Tag Archive | "Buck Showalter"

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Orioles officially place Davis on DL with oblique strain

Posted on 14 June 2017 by Luke Jones

An Orioles season spiraling out of control took another bad turn Monday with Chris Davis suffering a strained right oblique in the series opener against the Chicago White Sox.

The first baseman was officially placed on the 10-day disabled list prior to Wednesday’s game after being diagnosed with a Grade 1 strain. The Orioles selected the contract of first baseman and outfielder David Washington to take his place on the 25-man roster and shifted Rule 5 outfielder Anthony Santander (right forearm strain) to the 60-day DL to clear a spot on the 40-man roster.

It’s been a frustrating season for Davis, who currently leads the majors with 95 strikeouts and is hitting just .226. He leads the club with 14 home runs, but his .781 on-base plus slugging percentage is his lowest since 2014.

These types of injuries often sideline a player for a month or two, but Davis missed only two weeks with an oblique issue in 2014. Of course, he dealt with lingering effects and hit only .184 for the rest of that campaign.

In Davis’ absence, rookie Trey Mancini has made the first two starts at first base while Trumbo and Washington could also receive time there.

Washington’s promotion came as a surprise with veteran Pedro Alvarez currently at Triple-A Norfolk, but the former St. Louis Cardinals farmhand has batted .291 with 10 home runs, 16 doubles, and an .861 OPS for the Tides. The 26-year-old was making his major league debut as the designated hitter in Wednesday’s game against the White Sox.

Manager Buck Showalter said outfielder Seth Smith was unavailable Wednesday because of an undisclosed injury. Hyun Soo Kim was leading off and playing left field for a Baltimore club trying to snap a six-game losing streak.

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Twelve Orioles thoughts following 6-1 loss to White Sox

Posted on 14 June 2017 by Luke Jones

With the Orioles dropping their sixth straight game in a 6-1 final against the Chicago White Sox, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Matt Davidson’s grand slam in the sixth inning finished it off, but the Orioles stranded a runner in scoring position in each of their five turns at the plate leading up to that. Big opportunities were there with Manny Machado and Mark Trumbo each failing to capitalize twice.

2. Alec Asher walking Todd Frazier to load the bases with no outs in the sixth should have marked the end of his night. Understanding he has an undermanned bullpen, Buck Showalter still could have provided therapy for a battered rotation by attempting to preserve some semblance of a good outing.

3. Speaking of the Orioles bullpen, how exactly does it line up with Darren O’Day having joined Zach Britton on the disabled list last week? I suppose never coming close to having a lead late in the game alleviates that problem.

4. Derek Holland deserves some level of credit for allowing only one run over six innings, but the Orioles expanded the strike zone a lot in some important at-bats to help him out.

5. It was fitting that Davidson’s grand slam came after Welington Castillo just missed barreling one that would have been the go-ahead two-run home run in the top half of the inning. So close, but so far away.

6. Asher pitched well the first time through the order, but he struggled in his second and third  encounters with the middle of the Chicago lineup. His best role would be middle relief as he showed last month, but this is what happens when you have one trustworthy starter right now.

7. After what we’ve seen from the starting rotation over the last week, I was reluctant to make any comment about Asher’s solid performance through the first five innings. It felt like I would be jinxing a no-hitter in the ninth.

8. The Orioles fortunately have depth to endure Chris Davis’ right oblique strain that will land him on the DL, but I’m surprised to see David Washington apparently being the one to join the club. I’m not sure what that says for Pedro Alvarez at this point.

9. Adam Jones sure looked banged up in the late innings of Tuesday’s loss. He’s as tough as they come and takes pride in posting up, but it’s clear he’s still dealing with the hip and ankle issues that sidelined him last month.

10. Jimmy Yacabonis tossing two scoreless innings was encouraging to see, albeit in a 6-1 game. Showalter needs to find at least a couple more trustworthy relievers to back up Brad Brach and Mychal Givens in the current bullpen.

11. Baltimore has now allowed five runs or more in 10 straight games. Back-to-back ninth-inning comebacks against Pittsburgh last week accounted for the only victories over that stretch. At least the staff didn’t give up 10 runs again.

12. The Orioles have fallen below the .500 mark for the first time since the penultimate day of the 2015 season, but Toronto’s loss meant they would avoid falling into last place for at least one more night. So, they’ve got that going for them, which is nice.

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Orioles designate Jackson for assignment in latest bullpen shuffle

Posted on 11 June 2017 by Luke Jones

Continuing their search for fresh and effective arms in an injury-depleted bullpen, the Orioles designated veteran Edwin Jackson for assignment and optioned Stefan Crichton to Triple-A Norfolk on Sunday morning.

Baltimore recalled right-hander Logan Verrett and selected the contract of 25-year-old Jimmy Yacabonis from the Tides to fill those open spots on the 25-man roster before the finale of a three-game set with the New York Yankees.

Jackson, 33, had just been promoted from Norfolk on Wednesday, but he had struggled mightily in his three appearances, surrendering seven runs (four earned), 11 hits, two home runs, and four walks in five innings. Manager Buck Showalter expressed hope that Jackson would remain with the organization, but the right-hander was of little help to a bullpen currently without two-time All-Star closer Zach Britton and 2015 All-Star setup man Darren O’Day.

Crichton gave up six earned runs in a combined 3 1/3 innings on Friday and Saturday and now holds an 8.49 ERA in 11 2/3 innings with Baltimore this season.

Many have clamored for Yacabonis to receive an opportunity with the right-hander posting a 0.90 ERA in 30 innings with the Tides this season. However, the right-hander has struck out just 18 batters while walking 16, making one wonder how his stuff will translate to the major league level.

Despite a 5.87 ERA for the Tides this season, Verrett has fared well in his previous stints with the Orioles, pitching to a 3.38 ERA in eight innings and twice recording victories in extra-inning performances.

Coming off Saturday’s disastrous 16-3 loss to the Yankees, the Orioles rank 13th in the American League with a 4.61 team ERA.

In more encouraging bullpen-related news, manager Buck Showalter revealed that Britton will complete one more bullpen session and throw live batting practice this week. If those sessions go well, the lefty is scheduled to begin his minor-league rehab assignment at short-season Single-A Aberdeen on June 19.

Britton has spent all but a few days on the disabled list with a left forearm strain since mid-April.

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Orioles add infielder Ruben Tejada, designate Paul Janish

Posted on 06 June 2017 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — The Orioles swapped out reserve infielders Tuesday by selecting the contract of Ruben Tejada and designating Paul Janish for assignment prior to the series opener against Pittsburgh.

Tejada, 27, was acquired from the New York Yankees organization in exchange for cash considerations Sunday and will now serve as the utility infielder with Ryan Flaherty still on the disabled list with a right shoulder strain and waiting to be cleared to begin throwing again in Sarasota. Orioles manager Buck Showalter expressed hope that Janish would remain with the organization after clearing waivers.

Famously known for having his leg broken by a controversial slide from Chase Utley in the 2015 National League Division Series, Tejada has spent time with the New York Mets, St. Louis, and San Francisco in his major league career. He had been playing at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in the Yankees system to begin the 2017 season. Tejada batted just .167 in 78 plate appearances split between the Cardinals and the Giants last year.

In seven major league seasons, the right-handed Tejada has batted .252 with 10 home runs, 153 runs batted in, and a .647 on-base plus slugging percentage in 2,263 career plate appearances. He has primarily played shortstop in his major league career, but he has also seen action at second base and third base.

NOTES: Catcher Welington Castillo took batting practice early Tuesday afternoon as he continues to recover from a testicular injury sustained last week. He is eligible to be activated from the 10-day DL as early as Saturday, but it’s undetermined whether he will go on a minor-league rehab assignment or simply play in a sim game or two. … Manny Machado fell to third place among American League third basemen in the latest 2017 All-Star Game voting update. Minnesota’s Miguel Sano is now leading the way at the position while Jose Ramirez of Cleveland is second. Welington Castillo is second among AL catchers and Adam Jones ranks 12th among AL outfielders. … On Tuesday, the Orioles began a stretch of 20 straight games without a day off. They will not have another break until June 26.

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Saturday’s loss illustrates problem keeping Jimenez in Orioles bullpen

Posted on 04 June 2017 by Luke Jones

Orioles manager Buck Showalter was criticized as soon as Ubaldo Jimenez jogged in from the bullpen to pitch the top of the eighth inning on Saturday night.

Trailing only 2-1 to the Boston Red Sox, the Orioles still had a decent chance, prompting many fans to see red even before Jimenez gave up two runs to make it a three-run deficit entering the bottom of the eighth. The harsh reaction was fair with the struggling veteran now sporting a horrendous 6.89 ERA, but it illustrates how problematic stashing him in the bullpen is for a club currently without its All-Star closer or a starting rotation consistently pitching deep into games.

Asked why he used Jimenez in a one-run game, Showalter said right-handers Mike Wright and Mychal Givens were unavailable because of their recent workload and that he wasn’t going to use top relievers Brad Brach or Darren O’Day unless the Orioles had a lead. That left Jimenez and Donnie Hart as his only options to begin the eighth after Richard Bleier had already pitched two scoreless innings.

You may disagree with the philosophy of taking O’Day and Brach out of the equation there, but Showalter shying away from using his top relievers when the Orioles have trailed late in a game is hardly a new development. Especially with Zach Britton on the disabled list, the Baltimore skipper is trying to keep his best relievers fresh for the most winnable games, which will lead to some instances such as Saturday’s when he won’t use his best bullets despite facing only a small deficit. It looks strange when it happens and draws plenty of detractors, but there’s a method to his madness that’s worked extremely well for a long time with last year’s wild-card game being the ugly exception.

Yes, Showalter could have used Hart to begin the eighth, but the lefty specialist hasn’t been pitching well, either, and was only recently recalled from Triple-A Norfolk after being demoted last month for ineffectiveness. We don’t know how Hart might have fared against the top of the Boston order in the eighth, but he gave up a run in the following inning to make it a four-run deficit.

There was also the reality of Craig Kimbrel and his 0.75 ERA looming and the Orioles offense having, at most, three outs to work with before the Boston closer would be summoned. Showalter probably would have considered using O’Day — who briefly warmed up in the bullpen after Manny Machado homered to lead off the bottom of the seventh to make it 2-1 — had he known Kimbrel would give up his first two hits of the season against right-handed batters and allow a run for the first time since April 20. Managers don’t have the benefit of a crystal ball when making those decisions, however, and using your best relievers when you’re already losing and will be facing a terrific closer isn’t a great bet and will likely harm you more than help you in the long run.

Critics will say that’s waving the white flag, but you just can’t play every day of a 162-game schedule like it’s the seventh game of the World Series if you want to keep your bullpen healthy and effective.

I won’t argue if you want to blame Showalter for Saturday’s loss, but the real problem is having Jimenez in the bullpen and not having any trust that he can pitch in a semi-meaningful situation from time to time. In today’s game with such heavy bullpen use, few clubs are equipped to carry a long reliever who can neither be optioned to the minors nor be trusted to keep his team close when trailing by a run or two when other pitchers need a break. If Jimenez is relegated solely to mop-up duty, the Orioles will essentially be limiting themselves to a six-man bullpen most nights, and we already saw how that turned out earlier this season.

Asked last month about the possibility of Jimenez moving to a relief role before he was subsequently removed from the starting rotation in favor of Alec Asher, Showalter posed the question of whether that would be good for the Orioles bullpen.

We got our answer Saturday night.

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Orioles lose Castillo to disabled list with testicular injury

Posted on 31 May 2017 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — The Orioles have placed starting catcher Welington Castillo on the 10-day disabled list with a testicular injury after he took a foul ball to the groin in Tuesday’s loss to the New York Yankees.

Castillo remained in the game and returned to the clubhouse on Wednesday, but he went to the emergency room after Tuesday’s game and would not have been available for at least a couple days, requiring the Orioles to make a move to add a second catcher behind Caleb Joseph. Castillo’s injury occurred exactly one year after Joseph took a foul ball to the groin that required emergency testicular surgery.

Fortunately, Castillo isn’t dealing with an injury as severe.

“He’s got a hematoma there in his groin that we’re going to monitor and see how it progresses,” manager Buck Showalter said prior to the move being announced. “We wouldn’t use him tonight to catch. We’re trying to decide whether we’ll DL him or not, so we’ve got the possibilities in place. We’ll make a decision shortly.”

After being designated for assignment and outrighted to Triple-A Norfolk earlier this month, Francisco Pena was promoted to take Castillo’s spot on the 25-man roster. Showalter acknowledged that the Orioles might have been able to hold off on making a roster move with Castillo had emergency catcher and utility infielder Ryan Flaherty not currently been on the DL with a right shoulder strain.

Pena took the open spot on Baltimore’s 40-man roster.

In addition to missing Castillo’s work behind the plate, the Orioles will now be without one of their best hitters so far this season as the offense enters Wednesday ranked 20th in the majors in runs scored per game. Castillo is hitting a club-best .317 with four home runs, 17 runs batted in, and an .805 on-base plus slugging percentage despite having missed the first two weeks of May with right shoulder tendinitis.

In other injury-related news, center fielder Adam Jones returned to the lineup on Wednesday after missing four straight games with ankle and hip soreness.

The Orioles recalled right-handed pitcher Mike Wright and optioned right-hander Logan Verrett to Triple-A Norfolk to give themselves a fresh arm for the series finale against the Yankees.

Major League Baseball also announced that Orioles minor-league infielder — and former major leaguer — Robert Andino has been suspended 50 games for testing positive for amphetamines. He has been playing for Norfolk this season, hitting .234 with six home runs and 23 RBIs.

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Twelve Orioles thoughts following 8-3 loss to Yankees

Posted on 31 May 2017 by Luke Jones

With the Orioles suffering their eighth loss in nine games in an 8-3 final against the New York Yankees, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. The good vibes from Monday’s win vanished in a matter of nine pitches as Chris Tillman allowed a pair of solo home runs. We’ve seen Tillman straighten himself out after rough first innings numerous times in the past, but it was apparent that wasn’t happening Tuesday.

2. Tillman allowed nine of the 17 New York hitters he faced to reach base in what was easily his worst start of the year. His command wasn’t there as he either missed his spots badly or left pitches over the heart of the plate. That’s a lethal combination.

3. It was only a matter of time before the home runs allowed began to normalize as Tillman hadn’t allowed one over his first 20 1/3 innings of 2017. That was one of the lone factors keeping his ERA at a tolerable level through his first four starts.

4. Tillman showed his best average fastball velocity of the season at 90.8 miles per hour, but that’s still below his career average. He again said after the game that his shoulder feels good physically, but you wonder if this is the best we’re going to see from him moving forward.

5. Yankees starter Luis Severino deserves credit as he lowered his season ERA to 2.93 after 6 1/3 superb innings, but the Orioles scored fewer than five runs for the seventh straight game. Most of the lineup just looked lost as the quality at-bats were few and far between.

6. Manny Machado struck out four times in a game for the second time in his career as his average fell to .210. You could lower him in the order or sit him down, but perhaps a game at shortstop would get him to focus on something other than his struggles.

7. J.J. Hardy had an RBI single in the eighth, but three straight swinging strikes on Severino sliders with the bases loaded in the second were deflating as the Orioles had a chance to fight back against an early deficit. The 34-year-old shortstop has a .561 on-base plus slugging percentage.

8. Trey Mancini continues to be a bright spot as he went 3-for-3 with an RBI and a walk. His .873 OPS continues to lead the Orioles, and he continues to have impressive at-bats for a rookie.

9. Matt Holliday and Brett Gardner continue to be Oriole killers in 2017 as they each hit two home runs on Tuesday. Holliday has five homers against Baltimore this season while Gardner has four.

10. I hate the mentality of immediately blaming coaches when players aren’t performing, but hitting coach Scott Coolbaugh has to find a way to help get Machado going. The inconsistency of Chris Davis is one thing, but Machado is too good to be struggling this long.

11. Buck Showalter was asked about the possibility of shaking up the lineup Tuesday, and the time feels right to try it. With few hitting well, I’m not sure which direction to go, but maybe he should just draw names out of a hat like his mentor Billy Martin once did.

12. At some point, the obvious question needs to be asked about the Orioles’ starting rotation: How do you go about cloning Dylan Bundy?

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Twelve Orioles thoughts following 3-2 win over Yankees

Posted on 29 May 2017 by Luke Jones

With the Orioles snapping their seven-game losing streak to beat the New York Yankees in a 3-2 final on Memorial Day, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Dylan Bundy was the stopper, which is exactly what the club needed after dropping 13 of the previous 16 games. The 24-year-old registered his 10th quality start in 11 outings this season and did it against one of the best offenses in baseball. Where would the Orioles be without him?

2. The results over seven innings were paramount, but Bundy showed some of his best fastball velocity of the season, sitting comfortably around 93 mph over his final five innings and touching 95. For what it’s worth, this was about the point last year when his velocity began climbing.

3. Perhaps that velocity was the reason why Bundy relied so much on his fastball, throwing his four-seamer and two-seamer a combined 53 times against the powerful Yankees. We hear it over and over, but fastball command makes pitching so much easier and allows you to stay in attack mode.

4. Pitch efficiency allowed Bundy to complete seven innings for the fifth time this season as he had thrown only 72 pitches through six frames. A lengthy seventh prevented him from setting a new career-long outing, but he did quite a job staying out of trouble.

5. Jonathan Schoop delivered the key two-run double in the third after the Orioles had squandered some other opportunities early in the game. The second baseman added a nifty double play in the sixth inning with Bundy facing the heart of the New York order for the third time.

6. Bundy appeared to have struck him out on a questionable check-swing call earlier in the at-bat, but Aaron Judge showed off his monster power with a 429-foot home run to the bleachers on a 3-2 pitch in the seventh. He’s impressive to watch.

7. The Orioles made Jordan Montgomery throw a whopping 56 pitches over the first two innings, but they managed only one run. Give them credit for battling the lefty, but that’s the kind of result occurring far too often lately.

8. Buck Showalter would gladly take a young pitcher like Montgomery in his rotation, but his 100 pitches over 4 1/3 innings on Monday would fit right in with what we’ve been seeing in Baltimore. That’s not fun to watch.

9. The Orioles defense was trying to do too much early as Mark Trumbo cut in front of Joey Rickard on a fly ball — allowing Starlin Castro to advance to second — and Chris Davis deflected a Didi Gregorius grounder going right to Schoop. Those plays cost Bundy a run.

10. Darren O’Day is quietly looking like his old self again as he registered his fourth straight 1-2-3 inning and sixth consecutive scoreless appearance. He’s missing bats again, which the Orioles really needed.

11. That was as good as Brad Brach has looked all season as he struck out Judge and Gregorius to end the game. It isn’t coincidental that he and O’Day look much better when not having to pitch five times per week. Of course, the Orioles need to find middle ground.

12. Manny Machado struck out to lead off the bottom of the third and slammed his bat down at home plate, leaving the bat boy to go fetch it in the middle of an inning. His .216 average is concerning enough, but that wasn’t a good look at all.

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Jimenez penciled in for Sunday’s start — for now

Posted on 23 May 2017 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Those wanting the Orioles to finally move on from Ubaldo Jimenez will apparently need to wait a little longer.

But that doesn’t mean the struggling starting pitcher is in the clear, either.

Asked about his plans for the three-game series in Houston this weekend, manager Buck Showalter said the veteran right-hander’s turn was scheduled for Sunday, but he left himself wiggle room for that to change. What he doesn’t want to do is to move up the rest of his starting rotation at the expense of Jimenez or anyone else who could be in play to pitch the finale against the Astros.

The Orioles will be off on Thursday after concluding their three-game set with Minnesota on Wednesday afternoon.

“I’m going to give these guys the extra day with the off-day every chance we get, especially with Dylan [Bundy] and [Kevin Gausman],” Showalter said. “Jimenez’s next start is on Sunday, and we’ll see what happens when we get there. That’s when he’s scheduled to start again. But I’m going to keep Gausman and Dylan on that extra day with the off-day.

“We’ll take each day as it comes and see where we are as a pitching staff after each outing.”

After giving up six earned runs and squandering an early 5-0 lead in Monday’s 14-7 loss to the Twins, Jimenez now sports a 7.17 ERA, the worst among all American League pitchers with at least 40 innings pitched and second behind only San Diego’s Jered Weaver for the worst ERA in the majors. The 33-year-old is in the final season of a four-year, $50 million contract that pays him a total of $13.5 million in 2017.

In addition to the financial reality of any decision regarding Jimenez’s roster status, the Orioles would need to determine who would fill his spot in the rotation if they were to make a change. Right-handed reliever Alec Asher has registered quality starts in both of his starting opportunities this season and owns an impressive 2.33 ERA in 27 innings this season, but he hasn’t thrown more than 41 pitches in a game since May 7 and has been used in more and more key relief spots in recent weeks.

“I don’t think, on the surface, he’s that far removed from extended outings,” Showalter said. “Now, in a week or two, it probably wouldn’t be normal length if you went there. But I also think he’s shown an ability to serve a need in our bullpen, too, with Zach [Britton] being down. There’s some different challenges in our bullpen with Zach out that you need to have an optionable bullpen and you need to have some versatility down there and some guys who can pitch, physically, more than once every four days down there. It doesn’t work.”

Asked about the possibility of Jimenez moving to a relief role after Monday’s loss, Showalter alluded to the difficulty of carrying a pitcher who can’t be optioned to the minors and would need a few days to rest between outings. Of course, the Orioles probably wouldn’t be looking to use Jimenez in any close games, either, with the way he’s pitched so far in 2017.

NOTES: Needing a fresh long man in the bullpen for Tuesday’s game, the Orioles recalled left-handed pitcher Jayson Aquino and optioned right-hander Stefan Crichton to Triple-A Norfolk. Crichton threw a season-high 59 pitches and gave up two earned runs and six hits in 3 1/3 innings on Monday. … Outfielder Michael Bourn is no longer with Triple-A Norfolk as a decision looms for the organization regarding his opt-out clause. He has been temporarily transferred to Single-A Aberdeen in the meantime. … Right-handed pitcher Logan Verrett was activated by the Tides Tuesday after being on paternity leave and isn’t currently an option to be recalled by the Orioles since he hasn’t pitched since May 16. … Showalter celebrated his 61st birthday on Tuesday. The manager quipped that he was glad his birthday didn’t fall Monday when his club was blown out by Minnesota. “Remember when you thought 61 was old? It is.”

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Time for Orioles to reset bullpen — and find more quality

Posted on 17 May 2017 by Luke Jones

The idea of a six-man bullpen sounded good in theory for the Orioles.

Wanting to keep an extra position player for more flexibility off the bench late in games and having a collection of long relievers with minor-league options on the Norfolk shuttle, manager Buck Showalter tried to maneuver his way through games with at least one fewer reliever available on any given night. The plan may have worked had All-Star closer Zach Britton not re-injured his left forearm upon being activated from the disabled list in early May.

But the failure of the experiment came to a climax in Detroit Tuesday night with the kind of bullpen meltdown that’s been rare in these parts for a long time. Before putting Mychal Givens, Brad Brach, and Donnie Hart on full blast for their efforts in Detroit — and, yes, their performance was brutal — realize there are multiple reasons why the six-man bullpen hasn’t worked.

Many have fairly pointed to the lack of quantity in the bullpen, but the issue is as much about the need for more quality. You can argue that Showalter has relied too heavily on his top relievers in Britton’s absence if you want, but then you have to accept those times when he’s tried others in tight spots — like Alec Asher and Vidal Nuno during the recent four-game losing streak — and it hasn’t worked. Last year’s wild-card game in Toronto reminded us that the Orioles manager is hardly beyond reproach and maybe Darren O’Day’s recent shoulder issue should have landed him on the DL in favor of another healthy arm, but Showalter’s track record for managing a bullpen speaks for itself over the last five years and any skipper is going to look foolish when his top relievers perform like they have recently.

The Orioles need to find another bullpen arm — maybe two — who can be trusted in the sixth, seventh, or eighth inning of a close game, whether that guy is currently in their minor-league system or elsewhere. Frankly, a seventh pitcher in the bullpen isn’t going to help much if he can only be relied upon in mop-up situations.

The starting rotation hasn’t helped with Dylan Bundy being the only one offering both quality and length in his outings this season. Wade Miley’s 3.02 ERA looks good at first glance, but he’s averaging just over five innings per start and walking nearly six batters per nine innings. Kevin Gausman and Ubaldo Jimenez both have ERAs above 6.00 while Chris Tillman is still building shoulder strength in his recent return from the disabled list. It doesn’t take a pitching guru to figure out what strain that kind of a rotation can have on a bullpen.

Until scoring 21 runs over the last two games, the offense also deserved blame for scoring at a below-average level over much of the first six weeks of the season and putting so much pressure on late-inning relief. All those narrow, low-scoring victories that we saw in April and early May take their toll on higher-leverage relievers when the starting rotation is averaging 5.4 innings per start and the best closer on the planet is on the DL. This roster was constructed to have an above-average offense that will hit gobs of home runs to give the pitching some breathing room from time to time at the very least. Instead, the Orioles continue to lead the league in save opportunities.

You can only hope the recent awakening of Chris Davis and Mark Trumbo is a sign of better things to come for the offense.

Even without Britton, the rest of the bullpen is too good to continue like this. There’s little reason to think guys like Brach, O’Day, and Givens can’t return to pitching at a high level if they can stay healthy and relatively fresh, but they also have to take accountability for their own performance and rise up to get the job done without their normal ninth-inning man behind them.

The group must find a way to keep its head above water until Britton returns, which the Orioles hope will be sometime next month.

Still, you get the sense that the Orioles will need to average five or six runs per game more consistently to continue winning games in the short term. That and some reasonable improvement from the rotation would go a long way in calming the current relief crisis.

It’s time to reset the bullpen by adding a seventh man and auditioning the likes of Edwin Jackson, Stefan Crichton, and Jimmy Yacabonis for a legitimate middle-relief role. Perhaps the idea of using Mike Wright in middle relief should be revisited with several starting options ahead of him in the pecking order backing up the current rotation.

But a return to a seven-man bullpen may not matter if the group doesn’t get help from the rest of the roster.

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