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The Peter Principles (Ch. 3): How close did Angelos come to owning Baltimore’s NFL team?

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The Peter Principles (Ch. 3): How close did Angelos come to owning Baltimore’s NFL team?

Posted on 14 July 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

3. Giving Peter The Ball & Scabs

“I think they are concerned about litigation, but they feel as we do, that no one wants to litigate but one has to sometimes and the chances for success are excellent. I’m confident that Baltimore is the best applicant for an NFL franchise both from a financial and a fan standpoint.”

– Peter Angelos, May 18, 1994 to The Sun regarding Washington Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke blocking his rights to buying an NFL franchise

 

TO UNDERSTAND BALTIMORE’S INNATE YEARNING for a National Football League team is to understand what the Baltimore Ravens have meant to the town, its sports psyche and the league since returning in 1996. After winning Super Bowls in 2001 and 2013, it’s very hard to fathom that time and space between March 28, 1984 and Nov. 6, 1995 ­– when the town that participated in what became known as The Greatest Game Ever Played in 1958, the place that the Colts of Johnny Unitas, Lenny Moore, Art Donovan, Raymond Berry and Jim Parker roamed on 33rd Street in what was affectionately known as the World’s Largest Outdoor Insane Asylum – was without the NFL.

The Orioles were the toast of Baltimore for sure in the early 1990s but there was always something missing in the Charm City when there weren’t NFL games on those 12 seasons of Sundays in the fall. After a decade of high-speed pursuits by the state of Maryland, Mayor of Baltimore and then Governor William Donald Schaefer, the Maryland Stadium Authority and several bidders in 1993, the city was repeatedly turned down in the expansion process. By the time Angelos had purchased the Orioles, the NFL had found itself in a precarious situation with Baltimore sitting empty and several suitors working every angle possible to steal an existing team and essentially steal another city’s team the way the Colts were stolen off in the middle of the night in 1984 by owner Robert Irsay. And Washington Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke had tried every possible way to keep Baltimore from ever having a team again and once attempted to get a stadium built in Laurel to ensure it. Schaefer blocked Cooke and then rallied support for civic monies to be held to fund a Baltimore football stadium at Camden Yards if the NFL granted the city a franchise.

Despite all of the efforts of Schaefer and his steward Herb Belgrad, it didn’t work. In early 1995, the city of Baltimore was considered to be further away than ever in a search for a return to the NFL now that a pair of expansion teams had gone to Jacksonville and Charlotte and it was clear St. Louis was in the final stages of swiping the Rams from Los Angeles.

It was a dirty business, this franchise ownership, league gamesmanship, civic hostage taking of teams and the politics of modern sports. But Baltimore and Maryland were a unique player in the revolving door of NFL cities vying for the theft of teams from other markets where old stadia were failing to lure more revenue or ownerships were dissatisfied and looking for a bigger, better deal – led of course by Irsay’s decision to leave the land of pleasant living a decade earlier and the machinations of Al Davis in California with the Raiders.

Because of what the Orioles meant to the area and the success of the downtown revitalization spurred by the facility, Baltimore, Maryland had real money in the state coffers to fund a new stadium in the parking lot adjacent to the baseball stadium at Camden Yards. The area had always been earmarked as the site of a potential NFL team but the only problem was finding one of the existing 30 teams to find the deal too $weet to pass up. There was a lot of money to be made on an NFL franchise in Baltimore and the thought was that with many municipalities hard-lining NFL owners on the stadium issue on behalf of local taxpayers, it was only a matter of time before someone moved a team to the former home of the Colts. The insiders knew just how much money and how rich the Baltimore deal was for an owner who wanted to flee but the media and local fans were very skeptical after a decade of operating in the fog of having lost the Colts.

Once again, Angelos went into his office in Baltimore and tried to don the cape as a civic hero, flying in to save the day and bring the NFL back to his hometown.

But there were several other suitors pushing to be the winner in this grab for a football team in 1994.

Leonard “Boogie” Weinglass left Angelos’ partnership before it ever really began in September 1993 – he never invested in the team after being the original local person who was interested in the club when Eli Jacobs put it up for sale. At the time he said it was in an effort to pursue an NFL team that he hoped to call the Bombers, paying homage to the World War II planes that were built in Eastern Baltimore County at Martin Marietta.

Malcolm Glazer and his sons Bryan and Joel had been one of the three failed efforts by Baltimore to win the 1993 NFL expansion process. Now, they had set their sights on buying the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in their home state of Florida, where they lived in Palm Beach.

Baltimore beer distributors Bob Footlick and Bob Pinkner had also partnered with Robert Schulman in an effort to pursue an NFL team.

And, of course, with his August 1993 victory in the New York auction house and his leading man status as the owner of the Orioles, Angelos was funded and motivated to join Miami’s Wayne Huizenga as the second man to own an NFL and MLB franchise simultaneously. There had previously been language to disallow such a local

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This week’s #WNSTSweet16 is “going streaking”, you can bring your green hat

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This week’s #WNSTSweet16 is “going streaking”, you can bring your green hat

Posted on 22 June 2014 by Glenn Clark

Perhaps you’ve heard a rumor that we’re celebrating our 16th year as Baltimore’s sports media leader here at WNST. I know it’s been covered in most of the gossip rags, but I guess there’s one of two of you who aren’t regularly checking out “OK!” in your grocer’s aisle.

So we’re celebrating our 16th year as Baltimore’s sports media leader here at WNST. To do so, we’re looking over some of the great “water cooler” topics of the WNST era and attempting to define them by putting together lists of 16. We’re calling it the #WNSTSweet16.

We already know how awesome it is, but thanks for reminding us under your breath.

We’re into Week 25 of the year-long celebration. If you’ve missed any of the first 24 weeks, here’s a great chance for you to re-live them. (The #WNSTSweet16 is brought to you by Jerry’s Automotive.)

Week 24: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 all-time American soccer players
Week 23: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 greatest Baltimore/Washington Bullets/Wizards ever
Week 22: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 all-time greatest local high athletes
Week 21: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 greatest local lacrosse players of all time
Week 20: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 most unsung Orioles
Week 19: Gary Quill-Sweet 16 all-time Maryland horse racing moments
Week 18: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 most important picks in Ravens draft history
Week 17: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 worst draft picks in Baltimore Ravens history
Week 16: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest players in Washington Capitals history
Week 15: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 games we’ve been treated to
Week 14: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 Masters moments of the last 30 years
Week 13: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 greatest pro wrestling moments in Baltimore history
Week 12: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports goofballs/personalities
Week 11: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 local sports saints-athletes who gave back
Week 10: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 events a Baltimore sports fan must attend
Week 9: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest Baltimore college basketball players
Week 8: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 Orioles who didn’t live up to the hype
Week 7: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 most underappreciated Maryland basketball players
Week 6: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local sports “Heartbreakers”
Week 5: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local Olympic sport athletes
Week 4: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local athletes who deserved to win a championship but didn’t
Week 3: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 local sports people who “had a dream”
Week 2: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports playoff moments
Week 1: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 “debuts” in local sports history

Luke Jones is back in the saddle for this week’s list.

While the summer unofficially starts in Baltimore the first day someone says to you “it’s not the heat, it’s the humidity”; the summer has now also OFFICIALLY started here in Charm City. With summer does indeed come heat, and with heat comes hot streaks. Speaking of hot streaks, we haven’t had a “streak”-related #WNSTSweet16 yet, have we?

You see how I did that?

This week’s topic is the “Sweet 16 All-time Local Sports Streaks”.

Clearly, when you think of local sports streaks, the number 2,632 comes to mind. Yep, the 2,632 consecutive unfunny jokes Drew Forrester has made on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction”. But Cal Ripken also had a nice little streak of consecutive games played for awhile.

Drew Brees just famously broke Johnny Unitas’ record of 47 straight games with a passing TD just recently. I imagine that might just crack Luke’s list.

What else should be on the list? Joe Flacco’s five straight seasons of winning a playoff game at the start of his career? The same streak for John Harbaugh? The University of Maryland making the NCAA Tournament for a school record 11 straight years under Gary Williams?

And who doesn’t remember Wee Willie Keeler’s’ amazing 45 game hit streak for the Birds between 1896 and 1897? I remember almost every at-bat of that magical stretch myself.

What are the others? What local high school athlete had a streak of never losing a tennis match or a wrestling match, etc. Any local pro team, college team, high school athlete or individual sport athlete from the area can qualify for the list.

Luke wants your suggestions. You can leave them here in the comments on this blog post or email him (luke@wnst.net). We will be discussing the list throughout the day Monday on AM1570 WNST.net. We’d love to have you Tweet with us or discuss the topic via Facebook by using the hashtag #WNSTSweet16.

On Tuesday morning, Luke will unveil the “official” list here at WNST.net and then discuss it with Drew on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction” at 8am. He will then re-visit the list at 4pm Tuesday with Nestor on “The Happy Hours”.

Let’s head to the quad for some streaking! What are the greatest streaks in local sports history? Make your voice heard!

-G

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Ripken says Gwynn “Hall of Fame ballplayer but more importantly wonderful man”

Posted on 16 June 2014 by WNST Staff

Statement from former Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken on the death of Tony Gwynn:

This is an extraordinarily sad day. Tony was a Hall of Fame ballplayer but more importantly he was a wonderful man. Tony always had a big smile on his face and was one of the warmest and most genuine people I have ever had the honor of knowing. Like all baseball fans I will miss him very much and my thoughts are with his family today.

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Nationals select Ryan Ripken in 15th round of MLB Draft

Posted on 07 June 2014 by WNST Staff

Nationals conclude 2014 MLB First-Year Player Draft

The Washington Nationals concluded the 2014 MLB First-Year Player Draft on Saturday afternoon, selecting 30 players to round out this year’s draft class.

Over the course of the three-day draft, the Nationals selected 21 pitchers (seven left-handed pitchers, 14 right-handed), four catchers, 10 outfielders and five infielders.

Among the players the Nats selected Saturday was first baseman Ryan Ripken (Gilman) out of Indian River State College in Florida.

Ripken is the son of former Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame SS Cal Ripken. The younger Ripken was drafted by the Birds in the 20th round of the 2012 Draft before passing on the opportunity to accept a scholarship to play baseball at South Carolina.

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Pomp and circumstance: the WNST Sweet 16 Best High School Athletes in Baltimore history

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Pomp and circumstance: the WNST Sweet 16 Best High School Athletes in Baltimore history

Posted on 03 June 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

When Glenn Clark handed this list to me it came with a warning: “You’re going to upset some people this week” is how he presented the daunting task of naming the Sweet 16 High School Athletes in Baltimore history.

He was right. So many names. So many sports. So many nuances and a complete lack of a “criteria” given the generations and the benefit of a 20-20 hindsight after seeing the further life accomplishments of many local athletes. There were boys and girls, and many athletes who excelled at more than one sport.

A case can be made for hundreds of local jocks over a dozen different sports but this is the best I could do. Feel free to argue amongts yourselves or to give me a hard time in social media. This was a tough, tough list:

Now…onto No. 16…

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Here’s a little “prep” you can enjoy for this week’s #WNSTSweet16

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Here’s a little “prep” you can enjoy for this week’s #WNSTSweet16

Posted on 01 June 2014 by Glenn Clark

We’re quickly approaching the midway point of 2014-which means we’re preparing to celebrate our 16 and a half(th?) birthday here at WNST. Yes, we’re also expecting a card from you for this one.

We’ve been marking our 16th year of being Baltimore’s sports media leader by going over some of the more significant “water cooler” topics of the WNST era. Each week we attempt to “define” the topic with a list we’re calling the #WNSTSweet16 here at WNST.net.

The concept doesn’t exactly take an Ivy Leaguer to figure out. In fact, we’ve noticed that even some of the folks who listen to the “other” station in town have managed to be able to participate. Remarkable.

If you’ve missed any of the first 21 Sweet 16 lists we’ve put together this year, here’s a look back. (The #WNSTSweet16 is brought to you by Jerry’s Automotive!)

Week 21: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 greatest local lacrosse players of all time
Week 20: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 most unsung Orioles
Week 19: Gary Quill-Sweet 16 all-time Maryland horse racing moments
Week 18: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 most important picks in Ravens draft history
Week 17: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 worst draft picks in Baltimore Ravens history
Week 16: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest players in Washington Capitals history
Week 15: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 games we’ve been treated to
Week 14: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 Masters moments of the last 30 years
Week 13: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 greatest pro wrestling moments in Baltimore history
Week 12: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports goofballs/personalities
Week 11: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 local sports saints-athletes who gave back
Week 10: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 events a Baltimore sports fan must attend
Week 9: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest Baltimore college basketball players
Week 8: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 Orioles who didn’t live up to the hype
Week 7: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 most underappreciated Maryland basketball players
Week 6: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local sports “Heartbreakers”
Week 5: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local Olympic sport athletes
Week 4: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local athletes who deserved to win a championship but didn’t
Week 3: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 local sports people who “had a dream”
Week 2: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports playoff moments
Week 1: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 “debuts” in local sports history

“The Nasty One” himself is back at the helm of the #WNSTSweet16 in Week 22 and taking on another very difficult list.

I had the pleasure of speaking at Aberdeen High School last week to a group of kids that included a great number of seniors. We discussed opportunity, preparation and reaching goals after graduating from high school. For so many of them, the chat was particularly important because they were less than a week away from joining the “real world”.

It is graduation season throughout the region, which made us think about some of the great athletes who have graduated from Charm City area high schools. This stream of consciousness should probably tell you that this week’s topic is the “Sweet 16 greatest local high school athletes”.

We have certainly been blessed in this area to have had the first opportunity to see quite a number of incredible athletes here in this area. We probably could have made a list using Dunbar basketball players alone, as the likes of Reggie Williams, Reggie Lewis, Sam Cassell, Skip Wise, Muggsy Bogues, Kurk Lee, David Wingate and Keith Booth are all really good options to make this list.

Just considering basketball alone you can lump names in like Carmelo Anthony, Rudy Gay, Will Barton, Juan Dixon, Gary Neal, Marvin Webster, Kim English, Aquille Carr and more.

We haven’t even considered football players (Tommy Polley, Tavon Austin, Antonio Freeman, Keion Carpenter, Jeff Grantz), baseball players (Mark Teixeira, Gavin Floyd, some fellas named Cal Ripken and…ummm…Babe Ruth?), lacrosse players (Kyle Harrison, Steele Stanwick, Ryan Boyle, Joe Cowan, etc.) or some of the amazing female athletes (Pam Shriver, Angel McCoughtry, etc.) who did their prep work in the area.

I do not envy…in any way…the responsibility Nestor has in putting this list together. We haven’t even talked about the soccer players, wrestlers, runners, swimmers and others who are certainly also deserving of consideration. This list is going to be REALLY tough.

Nestor wants your suggestions. You can leave them here in the comments on this blog post or email him (nasty@wnst.net). We will be discussing the list throughout the day Monday on AM1570 WNST.net. We’d love to have you Tweet with us or discuss the topic via Facebook by using the hashtag #WNSTSweet16.

On Tuesday morning, Nes will unveil the “official” list here at WNST.net and then discuss it with Drew and Luke on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction” at 8am. He will then re-visit the list at 4pm Tuesday on “The Happy Hours”.

Shack Stanwick might be just the latest tremendous athlete we had the opportunity to see locally over the last school year. As it wraps up, let’s recognize the greatest we’ve ever seen. Make your voice heard!

-G

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The Peter Principles (Ch. 1): So, just how did Angelos become ‘King’ of Baltimore baseball?

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The Peter Principles (Ch. 1): So, just how did Angelos become ‘King’ of Baltimore baseball?

Posted on 19 March 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

IT WAS HOT AS HADES in that lower Manhattan federal courtroom. Jam-packed with bidders, curiosity seekers and baseball fans, the Baltimore Orioles franchise was up for grabs on August 2, 1993, and the bidding was as steamy as the air in the room once the price began to rapidly accelerate into the stratosphere.

The fact that there was any bidding at all was somewhat surprising to Peter G. Angelos, a Baltimore attorney who had begun a power play five months earlier to purchase the Major League Baseball franchise that was being sold off via an auction nearly 200 miles away from its home on the Chesapeake Bay. In the hours leading up to the auction, Angelos managed to turn his sole competitor from a previous suspended bid for the team during June into a partner. William DeWitt Jr., a Cincinnati native whose father once owned the St. Louis Browns in the 1940s and a minority investor in the Texas Rangers, joined Angelos’ celebrity-led local group from Maryland just hours before the bidding was to begin in the sweltering Custom House. DeWitt was promised a role in the operations and management of the club.

It was an amazing coup for Angelos to pull DeWitt from being a worthy, legitimate competitor into a teammate that morning, after convincing him that he’d be involved and an influential part of the eventual winning group. It was shocking that DeWitt had pulled out because several times over the previous eight months, he was convinced that he was already the winning bidder and new owner of the Orioles.

In February 1993, after six months of lengthy, arduous negotiations on a fair price, DeWitt had entered into a deal with Orioles majority owner Eli Jacobs to buy the team for $141.3 million. Jacobs, who was in his final days of semi-liquidity and quietly on the verge of bankruptcy, didn’t have the legal authority to close the deal with DeWitt once the banks seized his assets in March. Instead, the Orioles wound up at auction five months later and suddenly Angelos – with DeWitt now shockingly a member of his ownership team – believed he would emerge victorious without breaking a sweat in the summer heat of The Big Apple.

But that afternoon, after entering the courtroom in what he believed would be a rubber-stamped win, instead he found himself embroiled in a bidding war with a stranger he never strongly considered to being a worthy foil in the fray.

Jeffrey Loria, a New York art dealer and Triple-A baseball team owner, wanted badly to be a Major League Baseball owner. Baltimore native and former NFL player Jean Fugett represented a group led by TLC Beatrice, which featured a rare minority bid for an MLB franchise on that day in New York. One bidder, Doug Jemal of Nobody Beats The Wiz electronics stores, had early interest but bowed out before the steamy auction.

That August day, the bidding began at $151.25 million, which included a “stalking fee” of $1.7 million which was originally awarded to DeWitt’s team because of his vast due diligence and legal work done months earlier when he thought he had won a deal to secure the Orioles in the spring.

George Stamas, who represented Angelos’ group during the bidding process, opened the bidding at $153 million, which was seen as a good faith gesture from the combined bid with DeWitt, which could’ve been perceived as artificially deflating the sale price by judge Cornelius Blackshear. Loria, who was a stranger to the Angelos group, immediately raised it by $100,000. Stamas barked out, “One million more – $154.1!”

And for the next 30 minutes, the bids drew north from the $150 millions into the $160s. With every bid, Loria would raise by $100,000. Stamas, on behalf of Angelos, raised it by $1 million at a time. After 13 rounds of back and forth money, Angelos had the leading bid $170 million. Fugett, who had been completely silent during the auction, asked the judge for a recess.

The request was granted and the judge headed to his chambers.

And, suddenly, it got even hotter in a blazing courtroom on a sweltering day in The Big

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It’s time to honor some local sports “saints” with our #WNSTSweet16

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It’s time to honor some local sports “saints” with our #WNSTSweet16

Posted on 18 March 2014 by Glenn Clark

This one was far too tough. I’ll be on Tuesday morning at 8am to discuss it with Drew Forrester and Luke Jones. If he tells me I’m wrong, I’ll probably just agree with him.

If you need a reminder of what this week’s topic (Sweet 16 Local Sports Saints-Athletes Who Gave Back) is all about, check it out here.

If you’re someone who I left off the list, I apologize in advance. This was agonizingly difficult.

(Editor’s note: You’re going to ask me why Elrod Hendricks isn’t on the list. It isn’t an easy answer. It’s a complicated thought about the difference between Elrod the “player” and Elrod the “coach”. Elrod the coach is ABSOLUTELY part of this list-but we said the list was for “athletes.”

In the end, I should have just put him on the list. In that case, he would have been Top 5. I told you it was agonizing. Stop yelling at me.)

16. Keion Carpenter

Carpenter never played for the Baltimore Ravens, but as a Baltimore native he has shown great concern for his hometown via The Carpenter House and the fight for affordable housing for the underprivileged.

Carpenter is also involved in what seems like every youth football camp in the area, including many with Baltimore Ravens players.

(Continued on Next Page…)

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My Dinner With Peter G. Angelos (Part I)

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My Dinner With Peter G. Angelos (Part I)

Posted on 22 January 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

As I continue to gather more information and write the legacy of the Baltimore Orioles under the ownership of Peter G. Angelos, I’m stumbling onto all sorts of information, quotes and basic truths.

My book on the first 20 years of Angelos’ ownership, The Peter Principles, is coming to WNST.net in March.

I’ve only met Peter Angelos three times in my life. This was the first time in March 1997. When this video starts, I had literally just shaken hands with him less than two minutes earlier.

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Here are #WNSTSweet16 people who had a dream in Baltimore

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Here are #WNSTSweet16 people who had a dream in Baltimore

Posted on 21 January 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

These are people who’ve inspired, led, built and left or are leaving a legacy that affects people in Baltimore or elsewhere in the world. Some of them dreamed their whole lives, some had one big dream or act that keeps giving, producing and growing. Most of these “dreamers” have an eternal gift to have given something that transcends their initial efforts, legacy or life. Dreamers see the end before many see the beginning. I always think of guys like Walt Disney and the founding fathers of the United States of America, who built things.

Let’s start our list, page by page and go through our rationale and rankings. Feel free to share, feedback or comment with your own lists and ideas.

 

#WNSTSweet16 Dreamers

 

16. John Ziemann

There’s no doubt that John Ziemann had a dream of seeing the NFL back in Baltimore from 1984 through 1995 but unlike many local football fans, he actually did something about it. Something profound and beautiful and well-told by local film rock star Barry Levinson in The Band That Wouldn’t Die, Ziemann’s ability to keep the marching band of the Baltimore Colts together and see it through to the Ravens and two more Super Bowl titles makes him a dreamer who saw his vision to its fruition.

How many times did Ziemann think or hear that his band would die long before – and hell would freeze  before the NFL would return to Baltimore? The Marching Ravens tie the community and its roots back to Johnny Unitas and the Baltimore Colts of 33rd Street more than any other local tradition.

Just for the record, Carroll Rosenbloom and Bob Irsay didn’t make our #WNSTSweet16 cut. They were a part of taking the Baltimore Colts from our city. Ziemann was the loudest and most authentic part of bringing the NFL back.

See next page for No. 15

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