Tag Archive | "Calvert Hall"

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday Lax Roundup: Towson Upsets Stony Brook, Hopkins drops Heartbreaker to Syracuse

Posted on 19 March 2011 by WNST Staff

Here are the official recaps of Saturday’s lacrosse action, courtesy of the respective schools’ Sports Information Departments…

Hughes Leads Tigers Past #5 Stony Brook, 9-8

TOWSON, Md. – Sophomore attackman Matt Hughes scored a game-high three goals, including the eventual game-winner with 9:50 left in the fourth quarter, as the Tigers (2-4) snapped a two-game losing streak by earning a 9-8 non-conference victory over fifth-ranked Stony Brook University (3-2) at Johnny Unitas® Stadium on Saturday afternoon.

Led by Hughes, who posted his third “hat trick” in the last four games, the Tigers defeated a top five opponent for the first time since April 27, 1996 when they defeated fifth-ranked Johns Hopkins by a 13-12 margin at Homewood Field.

“These kids did a great job today,” Towson Coach Tony Seaman said. “Travis Love made some big saves for us when we needed them and Matt Hughes put the ball in the goal. I am very proud of this team and what they did today.”

After senior midfielder Timmy Trenkle gave the Seawolves a quick 1-0 lead just 62 seconds into the game, the Tigers answered by scoring back-to-back goals from Hughes and junior attackman Sean Maguire to take a 2-1 lead with 7:52 left in the first quarter.

Trenkle and senior midfielder Kevin Crowley regained the Seawolves’ advantage when they scored a pair of unassisted goals, giving Stony Brook a 3-2 lead with 2:20 remaining in the period.

But, the Tigers held Stony Brook scoreless for the next 17 minutes, 14 seconds while scoring six unanswered goals to take an 8-3 lead with 54 seconds remaining in the first half. The Tigers had six different players score a goal during the run, including senior attackman Tim Stratton, who scored his first goal of the season with 13:19 left in the second quarter.

Junior midfielder Robbie Campbell scored a pair of goals off feeds from Crowley in the final 13 seconds of the first half, narrowing the Seawolves’ deficit to 8-5 at the intermission.

After a scoreless third quarter, the Tigers upped their lead to 9-5 when Hughes took a pass from freshman Andrew Hodgson and scored his third goal of the game with 9:50 left in regulation.

Over the final nine minutes, the Seawolves scored three times to trim the deficit to 9-8. With 8:27 left, senior attackman Jordan McBride scored off a feed from senior attackman Tom Compitello to close the gap to 9-6.

Just over three minutes later, Trenkle scored his third goal of the game off a feed from Campbell for a 9-7 margin.

With 12 seconds left, Crowley cut the deficit to 9-8 when he tallied his second goal of the game after getting a pass from McBride. The Seawolves won the ensuing face-off, but were unable to get a shot as the final horn sounded.

While Hughes led the Tigers with his three-goal effort, Maguire added a pair of goals with an assist for Towson, which outshot Stony Brook by a 29-27 margin.

Crowley scored two goals with three assists for the Seawolves while Trenkle added his second career “hat trick” with three goals. Senior midfielder Adam Rand won 13 of 21 face-offs for the Seawolves, who had won their last three games after a season-opening overtime loss against Virginia.

The Tigers, who played their third game in an eight-day span, will open their Colonial Athletic Association schedule next Saturday afternoon when they travel to the University of Delaware for a 1 p.m. game against the defending CAA champion Blue Hens. Meanwhile, the Seawolves open a three-game homestand on Tuesday afternoon against Cornell at 7 p.m.

“This has been a tough week for us,” Coach Seaman added. “We played Maryland last Saturday, faced Navy on Tuesday night and then, had to play a very good Stony Brook team today. There is nothing easy about it, but the reason we do it is to get us ready for our conference, which starts next week.”

Post-Game Notes:
– The Tigers and the Seawolves were meeting for the second time in an all-time series which is tied at 1-1 … Stony Brook defeated Towson by a 14-11 margin in last year’s meeting at LaValle Stadium.
– The Tigers defeated a nationally-ranked opponent for the first time since last year’s CAA semi-final when they defeated 16th-ranked Massachusetts by a 13-6 margin … The Tigers had lost all three games this year against ranked foes prior to Saturday.
– The Tigers posted their first win over a top five opponent at home since April 4, 1992 when they defeated top-ranked Loyola at home by an 8-7 margin in overtime.
– Stratton scored his first goal since last year when he tallied a goal against Massachusetts in the CAA semi-finals at Unitas Stadium … It snapped a six-game scoreless streak.
– The Tigers held an opponent scoreless in the third quarter for the fourth time in six games this season … In the first six games, the Tigers have allowed just six third-quarter goals.
– With his three-goal effort, Hughes extended his point-scoring streak to nine straight games … During the streak, he has scored 15 goals with four assists.
– The Tigers held Stony Brook to a season-low eight goals on Saturday … The Seawolves were also limited to a season-low 27 shots against the Tigers.

Syracuse Slips Past Johns Hopkins in Double Overtime

SYRACUSE, NY – Syracuse senior Stephen Keogh scored his third goal of the game 15 seconds into the second overtime to lift the top-ranked Orange to a 5-4 victory over Johns Hopkins before a crowd of 8,241 at the Carrier Dome Saturday evening. Syracuse improves to 6-0, while the Blue Jays slip to 5-2.

After losing 10 of the first 13 faceoffs in the game, the Orange got the one that counted as senior Joel White came up with the loose ball on the faceoff in the second overtime and quickly worked the ball to Jeremy Thompson. Thompson carried into the zone and found Keogh to his left and he wasted no time blowing home the game-winner.

In a game much more exciting than the final score might indicate, the Blue Jays led 4-3 at the end of the third quarter after Zach Palmer’s second unassisted goal of the game with 3:07 remaining in the period gave JHU a one-goal lead. That lead held for nearly the entire fourth quarter on the strength on the spectacular play of sophomore goalie Pierce Bassett, who posted seven of his 16 saves in the fourth quarter.

Still, the Orange pressed and finally capitalized when Keogh polished off a patient possession with his second goal of the game with 1:40 remaining in regulation. The Blue Jays managed to force overtime after killing off a penalty in the last minute with Bassett stopping Tim Desko in the final seconds.

Both teams had chances to win in the first overtime as Hopkins fired four shots at senior John Galloway and Syracuse managed a pair on Bassett, but the first extra session settled nothing after a Kyle Wharton goal for Johns Hopkins was waived off with four seconds remaining for being in the crease. Keogh’s goal quickly ended the dramatics in the second overtime.
The Orange needed just 65 seconds to open the scoring as senior Josh Amidon took a nifty feed from sophomore JoJo Marasco and buried an eight-yard shot to give SU the early one-goal advantage. By the time Syracuse scored again, more than 27 minutes had elapsed and the Blue Jays had crafted a 3-1 lead.

Sophomore John Ranagan answered Amidon’s early strike when he scored on an ally dodge in an unsettled situation with just under five minutes remaining in the opening period, which ended with the score tied 1-1 and the young Blue Jays gaining momentum as the period wore on.

Ranagan and linemate John Greeley, playing in his hometown for the first time in his career, teamed up to give JHU a 2-1 lead less than a minute into the second period as Greeley worked in from the flank and flipped a pass to Ranagan, who never broke stride and beat Galloway from seven yards out.

Hopkins extended its lead to 3-1 – the first time this season Syracuse has been down by two goals – when Palmer dodged from behind and used his defender as a perfect screen to beat Galloway low to the far side.

Syracuse ended its scoring drought with just under two minutes remaining in the first half when Tom Palasek threaded a perfect pass to Keogh on the crease and Keogh did what he does best, one-time it home from the doorstep to make it 3-2 at the half.

The Orange drew even midway through the third quarter when Amidon struck off an assist from Palasek. The tie stood for just over four minutes before Palmer’s second goal gave JHU the 4-3 lead that held until the final two minutes of regulation.

Bassett finished with 16 saves, the second-highest total of his career, and Ranagan and Palmer led the way offensively with their two goals apiece. Senior Matt Dolente continued his strong play on faceoffs as he won 10-of-14 and grabbed six ground balls on the night.

#9 Johns Hopkins (5-2) 1-2-1-0-0-0/4
#1 Syracuse (6-0) 1-1-1-1-0-1/5

Goals: J: Ranagan-2, Palmer-2. S: Keogh-3, Amidon-2. Assists: J: Greeley. S: Palasek-2, Amidon, Marasco, Thompson. Saves: J: Bassett-16. S: Galloway-5. Shots: J-25. S-33. EMO: J: 0-for-3 S: 0-for-2. Attendance: 8,241.

Air Force Takes Early Lead, Holds Off Loyola

USAFA, Colo. – The U.S. Air Force Academy jumped out to a five-goal lead in the second quarter and held off the 17th-ranked Loyola University Maryland men’s lacrosse team, 8-6, in an ECAC Lacrosse League game on Saturday afternoon at Falcon Stadium.

The Falcons (2-5 overall, 1-1 ECAC) scored the game’s first three goals and held Loyola (3-3, 1-1) off the scoreboard for over 13 minutes to start the contest.

Adam Paranka and Vinny Sandtorv scored at 10:11 and 8:47 in the first quarter to put Air Force ahead, and Mike Crampton logged a goal 3:36 before the end of the frame.

Josh Hawkins broke the Greyhounds’ scoring drought with his first goal of the season 1:53 before the end of the quarter.

Air Force picked up where it left off offensive, however, in the second quarter. Tommy McKee scored 1:21 into the frame, and Sandtorv tallied his second and third goals of the afternoon to push the Falcons’ advantage to five, 6-1.

Loyola cut its deficit to four, 6-2, with 19 ticks left on the first-half clock as Davis Butts scored off a Mike Sawyer assist.

The Greyhounds pulled within three as Matt Langan took a Justin Ward pass and scored 2:14 into the third quarter, but Crampton scored back-to-back goals for the Falcons, extending their lead back to five, 8-3, with just under nine minutes to go in the third quarter.

Chris Basler tallied a goal for Loyola with 4:14 to go in the third, making it a four-goal game.

Loyola made it a three-goal Air Force lead after a strange sequence led to a man-down goal. Goalkeeper Jake Hagelin cleared the ball from the defensive end by himself and scored his first career goal with 4:44 to play.

Air Force won the next faceoff but a Sandtorv shot went wide, and Loyola had a chance on offense. Stephen Murray scored for the Greyhounds, pulling them within two.The Greyhounds had an extra-man opportunity with less than 90 seconds remaining, but Air Force forced a turnover to secure the game.

Loyola outshot the Falcons, 32-23 and 19-8 in the second half. Brian Wilson made 10 saves in goal for the Falcons. The Greyhounds also had an 11-18 advantage at the face-off `X’, as J.P. Dalton won a career-high 10-of-16 restarts. Scott Ratliff led Loyola with five ground balls.

The Greyhounds step out of conference play next weekend when travel to Emmittsburg, Md., for a 1 o’clock game at Mount St. Mary’s on Saturday.

Rossi Scores Three Goals to Lead No. 2 Mustangs Past No. 4 Cortland, 10-8

OWINGS MILLS, Md. – Stevenson men’s lacrosse freshman Tony Rossi (Towson/Calvert Hall) tied his career-high with three goals, including the game-tying and game-winning goals in the final 10 minutes to lead the No. 2-ranked Mustangs to a 10-8 victory over No. 4 SUNY Cortland on Saturday at Caves Athletics Complex.

Stevenson (8-0) improved its record to 17-1 at home the last two seasons and 5-0 this year. It was also the team’s fourth victory in as many as games against a top-10 team this season.

The game featured seven ties and four lead changes, the last coming on back-to-back goals by Rossi with 11:42 and 9:02 remaining in the fourth quarter as the Mustangs rallied from their fourth one-goal deficit.

After Mike Tota gave the Red Dragons (4-1) an 8-7 lead with 13:24 left, Rossi netted his second goal of the game at 11:42 to tie the game for the seventh and final time before picking up his first collegiate game-winning goal at 9:06.

On the ensuing face-off, senior Ray Witte (Annapolis/St. Peter and Paul) won his 12th draw of the game and picked up his fifth ground ball of the game en route to scoring his fifth goal of the season just seven seconds later to provide some insurance with 8:59 to play.

Stevenson’s three fourth quarter goals and six saves from junior Ian Bolland (Mountain Lakes, N.J./Mountain Lakes) helped offset the team’s eight turnovers which kept Cortland within striking distance. With the win, he improved his record to 10-0 as a starter.

Prior to Saturday, the only other meeting between the two teams came back on Feb. 24, 2007 at Caves Athletics Complex with the Mustangs posted a 10-9 victory over the third-ranked Red Dragons in what was Stevenson’s first win over a ranked team in school history.

With two goals and one assist, senior Jimmy Dailey (Westminster/Winters Mill) also totaled three points and now has 259 for his career, tying him with Eric Schmith for the school record. With two assists, senior Richie Ford (Baltimore/Towson) now has 255 career points, four behind Schmith and Dailey.

In addition, Dailey also picked up his 127th career assist, four behind current assistant coach Steve Kazimer for second on the school’s all-time list and 10 behind Schmith’s record of 137.

With two caused turnovers, senior Evan Douglass (Exeter, N.H./Exeter) also reached a personal milestone, totaing the 100th of his career, becoming the first player in school history to reach triple digits.

Tota led the Red Dragons with three goals while Jay DiStefano had two goals and two assists. Mike Kaminski had 12 saves.

Stevenson faces his its fourth-straight top-10 opponent on Wednesday when it welcomes No. 1-ranked and defending national champion Tufts to Caves Athletics Complex beginning at 4:00 p.m.

Mids Win Third Straight, Cruise to 8-3 Win over Holy Cross

WORCESTER, Mass. — The Navy men’s lacrosse team (4-4, 2-2 Patriot League) used a crippling defense and took advantage of 10 Holy Cross penalties to post an 8-3 victory over the Crusaders (0-7, 0-2 Patriot League) Saturday afternoon at Hart Turf Field in Worcester, Mass.  The Mids have now won three-consecutive games after dropping four in a row on the road.

“Holy Cross really slowed it down and their defense packed it in tight and played zone,” said Navy head Coach Richie Meade, who has never lost to Holy Cross in his 17 years at the Academy.  “It was a little sloppy out there early, but we settled in played our game.”

The story of the game came down to possession.  Not only did junior faceoff specialist Logan West (Berlin, Md.) control 11 of the 14 draws in the game, Navy also possessed the ball a great deal of the contest due to Holy Cross racking up nearly 10 minutes of penalty time.  Navy scored goals on five of its 10 extra-man opportunities, including the game’s first goal at the 2:23 mark in the opening period.  Freshmen attackmen Tucker Hull (Charlotte, N.C.) and Harrison Chaires (Ellicott City, Md.) worked together to put the Mids on the the scoreboard in what would be a lead they’d not relinquish.

Chaires punched in his second of three extra-man goals at 12:29 in the second quarter with Jay Mann (Cockeysville, Md.) finding him for a nifty shot.

Hull, who was named the Patriot League Rookie of the Week earlier in the week, then put Navy up 4-0 with back-to-back goals, including his first man-up goal of the year at the 10:26 mark,

Navy’s defense smothered Holy Cross the entire first half and after nearly 35 minutes of scoreless play, the Crusaders got on the board thanks to an unassisted goal by junior midfielder Andrew Morici.

Navy, though, went on to score three unanswered goals in the span of two minutes. The run began when junior attackman Taylor Reynolds (Babylon, N.Y.) found senior middie Andy Warner (Corning, N.Y.) for the goal at the 8:03 mark.  It was one of only three even-strength goals by the Mids in the contest.  A minute later, at the 7:05 mark, Warner pumped in an unassisted extra-man goal.  Meanwhile, Chaires turned in his first-collegiate hat trick with his third man-up goal of the afternoon off an assist from Hull.

Chaires is the first Navy player to score three extra-man goals in a single game since All-American Adam Borcz talled three against Penn State on April 14, 2001.

The Mids were not done, however, extending their lead to 8-1 on a Brian Striffler (Virginia Beach, Va.)-to-Sam Jones (Annapolis, Md.) goal at the 4:30 mark.

Navy made a change between the pipes following Jones’ goal, giving senior Mike Haas (Blue Bell, Pa.) just his second-career appearance in goal.  Haas would give up a pair of goals in the final four-plus minutes, including a garbage goal with 17 seconds remaining in the game to senior attackman Colin Flood.

The three goals are the fewest the Mids’ defense have surrendered since last year’s Navy-Holy Cross tilt in which the Mids won, 12-3, in Annapolis.  Ironically, it’s also the last time Navy held an opponent scoreless for a half.  In last year’s game, Navy jumped out to a 4-0 halftime lead before the crusaders scored in the 39th minute.

“I thought we really played great defense today,” added Meade.  “It was probably the best one-on-one defense we’ve played this season.  Jordan Seivold played probably his best and our two senior shorties Brian Striffler and Marty Gallagher were both enforcers out there.”

With his two-goal, one-assist effort against the Crusaders, Warner extended his point streak to 20-consecutive games which is tied as the 18th-longest streak in the country.  Meanwhile, he is just four points shy of becomming only the 29th player in program history to score 100 points in a career.  The last player to join the list was Nick Mirabito who amassed 158 points from 2005-08.

Meanwhile, West continues to roll at the “x.”  Over the last three games, he has won 46 of the 66 draws (.697) he has taken.  During the Mids’ four-game slied, he won 20 of the 53 faceoffs (.377) he took.

The Mids return to action next Saturday when they play host to Patriot League foe Colgate.  Action is slated for 12:00 pm at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

Comments Off on Saturday Lax Roundup: Towson Upsets Stony Brook, Hopkins drops Heartbreaker to Syracuse

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday Lacrosse Action: Loyola Falls to Denver, Stevenson Tops Roanoke

Posted on 16 March 2011 by WNST Staff

Here are the official recaps, courtesy of the Loyola and Stevenson Sports Information Departments…

#19 Denver Uses 6-0 Run In Win Over #17 Loyola

BALTIMORE – Loyola University Maryland’s Patrick Fanshaw scored an extra-man goal 47 seconds in the second half to tie the game at 6-6, but No. 19 Denver University scored six unanswered goals and the Pioneers defeated the 17th-ranked Greyhounds, 12-8, on Wednesday night at Ridley Athletic Complex in ECAC Lacrosse League action.

Denver (4-2 overall, 1-0 ECAC) was whistled for an unnecessary roughness penalty nine seconds in to the second half, as Brendan DeBlois checked Loyola face-off specialist John Schiavone in front of the crease, and the Greyhounds went on the extra-man.

Chris Basler found Fanshaw camped in front of the goal, and the sophomore scored to even the game at 6-6.

Neither the Greyhounds (3-2, 1-1), nor Denver scored for nearly eight minutes, however, until Alex Demopoulos tallied a goal for the Pioneers with 6:30 left in the third quarter.

Just six seconds later Mark Matthews scored in an unsettled situation, and the Pioneers were on the run.

Mike Sawyer led all players with four goals for the Greyhounds. He now has scored 14 in his last three games. Josh Hawkins had a career-high nine ground balls.

No. 2 Stevenson Runs Away From No. 9 Roanoke on the Road, 16-6

OWINGS MILLS, Md. – Led by six points from senior Jimmy Dailey (Westminster/Winters Mill) and four each from seniors Richie Ford (Baltimore/Towson) and Sean Calabrese (Rockville/DeMatha), the No. 2-ranked Stevenson men’s lacrosse team outscored No. 9 Roanoke 12-3 over the final three quarters en route to a 16-6 victory Wednesday at Kerr Stadium.

The win was the third in the last two seasons for the Mustangs (7-0) against the Maroons and the first in two all-time meetings on the road in Salem, Virginia. The only other meeting between the two in Salem came back in 2001 with Roanoke prevailing, 10-7.

With two goals and four assists, Dailey now has 256 points for his career, just three shy of the school record set by Eric Schmith who had 122 goals and 137 assists from 1996-99.

Roanoke (4-2) jumped out to a 2-1 lead in the game’s first four minutes on goals by Trey Kelley and Reid Mayberry and led 3-2 on a goal by Mike Hayden with 5:29 remaining in the first quarter.

Dailey scored at 2:26 to tie the game at 3-3 before assisting sophomore Tyler Reid (Clinton, Conn./Xavier) with only three seconds left to give Stevenson a 4-3 lead after one. The goals were the first two in a streak of eight consecutive as the Mustangs built a 10-3 lead midway through the third quarter.

Dailey had a goal and two assists during the run while Reid scored twice and Calabrese added a goal and an assist. Calabrese’s four points were one shy of his career-high.

Leading by seven with 11:16 to play in the fourth quarter, Ford scored three-straight goals in a span of 2:22 to push the lead to 10 before assisting on Dailey’s final tally with 4:03 remaining to provide the final margin.

Ford finished with three goals and one assist and now has 253 career points, three behind Dailey and six behind Schmith. He also increased his school record for goals to 173, 43 ahead of Dailey.

Reid, seniors Kyle Moffitt (Harrisburg, Pa./Central Dauphin East) and Neal Barthelme (Towson/Dulaney) and freshman Tony Rossi (Towson/Calvert Hall) each scored twice for the Mustangs.

Junior Ian Bolland (Mountain Lakes, N.J./Mountain Lakes) made a career-high 17 saves to lead the defense with senior Evan Douglass (Exeter, N.H./Exeter) totaling five caused turnovers and four ground balls. Senior Kyle Menendez (Cockeysville/St. Paul’s) had three caused turnovers.

Trey Keeley had two goals to lead the Maroons who had an eight-game home win streak snapped with their worst home loss since 2004. Noah Gibby had two assists and Mike Hardon and Charles Pease combined for 17 saves.

Stevenson will face its third consecutive top-10 opponent on Saturday when it welcomes No. 4 SUNY Cortland to Caves Athletics Complex beginning at 1:00 p.m.

The Mustangs won the only previous meeting between the two teams back on Feb. 24, 2007 at Caves Athletics Complex, 10-9. The win over the third-ranked Red Dragons marked the first against a ranked opponent in school history.

Comments Off on Wednesday Lacrosse Action: Loyola Falls to Denver, Stevenson Tops Roanoke

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Local Lacrosse Weekend 4 Wrap: Maryland tops Towson, Hopkins routs UMBC

Posted on 12 March 2011 by WNST Staff

Here are the official recaps of this weekend’s local college lacrosse action, as provided by the respective schools’ Sports Information offices.

Seven Terps Score In 8-4 Win At Towson

TOWSON, Md. – Seven different Terps scored to lead the No. 8 University of Maryland men’s lacrosse team to a hard-fought, 8-4, victory at Towson Saturday afternoon at Unitas Stadium.

Maryland (4-1) claimed the advantage right off of the opening face-off. An illegal body check penalty on Peter Mezzanotte gave the Terps an extra-man opportunity and, while Maryland failed to convert on the EMO, the Terps made the Tigers pay, scoing a goal just seven seconds after the penalty expired. Senior Travis Reed fed senior Grant Catalino on the right wing and Catalino beat Tiger goalie Travis Love near side to give the Terps a 1-0 lead at the 13:40 mark.

After Towson (1-3) tied the game at 1-1 with just under seven minutes left in the first, Maryland regained the lead on a nice two-man play by sophomore John Haus and Reed. Haus dodged his defender down the right side of the restraining box. Reed slipped inside the play and Haus fed Reed just outside the crease where he finished the play with a one-timer.

Reed extended the lead to 3-1, finishing a transition opportunity with a great low-to-low shot from the right wing. Sophomore Landon Carr earned his first career assist by getting the ball to Reed with a great 30-yard skip pass.

The Tigers closed the gap to a goal right before the end of the first on a Carl Iacona goal with just two seconds left on the clock.

Maryland looked to be in a bit of trouble early in the second when junior Joe Cummings was sent off on a tripping penalty. But senior defender Ryder Bohlander picked up two tough groundballs to give the Terps possession and another transition opportunity. Senior long pole Brian Farrell converted that into another Maryland goal, off an assist from senior Scott LaRue, to make it a 4-2 Maryland lead with 8:59 left in the second.

Cummings extended the lead to 5-2 less than a minute later on the game’s first unassisted goal, which proved to be the game-winner. He took the ball at the top of the restraining box and used a quick dodge and re-dodge to get by Towson defender Michael Landy. Cummings’ shot got by Love, hit the inside of the right post and bounced over the goal line into the left side of the net for the score.

Haus and Reed reversed roles from the Terps’ second goal of the game to make it a 6-2 Maryland lead. This time it was Reed finding Haus with a nice pass as Haus quickly cut to the front of the crease. Haus then finished with a one-timer.

Towson scored the only two goals of the third quarter to trim the Maryland lead to 6-4 going into the fourth quarter.

But, arguably, the biggest play of the day for the Terps came as the clock wound down in the third. Britton’s shot for the Tigers went wide, but Matt Hughes was there to pick up the groundball. Maryland goalie Niko Amato moved on Britton’s shot and was out of position when Hughes got the ball quickly out of his stick. That’s when Farrell made an outstanding play by leaving his man and jumping in front of the Terrapin goal, blocking Hughes’ shot. Instead of Towson closing to within a goal going into the final period, the Terps maintained their two-goal lead.

Neither team could get any offense going in the fourth until the Terps’ transition game kicked in with less than four minutes left. A Tiger man-up opportunity was thwarted by a groundball by Amato. He then made a long outlet pass to LaRue at the midfield stripe. LaRue looked up an found senior Ryan Young on the left side of the crease and Young ripped a low shot to push the Terrapin lead to 7-4.

Sophomore Curtis Holmes, who won 9 of 16 face-offs on the day, won the ensuing draw, which virtually forced the Tigers to come out of their zone defense, double-team the ball and try to force a turnover. But it didn’t quite work out that way. Junior Drew Snider scored an empty-net goal with 1:33 left to seal the victory for the Terps.

Towson out-shot the Terps 38-21 for the game, but the Tigers only put 13 of those shots on cage thanks to a relentless defensive effort, which was backed-up by eight saves from Amato.

Maryland won the groundball battle, 31-21, with Holmes leading the way with five. Bohlander and senior Brett Schmidt had four groundballs apiece.

The Terps return to action on Friday with a primetime game vs. another in-state rival, UMBC, at 8 p.m. at Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium. That game is set to be broadcast locally on WMAR in Baltimore and world-wide on ESPN3.com.

Game Notes:
• With today’s 8-4 win Maryland is now 28-5 all-time vs. Towson.
• The victory also makes the Terps a perfect 14-0 all-time in games played at Towson.
• Senior Grant Catalino’s goal was the 97th of his career, which moved him past Ron Martinello (96, 1997-81) for sole-possession of 12th place on the school’s all-time goals list.
• Catalino’s one point gives him 158 for his career, moving him past Mark Douglas (157, 1988-91) for sole-possession of 16th place on the Terps’ all-time points list.
• Senior Ryan Young’s one point on one goal gives him 129 for his career, moving him past C. Rennie Smith (128, 1952-55) for sole-possession of 25th place on the Terps’ all-time points list.
• With four points on two goals and two assists, senior Travis Reed now has 32 multi-point, 21 multi-goal and 12 multi-assist games for his career.
• With two points on one goal and one assists, sophomore John Haus now has seven multi-point games for his career.
• With two assists, senior Scott LaRue recorded his first career multi-point game.
• With four points on three goals and an assist, senior Ryan Young now had 39 multi-point and 19 multi-goal games for his career.
• The Terps held Towson scoreless in the second and fourth quarters, marking the third and fourth times this season that Maryland has held an opponent without a goal for an entire quarter.

Johns Hopkins Races Past UMBC, 16-5, in Face-Off Classic

BALTIMORE, MD – Johns Hopkins got a goal from senior Kyle Wharton just five seconds into the game and the Blue Jays never looked back in a 16-5 victory over UMBC in the third game of the fifth annual Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic at M&T Bank Stadium Saturday afternoon. The Blue Jays improved to 5-1 on the year, 3-2 all-time in Face-Off Classic and 9-0 all-time against UMBC. The Retrievers, who were playing their first-ever game at M&T Bank Stadium, slip to 1-3 on the year.

Hopkins led 5-1 early in the second quarter after the second of Chris Boland’s five goals, but UMBC trimmed the deficit to 6-3 as Rob Grimm and Dave Brown sandwiched goals around a Zach Palmer tally for Johns Hopkins midway through the quarter. Brown’s goal, an unassisted strike with 8:28 remaining in the first half, would be the last for the Retrievers for more than 20 minutes and Hopkins put the game away with a 7-0 run during that time that turned the 6-3 lead into a 13-3 advantage late in the third quarter.

Senior Mark Goodrich opened the spree with an unassisted goal less than 90 seconds after Brown scored and sophomore John Ranagan and Wharton scored back-to-back goals in a span of just 11 seconds late in the period to make it 9-3 at the half.

The Retrievers held the Blue Jays scoreless for nearly six minutes at the start of the third quarter, but Boland’s third goal of the game with 9:02 remaining opened the floodgates as Palmer scored 54 seconds later off a nifty feed from Ranagan and Boland added his fourth of the day – this one off an assist from Palmer – to make it 12-3. An unassisted goal by junior Marshall Burkhart with 2:29 remaining capped the 7-0 run, which was finally halted by Joe Lustgarten’s transition goal with 1:14 remaining in the third quarter.

Hopkins fired home the first three goals of the fourth quarter to extend the lead to a game-high 12 at 16-4 with more than six minutes remaining before Brown closed the scoring with an extra-man goal with just under three minutes to play.
Wharton’s game-opening goal came after the first of senior Matt Dolente’s career-high 15 faceoff wins on the day for the Blue Jays, who held decisive advantages in shots (44-30), ground balls (39-24) and faceoffs (20-5). It was 3-0 after freshman Rob Guida and Boland added first-quarter strikes, but a Scott Hopmann goal with 1:10 left trimmed the deficit to 3-1.

Ranagan and Boland scored back-to-back goals to account for the 5-1 lead early in the second quarter, only to have the Retrievers make it a three-goal game with the Grimm and Brown goals midway through the period. That set the stage for the game-turning 7-0 run, which include goals by six different players for the Blue Jays.

Boland led Johns Hopkins with five goals and the one assist, while Ranagan added a career-high five points on two goal and three assists. Dolente won 15-of-20 faceoffs and grabbed 11 ground balls, while Wharton (2g) and Palmer (2g, 1a) also had multi-point games for the Blue Jays. Sophomore Pierce Bassett posted eight saves and allowed just four goals in just under 54 minutes before giving way to junior Steven Burke.

Brown led UMBC with two goals and Lustgarten added one goal and one assist, while Adam Cohen posted 11 saves in goal for UMBC.

#11 Johns Hopkins (5-1) 4-5-4-3/16
UMBC (1-3) 1-2-1-1/5

GoalsJ: Boland-5, Ranagan-2, Palmer-2, Wharton-2, Coppersmith, Guida, Goodrich, Interlicchio, Burkhart. U: Brown-2, Lustgarten, Hopmann, Grimm. AssistsJ: Ranagan-3, Boland, Greeley, Maydick, Palmer. U: Jones, Kimbles, Lustgarten. SavesJ: Bassett-8, Burke-1, Schneider-0. U: Cohen-11. Shots: J-44. U-30. EMOJ: 0-for-3 U: 1-for-3. Attendance: 17,057.

Sawyer Scores Five, But #15 Duke Tops #10 Loyola

DURHAM, N.C. – Loyola University Maryland’s Mike Sawyer scored five goals for the second game in a row, but Duke University scored the game’s first nine goals and despite a late run by the 10th ranked Greyhounds, the 15th-ranked Blue Devils defeated the visiting Greyhounds, 14-9, on Friday night at Koskinen Stadium.

The loss was Loyola’s first of the season following three victories to open the season.

Duke (3-2 overall) jumped out to a 4-0 lead in just over 20 minutes, as Jordan Wolf scored three times in the first quarter, and David Lawson tallied a goal in transition with 9:48 to go in the second quarter.

Christian Walsh then made it 5-0 with an unassisted goal 3:50 before the half.

Loyola’s Pat Laconi appeared to cause a Duke turnover with less than 20 seconds to play, but Zach Howell came up with the ground ball, and he scored to put the Blue Devils up with 11 seconds to play left in the first half.

After the break, Justin Turri scored for Duke 2:10 into the third frame, and Howell then registered his second and third goals, the latter coming with 11:27 remaining in the quarter.

Mike Sawyer finally broke through for the Greyhounds, taking a Davis Butts pass and scoring 50 seconds after Howell’s tally.

A Duke penalty then led to Loyola’s second goal, as Matt Langan then fed Sawyer who scored an extra-man goal with 9:27 on the clock.

C.J. Costable snapped the Greyhounds’ brief run, winning the face-off and scoring six seconds following Sawyer’s goal.

Neither team scored for nearly seven minutes until Loyola had two shots miss with just under three seconds to go in the third. Butts had a shot saved by Dan Wigrizer, but Butts picked up the ground ball and fed Sawyer who recorded the hat trick with his third goal of the game.

Duke’s Robert Rotanz scored on extra-man, pushing the Blue Devils’ lead back to eight, 11-3, but Langan took a Chris Basler pass less than 50 seconds into the fourth quarter to make it 11-4.

Howell tallied his fourth of the night with 9:42 to play for Duke’s 12th goal.

Following that, however, Loyola reeled off four goals unanswered. Pat Byrnes scored with 5:26 left in the fourth quarter, and after John Schiavone won the ensuing faceoff, Sawyer tallied his fourth goal of the game 19 ticks later.

Duke had two penalties that gave Loyola an extra-man possession, and Patrick Fanshaw was on the receiving end of a Langan pass, and the sophomore attacker scored to make it 12-7 in Duke’s favor with 3:55 to play.

Schiavone then won the next face-off to himself, picked up the ground ball and raced down the middle of the field, scoring his first goal of the year to make it 12-8 with 3:49 left.

Duke snapped the rally, however, with an extra-man goal by Josh Offit with 2:20 to play. Wolf then scored his fourth for the Blue Devils with 51 ticks on the clock.

Sawyer registered his fifth for the second-straight game, scoring with 30 seconds left. He also scored five last Saturday against Bellarmine.

Loyola outshot the Blue Devils, 34-31, but Wigrizer made 13 saves for Duke. Jake Hagelin  tallied eight saves in goal for the Greyhounds.

Schiavone won 14-of-23 face-offs for the Loyola and led all players with nine ground balls. The game, however, was the first time this season that the Greyhounds have come out on the losing side of the ground ball battle. Duke picked up 39 to Loyola’s 27.

The Greyhounds return to Baltimore for the first-ever night men’s lacrosse game at Ridley Athletic Complex. They host ECAC foe Denver University on Wednesday at 7 o’clock.

Stevenson Remains Unbeaten With Second Top-10 Win, 16-8 Over No. 9 Lynchburg

OWINGS MILLS, Md. – Stevenson men’s lacrosse senior Jimmy Dailey (Westminster/Winters Mill) posted his fifth consecutive game with at least five points as he totaled seven to lead the No. 2-ranked Mustangs to their second top-10 victory in six games this season, 16-8 over No. 9 Lynchburg Saturday at Caves Athletics Complex.

The Mustangs (6-0) extended their home winning streak to 10 games, scoring eight goals in each half en route to a convincing eight-goal victory.

Dailey totaled five goals and two assists while senior Richie Ford (Baltimore/Towson) finished with four points on two goals and two assists as both moved past former teammate and current assistant coach Steve Kazimer on the school’s all-time points list.

Dailey is now second with 250 and Ford is third with 249. Both trail current record holder Eric Schmith who had 259 points from 1996-99.

The Hornets (4-2) scored two of the game’s first three goals to take a 2-1 lead with 2:39 left in the first quarter before back-to-back goals by seniors Neal Barthelme (Towson/Dulaney) and Ray Witte (Annapolis/St. Peter and Paul) just nine seconds apart to end the quarter gave the Mustangs the lead for good.

Lynchburg’s two first quarter goals by Ben Sauer and Eddie Bilinkas were the first allowed by Stevenson in the opening quarter this season, snapping a streak of 80:42 without a goal. The Mustangs have now outscored their opponents 25-2 in the first quarter this season.

After scoring his first goal with just one second left in the first quarter, Witte added another tally just seven seconds into the second before Bilinkas scored his second to pull the Hornets back within one, 4-3 with 11:51 remaining.

From there, Dailey and Ford combined to score Stevenson’s next four goals and it built an 8-4 halftime lead.

Lynchburg scored the first two goals of the second half to pull within two, but four consecutive goals by the Mustangs, including two more from Dailey pushed the lead to 12-6 after three quarters.

The Hornets again responded with back-to-back goals to start the fourth quarter to cut their deficit to three with 6:50 left until the Mustangs scored four consecutive in a span of 3:07 to provide the final margin.

Eight different players had at least one goal for Stevenson, including freshman Chris Dashiell (Salisbury/Parkside) who netted the first of his carer to cap the scoring. Senior Jake Stocksdale (Westminster/Winters Mill) finished with three assists while Witte, Barthelme and freshman Tony Rossi (Towson/Calvert Hall) each had two goals.

Senior Kyle Menendez (Cockeysville/St. Paul’s) had four casued turnovers and two ground balls while senior Evan Douglass (Exeter, N.H./Exeter) added two caused turnovers and three ground balls to lead a defense that limited the Hornets to just 18 shots and forced 23 turnovers.

Junior Ian Bolland (Mountain Lakes, N.J./Mountain Lakes) needed to make just three saves to improve his record to 8-0 as a starter.

Derek Sweet led the Hornets with two goals and two assists while Andrew Wilfong had three assists. Franc Cook made 17 saves before being relieved by Roland St.Clair-Barrie.

Stevenson faces a tough road test against another top-10 team from the ODAC on Wednesday when it travels to No. 5 Roanoke. Game time is at 4:00 p.m.

Quick Start Propels Navy Lacrosse to 15-6 Win Over Lafayette

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The Navy men’s lacrosse team (2-4, 1-2 Patriot League) jumped out to an 8-0 lead early in the second quarter and never looked back as the Mids dealt Patriot League foe Lafayette (2-3, 0-1 Patriot League) a 15-6 loss Saturday afternoon at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

It was a pleasant return home for the Midshipmen, who, after opening their season on Feb. 12 at home, had played four-straight games on the road. Along the way, heartbreak had set in as Navy dropped a pair of one-goal decisions to nationally-ranked Loyola and Bucknell, while top-10 ranked North Carolina ousted the Mids by two.

That heartbreak, however, was erased Saturday when Navy put together its most complete game to date, playing to near perfection at every phase of the game.  One of the most troubling stats of the season for the Mids has been their lack of success at the faceoff “x” which snowballed into various other deficiencies. And while Navy’s faceoff corps would once again face a formidable foe in all-league performer Cesar Munoz, Navy junior Logan West (Berlin, Md.) was perhaps the biggest difference maker in the Mids’ win over the Leopards.

West, who began to turn his game around in the fourth quarter of last Monday’s Bucknell contest, dominated the “x” on Saturday, winning 16 of the 23 draws he took and in turn, put the ball in the offensive players’ hands.

“I think confidence is what I had been missing,” said West, who came into the game having won just 43.7 percent of his draws.  “In the opener I played pretty well, but then it started to go downhill for me in the second half of the Loyola game and I found myself in a slump.  I couldn’t seem to get into any rhythm.

“I think our wing play today was probably the best I’ve seen it all year.  I couldn’t have done it without them.”

There is certainly a correlation that can be made between faceoff possession and Navy goals.  The Mids won six draws in the opening quarter and scored seven goals, while in the third quarter Navy claimed seven faceoffs and in turn stuck five goals.

Navy opened the game on an 8-0 run, featuring a 7-0 advantage after the first quarter of play.  Junior Nikk Davis (Cockeysville, Md.), who scored a pair of goals in the final 18 seconds of play to force overtime at Bucknell, punched in the game’s first goal less than two minutes into the contest.  The flood gates opened from there and continued into the second quarter where sophomore middie Jay Mann (Cockeysville, Md.) scored 52 seconds into the second frame with a 10-yarder from the right wing to cap the 8-0 run.

Lafayette finally got on the scoreboard with 11:42 to go in the second quarter when all-league attackman Tom Perini capitalized on an extra-man opportunity, sending a hard-driven shot past Navy keeper RJ Wickham (Penn Yan, N.Y.) from 10 yards out.  Just 36 seconds later, Navy defenseman Peter Rogers (San Diego, Calif.) got caught up in the netting and Lafayette midfielder Will Heffernan capitalized by curling around and sticking his shot.

After nearly 10 minutes without a goal, Navy senior middie Andy Warner send his 12-yard shot top shelf to give the Mids a 9-2 advantage with 5:03 to go in the opening half.

The Leopards put together a run to close out the half with Heffernan scoring his second of the day, beating Navy defenseman Michael Hirsch (Schwenksville, Pa.) on the crease, followed by an unassisted goal by Doug Prusoff who bullied his way past defensive middie Jordan Seivold (Minnetonka, Minn.) and somehow threaded his shot past Wickham.

Senior midfielder Franklin Floyd trimmed the Mids’ lead to four at 9-5 just minutes into the third period when he cleared the ball and waltzed into the box untouched.

The Mids would gain control, however, scoring back-to-back goals just 22 seconds apart, including a strike by senior pole Tom Mansfield (Port Washington, N.Y.), who, racing down the field in transition, scored his first-collegiate goal.

A roll dodge by Prusoff midway through the third period resulted in a Lafayette goal, but Navy’s defense would keep the Leopards off the scoreboard for the final 22 minutes of the game to preserve the win.

Navy, meanwhile, scored three more in the third and once in the fourth to produce the most goals in a game since defeating VMI last year, 16-5.  Freshman attackman Tucker Hull (Charlotte, N.C.) scored a pair of goals in the third quarter, including a man down goal with 5:32 to go.  Lafayette’s Perini took a shot following a Navy penalty which took out the legs of one of his own players.  Following a stoppage of play, the ball was awarded to Navy.  A heads-up play, team captain Marty Gallagher (Wayne, Pa.) sent a long pass to Taylor Reynolds (Babylon, N.Y.) who fed Hull on the doorstep.

It was the Mids’ first man-down goal since Joe Lennon pumped one in at Army on April 12, 2008.

Seven different players scored for Navy, including three – Hull, Warner and freshman Sam Jones (Annapolis, Md.) – who recorded hat tricks.  All three players have produced a point in each of the six games this season, while Warner owns one of the nation’s longest point scoring streaks.  Ranked 20th, he has turned in either a goal or assist in 18-consecutive games dating back to last year’s Lehigh contest (March 2, 2010).

Jones, who has scored a goal in every game this season, paced the Mids with a career-high six points (3G, 3A).  He continues to move his way closer to Navy’s top-10 freshman points, goals and assists list.  He has amassed 25 points on 16 goals and nine assists.

Hull, meanwhile, moved into a tie for eighth on Navy’s all-time freshman assists list, turning in his 10th helper of the year.  He is tied with John Hawley (1985) and Jim Shulson (1975) and is three shy of tying seventh-place Mike Chanenchuk.

Defensively, it was Navy’s best effort to date, holding the Leopards to six goals.  It’s the fewest goals the Mids have given up since defeating Holy Cross, 12-3, on March 20, 2010.

“I think this week we focus on communication, getting fills and sliding at the right time,” said Hirsch, a three-year starter for the Mids.  “We were leaving RJ hung out to dry and we just couldn’t continue to let that happen.  Our team has been putting up goals and I think we are of the mindset that if we can hold our opponent to under 10 goals, we will win.”

The Midshipmen have a quick turnaround playing host to Towson Tuesday evening at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.  Faceoff is set for 7:00 pm.

Comments Off on Local Lacrosse Weekend 4 Wrap: Maryland tops Towson, Hopkins routs UMBC

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Towson Hoops Coach Pat Kennedy Resigns

Posted on 07 March 2011 by WNST Staff

Here is the official release, courtesy of Towson University…

Men’s Basketball Head Coach Pat Kennedy Resigns from Towson

TOWSON, Md. – Towson University head men’s basketball coach Pat Kennedy resigned from his position effective immediately, TU Director of Athletics Mike Waddell announced today. Kennedy completed his seventh season at Towson with a record of 4-26 as the Tigers head coach.

“Pat Kennedy is a class act and a great basketball mind,” said Towson Director of Athletics Mike Waddell.  “It is unfortunate the past seven seasons have not met our mutual expectations.  I am sure he will continue in the basketball world as he should.  We thank Pat and his wife Jeannie for all their efforts the past seven years and wish them the best in the future.”

The 2010-11 season marked Kennedy’s 31st as a Division I head coach. He ranks among the Top 25 active winningest Division I coaches with his 488 career victories, coming in at No. 22 before the start of the 2010-11 campaign.

Kennedy has taken teams to eight NCAA Tournaments and five NIT’s. He has had ten 20-plus win seasons and is the winningest coach in the Colonial Athletic Association. Over his career, 17 of his players he recruited went on to NBA careers, including former Towson Tiger and all-CAA selection Gary Neal from Baltimore’s Calvert Hall College, who is currently with the San Antonio Spurs.

A number of Kennedy’s former assistants have gone on to become head coaches or assistants in the NBA.

For over a decade, Pat served on the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) Board of Directors and was the organization’s President in 2004-05.

A confidential national search for the next head coach of Towson basketball will begin immediately. Towson will be utilizing the services of Fogler Enterprises, a nationally recognized firm that conducts searches for championship caliber basketball coaches. TU Director of Athletics Mike Waddell will not be making any further comments on the search until the process has concluded.

Q&A with Director of Athletics Mike Waddell

What are you looking for in a new head men’s basketball coach?

First and foremost we are looking for the best fit for the long term benefit and development of our men’s basketball program. That takes into consideration a coach’s knowledge of the game and the ability to be an effective teacher and communicator. Our coach must have solid East Coast recruiting ties and a proven track record of being able to recruit a high caliber of player.  We will talk with existing head coaches, former head coaches, current college and pro assistants. Being able to build a coaching staff is a very important element towards building a winning program.

Specifically when you talk style of play, I would like to see someone who values a tough minded, physical style of basketball, intense defense, solid fundamentals, and up tempo offense that is fun to watch.  Win or lose going forward teams need to remember the Tigers the morning after we play them.  That will breed an attitude amongst our team and our fans. There is nothing like watching student-athletes who give their all, dive for loose balls, and play with great emotion. The type of coach that we will bring to Towson will value these traits, along with others.  This will all come to the surface when we interview candidates over the run of the process. There are things that you know going in are 100 percent essential and then there are other traits that will become apparent when the right person is in the room with you. I cannot over communicate the need for a true fit for this position.

What is the timeline to have a new coach in place?

Ideally, we would have our new coach and his staff in place soon after the Final Four is complete in Houston, sometime during the first week in April or thereabout.  A lot of this depends on when the coaches we want to talk to are finished with their seasons.  The spring recruiting period begins around the middle of the month following a dead period immediately after the Final Four.  By meeting this timeline, we set ourselves up to be able to fill out our roster spots with some recruits in the spring signing period.

What are your selling points that you will use when talking to coaches about the position?

I believe that we have one of the best jobs in mid-major basketball when you look at the facts. We have a great city to live in, a great recruiting area to draw talent from, and an outstanding University for our prospective student-athletes to get a first-class education.  Probably the most exciting attribute is that starting in two years Towson will have the best basketball arena in the CAA as well as a new dedicated practice facility.  Off the court we are making improvements such as improved academic support, a dedicated basketball strength and conditioning coach and sports medicine professional, plus enhancements in housing assignments for our basketball program and the best meal plans to enhance their physical development.  We will also be looking to upgrade the competitive schedule to include some additional television appearances for the program and will be working with Under Armour to maximize our basketball brand, nationally and internationally.  We are very fortunate to have some enhanced support coming in from a variety of areas and that will be a booster rocket behind Tiger Basketball. We’re going to be successful here at Towson because there is simply no other outcome that is acceptable.

Who will be running the program during your search for a new head coach?

I have asked Assistant Coach Phil Cohen and Director of Basketball Operations Kerry Kinard to stay on during this interim period. Phil was the director of basketball operations last year before becoming an assistant coach. Kerry joined the staff this past October following stops with the Utah Jazz and Charlotte Bobcats of the NBA. They will conduct off-season workouts, help monitor academic performance while Assistant A.D. for Sports Performance James Shipp will oversee the weight room workouts and the rehabilitation of any lingering seasonal injuries.

Are you using a committee to assist you in the process of selecting the new head coach?

I will be speaking with a lot of different people over the course of the search who will share knowledge and counsel on the various candidates that we will visit with. There will be no formal search committee. Once I have a candidate that I am comfortable with, I will forward that name to the President for final approval.

When will you update fans on the progress of the search?

This interview will be the only time during the process that I will be communicating with the Tiger Nation until we have a press conference and welcome in our new coach. Over the last 22 years, I have been a part of a lot of coaching searches, some more high profile than others. One thing that I have learned is that you really can impair the process by conducting business through the media, intentionally or otherwise.  We have a plan on how to find a new head men’s basketball coach for Towson University and we will go out and bring back the best coach to lead us to the top of the CAA and beyond. Once we have a coach, we’ll call a press conference and will have that for you live on www.TowsonTigers.com.  Once something is decided, we will not let time pass before we share that with our fans and alumni. The more secure the process can operate the better quality of people who will be involved.

Comments Off on Towson Hoops Coach Pat Kennedy Resigns

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bud Millikan’s legacy lives on at Maryland

Posted on 28 January 2010 by Luke Jones

Bud Millikan won’t be remembered for Final Four appearances, national championships, or multiple ACC titles during his 17 seasons (1950-1967) as men’s basketball coach at the University of Maryland.

His 243-182 (.572) record and 1957-58 team’s ACC title and NCAA Elite Eight appearance is impressive but not overwhelming. Millikan helped usher in a new era of basketball in College Park as his Terrapins moved from Ritchie Coliseum to the legendary Cole Field House, but you won’t find a plethora of championship banners from his tenure hanging in the rafters.

Instead, the legacy of the late head coach can be found in the accomplishments of the players he coached.

Billy Franklin went on to coach Bowie High School.

Joe Harrington coached at George Mason, Long Beach State, Colorado, and currently serves as the director of men’s basketball student services at Maryland.

Terry Truax led Towson, and Billy Jones was the head man at UMBC.

And, of course, his point guard and team captain in 1967 was a young man named Gary Williams, currently in the midst of a Hall of Fame coaching career and 21-year tenure at Maryland that includes the school’s first and only national championship.

Coaches are ultimately—and understandably—judged by their win-loss records and number of championships won, but perhaps a more appropriate factor to consider is the impact left on the people they teach. Anyone who participated in a team sport at some point in their life can recall the influence a coach had—good or bad.

Most players take a coach’s lessons to improve their play in their respective sports and then move on with the rest of their lives, but a select few take these lessons with them to one day become coaches themselves.

That’s not to say the protege always becomes the carbon-copy of the mentor. Mike Krzyzewski will never be confused with the fiery Bobby Knight, but the lessons learned from his playing days at Army under the temperamental coach helped shape one of the finest coaches in the history of the college game.

Bill Walsh may always be defined by his three Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers, but isn’t it equally impressive to study the extensive coaching tree from his tutelage that has extended throughout the NFL over the last 20 years? Even former Ravens coach Brian Billick is a descendant and now finds his own former assistants making names for themselves as head coaches.

Millikan’s accomplishments as a head coach may not dazzle Terps fans of later generations, but his impact on Maryland basketball cannot be understated. To hear Williams speak about his college coach says it all.

“To have that many coaches come off one team shows that if you listened, you picked up a lot of good things. He was a tough coach and if you wanted to play, you did things his way.”

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

For any Maryland fan that’s savored the last 21 years under Gary Williams’ leadership that has lifted the program from the ashes of Len Bias’ death and NCAA probation to heights that once seemed unimaginable, Millikan deserves recognition for helping shape the coach that would one day guide a skinny underdog from Calvert Hall and a big kid from Silver Spring to the Georgia Dome in 2002.

And the rest was history.

In the final second, as Juan Dixon hurled the basketball toward the top of the Georgia Dome roof, Bud Millikan probably didn’t cross the mind of anyone watching except his former point guard—and the most important figure in the history of Maryland basketball.

When we reach the pinnacle of our respective careers, we cannot help but think of the people that helped us along the way. Undoubtedly, Williams had to be thinking back to the many lessons on man-to-man defense and tenacity acquired from his college coach in the mid-1960s.

And for that, Maryland fans should offer a few simple words to the late Millikan’s memory.

Thank you, Coach.


Comments Off on Bud Millikan’s legacy lives on at Maryland

Boss

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Giving Thanks to Baltimore coaches everywhere

Posted on 26 November 2009 by Nestor Aparicio

Well, we made it to yet another Thanksgiving. It’s another late Thursday in November, another Calvert Hall-Loyola game, another dose of Detroit for lunch and Dallas for dinner. We’re all a year older and hopefully a year wiser. It’s football, turkey and “giving thanks” for whatever good graces we all have in our lives.

So, being the sports guy that I am, I thought I’d write a Thanksgiving tribute to all of the coaches in my life. At 41 and being the nutty up-all-night sports web media entrepreneur that I am, the real gift of all of my years of doing Baltimore sports media has been the wisdom that I’ve unwittingly acquired along the way from coaches, managers and leaders of men in the business that I’ve fallen in love with – sports and community.

Of course, when you’re 15 years old and taking the No. 23 MTA bus downtown to Skipjacks games and writing about them for The News American next to John Steadman, you don’t realize until much later the impact these people have had on your life. So, today, I’ll give them thanks.

I truly have a lot to be thankful for – a great family, wife, son, a 90-year old Mom who brings great humor to my life, and many awesome partners, co-workers, friends, business associates and athletes, jocks and Facebook friends.

This whole “Thanksgiving blog” idea was borne out of a phone call I received about six weeks ago. It was from the 847 area code and I didn’t recognize the number. (This is where I should insert that I HATE phone calls. I’m a texter. I’m an emailer. I’ll even IM on occasion. Ask anyone in my life, I’m a communicator. But in 2009 – after spending 35 years of my life with my ear glued to a phone to do virtually every piece of my communication — I now find phone calls to be intrusive and disruptive and generally annoying.)

That said, I always seem to answer the damned thing.

“Hello,” I bellowed.

“Nestor…it’s Gene Ubriaco here. How ya been, kid?”

These are the little “gifts” that come out of the blue. I met Gene Ubriaco 25 years ago this month, when at the age of 16 I was put on the Skipjacks beat. My boss, Tom Gibbons, pulled me into his little office on Pratt and South Streets and basically said, “You’re the only one around here who actually wants to go down there and write about them so you’re our guy.”

Gibbons, who came from Boston and loved hockey, also had no budget at a dying newspaper (sound familiar?) and paid me $3.33 per hour to go to games. So, I made about $13 a game, parked for free, got free hot dogs and soda and the good fortune to sit on the roof of the then-Baltimore Civic Center’s rooftop veranda with the rats, roaches and a myriad of really cool old dudes who loved hockey and told me a zillion awesome stories. And sometimes, Barton Mitchell would even bring corned beef sandwiches from Attman’s as a “thank you” to the media.

Jimmy Jackson covered the team for The Sun. George Taylor covered the team for The Evening Sun. They were both well into their 60s. Pete Kerzel was my first media friend and we’d talk about pro wrestling and Jimmy Buffett. I was 16. Those evenings with Jackson and Taylor are my greatest memories of being a sportswriter. They’d eat Fiddle Faddle, yell at the officials, laugh and talk hockey.

After the games, we’d head down Baltimore’s slowest elevator to the locker room to chat with Skipjacks coach Gene Ubriaco. “Ubie,” as everyone would call him, was almost 50 then – a middling to bottom of the roster NHL hockey player but mostly a minor-leaguer who had made a post-career life as a coach and went on to lead the early Mario Lemieux-era Pittsburgh Penguins into a few playoff berths before being jettisoned. He also coached the Italian Olympic hockey team in Albertville, France in 1992 and has been in Chicago for the last 15 years running the Chicago Wolves of the AHL.

Ubie, who will turn 72 the day after Christmas, was kind of like an uncle to me, teaching me the game of hockey and giving me insights into the psychology of a hockey player. He knew because he had been that kid from “The Sault” (that’s Sault. St. Marie, Ontario, eh?) who was trying to catch on in the NHL. Ubie played just three season in “The Show” – all in different locales like Pittsburgh, Chicago and Oakland (yep, he was a Seal!)

Ubriaco would always take extra time to not just “give me quotes” – as every newspaper reporter needed – he would actually try to instruct me as to what he was thinking and why, so I learned more about the game. He was truly an educator, a teacher. He also had a little trouble hearing and pinched cheeks like the old Italian uncle.

Two decades later when I was sitting in NFL film rooms with Marvin Lewis or Jim Schwartz or Rex Ryan, I suppose that “learning” experience and openness that Ubriaco shared with me in 1984 was still being passed down to me by good men simply because I asked and had an interest in trying to get the story right.

Today, I celebrate Thanksgiving by thanking them here.

So, Ubriaco called me out of the blue six weeks ago, he’s back in Baltimore with his son for this holiday and on Black Friday we’re going to lunch together. We’re going to talk about old times, hockey and life. He recommended that we go to Gary Rissling’s place, Silver Spring Mining Company, and so it is. Rissling was on that first Skipjacks team I covered in 1984 and we work together to bring Caps fans to his restaurants and he still travels the world spreading the gospel of hockey.

Maybe you remember “My Dinner With Andre.” Well, this is my lunch with Geno. I’m sure I’ll have some great wnsTV footage.

But this reunion with Ubriaco has gotten me thinking about coaches and what an unbelievable source of knowledge they’ve been for me over the years in so many ways. Especially after my father died in 1992, they’ve all filled some sort of interesting role in my life as friends, teachers, advisors, sounding boards and confidants. And, obviously, Brian Billick is a partner in my business now at WNST.net. He’s shown the ultimate confidence in me and I’m thankful for his friendship and wisdom.

Ask my wife or anyone close to me and they’ll tell you that coaches are my favorite people in the world.

I’m really “thankful” for all that they’ve done for me.

At 41, I’ve now become a very reluctant coach of sorts. Sometimes, I’ve had to replace players, fire them, make moves for the betterment of the team at WNST. And it’s never easy and never comes without great strategy and use of knowledge and information that I’ve been taught by coaches.

But it’s no different than any of the other coaches who’ve had to deal with the media, cut players, fire assistants, deal with ownership, fans, the “crowd” and still manage to have families and passions outside of the games that they try so desperately to win.

Ubie was the first of many, many good men I’ve met and befriended along the way. Quite frankly, he taught me the ropes of being a sportswriter – all the stuff they’d never teach you in college.

One day I’ll write a whole book with a chapter about these guys and funny stories. (Some of them I could write a whole book about, but I don’t think I’m old enough to do that just yet.)

But I want to point some of them out by name, because it’s been one helluva run of good people over these 25 years and Ubie is special because he was the first person who took the time to care and try to help me not only understand the game but to be a better person.

For that, I’m thankful!

In hockey, Bryan Murray and Terry Murray (I covered the story the day the younger brother replaced his fired older brother…weird day at the Capital Centre!), Doug MacLean, Barry Trotz, Walt Kyle and Moe Mantha were all superstars in continuing a hockey tradition of fellowship.

I still see Trotz all the time in Nashville and one of Doug MacLean’s interns is our weekend Section 410 anchor Eric Aaronson. In particular, Terry Murray and I always had a special relationship because I had to track him down after games on the road in places like Fredericton and Binghamton to get quotes after listening to the games on the radio. He thought I was nutty/obsessed with getting the story and he was right. He always called me his “favorite reporter” in some sort of tongue-in-cheek way.

I also covered Eliott Uzelac’s macho boys of Navy football and Jim Lynam’s NBA Bullets. Lynam was a helluva good guy and loved to talk basketball. He was a junkie.

When I started doing radio in 1992 and the Orioles moved to Camden Yards, I inherited the first skipper that I really didn’t like, Johnny Oates. Unlike all of the other “friendly” skippers I’d had the good fortune to chat with after games in hockey, Oates was introverted, militaristic and hated any real questions.

Think about it. As a sports reporter, when you ask a “question” to a coach or player you’re essentially doubting, second-guessing or asking for some sort of justification for a decision or action. By its very nature, I suppose it’s weird or confrontational for anyone who is paranoid to be asked “why” they did or didn’t do something.

Oates, in particular, took every “What were you thinking in the 7th inning question?” as a personal assault. Almost 20 years later, just watching Dave Trembley do these things on live television after a loss is a throwback to the worst days of Oates. I literally cringe some nights.

But through it all, Oates appreciated that I knew the game and would take time to explain things on nights when the team won. But after a loss, he wasn’t warm and fuzzy. In the end, he came around during the 1993 season and apologized for being so evasive and snappy. This was right around the time that he found a spiritual change in his life and mellowed.

In September 1993 he chased me through the old Cleveland Stadium locker room – still the nastiest, dirtiest visiting locker room I’ve ever entered in any facility, major or minor league – while soaking wet and draped in a towel and called me into his office and we had a 30 minute chat about our roles and jobs and we made a peace pact and professional courtesy that lasted until his tragic death.

Oates was a good man. And in the end, he taught me a lot about baseball and about the people in baseball. It’s a conservative game. And it’s an awful business. There are a lot of tortured souls in the game of baseball, no matter how much money is involved.

In the days when I had a press pass (before Peter Angelos came and wrecked sports in our city during the summers since the mid 1990’s), baseball was great for educators about the game: Phil Regan, Greg Biagini, Chuck Cottier, Elrod Hendricks, Sam Perlozzo, Leo Mazzone, Davey Lopes, Tom Treblehorn, Bruce Bochy and Sparky Anderson were all awesome resources and always happy to answer any question that started with “Why?”

Cottier in particular would always put his arm around me and say: “Anything you ever wonder about in the game you just come to me and I’ll help you…”

I’m thankful for the Chuck Cottiers of baseball. There weren’t a lot of them, but they are appreciated.

I’ve also encountered some other great educators in other sports – Kenny Cooper, Pete Caringi, Dave MacWilliams, Kevin Healy, Bobby MacAvan, Tim Wittman, Mike Stankovic and others within the soccer world. And the basketball guys like Dino Gaudio, Mike Jaskulski, Terry Truax, Jimmy Patsos and Tom Sullivan have always had an open-door policy to asking questions about strategy and the nuances of the game on the hardwood.

Even with a sport like lacrosse, which has never been in my blood, when guys like Tony Seaman and Paul Cantabene do my radio show or see me out around town, they’ve always been enthusiastic about teaching me their game and comparing it to other sports so I could better understand the technical aspects.

But it’s been in my adulthood and with the emergence of the Ravens in Baltimore that my “coaching up” has taken on graduate-level courses.

Marvin Lewis was the first coach I met when the Ravens came in 1996. He’s taught me more about football than anyone over the years. Every Friday, we’d watch film and do a Q&A about the strategy of the game and the decisions that are made on the field on Sundays. Usually, Jim Schwartz was in the room in those early years and later did eight years worth of Fridays on my radio show and station, checking in with his Baltimore roots. Kirk Ferentz and Pat Hill were also phenomenally generous with their time and knowledge during the days of the flying ‘B.’

Then came Brian Billick and a myriad of super people like Jack Del Rio, Mike Smith, Mike Nolan, Mike Pettine, Rex Ryan, Jim Fassel, Rick Neuheisel and Matt Cavanaugh who always had a seat in their office for a few minutes of transparency in their ideologies and strategies to turn me from novice fan into someone who really understands the game.

And scouts like Phil Savage, Eric DeCosta, George Kokinis and Joe Hortiz are coaches of a whole different kind and have always been educational and accountable.

Again, one day, I’ll write a whole book on these guys above – the education is always ongoing with football and the NFL.

But for today, I just want to say “THANKS, COACH!” I’ll never be able to repay them for their time, energy or candor about all aspects of their job.

My Pop was the ultimate coach – he taught me to listen to coaches.

And as much as I know I’m still not the world’s greatest listener…

Boss

I must’ve done something right along the way because I’ve certainly heard the greater message.

Honesty. Integrity. Kindness. Charity. Friendship. Honor. Strategy. Accountability. Passion. Respect. Diligence. Creativity. Team first. These are the things that all of these sports coaches preach on a daily basis to their players. I’d like to think that a lot of this has sunk in over the years.

So, on this Thanksgiving, I just want to take time to thank all of the people who’ve taught me the most about life.

To the coaches of Baltimore over the past 25 years who’ve been cool and kind and helpful – with a special bow to Gene Ubriaco — on this special Thursday in November, I say: Happy Thanksgiving!

Comments Off on Giving Thanks to Baltimore coaches everywhere

Tags: , , ,

Loyola Wins Again and a National Record is Broken at the MIAA Swimming Championships

Posted on 09 February 2009 by Alex Thomas

As expected, the Loyola Dons won their sixteenth consecutive MIAA swimming title this past weekend, led by several All-American performances from breaststroke specialist Sean Roddy and freestyle phenom Hugh Davison.

And as their coach, I’m also very proud to say that the Calvert Hall Junior Varsity squad captured the MIAA JV championship. The JV aquacards were led by John Fox’s incredible victory in the 100 breaststroke and strong performances from freestyle specialist Justin Brier, freshman IMer Steven Roberts, sophomore sprinter Rob Walker, and distance swimmer Trey Guillott.

In one of the fastest meets I have ever been a part of, both competing and coaching, MIAA swimmers put on a show Saturday night. In fact, Michael Phelps’ coach Bob Bowman was in attendance to witness the fastest meet in MIAA history. Loyola, McDonough, and Calvert Hall could have easily beaten most local colleges. It was THAT fast.

Every single MIAA meet record was broken, except for the 100 backstroke record which is held by Mt. St. Joe alum and former Olympian Tom Hannan.

The highlight of the meet was the ‘A’ Conference finals of the Men’s 50 Freestyle. After swimming a blistering 20.26 in prelims, McDonough’s Giles Smith did the unthinkable. Smith broke a national high school record in the 50 freestyle, touching the wall in 19.74 seconds!

There were countless All-Americans and it would take forever to post them all. Even kids who earned third and fourth place were swimming All-American times. Here are some other quick highlights from the meet:

-In the ‘B’ conference, St. Paul’s Austin Surhoff, BJ Surhoff’s son and a future Texas Longhorn, swam a meet-record and automatic All-American qualifying time in the 200 IM (1:48.68).

-Loyola’s Sean Roddy, a future LSU Tiger, set a meet record in the 100 breaststroke, registering a time of 55.66, also good enough for All-American.

-Loyola’s Hugh Davison and McDonough’s Drew Cosgarea tied for first in the 200 freestyle. Both swam a meet record and All-American time of 1:38.89. To put things in perspective, a 200 yard freestyle is 8 laps in a regulation pool. Davison won the 100 freestyle in a meet record time of 46.26 and Cosgarea won the 500 freestyle in a meet record time of 4:29.42. Both swims were also All-American qualifiers.

-To cap off an incredible performance, Giles Smith set a meet record in the 100 butterfly, setting the mark at 48.82 seconds.

-Despite coming in third place behind other-worldly performances by the relay teams from McDonough and Loyola, the Calvert Hall 200 Freestyle Relay broke a 15-year-old school record. The team of Pat Seipp, Will McLennan, Nick Girken, and Dave Roberts touched the wall in 1:27.17, good enough for All-American. In the lead off leg, Seipp swam his 50 in 21.32, which qualifies him for All-American consideration.

In two weeks, the Dons and the Cardinals will compete against the best swimming programs on the east coast. The 2009 Easterns will be held at La Salle University starting February 20th.

Comments Off on Loyola Wins Again and a National Record is Broken at the MIAA Swimming Championships

Tags: , , ,

Loyola Dons Win Second Consecutive National Catholic Swimming Title; Other Local Teams Perform Well

Posted on 03 February 2009 by Alex Thomas

Under Loyola Blakefield Aquatics Director Keith Schertle, the Loyola Dons captured their second consecutive National Catholic Swimming title this past weekend at Villanova, blowing most of the competition out of the water.

Here are the final top 10 team results. Local teams have been posted in bold:

TEAM SCORES

1 LOYOLA BLAKEFIELD 432
2 GONZAGA HIGH SCHOOL 310
3 GEORGETOWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 292
4 CALVERT HALL COLLEGE HS 184.5
5 MALVERN PREP SWIMMING 169
6 BISHOP O’CONNELL HIGH SCHOOL 162
7 GOOD COUNSEL 141
8 PAUL VI CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 129
9 MOUNT ST. JOSEPH 120.5
10 SETON HALL 90

Points are awarded based on performances in the Sunday Finals, in which swimmers scored points for placing anywhere from 1-16.

Loyola’s Keith Schertle was named Coach of the Meet, and Seton Hall’s Jameson Hill was named Swimmer of the Meet by the coaches.

Below, I have listed the top 10 times and places from all of the local athletes in each event, as well as some notable swims from five-star recruits in the Mid-Atlantic area.

It was very exciting to watch these athletes swim so well, and I witnessed some VERY fast swimming over the weekend. Notable swims by athletes from outside the Baltimore area are listed in bold:

200 Medley Relay

1 LOYOLA BLAKEFIELD ‘A’ 1:36.11
7 CALVERT HALL COLLEGE HS 1:41.30
9 MOUNT ST. JOSEPH HS 1:44.39

200 Freestyle

1 HILL, JAMESON JR SETON 1:39.94

3 PORTER, ALEX SO LB 1:44.34

6 WARREN, ARCHIE SR CALVERT HALL 1:48.86

7 MARQUEZ, MATT JR LB 1:49.04

200 Individual Medley

1 RODDY, SEAN SR LB 1:50.56

3 BENNETT, OLIVER SO LB 1:56.05

7 MCDONALD, KENDRICK FR LB 2:01.45

50 Freestyle

2 DAVISON, HUGH JR LB 21.42

7 JONES, AARON SO LB 22.34

11 ROBERTS, DAVID JR CALVERT HALL 22.45

12 MCLENNAN, WILL SR CALVERT HALL 22.64

100 Butterfly

1 FOX, BRADY SR GEORGETOWN PREP 49.72

4 THEIN, TYLER SR LB 52.79

5 ELFERT, TYLER JR LB 53.10

7 ROBERTS, DAVID JR CALVERT HALL 53.76

100 Freestyle

1 HILL, JAMESON JR SETON 45.76

4 SEIPP, PAT JR CALVERT HALL 48.71

8 KERINS, BRENDAN JR MT. ST. JOE HS 50.06

500 Freestyle

1 DAVISON, HUGH JR LB 4:32.52

4 PORTER, ALEX SO LB 4:46.87

8 MARQUEZ, MATT JR LB (4:53 Prelim) 5:01.86

9 CADIGAN, TIMOTHY SR CHC (5:04 Prelim) 4:51.69

200 Freestyle Relay

1 GONZAGA COLLEGE HS 1:25.35

2 LOYOLA BLAKEFIELD 1:26.23

3 CALVERT HALL COLLEGE HS 1:28.33

8 MOUNT ST. JOSEPH HS ‘A’ 1:32.60

100 Backstroke

1 FOX, BRADY SR GEORGETOWN PREP 50.30

2 BENNETT, OLIVER SO LB 53.21

5 PELTON, GREG SR LB 54.43

10 KERINS, BRENDAN JR MT. ST. JOE HS 55.45

100 Breaststroke

1 RODDY, SEAN SR LB 56.04

2 THEIN, TYLER SR LB 1:00.62

3 ELFERT, TYLER JR LB 1:01.08

8 GORMAN, ERIC JR CALVERT HALL 1:03.97

400 Freestyle Relay

1 LOYOLA BLAKEFIELD 3:08.48

5 MOUNT ST. JOSEPH HS 3:21.01

6 CALVERT HALL COLLEGE HS 3:21.18

The MIAA Swimming Championships will be held at McDonough this weekend. Expect more fast swimming this coming weekend, and try to make it out to McDonough on Saturday night to watch the finals.

Comments Off on Loyola Dons Win Second Consecutive National Catholic Swimming Title; Other Local Teams Perform Well

Tags: , , ,

Local Teams Compete in the National Catholic High School Swimming Championships

Posted on 28 January 2009 by Alex Thomas

The National Catholic High School Swimming Championships will take place at Villanova University this weekend, and several local teams have been invited to compete. Calvert Hall, Loyola, Mt. St. Joe, Spalding, and Sts. Peter and Paul will be traveling up to Philadelphia this weekend to compete against some of the Mid-Atlantic’s best high school swimming programs.

Among the other teams attending are Georgetown Prep, Gonzaga, Malvern Prep, Bishop O’Connell, and Good Counsel.

Loyola is heavily favored to repeat as NCHS champions this year. The Dons are led by All-American breaststroke/IM specialist Sean Roddy, who will be attending LSU next year to swim for the Tigers, who boast one of the best programs in the country.

Roddy was the Baltimore Sun’s Athlete of the Week on January 16th, after going 57.41 in the 100 breaststroke and 1:53.81 in the 200 IM against Mercersburg Academy in a dual meet a few days prior. The same day he was named Athlete of the Week, he proceeded to break his own breaststroke school record against McDonogh (56.08) and broke another school record in the IM (1:49.39).

Georgetown Prep’s Brady Fox, a five-star prospect by Swimming World magazine, should also put on a strong performance. Fox has Olympic time trial cuts in both backstroke events (100 meter and 200 meter distances), and has committed to UVA, rounding out arguably the strongest recruiting class in the nation.

The Maryland teams are right in the middle of the “taper” portion of their practice schedule, where dryland activities end, and the coaches focus on having their athletes swim fast while doing significantly less yardage. The teams will not complete their taper, however, until next week, as the National Catholics are just a quiz before the big test. The MIAA swimming championships will take place next Saturday at McDonogh.

Regardless, expect some fast swimming this weekend up at Villanova.

Comments Off on Local Teams Compete in the National Catholic High School Swimming Championships

Tags: , , , , ,

Holiday Edition of The Wednesday Wheelhouse

Posted on 31 December 2008 by Alex Thomas

Welcome back to the Wednesday Wheelhouse, where we discuss anything and everything that’s on your mind. It’s been a few weeks since the last edition, so let’s jump right into it.

-Yesterday morning, Nestor, Brad, and I were playing with the new commercial software on the Apple Mini, and I overheard Drew and Glenn discussing who was their Ravens MVP. The media has voted on Ed Reed, and it’s hard to argue with that selection. But I’d have to go with Derrick Mason. My decision is based more on the guts than the glory of Mason’s performance this year, but he’s been nothing but reliable and a consummate professional for this Ravens team. Granted, we wouldn’t be 11-5 without Joe Flacco…but Joe Flacco wouldn’t be who he is today without Derrick Mason.

-So…Mark Hendrickson, huh? That’s the Orioles big off-season signing? Way to mount a strong comeback after dropping the ball with Mark Teixiera. When you’re a bad team, you have to overpay for free agents…bottom line. The sooner the Orioles realize that, the better off we’ll all be.

-It’s been a while since we talked about the English Premier League, so here’s an update for those who don’t follow soccer. The top five are as follows: 1. Liverpool (45 points…without Fernando Torres) 2. Chelsea (42 points) 3. Manchester United (38 points +19). 4. Aston Villa (38 points +11) 5. Arsenal (35 points). As a Manchester United supporter, I’m pretty stoked. The Red Devils sit in 3rd place with 38 points and a +19 goal differential, and they’ve played two fewer games than the rest of the top five. Mainly because they were busy winning the Fifa Club World Cup, beating Ecuador’s LDU Quito 1-0 in a match that should not have been that close. ManU dominated the game, but couldn’t finish their chances until a Wayne Rooney bullet found the back of the net in the second half.

-In swimming news, Michael Phelps was named U.S. Sports Academy’s Athlete of the Year after his ridiculous performance in Beijing this past summer. I swam with Michael for a few years at NBAC, and actually beat him in the 50 yard Breaststroke at the Maryland All-Star Meet when I was 10 years old…I don’t mean to brag, but after swimming for 18 years that’s still my claim to fame (LOL)! Locally, the Loyola Dons completed their annual holiday 100 mile swim for charity. In past years, the Dons have sent their fund-raiser money to Johns Hopkins Bayview Burn Center, Christo Rey House, and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society among others. Head Coach Keith Schertle does an excellent job with this event, and the Dons are poised to win yet another MIAA swimming championship…at this point, it’s too many consecutive wins to count. While Calvert Hall has dominated water polo for the past decade, Loyola has been just as dominant in swimming.

-For the second year, Yellow Taxi is providing free taxi rides for the inebriated during the New Year’s Eve holiday. Those who live in the Baltimore area should use the “Tipsy? Taxi!” program. This event is sponsored by AAA Mid-Atlantic, and covers up to $50 in cab fares. Any fee over $50 will be the passenger’s responsibility. Those who are interested should call 1-877-963-TAXI…you might want to save that number in your phone now, because as the night progresses, that cell phone screen seems to increase in blurriness. “Is this thing on?”

Have a very happy New Year, and please be safe tonight. Don’t be stupid. Have you seen all of those DUI commercials on TV? DUI check points will be all over the place tonight. My advice: go somewhere and stay there.

Talk to you in 2009!

Comments Off on Holiday Edition of The Wednesday Wheelhouse