.

And that’s when we begin to view Markakis as the fascinating case study of weighing the old-school “gamer” against the cold, hard numbers he produces.

A look at the negative reaction from players via social media in the hours after the announcement suggests how unpopular the move will be in the Orioles clubhouse. Though a quiet man who doesn’t draw attention to himself, Markakis was a prime example of the club’s sum being better than its parts over the last three winning years. He plays the game the right way and is admired by teammates and fans alike.

But how much can and should you pay for those intangibles?

Assessing his value based solely on what shows up in the box score, Markakis likely isn’t worth close to $44 million over the next four seasons. In fact, observers with no apparent agenda are already saying the Braves will wildly regret investing so much in an outfielder whose numbers have declined over the last couple years.

Though he never developed the home run power some projected him to earlier in his career, Markakis averaged more than 65 extra-base hits per year from 2007 through 2010. He’s averaged just under 42 in each of the four years since, with only 34 in 160 games in 2013. What was once a gap hitter who regularly hit more than 40 doubles per year has become much more of a singles hitter — with little speed — in recent years.

His slugging percentage has dipped below .400 in each of the last two seasons, and he has only posted an on-base plus slugging percentage above .756 once in the last four years — his injury-abbreviated 2012 campaign when he produced an .834 OPS in only 471 plate appearances. Though a very good and dependable right fielder with a strong arm that resulted in him winning his second Gold Glove in 2014, Markakis’ range in right field has declined and figures to get worse over the next four years.

Those numbers aren’t presented to suggest Markakis no longer has any value as his durability, leadership, and work ethic can’t easily be quantified and will certainly be missed in addition to what he can still bring with the bat. But the numbers do confirm there is strong evidence to suggest he’s not worthy of a four-year investment after already showing substantial decline in recent seasons.

Only time will tell if the Orioles regret their decision based on how effectively they’re able to replace their longtime right fielder and on how he plays in his new home. It’s quite possible executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette made the responsible call, but that will only matter if the Orioles find a quality replacement at the top of the order and in right field to continue the momentum of three straight winning seasons and a 2014 division title.

That will be easier said than done based on what options are available on the open market unless they plan to overpay some other player after drawing a line in the sand with the longest-tenured member of the organization.

The numbers and projections certainly shouldn’t be ignored, but baseball isn’t played in a vacuum, either. Markakis will be missed by teammates and fans alike, but the cold, hard numbers ultimately prevailed.

Markakis wasn’t the biggest or only reason why the Orioles have won over the last three years, but he has been a significant part of what they’ve done. He’s been one of their rare hitters to work counts and get on base — major weaknesses for the club despite their winning record — and one of their most influential presences in a clubhouse that’s been harmonious under Showalter.

Despite the disappointment and the frustration felt by many over the lifelong Oriole’s departure and the questions it creates, four months remain before Opening Day. Duquette deserves some benefit of the doubt after a very rocky start to the offseason in which two key everyday players have bolted.

But the Orioles have a lot of work to do to appease both a shaken fan base and an unhappy clubhouse.

Comments (2)

Orioles searching for new hitting coach to replace Presley

Tags: , , , ,

Orioles searching for new hitting coach to replace Presley

Posted on 25 November 2014 by WNST Staff

After previously anticipating his entire coaching staff would return for the 2015 season, Orioles manager Buck Showalter must now find a new hitting coach.

Reportedly citing personal reasons, Jim Presley will be reassigned after four seasons as the hitting coach in Baltimore. The Sun first reported the news on Monday as the Orioles have already begun the search for his replacement.

The 53-year-old Presley had one year remaining on his contract as the Orioles led the major leagues in home runs for the second straight year. In 2014, they finished eighth in the majors in runs scored, ninth in batting average, and 17th in on-base percentage.

MASN reported the Orioles interviewed minor league hitting coordinator and former major leaguer Jeff Manto for the position on Monday.

Comments (0)

Buck pose

Tags: , , , , , , ,

O’s END YEAR WITH RECOGNITION

Posted on 16 November 2014 by Tom Federline

Ok, so it’s not a World Series appearance. At least a few of the Orioles were rewarded with accolades due them. Being recognized with four major personal awards cannot compare with the ultimate team award, but hey, not a bad take home. The O’s had three key players out for the stretch run and playoffs. Against the odds, the boys almost made it. There was Orange fever in October and that alone felt pretty good.

The bad news……The Orioles fell short. They collapsed against a team on a roll. So, what’s another year? We’ve only been waiting 31 years to reclaim the title of World Series Champs. We’re O’s fans, we’re used to it. Actually, I’m tired of waiting. At least we haven’t waited as long as Chicago Cub fans.

The good news…….recognition. For me, it saved the season. Three O’s taking home Gold Glove awards and finally Buck-Buck getting his due with Manager of the Year. I wasn’t expecting Hardy. Thought he made to many errors. Jones is a “voters” favorite. And Markakis, the best fielder in the bunch, simply rocked the league with a 1.000 fielding percentage. I thought they were going to go with the Royals manager, banking it on their one month run and WS appearance. I was pleasantly surprised when they actually gave the award to the manager who deserved it.

As you could have guessed, I watched and errupted when they announced Markakis as the Gold Glove winner for right field. Not there should have been any doubt, but he has been “denied” before. They actually got it right this year. You play in 90%-plus of the games and are charged with NO errors – you deserve the Gold Glove. This was his second. He should have five (5) of them. He is and has been the best right fielder in baseball over the past 8 years. Read my past November blogs for support data. SIGN MARKAKIS!

“J….J….Hardy!”, deserved it. You think the announcement of his name by the fans, will continue like that into next year? It was cool. But, we should do it for the entire line-up. That would be cooler. Annnnnd only during the playoffs. Hardy has one of the best guns in the league. His relay to home from the outfield is unmatched. There is a sense of security when the ball is hit his way. Kind of like when the ball was hit to Cal – more than likely there is going to be an out. It did appear his back problems were worse than divulged to the public. Hopefully he can get that under control, without surgery. J….J…Hardy, signed.

“Jonesy”, is the glue in center. 155 games this year. He shows up, he’s in the line-up, he rarely takes a play off. I believe he was rewarded for those qualities versus having the best fielding percentage and projecting “flashy” efforts. That double play he turned, taking away that home run then nailing the guy at second, was a Top 5 “Web Gem” of the year. His arm is deceivingly strong. Team captain – Adam Jones, signed.

Buck-Buck, the consummate team leader. Steadfast in his approach. Has the respect of his players and his peers. He just needs a couple more “gold nuggets”. He was rewarded his third Manager of the Year Award. With three different teams, each one 10 years apart. “I know I won’t be around for another one in 10 years.” The Orioles and Baltimore appear to be Buck’s swan song. The Orioles organization and fan base is fortunate that we have him. It appears that Buck-Buck is happy here. He is quite the fit with this town. Buck appreciates the fan base and opportunities the front office has afforded him. He has something to work with. He is a fundamentalist.

The O’s either do it with this guy or I feel we may be waiting in a time frame more in the line with those Chicago Cubs fans.

The O’s covet 2 of the best outfielders in baseball, arguably the best shortstop and hands-down, the best Manager. Those four Orioles are solid, “Solid as a Rock” – Ashford and Simpson. Hopefully the rock is not chiseled away before we can get one more World Series Championship in my lifetime. We should count our blessings. True Oriole fans have always known the amount of talent showcased on field these past few years. Finally, the baseball world has woken up and threw some recognition the Orioles Way. Get a starter. Sign Andrew Miller. Dump Cruz. Congrats to the backbone of the Birds (minus Weiters). If Weiters had been playing, the O’s would have had 4 Gold Glove winners. Sarasota can’t come soon enough. Let’s Go O’s!

D.I.Y.
Fedman

Comments (2)

Showalter named 2014 AL Manager of the Year

Tags: , , ,

Showalter named 2014 AL Manager of the Year

Posted on 11 November 2014 by Luke Jones

After guiding the Orioles to 96 wins and their first American League East division title in 17 years, Buck Showalter was officially named 2014 AL Manager of the Year Tuesday night.

Receiving 25 of 30 first-place votes from the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, Showalter finished ahead of fellow finalists Mike Scioscia and Ned Yost to win the third Manager of the Year award of his career. The 58-year-old also won in 1994 with the New York Yankees and 2004 while managing the Texas Rangers, but some regarded 2014 as possibly Showalter’s finest managerial job.

Losing All-Star catcher Matt Wieters and All-Star third baseman Manny Machado to season-ending injuries and 2013 home run king Chris Davis to a 25-game suspension for amphetamine use, Showalter and the Orioles didn’t blink as they pulled away from the rest of the division in August to win the AL East by 12 games. An expert at manipulating his roster, Showalter received meaningful contributions from career journeymen such as Steve Pearce as well as longtime minor leaguers like rookie catcher Caleb Joseph.

Though voting was completed at the end of the regular season, Showalter also guided the Orioles to their first postseason series win since 1997 before they were swept by the Kansas City Royals in the AL Championship Series. This was the fourth different club he’d taken to the playoffs and second time he’d made it with the Orioles.

Showalter has 1,259 career wins in 16 seasons as a major league manager, third on the active list. He is 377-328 in five seasons as the Baltimore skipper since being named the 19th manager in club history on Aug. 2, 2010. From the day he arrived in Baltimore, Showalter began changing a losing culture that had persisted for more than a decade and led the 2012 Orioles to the AL wild card, ending a stretch of 14 consecutive losing seasons. The Orioles have now posted three consecutive winning season for the first time since 1992 through 1994.

He becomes the third manager in franchise history to be named AL Manager of the Year, joining Frank Robinson in 1989 and Davey Johnson in 1997.

Comments (1)

Showalter named finalist for AL Manager of the Year

Tags: , , ,

Showalter named finalist for AL Manager of the Year

Posted on 04 November 2014 by Luke Jones

After guiding the Orioles to their first division championship since 1997, Buck Showalter was named one of three finalists for the Baseball Writers’ Association of America’s American League Manager of the Year award.

The winner will be announced on Nov. 11 as Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia and Kansas City Royals manager Ned Yost were named the other finalists on Tuesday. Voting was completed at the end of the regular season, meaning the playoffs do not factor into the decision.

The Orioles won 96 games in 2014 and advanced to the AL Championship Series for the first time since 1997 before they were swept by Kansas City. Baltimore swept the Detroit Tigers in the AL Division Series.

Showalter was named a finalist two years ago when the BBWAA named Oakland’s Bob Melvin as the winner. The Orioles manager previously received the honor in 1994 when he managed the New York Yankees and in 2004 when he was the skipper of the Texas Rangers.

Last month, Showalter finished second to Scioscia in this year’s Sporting News AL Manager of the Year award by one vote.

Comments (0)

How far should Orioles go to re-sign Markakis?

Tags: , , , , , ,

How far should Orioles go to re-sign Markakis?

Posted on 28 October 2014 by Luke Jones

It’s no secret that the Orioles want to keep Nick Markakis.

The organization’s first-round pick in 2003 and the regular right fielder since 2006, Markakis is the longest-tenured Oriole and offers some value that can’t be easily measured as a longtime leader in the clubhouse. But even as executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette engages in contract talks to keep the soon-to-be 31-year-old in Baltimore for the 2015 season and beyond, everyone has a price and determining Markakis’ overall value is a tricky proposition.

It was apparent a couple years ago that the Orioles weren’t going to exercise Markakis’ $17.5 million mutual option for 2015. Even as a favorite of manager Buck Showalter and his teammates, the right fielder’s numbers have declined in recent years as 2013 was his worst season and he still only produced a .729 on-base plus slugging percentage this year. He’s hit below .280 in each of his last two seasons and his slugging percentage has fallen below the .400 mark in back-to-back years as he doesn’t provide the same gap power he did as a hitter who once averaged 45 doubles or so.

A simple look at his numbers over the last four years — save a productive 2012 that was limited to 102 games due to injuries — suggests the Orioles should attempt to find an upgrade in right field, but it isn’t quite that simple with a player like Markakis. This winter’s crop of free-agent outfielders offers few options as good as Markakis, let alone better.

That reality not only means it would be challenging to find a player of his caliber, but demand could be substantial in the open market, further driving up his price. The Orioles could make the $15.3 million qualifying offer that would drive down demand from other teams who would then forfeit a draft pick to sign him, but Markakis could simply accept the qualifying offer — in addition to his $2 million buyout — and essentially be back where he was with the original mutual option.

Internal options to replace Markakis in right field include Steve Pearce and a variety of fourth-outfielder types such as David Lough, Alejandro De Aza, and 25-year-old outfield prospect Dariel Alvarez unless you’re going all in to re-sign slugger Nelson Cruz to a long-term contract.

So, how much is Markakis really worth?

The general consensus is that a win costs approximately $6 million on the open market and Markakis has averaged just over two wins above replacement (WAR) per season over the last five years if you eliminate a very productive 2012 cut short by injuries and a horrendous 2013, the two clear outliers in that period of time. If we’re to assume Markakis continues to be a 2.0 WAR player over the next few years — optimistic, but not unreasonable for a player in his early 30s — that would put him in the neighborhood of earning $12 million per year in a vacuum.

Of course, that’s a statistically-driven monetary value that doesn’t consider the intangibles that Markakis brings that can’t be easily quantified or the supply and demand of the open market in any given offseason.

What does each side expect from the other? Do the Orioles want Markakis to take a hometown discount after signing shortstop J.J. Hardy — who’s been a 3.65 WAR player per year since 2011 and is only slightly older — to a reasonable three-year, $40 million contract with a vesting option? Does Markakis expect the Orioles to split the difference between what the numbers suggest he’s worth per year and the $17.5 million option for 2015 that they declined? Does he expect to be paid as much as or more than Hardy even though the latter has been more valuable over the last four seasons?

Even though he’s one of the few Orioles to make Baltimore his year-round home in recent years, Markakis has never had the opportunity to test the free-agent market and perhaps he’s curious to see what other teams might offer.

If you’re the Orioles, a three-year contract worth somewhere between $34 million and $38 million would be acceptable if you can’t reap the benefits of a hometown discount. Perhaps a vesting fourth-year option similar to the one Hardy received — which is reportedly based on plate appearances — would be an attractive addition, but there has been too much decline in Markakis’ production in recent years to go much higher than that in terms of years or money unless you’re perfectly fine with overpaying.

Entering the 2015 season at age 31, Markakis should have plenty of solid baseball ahead of him, but the last five years suggest the best you’re reasonably going to get from him is worth roughly $12 million per year on the open market and that’s assuming he doesn’t decline further. Of course, his value isn’t based solely on the numbers, but you have to be careful not to overpay for intangibles and sentimentality.

Replacing Markakis wouldn’t be easy in terms of finding a leadoff hitter and replacing his leadership in the clubhouse, but the Orioles shouldn’t overpay for those qualities, either, with other players and other needs to address this offseason and in the coming years.

Comments (2)

Showalter finishes second in Sporting News AL honor

Tags: , , , ,

Showalter finishes second in Sporting News AL honor

Posted on 21 October 2014 by Luke Jones

After guiding the Orioles to their first American League East title and AL Championship Series appearance since 1997, manager Buck Showalter finished second for the Sporting News’ AL Manager of the Year award on Tuesday.

Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia won the award after guiding his club to the best record in baseball with 98 wins. Voting was done by major league managers prior to the start of the postseason with Scioscia receiving six votes and Showalter getting five. Seattle Mariners skipper Lloyd McClendon finished third with three votes.

Washington Nationals manager Matt Williams won the NL honor after guiding his club to the best record in the Senior Circuit.

“You know what those [awards] are? That’s which team surprised the most,” said Showalter last week when asked about the possibility of winning. “If you had a vote from managers and coaches, you’d see a whole different guy get it every year. That’s all a reflection on your players and how good they played and how much they surprised people. Sometimes, the best jobs are done when you’re supposed to win. That’s why I have so much respect for those guys.

“I’d like to have that next year. I’d like to have us expected to win.”

Showalter won the publication’s AL honor in 2012 after guiding the Orioles to a 93-69 record and their first postseason appearance in 15 years. However, he lost out to Oakland manager Bob Melvin that year in the Baseball Writers’ Association of America’s vote, which is typically recognized as the most prestigious award.

The BWAA will announce its Managers of the Year on Nov. 11.

Comments (0)