Tag Archive | "Cal Ripken"

Here are #WNSTSweet16 people who had a dream in Baltimore

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Here are #WNSTSweet16 people who had a dream in Baltimore

Posted on 21 January 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

These are people who’ve inspired, led, built and left or are leaving a legacy that affects people in Baltimore or elsewhere in the world. Some of them dreamed their whole lives, some had one big dream or act that keeps giving, producing and growing. Most of these “dreamers” have an eternal gift to have given something that transcends their initial efforts, legacy or life. Dreamers see the end before many see the beginning. I always think of guys like Walt Disney and the founding fathers of the United States of America, who built things.

Let’s start our list, page by page and go through our rationale and rankings. Feel free to share, feedback or comment with your own lists and ideas.

 

#WNSTSweet16 Dreamers

 

16. John Ziemann

There’s no doubt that John Ziemann had a dream of seeing the NFL back in Baltimore from 1984 through 1995 but unlike many local football fans, he actually did something about it. Something profound and beautiful and well-told by local film rock star Barry Levinson in The Band That Wouldn’t Die, Ziemann’s ability to keep the marching band of the Baltimore Colts together and see it through to the Ravens and two more Super Bowl titles makes him a dreamer who saw his vision to its fruition.

How many times did Ziemann think or hear that his band would die long before – and hell would freeze  before the NFL would return to Baltimore? The Marching Ravens tie the community and its roots back to Johnny Unitas and the Baltimore Colts of 33rd Street more than any other local tradition.

Just for the record, Carroll Rosenbloom and Bob Irsay didn’t make our #WNSTSweet16 cut. They were a part of taking the Baltimore Colts from our city. Ziemann was the loudest and most authentic part of bringing the NFL back.

See next page for No. 15

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We debut our #WNSTSweet16 list with the Greatest Local Sports debuts

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We debut our #WNSTSweet16 list with the Greatest Local Sports debuts

Posted on 07 January 2014 by Glenn Clark

On Sunday night we introduced our first #WNSTSweet16 discussion topic for 2014. As we celebrate 16 years as Baltimore’s local sports media leader, we’re looking at some of the “water cooler” topics you’ve most discussed since we first turned on the microphone.

With the debut of #WNSTSweet16, our first list focuses on just that-debuts. The Greatest Local Sports Debuts is the topic in fact. As we look over the history of Baltimore (and Maryland) sports, what single games, seasons, etc. stand out as the best of the best?

We’ve been discussing the topic here, on-air at AM1570 WNST and on social media for the last couple of days and will continue to do so. Here’s the list.

16. The inaugural season of the Baltimore CFL Colts/Baltimore CFL’s/Baltimore Football Club/Baltimore Stallions (1994)

As I look back on the first of two years of Canadian football in Charm City, what stands out most was the attendance figures for the home games.

Courtesy of Wikipedia, that’s 31,000 or more fans at EVERY home game at Memorial Stadium to watch (let’s be honest) a second rate product. It was a remarkable testament to the rabid nature of football fandom in Baltimore and further proof of the city’s worthiness of a NFL return. The team itself was quite good-including future NFL players like O.J. Brigance, Josh Miller and Shar Pourandesh as well as Canadian Football Hall of Famers like Tracey Ham and Mike Pringle. The season ended with a loss to the BC Lions in the Grey Cup, a year before the franchise would become the only American team to ever win a Grey Cup.

No. 15 next page…

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Introducing our weekly #WNSTSweet16 discussion topics

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Introducing our weekly #WNSTSweet16 discussion topics

Posted on 05 January 2014 by Glenn Clark

As you may have heard, 2014 marks the 16th year for WNST.net, a remarkable accomplishment for a sports media company that our competitors have written off time and time again during the span.

To celebrate our “Sweet 16″, we will be discussing a group of topics each week that we hope to make definitive lists for when it comes to local sports-”water cooler” type topics if you will. Every Sunday night I will introduce that week’s topic here at WNST.net. We’ll discuss the topic here, on-air via AM1570 WNST and via social media on Facebook and Twitter. Then each Tuesday morning-one WNST personality will unveil our list both here at WNST.net and on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction” at 8am with Drew Forrester and Luke Jones.

As you discuss the topic on Twitter and Facebook, use the hashtag #WNSTSweet16 to make your voice heard and your thoughts included in the debate.

The lists will be related to either something currently going on in sports or will be based on the date.

First up? In honor of the “debut” of our Sweet 16 discussions and the “debut” of the year 2014, we’re going with the “Sweet 16 Debuts in Local Sports History”.

“Debut” could mean a number of things. It could mean a first game (or day), a first season, a first at-bat, a first fight, a first week or anything else that you can spin into a “debut”. It could be a debut for a rookie or a debut for a new player or a debut for a stadium or an arena or a coach or a new team altogether. It’s wide open.

We’re calling it “local” sports debut because we want to include not only the Baltimore Orioles and Baltimore Ravens, but also Maryland, Navy, Towson, UMBC, Loyola, Morgan State, Coppin State, Johns Hopkins, the Blast and other current and former area sports teams as well as high schools and individual local athletes.

I’m handling the first list. You’ll see my post Tuesday morning at WNST.net and I’ll join Drew and Luke Tuesday morning at 8am to discuss it. We’ll tackle the list again at 4pm on “The Reality Check Driven by Jerry’s Chevrolet”.

I’ve thought about those locals who have won “Rookie of the Year” awards like Ron Hansen, Curt Blefary, Al Bumbry, Eddie Murray, Cal Ripken, Gregg Olson, Vernon Maxwell, Peter Boulware, Terrell Suggs, Ray Felix, Earl Monroe and Wes Unseld. (You probably forgot about or were completely unaware of a few of those names. I know I was!)

I’ve certainly thought about the first game in Ravens history, the first game for John Harbaugh, the first game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards and even more.

But what haven’t I thought about?

What is our list incomplete without?

Like I said earlier, I want this to be as definitive a list as possible. I don’t want to exclude anything that deserves mention. Is there an area high school athlete who blew up very quickly upon arrival? Is there a jockey who hopped on a horse for the first time at Pimlico and quickly became a household name? Who had an incredible first season for the Baltimore Thunder or Baltimore Bayhawks or Baltimore Stallions that others either forgot about or never really knew about?

I’m looking forward to taking this trip down memory lane with you. We’ll be having these conversations and making these lists every week to celebrate a “Sweet 16″.

Let me know what I need to be thinking about, Baltimore. 2014 is going to be a lot of fun.

-G

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red-sox-beards 2013

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Baseball Post Season – Unfavorable

Posted on 18 October 2013 by Tom Federline

Detroit, please stop the “Bearded Boys of Summer.” The Boston Red Sox and the beards need to go. I can dig the “team unity/bonding” deal. It can be cool. I did it and I’m sure some of you developed some quirk during your playing days to build that camaraderie among your teammates. If I want to watch bearded ones, I’ll put in a ZZ Top DVD or I’ll replay a Duck Dynasty episode from the DVR. But because it is Boston – it just turns my stomach. When it comes to baseball, no scruffy facial hair and no jewelry. Especially the pretty hemp necklaces and the metal medalions hanging off pitchers necks. I am not a Boston fan. In fact the Red Sux, Spankees and Duke basketball are inter-changeable among my most disliked sports teams.

The baseball postseason is unfavorable due to the #1 fact that the Orioles are not there. So since October 1, it has been “Anybody but the Red Sox.” Not that I really care who wins, just as long as it’s not the Red Sux. Definately a fan of the lesser budgeted teams like the A’s (and they’re out. I was also having a tough time with the Pirates – glad they made it back – just still have a bad taste from 1971 and 1979. “We are Family” – Sister Sledge, to this day is immediately turned off when heard over the radio. The Cardinals – tired of seeing them in post season. Dodgers – cool stadium and I like Don Mattinglys approach to baseball and interviews. He is probably the only Yankee I ever liked. Detroit – not a big fan of them either, they just need to stop the bearded ones.

Other post season pet peeves:
1. Cal Ripken – yes, you heard me right, Cal Ripken. He knows baseball – I do not care. Do you all remember this gem from last years O’s vs. Rangers game – “Adrian Beltre is the best defensive third baseman I have ever seen – even better than Brooks Robinson – sorry Brooksie.” That comment right there has put Cal Ripkens voice in the “not worth my time zone.” Cal is now in that elite Club along with Gary “Thorne in our side.”
2. Get the hand-held TV video cameras …..off the field! Remove the clutter from the field. No cameras, no camera crew running next to these steroid boys. The field should be off limits during the game to anyone not directly invloved with the game. It is an athletic event, not a made for tv movie. Speaking of clutter on the field……ever notice an NFL sideline? Besides the 50 assistant coaches and then the 50 assistant coaches assistants, the entourage of the 100 tv camera crew memebers, the 100 still photographers, the 200 family members and then the 200 friends of the family members, you have to wonder where do they find room for the players and EMT’s.
3. Camera angles – I am sick of the “Pitch Trax”. Is it where the ball crooses the plate or where the catcher cathes the ball? It misrepresents the actual pitch. Put the camera behind the plate and guess what? Most baseball fans are smart enough to tell wether the pitch it is outside, inside, low or high. Remember that camera angle – “back in the day”? Occasionally you may see it, but it is a rarity. You can catch real baseball coverage on MASN airings of Orioles Classics from the 60′s and 70′s.
4. No interpreters for the illegal alien pitchers. If you can’t speak English – learn. All they have to know – keep ball down, 1-fastball, 2- curveball, 3-slider, 4-change-up, get batter out, you did not earn money today – you stunk it up – leave mound, good, bad, yes, no. When you are getting paid around $50-100,000 per outing and throw a ball a couple of days a week for a few minutes or hours, you have the time to learn basic communication of the English language.
5. Mark McGwire – just go away. He is still around and involved with baseball. When they first showed the Cardinal dugout and announced the players; I was like cool – no lieing steroid boy. Then they switch over to the Dodgers dugout and AUGH, there was the deflated cheater. The numbnut Doger organization went and hired him after he got fired from the Cardinals. I guess they needed a “pass-thru” for that Puig juicer guy.

Beards, Cal Ripken, hand-held cameras/camera crews on the field, interpreters and Mark McGwire – all unfavorable and should be gone! Anything from the baseball coverage bugging you?
And to end on a positive note:
1. I dig the 5 – 8pm late afternoon games coming home from work.
2. Unrelated – check out ESPN’s “No Mas”, another good production.

Reminder – It has been thirty (30) years and counting. 30 years – that’s just wrong, man. Definately – unfavorable.

D.I.Y.

Fedman

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Ripken’s mother safe, suspect in custody after attempted carjacking

Posted on 15 October 2013 by WNST Staff

ABERDEEN, Md. (AP) — Police say a man with a handgun approached baseball great Cal Ripken’s mother in a bank parking lot in Maryland and demanded her car, but she activated a key alarm and he left.

Authorities say 75-year-old Vi Ripken wasn’t hurt Tuesday and a suspect is now in custody.

Police spokesman Lt. Frederick Budnick says Ripken entered the bank afterward to alert authorities in her hometown of Aberdeen, north of Baltimore.

The spokesman says charges are pending. He didn’t immediately identify the suspect.

Last year, Vi Ripken reported being kidnapped at gunpoint from her Aberdeen home. She returned unharmed 24 hours later. No one has been arrested in the case.

Hall of Fame infielder Cal Ripken played in 2,632 consecutive games in a 21-year career with the Baltimore Orioles.

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Ripken to be honored by Louisville Slugger

Posted on 17 September 2013 by WNST Staff

Cal Ripken, Jr. to Receive 2013 Living Legend Award from Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory

Baseball’s “Iron Man” to accept award in Louisville on November 8th

Louisville, KY – September 17, 2013 - Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory will honor Baseball Hall of Famer and Baltimore Orioles great, Cal Ripken, Jr., with its 2013 Living Legend Award on Friday, November 8th. Ripken, Jr. will be recognized during a special ceremony that kicks-off the 10th Annual Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Auction.

“Cal Ripken, Jr., has always been an inspiring ambassador for baseball and really knew how to wield his Louisville Slugger bats,” said Anne Jewell, Executive Director at Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.  “He is a true class act, a consummate teammate and one of the hardest working men in baseball.  We’re excited and honored to recognize him with our 2013 Living Legend Award,” she said.

One of the true legends of baseball, Cal Ripken, Jr., began his professional career in 1978, made it to the majors in 1981, and quickly set a new standard for shortstops. Big, strong, and durable, he displayed power at the plate, grace in the field, and unrivaled perseverance.

He earned AL Rookie of the Year honors in 1982, won the MVP award in 1983 and 1991, and received a Gold Glove in 1991 and 1992. In 1995, Cal broke Lou Gehrig’s major league record for consecutive games played (2,130). Cal voluntarily ended his streak on September 20, 1998, after playing 2,632 consecutive games.

Using a Louisville Slugger P72 model throughout most of his 21-year career, Ripken amassed 3,184 hits, including 431 home runs. He holds many major league records, including most home runs by a shortstop and highest single season fielding percentage by a shortstop (.996). He retired from baseball in 2001 after 21 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles.

Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007 with the third highest voting percentage in history, Cal Ripken, Jr., is baseball’s all-time Iron Man.

After his playing career, Ripken, Jr., has experienced great success off the diamond.  He is a best-selling author, TV analyst and President and CEO of Ripken Baseball, Inc., a company whose mission is to grow the game of baseball at the grassroots level.

Ripken Baseball owns and operates Ripken Experience youth complexes in Aberdeen, MD. And Myrtle Beach, SC. In addition, the company owns two minor league teams and Ripken Sports, a full-service design and build company that helps communities and organizations achieve their sports facility dreams.

Cal and his family established the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, in memory of their father.  The Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation helps to build character and teach critical life lessons to disadvantaged young people residing in America’s most distressed communities through baseball and softball themed programs.

“It’s a tremendous honor to be presented with Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory’s Living Legend Award.  To be recognized by Louisville Slugger and included in the company with past award recipients is very special,” said Ripken, Jr.  “Louisville Slugger has been a long-time partner of the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation and I appreciate all they do to support the Foundation in its goal to help our nation’s disadvantaged youth.  I am eagerly looking forward to accepting the award in Louisville this fall.”

Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory has produced a limited edition P72 model collector bat autographed by Ripken, Jr. Only 100 signed bats are available and the cost is $250 per bat, which includes two tickets to the invitation-only Living Legend celebration. Proceeds from the sales of these special bats will benefit the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation. For more information or to purchase a bat, please call 502-588-7271 or email giftshop@slugger.com.

Past recipients of the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Living Legend Award are Tony Gwynn (2012), Johnny Bench (2011), Ernie Banks (2010), Hank Aaron (2009), Frank Robinson (2008) and Ken Griffey, Jr. (2007).

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The Day Cal Ripken Saved Baseball

Posted on 06 July 2013 by Geoff Crawley

I used to love baseball.

Don’t get me wrong, I love it again now, but there was a time where I wanted nothing to do with it. When the owners decided that they were bigger than the game and actually cancelled the World Series in 1994 because of a collective bargaining dispute, I was done with it.

“I’m done with you baseball,” I said. “Never again. I’m done going to games, I’m done playing fantasy baseball, I’m done with it all.”

“Done,” I added.

And I was. Baseball was my favorite sport as a child. I watched games every chance I could. I played baseball in the street. (Kids used to actually do that.) It was my first love. Then, greedy owners took away the World Series. They cancelled the World Series!

Think about that for a second. Can you imagine the NFL being stupid enough to cancel the Super Bowl? Or the NBA being dumb enough to cancel the NBA Finals? Or the NHL…oh, wait, they did it too, but nobody noticed.

So in 1995, I decided that I was never watching another Major League Baseball game again. In fact, I would still be boycotting today if not for one man, on one fateful night.

That man is Cal Ripken, Jr.

The night was September 6, 1995. The night Cal Ripken, Jr. saved baseball.

It was on that night that the Orioles’ Hall of Fame shortstop broke the record that people said would never be broken: Lou Gehrig’s streak of 2130 consecutive games played. To put that in perspective, that is over THIRTEEN SEASONS of 162 games, spread out over six months per season, without missing a single one. That means, that for THIRTEEN SEASONS, Ripken never, not one time, got suspended for doing something stupid, never stayed out all night drinking and got scratched for “flu-like symptoms,” never even stubbed his toe and had to sit for a couple days.

He also, over the course of that streak, played so well that he needed to be in the lineup anyway. He was rookie of the year, two time American League MVP, and a two time Gold Glove award winner. The NINETEEN time All-Star won the All-Star game MVP twice as well, and won the Silver Slugger eight times during the streak.

Why would you ever take that kind of production out of the lineup anyway? You wouldn’t, that’s why he broke the record.

But this is not about Cal’s greatness, it’s about how he saved baseball for me. I hadn’t watched a game all year, but of course I was paying attention to this streak. It was historic. And so, on that September evening, I sat down to watch history, not baseball. My intent was to watch the game until it became official and then change the channel.

So I’m watching when Cal comes up to bat in the fourth inning and hits a home run. I had goose bumps. Then, when the game became official in the bottom of the fifth, the 2131 banner was unfurled in the outfield and the crowd erupted. The opposing team (the Angels), all of the umpires and the entire crowd stood, cheered and applauded for 22 minutes straight. It was during this ovation that it happened.

Cal Ripken, the ultimate team player, a guy who was never about himself, was practically pushed out of the dugout and told to do a lap around the field by his teammates. The crowd, somehow, got louder. As he circled the field, shaking hands with and high fiving fans, I noticed that I was crying.

This man, this incredible man, by simply acknowledging that we, the fans, are important, saved baseball for me. His going out there was totally against his character, because the last thing he ever wanted to do was to bring more attention to himself. He was all about the game. He remembered what the owners forgot the previous year, that this game, this wonderful game, is not about the money. It’s about going out there every day and trying your best for the fans that pay your salary. Cal Ripken was bigger than the game that night even if he didn’t want to acknowledge it. And he saved baseball.

It’s not the same for me, of course. It never will be. Baseball broke my heart in 1994, and it will never fully get it back. But I do love baseball again, and it started that night, as I watched Cal Ripken, Jr. remind us all what it means to love baseball. That game, that crowd, that run around the field – history itself – that is what baseball is all about.

Thanks for saving baseball, Cal.

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Reaction to the passing of Orioles manager Earl Weaver

Posted on 19 January 2013 by WNST Staff

“Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball. This is a sad day for everyone who knew him and for all Orioles fans.

Earl made his passion for the Orioles known both on and off the field. On behalf of the Orioles, I extend my condolences to his wife, Marianna, and to his family.”-Orioles owner Peter Angelos, via a team release.

“Every time I look at an Oriole, it’s going to be missing a feather now without Earl.“-Orioles manager Buck Showalter 

“Earl was such a big part of Orioles baseball and personally he was a very important part of my life and career…and a great friend to our family. His passion for the game and the fire with which he managed will always be remembered by baseball fans everywhere and certainly by all of us who had the great opportunity to play for him. Earl will be missed but he can’t and won’t be forgotten.”-Cal Ripken Jr. 

“I would say that Earl Weaver had the greatest impact on me as a baseball player-more than anyone else. He was tough to get along with and only cared about winning, but he is the reason why Oriole baseball is what is today. Earl was a genius and a Hall of Fame manager, and the closest that’s ever got to that is the man we have right now in Buck Showalter.”-Former Orioles catcher and MASN broadcaster Rick Dempsey.

“It’s a sad day for Orioles fans and all of baseball. Earl certainly was one of the greatest managers. To me, his greatest strength was his ability to get his players to focus on playing the game on a daily basis. The results were many wins, and a Hall of Fame career.”-Former Orioles OF Ken Singleton, who played for Earl Weaver from 1975-1982.

“O’s and MLB family lost a great leader yesterday. Earl Weaver wasn’t blessed with height but if u measured his HEART he was a 7 footer.

The man lived a great life. I think it should be a celebration. 82 years is a remarkable feat.”-Orioles OF Adam Jones

“[Earl] was a strange, intense but unforgettable man…a big part of my youth.”-Broadcaster and longtime Oriole fan Roy Firestone.

“It’s a sad day, obviously. Earl was a terrific manager and I have to be grateful that Earl was with us for the Legends Series and we got a chance to spend time with him for every single statue ceremony unveiling. He is terrific. His simplicity and clarity of his leadership and his passion for baseball are unmatched. He’s a treasure for the Orioles and we are so grateful we had the opportunity to work with him this year.” -Orioles Executive VP of Baseball Operations Dan Duquette

“Really sad to hear about that today.  He meant a lot to this city and to this organization.  You wouldn’t want to be anywhere else for today to spend all day with Oriole players and thousands of Orioles fans just to remember everything about him.” -Steve Johnson, Orioles Pitcher

“It was the perfect relationship. We won, he was tough, we got our World Series checks. It worked…you don’t ever forget an Earl Weaver. And not just if you were an umpire. Fans, players, everyone…Earl was about winning and that was what he did.

It’s a sad day for any of us that knew Earl but it’s also a sad day, I think, for anybody that has been involved with Orioles baseball. We were lucky to have him here because he did end up in the Hall of Fame. He managed some marvelous teams. But I think now we all share the pain of him being gone.

Earl never wanted to be your friend because I think he thought it would detract from his ability to be a manager.  But the one thing he did want to do — he let you know that he was loyal to you by putting your name in the lineup. You can’t really ask for much more than that.

One of the great stories is Mike Flanagan came up to me and said ‘One year you had pitched 5 innings. It was your second or third time out at spring training and you were running foul line to foul line. He (Earl Weaver) called me over to the bench and said you see that guy out there? And Mike said you mean Jim Palmer? He said yes, just do what he does and you will be fine here in the big leagues’. Mike would always tell me that and I almost wanted to call Flanny to tell him that Earl had passed away. But he (Earl Weaver) said if you do what he does things are going to take care of themselves. Couple of years ago up at the Hall of Fame, the night before the induction I told him that story and said one of the biggest compliments you ever paid me, not directly to me, was what you told Mike Flanagan.  He looked at me and said I just didn’t tell Flanagan, I told everybody…” -Former Orioles Pitcher Jim Palmer

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Harbaugh grateful for support of Showalter, Orioles at Thursday’s game

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Harbaugh grateful for support of Showalter, Orioles at Thursday’s game

Posted on 28 September 2012 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Enjoying their final day off before the last six games of the regular season, manager Buck Showalter and some of the Orioles took the opportunity to attend the Ravens’ 23-16 win over the Cleveland Browns on Thursday night.

What the Orioles skipper didn’t expect was the thunderous ovation he and several of his players would receive when they appeared on the M&T Bank Stadium video screen in the second half. Nearly 71,000 fans exploded into a “Let’s go O’s!” chant and provided a standing ovation as the Orioles in attendance watched the game from Cal Ripken’s suite.

“That was fun. I know the players were buzzing about it,” said Showalter, who was sitting elsewhere before deciding to stop by the suite to say hello to Adam Jones, Chris Davis, and a few others before leaving for the night. “I think it even surprises them sometimes, the reaction that our city and our fans have to what they’re doing this year. I think it’s good, and I’m trying to stay in the background.”

While obviously focused on the task at hand of beating the Browns for the ninth straight time since becoming the coach in Baltimore, John Harbaugh shared his appreciation for the support shown by Showalter and Orioles players and offered his thoughts on what’s happening with Baltimore’s other professional sports team this year.

“I think the world of that team,” Harbaugh said. “I love Buck. I think he does a great job. They play fundamentally-sound baseball. This is a special team.”

An avid college football fan, Showalter was trying to leave the suite as his players and stadium personnel urged him to stay, obviously with the plan of showing the manager and his players on the video board. As fans erupted into loud cheers, Showalter wanted the energy to assist the Ravens in protecting their closer-than-expected lead over the winless Browns.

“They were trying to time it,” Showalter said. “I guess they needed a big defensive stand there or something. They thought it’d be a good reaction to the players on the board. I was hoping and praying it was going to be three-and-out afterwards. Otherwise, we’d never be [invited] back, but I think it was. And that’s when I left. I’m leaving in a hurry [after that].’”

Harbaugh offered high praise of the Orioles’ historic success in one-run games and extra-inning contests this season as they’ve already secured their first winning season in 15 years and are on the verge of earning their first postseason berth since 1997 as well.

The Orioles entered Friday with a 27-9 record in one-run games this season, which is on pace to tie the highest winning percentage in major league history in games decided by one run. They’ve won a franchise-record 16 straight games that have gone to extra innings, the longest streak in the majors since the 1949 Indians won 17 in a row.

Growing up in Ohio, Harbaugh recalled listening to Indians games on the radio with his father Jack, who is the bigger baseball fan. The Baltimore coach sees similarities between the Orioles and his own team in 2012.

“How many close games have they won this year? I think they set a record,” Harbaugh said. “One-run games, extra-inning games, finding a way to win. It’s something that we can look at as a team, too, and say, ‘That’s what we did a little bit last night.’ You find a way to win games.”

Unlike any other time in the 17-year period in which the franchises have co-existed in Baltimore, this is the first season in which Baltimore fans have had a reason to be excited about both teams in September and, if they’re lucky, well into the month of October.

Harbaugh made it clear the Ravens are behind the Orioles, inviting Showalter out to watch practice whenever he wants but also acknowledging the Orioles manager and his players are a little preoccupied these days. He even admitted to taking a peak when the result of the Yankees game was shown on the video board during Thursday’s game.

“The Ravens are big fans of the Orioles,” Harbaugh said. “We’re cheering them on in this pennant race. The Yankee score came up last night; I did happen to see that, I have to admit.”

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Art Modell on the life of Art Modell – celebrating his amazing life all weekend at WNST.net

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Art Modell on the life of Art Modell – celebrating his amazing life all weekend at WNST.net

Posted on 07 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

I’ve been reading a lot about the life and times of Art Modell over the last 24 hours. Obviously, my heart has been heavy with the loss of his charm, humor and kindness not only for my selfish emotions but for everyone who ever loved Mr. Modell. I’ll never forget seeing the raw emotions of Ray Lewis, Ozzie Newsome, Kevin Byrne and John Harbaugh yesterday in Owings Mills.

Today and all weekend at WNST.net & AM 1570 we will be presenting what I feel is the finest radio interview of my career – a long-winded, emotional, retrospective of the life and times of Arthur B. Modell, told in his own words.

In 2004, just after I retired from hosting a daily show after 13 years of grinding out quality sports talk radio, I decided to do a series of “sit downs” – I called them “Barbara Walters-style interviews” – with many Baltimore sports legends. Art Donovan, Cal Ripken, Phil Savage, Brian Billick, Marvin Lewis, Pam Shriver, Lenny Moore, Bob Ehrlich and several others were kind enough to participate in a series of monthly chats I did to shed light on their careers and how they came to enter their chosen field of work.

Every conversation was personal and memorable but nothing like my time with Art Modell.

I joined Art Modell at his office at M&T Bank Stadium in the spring of 2004 and wound up taking the better part of two mornings to get all of the questions answered.

I haven’t even listened to these yet myself to know exactly all of the ground we covered. I do remember him saying at the end, “You have enough there for a book. No one has ever asked me that many questions before!”

I remember him being emotional several times when I asked about his father. I remember him being a little upset at some of the line of questioning. I remember him being incredibly thoughtful and patient as I probed some memories that he was mostly uncomfortable sharing with me.

But I think we both brought our “A games” with us those two days as we chatted about his entire life and the many people who affected him and shaped his world. How he met soap opera actress Patricia Breslin and married her and adopted her two young sons, David and John. Tales of Jim Brown, Lucille Ball, Bob Hope, Ozzie Newsome, Ray Lewis, Lou Groza, Cleveland, the Browns, Bernie Kosar, Bill Belichick, Pete Rozelle – there’s a lot of meat in this conversation.

This will take some time – there’s about 3 hours worth of chatter here, most of it dominated by Art telling the best stories of his life.

The last question I asked him was stolen from Jim Lipton (and Bernard Pivot):

If heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the pearly gates?

Art Modell deadpanned: “First and long…”

There’s a lot of humor in this conversation as well because that was Art’s Way.

We’ll be playing this interview all weekend on WNST-AM 1570. You can listen in your car or you can click below to take with you wherever you go.

I hope you enjoy the chat. And, quite frankly, I hope it’s as good as I remember it being.

Here are the links via WNST.net and our Buy A Toyota audio vault:

Part 1 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 2 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 3 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 4 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 5 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 6 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 7 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 8 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

Part 9 of my WNST.net sitdown with Art Modell

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