Tag Archive | "caps"

Kuzy Canucks

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Caps Win 10th Straight At Home in 3-1 Triumph Over Vancouver

Posted on 09 January 2018 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals scored three goals in a span of 10 minutes and Philipp Grubauer stopped 37 of 38 shots as the Caps reeled off their 10th straight victory at home to defeat the Vancouver Canucks, 3-1, at Capital One Arena on Tuesday night.

Washington, who will face Carolina in a home and home matchup on Thursday and Friday, have just those two tilts to play before their five day “bye” break begins on Saturday. With the triumph over Vancouver, the Capitals improve to 27-13-3 (57 points) and they lead the Metropolitan Division by a season high four points over the Columbus Blue Jackets, who have played one more game. New Jersey is five points behind the Caps, but they have two games in hand.

The Canucks destroyed the Capitals back in October, 6-2, when Washington wasn’t playing good hockey and were missing some top players (Matt Niskanen and Nicklas Backstrom). Since then, though, the Caps have been one of the league’s best squads while Vancouver has turned into the doormat I and many others expected them to be this season. Coach Travis Green’s club is now 16-21-6 (38 points) and only the Arizona Coyotes have fewer points than the Canucks in the Western Conference.

On paper, this looked like a mismatch, but the game started well for the visitors. Washington was sloppy with the puck giving the Canucks more shot opportunities. Grubauer didn’t have to make many big saves early, but a Devante Smith Pelly lazy offensive zone infraction put Vancouver on the power play. Coach Barry Trotz’ improving PK unit looked ready to kill it off, but when Chandler Stephenson jumped over the boards and battled for the puck before Tom Wilson could get to the bench, the Caps were boxed for too many dudes. That gave Vancouver a five on three and it was pretty much a five on two when Jay Beagle was hobbled after blocking a shot. The huge manpower difference for the Canucks resulted in a Daniel Sedin tip in of an Alex Edler point shot at 8:23.

With a 1-0 lead, Nikolay Goldobin nearly made it a two puck advantage, but Grubauer made a big save on #77 and then he hit the pipe with the rebound. It was one of those quality high danger stops at a key time that Washington has gotten a lot of this season from their stellar goaltending duo of #31 and Braden Holtby.

Just two minutes after that, John Carlson tied the game when he fired the puck on net from the right wing boards and it went five hole on Jacob Markstrom (33 saves). The big goalie was likely distracted by the net coming up in the air just beforehand along with Michael Del Zotto standing right in front of him messing with the cage. Green challenged the goal for goalie interference, but there was none of that and the tally stood.

Washington continued to press the play and less than three minutes later they took the lead when Madison Bowey gave Lars Eller a nice neutral zone feed. Eller then headed up the middle of the ice with speed and using the Vancouver defender as a screen, Lars shot from just inside the blue line and it beat the goalie, who was suffering from an obstructed view, top shelf. That goal, on a heck of a snipe, made it 2-1 with 2:08 left in the opening frame.

In the middle stanza, Washington was downright dominant controlling the puck for the majority of the period. Evgeny Kuznetsov increased the Capitals lead to 3-1 at the 4:57 mark when he took a feed from Niskanen just outside the offensive blue line and skated in with Erik Gudbranson charging towards him. Kuzy shot the puck and Markstrom batted the rebound in the air into the slot. Both Kuznetsov and Gudbranson swatted at the puck, but it was the stiff #44 who put it into his own net with his glove. The marker gives #92 13 goals for the season.

The Capitals were relentless in their pursuit of the puck and it was wave after wave of Washington players storming into the offensive end in period two, one in which the Caps have really struggled in this season. That was not the case on Tuesday and if not for a lot of over passing, this game should have gotten out of hand. Once again, the Capitals were trying for the perfect play, which was kind of silly considering the way they scored their first three goals, which were on pucks just directed at the net. As fun as it was to watch, the Caps skill and Harlem Globetrotters like play resulted in zero goals the remainder of the period. That was disappointing because Coach Trotz’ crew was really skating and working, but they again suffered from being too fancy.

The passing up of shots, especially from the high danger area of the ice, has to change if Washington wants to advance deep into the playoffs and reach their ultimate goal. This squad has a TON of skill and talent, but sometimes they out think themselves in trying to be too perfect and it allowed a crummy hockey team like Vancouver to stick around in this affair.

In the third period, the Canucks had 20 shots on net as they tried to come back, but 11 of those came in the last nine plus minutes and there weren’t many quality chances. Grubauer made some nice glove saves, but those were on shots he clearly had a great sight line on.

This was really a mismatch, but the Caps couldn’t finish. They often passed themselves out of a scoring chance or they waited too long to shoot and with Markstrom taking up so much cage with his size, they had trouble getting biscuits behind him. The NHL is a shoot first and shoot quick league, but the Caps seem to forget that, too often, and it takes away from their offense. Washington has the puck a lot, but based on shot attempts, you wouldn’t think so. The fact is this team is so focused on the perfect goal play that they decrease their chances of scoring. If they can get away from the extra cross ice pass in the offensive zone and focus on hard shots on net that either go in or produce rebounds, they will score even more.

Overall, this was a solid victory. Grubauer was very composed and poised in net. You never felt like he was going to give up a goal that would get Vancouver back in the contest. The Canucks didn’t have the puck a ton despite their 73-65 edge in shot attempts. Coach Green’s team often just throws the puck on net from everywhere, but the Capitals kept them on the perimeter quite a bit. On the flip side, the Caps got into the interior on offense, but they too often didn’t seize the right moment to fire on net. That’s why the scoreboard stayed close, despite the on ice domination that Washington displayed.

Notes: Jakub Vrana had a very active game with six shots on net. He was really moving his legs and opening up space on the ice…Brooks Oprik had a semi-breakaway in period three and was drilled by a Ben Hutton elbow to the head (no penalty was called) and sent flying to the ground. Smith-Pelly came in, immediately went after Hutton, and threw some good punches to let the Canuck know that the questionable hit was not well received by Washington. Orpik had a strong night going +1 in 20:49 and he had four shot attempts…Alex Ovechkin had six shot attempts and an assist in 19:25…the Caps were 0 for 2 on the power play while Vancouver was 1 for 3. I didn’t think Kevin Pollock and Kendrick Nicholson called a good game, they missed several infractions on the Canucks, but perhaps they were too busy focusing on offside since linesman Greg Devorski left after the first period due to an illness?…the Capitals won the faceoff battle, 33-28. Kuznetsov was 10-6…Wilson was very impressive with six shots on goal and seven hits…Bowey had an assist in 14:44 and he was much cleaner with his puck management…T.J. Oshie had 0 shots on goal in 17:39. His hands seemed to be betraying him in this affair…Carlson led the Caps in ice time with 24:16.

Comments (0)

Ovi Bruins

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ovechkin and Holtby Help Caps Rally for 12th Straight Victory Over Boston

Posted on 28 December 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Trailing 2-0 and being out shot attempted, 27-11, the Washington Capitals were staring at a fourth straight defeat and their first loss to the Boston Bruins in 12 games.

Braden Holtby (32 saves), however, somehow held the Caps in this one until the team found its legs and game after it seemed to have disappeared once they left the Lone Star State back on December 19th.

Midway through period two, a Tom Wilson offensive zone hit forced a turnover and Lars Eller fired the biscuit past Anton Khudobin (31 saves) for his first goal in 17 games. That tally gave Washington life and they slowly started to take over this affair.

23 seconds after Lars had ended a Caps shutout streak that spanned over two games and was fast approaching the team record drought of 181:15 from 1989 (h/t @TomGulittiNHL), Jakub Vrana used his speed to go around Torey Krug like an orange road cone to draw a slashing penalty. Washington’s power play, which was in a 1 for 23 dry spell of its own, finally woke up and the Gr8, Alex Ovechkin, took a whale of a pass from John Carlson and blasted it by the Qdoba man in net to tie the game up just 1:37 after Eller had broken the seal.

From there the Capitals really played their game against a very good and red hot Boston squad. Khudobin made some amazing stops to keep his team in it and when T.J. Oshie made a bad defensive zone turnover after exiting the sin bin with 12:21 left, David Backes tallied from the high danger area to give Boston the lead again. Surely the Bruins would finally end this Capitals curse, right?

The Holtbeast would have none of that and he made several huge stops on a Bruins power play (0 for 5) to keep it a one goal margin after Devante Smith-Pelly was called for a questionable holding infraction.

Another hard working shift by Wilson, Eller, and Brett Connolly resulted in a goal mouth scramble tally for #10, his eighth marker of the season, and this tilt was all knotted up with 8:38 remaining.

The Capitals pressed the play and had the lion share of the chances, but Anton was really solid in the cage and this one went to overtime. Ovechkin had a great chance in OT on his backhand, but he missed the net and the bonus point ended up being decided in the skills competition.

Oshie, who was -2 but had six shots on goal in 21:39, didn’t even get a shot off on his attempt, which really makes you wonder if he’s feeling 100%? I love the Osh Babe as much as anyone, but he has not looked the same since returning from the concussion he incurred from the Joe Thornton cheap shot back on December 4th.

Brad Marchand, Evgeny Kuznetsov, and David Pastrnak all couldn’t light the lamp setting the stage for the Gr8 to try and put the Caps up in the third and final round. The cuddly Ovi skated in on Khudobin, who was fabulous for Boston, and beat him top shelf glove side with an utterly sick shot that went just under the bar. The Holtbeast then forced Riley Nash to shoot wide and #70 continued his mastery over the boys from Beantown, who have been playing some really good hockey.

The much needed victory improves the Caps to 23-13-3 (49 points) and they’ll take on the New Jersey Devils at Capital One Arena on Saturday night. The Devils host the Sabres on Friday at The Rock and when they beat Buffalo they’ll have a two point lead on the Capitals.

Washington, who blew a late lead and lost in OT in Arizona, then were blitzed in the first period in Vegas on December 23rd, and fell in the shootout after a scoreless 65 minutes at Madison Square Garden, has been playing some unintelligent hockey lately. Over passing was back and there were far too many defensive zone turnovers by both defensemen and forwards that led to quality chances and goals against. That trend continued in the first period against the Bruins. A lack of recent practice time was vividly evident as passes were missing the mark far too often.

Somehow, though, the team worked through it and they started looking like the club that won 11 of 13 games before the recent slide (0-1-2). Maybe it’s the home cooking or the Rock the Red crowd, but the energy seemed to be back in Washington’s skates? Over the last 45 minutes, they closed the shot attempt margin to 69-65. Thus the Caps had a 12 shot attempt advantage after it was 2-0 and that came against a hockey team that is playing as well as any team in the league.

So that’s the encouraging part of Thursday’s rally, Washington has tons of talent, but they need to consistently get back to playing north-south hockey and lose the soft and careless bad habits they’ve picked up recently. They are routinely being bailed out by great goaltending; Philipp Grubauer was outstanding in extra time losses in the Desert and in the Big Apple. Holtby was good despite being dented three times in the opening frame in Rock Vegas and #70, once again, found a way to get it done against a team he’s had so much success against at the NHL level.

Plain and simple, the Holtbeast owwwwwnnnnnnssss the B’s!

Oh, and that guy wearing the C, he’s pretty darn good, too. After the shootout loss to the Rangers, the team leader stated that the Caps needed to get back to playing a more simple game. On Thursday, after the bad start, they did just that and were triumphant. That’s quality leadership right there.

Notes: the Caps got physical over the last 45 minutes and outhit Boston, 37-14, on the night. Willy had seven hits and Ovi had five…Ovi had ten shot attempts (four on net) and Oshie had nine…the Capitals lost the faceoff battle, 37-30…Carlson led the team in time on ice at 28:51. #74 had a bad giveaway on the Bruins first goal, but John rallied to have a strong game as did Madison Bowey (1 assist in 9:34), who was beaten on the second Boston marker. #22 had some other rough shifts in the early going before settling in, like many of his teammates for the last two periods and overtime…Christian Djoos was +2 in only 11:59 of action. He took a puck to the face on Wednesday against the Rags that required stitches, but he returned to finish that game…Andre Burakovsky only played 8:42 and was minus one. The Caps need the #65 that dominated in Dallas on a more consistent basis…the Caps claimed Nathan Walker back off of waivers from Edmonton last week and on Thursday the Aussie was sent to Hershey to hone his game…Coach Barry Trotz tied Lindy Ruff for the fifth most wins in NHL coaching history with 735…the Caps have won a season high seven straight games at Capital One Arena…there’s no place like home!

Comments Off on Ovechkin and Holtby Help Caps Rally for 12th Straight Victory Over Boston

Burkie Holtby

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Burakovsky Delivers for the Caps in the Lone Star State

Posted on 20 December 2017 by Ed Frankovic

The Caps welcomed back T.J. Oshie into the lineup after he missed six games due to a Joe Thornton cheap shot, but the real welcome back on Tuesday night in Dallas should go to Andre Burakovksy. The Swedish winger, who missed 20 games with a fractured thumb and had been struggling since returning to the lineup 10 days ago, scored twice, including the game winner just 1:51 into overtime. Burkie also assisted on the game tying tally with 3:36 remaining in regulation when he outworked Dallas defenders in the left wing boards and then set up Brett Connolly in the high slot, who fired a quick laser past Ben Bishop (24 saves) to tie the game at three.

Wow, what a hockey game!

This was a physical and fast paced game. Dallas was downright cheap with some of their play, including an Antoine Roussel hit to Oshie in the first period that no one in the Capitals organization liked.

All game the Stars tried to be physical and there were several extracurricular scrums following whistles. It was vintage Ken “I learned to coach in the Flyers organization” Hitchcock.

Washington, however, would not back down in this affair. They started the scoring 10:35 into this game when Connolly made a great play in his own end to get the puck out, then with Lars Eller (+3) smartly driving the net, #10 fed a sweet backhanded cross ice pass to Burakovsky (two goals, one assist, +3) and he buried it quickly. It was a great shot and it came with none of the recent hesitation we’ve seen from Andre.

The Stars would tie the game up on a power play they received when the turtling Roussel jumped Wilson on a centre ice faceoff, then fell on his back and covered up. Willy received four minutes to just two for the Stars player in a call by Steve Kozari and Furman South that left many heads scratching.

As has been the case lately, especially on the road, the Capitals struggled in the middle frame. The biggest problem is that with the long change they don’t simplify their game and they turn too many pucks over at the offensive blue line. Instead of getting pucks deep and wearing out their opponent, the opposition gets the disc and goes the other way and exhausts Washington.

Dallas would take the lead at 11:09 of the middle frame and they held a large possession advantage in that period. After the goal though, Caps captain Alexander Ovechkin seemed on a mission and he was flying on the ice and using his body to throttle Star players. Suddenly Washington came to life and Dmitry Orlov scored a beauty of a goal when the Stars defenders thought for sure #9 was going to drop pass to the Gr8, who was barreling in the zone right behind Dima. Orlov then faked the pass, backhanded the biscuit through his skates, toe dragged the disc, and then flew around John Klingberg to score a goal top shelf that was reminiscent of Paul Coffey’s end to end rushes with the Edmonton Oilers in the 1980’s. Boy was that tally sweet!

In that middle frame the Capitals were outshot 14-5 and the shot attempts through 40 minutes were 50-31 for the Stars. The reason the Caps were able to stay in this game, once again, was because of their all world goaltender, Braden Holtby (33 saves). The Holtbeast made a huge save on a Stars four on two rush when it was 2-1. If it goes 3-1, Washington probably loses this contest.

In the third stanza and overtime, the Caps came to play, out shot attempting Dallas, 25-20, but a neutral zone turnover and poor gap control allowed the Stars to take a 3-2 lead with 4:07 left. After playing such a good road game to that point, you would have thought the team would be deflated and feel like the Big D curse was going to strike again, but not this Washington bunch. The third line came out and had a completely dominant shift with Burakovsky winning some big one on one battles on the wall to set up Connolly for a great tally just 41 seconds after Hitchcock’s chippy Stars thought they were going to get two points.

In overtime, Holtby made a great stick shaft save on a Stars three on two to get a defensive zone faceoff and then Washington went the other way with the puck and worked their cycle game in the offensive zone. Burakovsky actually had two other opportunities to shoot, but he passed up the openings and kept circling. Burkie and John “Norris Trophy Worthy” Carlson worked a nice overlap play that gave #65 a straight line to the net and he roofed one by Bishop to give Washington an amazing victory in Dallas, their second straight 4-3 overtime win in two years in the Lone Star State.

In summary, this was a gutsy effort by the Caps. Jakub Vrana stuck up for Oshie early on before Wilson could announce his presence to that punk Roussel with authority. In addition, the Osh Babe sacrificed his leg to block a shot late in the game, but he eats rocks for breakfast and came back out for his next shift. This was a tough game and the Stars brought their intensity that often crossed the line. But this Capitals squad continues to come together and work as a team. The young rookies on defense, Christian Djoos (1 assist) and Madison Bowey are getting better and better and the forward lines are starting to really take shape. Alex Chiasson had another good game despite being moved to the fourth line while the third line was the difference in this affair, along with Holtby.

The Caps have now won four games in a row, are 22-12-1 (45 points) and are back in sole possession of first place in the Metropolitan Division. The division race is really tight and every game matters. The scary thing is that this Capitals club, which is winning games despite injuries and rookies scattered across the lineup, can still get a lot better.

On Thursday night, however, they can sit back and enjoy this win over the chippy and cheap Hitchcock led Stars. Scoreboard Hitch!

Notes: Carlson was outstanding again on the back end logging a team leading 27:07. He had an assist on the GWG and he was +2…Orlov is playing super on defense, as well. His only mistake was backing up a bit too much on the Stars third goal. Dima played 23:54. He’s been super since Halloween…Connolly is now up to seven goals on the season and if that 3rd line can gel like it did last January, look out!…Ovi had eight shot attempts and no points, but he continues to fly on the ice. His speed and tenacity is making a difference out there. I thought his play after the Stars took the lead in the middle frame helped turn the Caps fortunes around. Dallas knew they couldn’t contain him and over focused on the Gr8, opening up the lanes for others, and Orlov took full advantage of that. Wow, I’ll say this again, what a goal that was by Dmitry!…Final shot attempts were 70-56 for Dallas. Shots on goal were 36-28 for the Stars…the faceoff battle was tied at 28 apiece. Jay Beagle went 11-6…the Caps were 0 for 3 on the power play while Dallas went 1 for 4. Next up for the Capitals are the Coyotes in Arizona on Friday night, then they play the Vegas Golden Knights in Rock Vegas on Saturday night before they go on a three day Christmas break from December 24th through 26th.

Comments Off on Burakovsky Delivers for the Caps in the Lone Star State

Ovi Detroit

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ovechkin’s OT Tally Helps Caps Right the Ship

Posted on 20 October 2017 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals were less than three minutes away from losing their fifth game in their last six tries and falling below .500 for the first time in forever, and then everything changed.

Detroit’s Dylan Larkin took a careless delay of game penalty and T.J. Oshie scored on the power play, with Braden Holtby on the bench for the extra attacker, with just 1:01 remaining to send this tilt to overtime.

In the Caps first ever visit to the new Little Caesar’s Arena, Alexander Ovechkin drew a tripping penalty and then scored his first career goal on Wings goalie, Petr Mrazek, to win the game for Washington, 4-3. The Capitals are now 4-3-1 on the season and more importantly, they halted a two game slide. Had they lost this one, they would’ve been 0-3 without the injured Matt Niskanen in the lineup.

For most of this game, the Capitals played well, especially at five on five, but they took too many penalties, once again (five). Detroit used the last one, a terrible delay of game penalty on John Carlson, to grab a 3-2 lead with 6:15 left in regulation. The goal by Tomas Tatar, which came just over seven minutes after he scored his first of the night on an unbelievable deflection to tie the game up at deuces, came on a power play rush. Good things happen when you get pucks to the net and that’s what the Red Wings did on their first 3rd period tally that came just under four minutes after Jay Beagle’s shorthanded breakaway gave Washington a 2-1 lead just 84 seconds into the final frame.

Things were looking bad for the Caps trailing by a puck with just six minutes left and they didn’t help themselves by trying too many East-West passes when they were coming across the Detroit blue line. Washington tends to get into this habit too often. Good things happen when you get pucks and bodies to the net, the Tatar first tally was proof of that, so why the Capitals keep forcing cross ice feeds just inside the opposing blue line is a head scratcher?

Larkin’s mistake allowed the Caps to finally realize what they needed to do to succeed – go North-South and get to the net. Coach Barry Trotz pulled the Holtbeast (34 saves) and put Ovechkin, Oshie, Carlson, Evgeny Kuznesov, Nicklas Backstrom, and Andre Burakovsky on the ice. Burakovksy, who has been really struggling, had more jump in this one, especially after he tied the game up late in period two with a sweet snipe off of a great feed from Dmitry Orlov. #65’s laser was able to elude Mrazek thanks to a beauty of a screen by Backstrom.

It would take the Capitals 102 seconds to tie the game with Larkin in the box. Backstrom made a great play along the wall to carry in the puck and fight off two defenders before getting the puck to Kuznetsov down low. With Burakovsky and Oshie crashing the net, #92 found #65 all alone in front of Mrazek. When the Wings goalie totally committed to Burkie’s shot, Andre slid the puck over to the Osh Babe, who made no mistake about depositing it into the open cage for his sixth goal in eight games. It was text book hockey – get pucks and bodies to the net and you drastically increase your chances to score.

The goal then set the stage for the Gr8. Backstrom made a SUPER zone entry using his body, or big fat ass as Mike Babcock calls it, to shield the biscuit from two Wings defenders. The Caps then got set up four on three. With Oshie in front, Backstrom, Carlson, and Ovechkin all rotated around and confused the Detroit PK trio. #19, moving to his right, then slid an all world pass back across the ice to Ovi, and the league’s best goal scorer buried it far post for his 10th goal in just eight games.

Game over!

Wow, what a comeback!

This was a huge win because the Capitals finally received some balance in the goal scoring department. They had two goals from players in their bottom six in Beagle and Burakovsky (dropped down to the third line for this tilt) and when the chips were down and things looked lost, the Osh Babe and Ovi showed up to save the day.

It was a much needed victory in a season that will see the Eastern Conference very tightly bunched for most of the campaign. Giving points away now makes things harder to overcome later in the season, so this was a monumental triumph.

Here are some other random thoughts on Friday’s big OT win:

  • Orlov was just stellar in this game and he led the Capitals in ice time at 27:37. When #9 has the puck he really is able to drive possession and he did just that in Motown.
  • I liked the move of Tom Wilson up with Backstrom and Oshie. #43 is a big physical presence who can really skate. He caused havoc for the Wings most of the night. If Tom can get his hands to cooperate this line could really take off because Backy and Osh are playing so well. It really is unbelievable just how good #19 is at both ends of the ice.
  • Ovi had a terrible giveaway on the Wings first tally, a shorthanded goal by Darren Helm on a two on one rush. Holtby was hung out to dry a bit, but I bet #70 would like to have that shot back. He won’t like being beat short side there.
  • Burakovksy had three shots on net, all of which were very good chances. He still needs to work on adding a very quick snap shot to his arsenal. Too often he has to cradle the puck before firing and that gives the goalie and opponents time to adjust.
  • Madison Bowey played the fourth highest minutes for Caps defenders and he performed very well. #22 logged 15:50 and was +1. He is very sound positionally and he has the size, speed, and skill to be a top four defensemen in this league in due time. As much as it hurts to have Nisky injured, being able to bring Bowey up now will end up being a blessing in disguise for Washington later in the season. This kid can play.
  • Carlson had 10 shots on net in 27:07. He’s playing a ton of hockey and his subpar third period was likely the result of too many minutes. Coach Trotz is going to have to try and find a way to keep him under 25 minutes overall going forward until Niskanen returns.
  • Shot attempts for the game were 69-65 for Washington, but at even strength shots on goal were 29-23 for the Capitals. The Caps can still do better in the offensive zone with the puck. Did I mention there were a lot of offensive zone giveaways on bad decisions?
  • The Holtbeast is now 4-2 this season with a save percentage right around .93. Once again, the Capitals will need their star players to shine this season, and so far Holtby, Ovechkin, Backstrom, and Oshie are doing just that.
  • Alex Chiasson hasn’t done much for the Caps in seven games, but his play to set up Beagle’s shorthanded tally was some good ole fashioned hard work and sacrificing of his body on the penalty kill.

Next up for the Caps are the Florida Panthers at Capital One Arena in DC on Saturday night at 7:30. Both teams played on Friday night with the Cats losing at home to the Penguins, 4-3.

Notes: Washington won the faceoff battle, 33-27. All Star Backstrom was 10-5…Taylor Chorney had the fewest minutes on the blue line with just 11:53 of ice time. Forward Devante Smith-Pelly only played 6:02 and Chiasson saw just 9:56 of action…Philipp Grubauer will get the start for the Capitals on Saturday night. Florida will likely go with James Reimer since Roberto Luongo injured his right thumb against the two time defending Stanley Cup Champions on Friday night.

Comments Off on Ovechkin’s OT Tally Helps Caps Right the Ship

Ovi photo

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Caps Thoughts After the Season Opening Victory in Ottawa

Posted on 06 October 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Alex Ovechkin’s hat trick and shootout tally allowed the Washington Capitals to overcome 3-1 and 4-3 third period deficits to win, 5-4, in Ottawa on Thursday night in the Caps season opener. Evgeny Kuznetsov had three helpers and Braden Holtby made 28 saves, several of which came at key junctures in the hockey game.

Simply put, when your star players are your star players, you often win.

With that, here are nine thoughts on the Caps victory over a very good Senators team that was missing its best player in defensemen Erik Karlsson.

I predicted 50 goals for Ovi this year after he changed his offseason training and slimmed down. The Gr8 was super in this affair with 11 shot attempts, 3 goals plus a shootout tally. He also hit the post in period two. The Gr8, Kuzy, and Jakub Vrana were a very good line and when #13 keeps his legs pumping he opens up space on the ice for his teammates.

Brett Connolly has a good shot and he buried his 1st of the season from the high danger area. It was a great keep in and pass by Matt Niskanen at the offensive blue line and Lars Eller made a great feed to #10 on that goal. I really liked the way Eller went to the net and created space for Connolly to score.

It’s not often your goalie plays well giving up four goals, but the Holtbeast was strong in the cage. The 1st Sens marker was eerily reminiscent of the weird lamp lighters Toronto scored in the playoffs last season. Braden made several big stops, including a gem on Johnny Oduya early on. His best of the night was likely the shoulder save when Ottawa was on the power play in overtime.

Ottawa had five power plays to just one for the Caps, yet Washington out shot attempted them 62-56. Nine of the Senators 32 shots on goal came on the power play. Simply put, the Capitals were very good at even strength and the season opening performance in terms of puck possession is encouraging.

Washington won this game thanks to four even strength goals and a perfect 5 for 5 on the penalty kill. Holts was stellar in net while the team was shorthanded and the Caps did well with their clears. Brooks Orpik and John Carlson were super in shorthanded situations. Devante Smith-Pelly also did well on the PK stepping in for the suspended Tom Wilson (out for the first four games).

Three of the four Ottawa goals were off of bad turnovers (Carlson, Niskanen, and Smith-Pelly). Better puck management is paramount going forward. There were forced passes in the neutral zone and pucks sent up the middle of the ice in the defensive end. Both of those are no no’s. In the words of famed Charlestown Chiefs goalie Dennis Lemieux, “You don’t do that, never, never…”

Coach Barry Trotz rode his top players in the season opener. The top two lines each played right around 20 minutes. On the back end, Trotzy rode his top 4D hard. Orpik played 24:47 while Dmitry Orlov and Niskanen were each over 25 minutes. Carlson logged 27:45 to lead the club in ice time. I thought Orlov was fabulous in this contest and it’s amazing how much his game has progressed since he has been paired with Minnesota Matt. The third pairing of Aaron Ness and Taylor Chorney were right around 11 to 12 minutes of ice time.

The referees were Chris Lee and Frederick L’Ecuyer and the power plays were 5 to 1 for Ottawa. The league is supposed to be cracking down on certain things (slashing) yet Washington’s only man advantage was the result of Ottawa having too many dudes on the ice. Those are the facts. It was a bit of a head scratching game from a zebras perspective. Anyone seen Oliver Stone lately??!!

Tyler Graovac only logged 6:22, a team low, and was a minus one. He didn’t get any PK time either. I’d expect that Nathan Walker goes into the lineup on Saturday night for the 7 pm home opener against Montreal. Congrats to Nathan on being the 1st Australian hockey player to make it to “The Show!”

Comments Off on Caps Thoughts After the Season Opening Victory in Ottawa

nathan-walker

Tags: , , , , , , ,

12 Caps Thoughts After Four Preseason Games

Posted on 24 September 2017 by Ed Frankovic

With the Washington Capitals completing four of their seven preseason tilts, I’ve written 12 thoughts on the Caps as we head into the final week of games that don’t count in the standings.

  1. Following Saturday’s 4-1 defeat to the Carolina Hurricanes at the Capital One Arena (formerly the Verizon Center), Coach Barry Trotz lamented about the team’s lack of even strength offense pointing out that his club has only one even strength tally in four contests (Devante Smith-Pelly’s game winner in Montreal on Wednesday night).
  2. The reason for the scoring problems are numerous, but first and foremost, has to be the instability on the back end. Puck possession begins with a defense that can get the biscuit out of its own end efficiently. Washington has two defensive openings and the coaching staff and General Manager Brian MacLellan are taking a look at several players, most of which have little to no NHL experience, for those slots. As a result, there has been a lot of turnovers and ragged positional play from the Washington blueline, thus far.
  3. The Caps have talked about promoting from within their organization and building a team with more speed. Having watched Nathan Walker play in both of his 2017-18 “auditions,” I think it’s safe to say this 23 year old, who has spent his last four seasons in Hershey, will be making “The Show” this fall. Walker’s speed opens up the ice for his teammates and creates scoring chances. His likely center, Jay Beagle, told the media on Saturday night that #79 is great with the puck and brings a lot of energy and grit to the hockey team.
  4. Also in the promoting from within department, the other pretty close to a lock to make the roster up front is 2014 first round pick, Jakub Vrana. So far #13 has a goal and an assist in three games and he’s had several quality scoring chances.
  5. Washington’s goaltending has been very solid in the preseason led by Braden Holtby and Philipp Grubauer. Both have high save percentages and they’ve looked sharp. They’re getting a lot of action because of the Caps issues in the puck possession department. Grubauer played the last 40 minutes on Saturday against Carolina and he was decent, but he did lose the third goal, by Julien Gauthier, because he struggled to pick the puck up as it left Gauthier’s long stick. As a result, Carolina received a high, short side lamplighter that pretty much ended this affair at the 2:35 mark of period three.
  6. Tyler Graovac, who was acquired this spring from the Minnesota Wild for the Caps 2018 5th round pick, was the best player on the ice in Friday’s contest against St. Louis. #91 is six foot five and can really skate. He is vying for one of the last forward spots on the roster with Smith-Pelly, Chandler Stephenson, and Alex Chiasson.
  7. Speaking of Chiasson, he had a power play goal in Saturday’s defeat to the Canes. On that tally, all five Capitals touched the disc before Chiasson deposited it into the cage from the “Oshie” spot in the slot in front of the opposing goaltender. #39 isn’t the fastest skater, but he has scored 50 goals in 320 NHL games, including 12 tallies in 81 tilts last season for the Calgary Flames. There is a very good chance that Chiasson makes the opening night roster.
  8. For the past two seasons forward Marcus Johansson, who is now with the New Jersey Devils, has been the primary forward to carry the puck into the opposing zone on the Capitals first power play unit. Now that slot belongs to Evgeny Kuznetsov and I don’t think you’ll see any drop off at all in quality zone entries. Through the first four games of this preseason #92 has been the best Cap and his skating has been stellar.
  9. There was lots of talk in the offseason that Alex Ovechkin had lost weight and was going to play faster. On the first day of training camp, the Gr8 stated that he did not lose weight, although his official roster weight is now 235 versus 239 that was listed last season. Ovi talked about training differently to get faster. It’s only been two preseason games, but so far, I’m not seeing the results of that training change. Perhaps Alex is just easing into the season? No cause for concern yet, but Washington is going to need him to be going full tilt from the get go in 2017-18.
  10. On the backend, the battle for the last two spots is fierce. Christian Djoos has been mentioned in that conversation quite a bit and on Saturday night against the Canes, he showed off his offensive talents. On one shift in the second period he displayed his ability to move around at the offensive blue line and even rush the net when given the opportunity. He did just that and ended up drawing a penalty. On the downside, though, his defensive zone needs work. On the Canes game winning goal, Djoos was outmuscled behind his own cage by Marcus Kruger and that one on one battle loss proved very costly. Djoos’ primary competition for one of the blue line spots is Aaron Ness, Madison Bowey, and Tyler Lewington.
  11. Travis Boyd, who is a bit of a long shot to make the opening night roster, drew two penalties on Saturday against Carolina. #72 will likely end up in Hershey to start the season, but I’m pretty sure he will get some NHL game action at some point in 2017-18.
  12. Tom Wilson didn’t play on Saturday night due to a two game suspension he received for interfering with the Blues Robert Thomas. #43 hit the Blues center along the boards a second or so after the puck was gone. Thomas really had no way to defend himself and “Willy” made the mistake of focusing too much on the man instead of the puck. This is Wilson’s first NHL suspension, although he’s been fined several times.

The Caps next preseason game is on Wednesday at 7:00 pm in DC against the New Jersey Devils.

Comments Off on 12 Caps Thoughts After Four Preseason Games

Kuznetsov Bird

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Caps Still A Contender Despite Off Season Losses

Posted on 03 July 2017 by Ed Frankovic

For the past three years Capitals General Manager Brian MacLellan built a squad to compete for the Cup with entry level or bridge contracts working in his favor. Unfortunately, despite having a complete roster this past season, which led to a second straight Presidents’ Trophy, they did not get the job done.

The Caps had the best team on paper this past spring, but when it came down to it, they couldn’t defeat Pittsburgh, once again.

Bottom line, they couldn’t handle the pressure of the top seed and they under performed.

They choked.

There is no way around that, all you have to do is go back and watch the panic they displayed in game seven after the Penguins took a 1-0 lead.

But we’ve already dissected that loss and the disappointing end to the season, so it’s time to move on.

On this journey, however, MacLellan, while talking about what he called a two year championship window (2015-16 and 2016-17), also clearly pointed out that after those two years were up that roster changes were inevitable due to the salary cap.

As the Caps GM and anyone else that closely follows this team knew all along, they had 11 players from this past spring’s roster that were up for new contracts.

Eleven!

So there was NO WAY this team was going to be the same and they were going to lose many pieces, especially with the salary cap only going up to $75M after the NHLPA mistakenly didn’t take advantage of the full escalator clause. That error is now putting many veteran NHL players out of work and could force many of them to have to take major pay cuts just to stay in the league.

So with five unrestricted free agents, six restricted free agents and the expansion draft guaranteeing one unprotected player was going to be taken by Vegas, the Caps GM had his work cut out for him.

MacLellan wisely took a strategy that focused on keeping the core of the team intact while letting players be exposed, unsigned, or traded where they had other options in the pipeline at those positions, such as on defense and at wing.

For the expansion draft he took the 7-3-1 protection approach which left them most vulnerable with either their 4th defensemen (Nate Schmidt) or the backup goalie (Philipp Grubauer). Leaving just those spots exposed was good asset management, especially when the Capitals knew they were losing one good player NO MATTER WHAT. That turned out to be the very popular, but still relatively inexperienced Schmidt. The 88 car, who is a very good skater and a positive player, was an undrafted free agent that had yet to play a full 82 game season and playoffs as a top four defensemen. The Capitals clearly liked Schmidt and openly stated the plan was for him to have the first shot at the fourth blue line slot this upcoming season, despite not having lengthy experience in that position at the NHL level.

Vegas GM George McPhee, who knew Schmidt well from his days with the Caps, opted to take Nate instead of Grubauer and the first roster hole became official.

Immediately after the expansion draft, the T.J. Oshie signing occurred allowing Washington to keep the 33 goal scorer and top line right wing at a bargain price of $5.75M for eight years.

This past weekend, with the start of free agency on July 1st, MacLellan focused his efforts on signing his restricted free agents. He inked defenseman Dmitry Orlov to a six year $30.6M deal, winger Brett Connolly to a two year $3M contract, and center Evgeny Kuznetsov to an eight year $62.4M monster extension. Over the same period unrestricted Washington free agents Karl Alzner signed with Montreal, Kevin Shattenkirk went, as expected, to the Rangers, and Justin Williams received a high paying two year deal ($9M) to return to Carolina.

The problem with the Caps signings was that the Orlov and Kuznetsov numbers came in a bit higher, especially in Kuznetsov’s case, than originally anyone expected. Both had leverage with the KHL, primarily Kuznetsov, and with Washington thin at center in the organization, Kuzy had even more extra leverage to get a big pay day. After all he could bolt to Russia, play in the Olympics and KHL this season, log another year overseas and then become an unrestricted NHL free agent in the summer of 2019. With no clear top two centers in the Capitals organizational pipeline, MacLellan had no choice but to re-sign Kuznetsov, mostly on #92’s terms. At that point, with restricted free agents Andre Burakovsky and Philipp Grubauer still the only ones needing new deals, someone was going to have to be moved now or in the future to make the overall salary cap dollars work.

The NHL allows teams to carry up to 10% over the salary cap until final roster cut downs, but with so many veteran players on the market likely to be cheaper going forward due to the small salary cap increase (bad move again, NHLPA) it was clear that the trade market was going to be decreasing rapidly going forward. Add in the fact that most teams spent a lot of money to give big increases to their own players (see Connor McDavid and Carey Price) and you can see why there hasn’t been a big trade market since the NHL expansion draft.

Case in point, just last week Vegas GM George McPhee, who selected top four defensemen Marc Methot from Ottawa in the expansion draft, was only able to obtain from the Dallas Stars a 2020 2nd round pick and goalie Dylan Ferguson (a 7th round pick in the 2017 draft) for the blue liner. You read that correctly, it’s the year 2020 for that second round pick!

So with MacLellan needing to deal because the trade market was looking bleak going forward, the Caps GM had to pick a player to move for salary cap room while also finding a dance partner. Marcus Johansson, who carries a $4.583M cap number, was the most likely candidate, especially with Burakovsky and 2014 NHL first round pick Jakub Vrana in place and ready to move up the depth chart at wing. Luckily the New Jersey Devils, who had set aside money to try and lure Shattenkirk to their club on July 1st, but failed to do so despite likely offering more money than the Rangers, had remaining budget and needed to make a splash to improve their team and appease their fan base.

So on Sunday night, just after announcing the blockbuster Kuznetsov deal, the Caps traded Jojo to the Devils and received 2018 2nd and 3rd round picks for the forward who just completed a career year in Washington with 24 goals and 58 points. 19 of those 58 points came on a first power play unit with Nicklas Backstrom, Alex Ovechkin, and Oshie, but Marcus did his share to earn those points by being the best on the team in man advantage zone entries (Kuznetsov will assume Johansson’s 1st PP spot going forward).

With the departure of the also very popular Johansson to go along with Schmidt and the three EXPECTED unrestricted free agent losses, some in the fan base and local and national media went nuts. This despite the fact that MacLellan had managed to pretty much ensure he’d re-sign six of the 11 players that needed new contracts for 2017-18 while also getting two draft picks for the departed Johansson to fill in holes that they had in the 2018 draft as a result of previously traded choices. Those draft picks should prove to be valuable going forward.

Following the Johansson trade, the fan response on Twitter and blog/Twitter posts of some in the local and national media were emotionally charged and a major overreaction in a negative sense. It seems that many conveniently forgot the facts, or chose to ignore them: the Caps were going to lose good players this off-season and when prices went up in the restricted free agent market, it likely cost them one more that they did not originally expect or could reasonably prepare for given the expansion draft.

Suddenly MacLellan, who along with Coach Barry Trotz and his coaching staff have done a wonderful job of turning around a team that was an absolute train wreck just three years ago, had become the village idiot on Twitter for losing Schmidt and Johansson. But in reality they are two replaceable players in the grand scheme of things when you look at the Capitals organizational depth. They have young quality defensemen in the organization and at wing both Burakovksy and Vrana are ready to move up to fill in the gaps left by the departure of Jojo.

Overall, the expansion draft and the upward costs of the restricted free agents resulted in the loss of those two players in addition to their unrestricted free agents (although MacLellan did keep Oshie from the UFA pile). In my opinion, however, you’d be hard pressed to pick any other two players from the 7-3-1 protected list and restricted free agent crew that make the dollars work while resulting in a better overall scenario for Washington going forward, especially given the other assets they currently have in the organization for replacements. Keep in mind that Vegas had the final say for the expansion draft, too, so the Caps did not get to choose who the Golden Knights selected. In addition, the idea of buying out Brooks Orpik was never a viable option and it would not have resulted in enough salary cap savings (only $3M) this season to allow all of the restricted free agent signings to occur (not to mention it would add wasted dollars to the salary cap for the next four seasons).

The Caps lost good players, but let’s get one thing straight in spite of everything that has transpired since the end of the season – the Capitals still have a VERY GOOD hockey team heading into 2017-18.

The projected line-up, based on input from the Caps GM during his Monday morning conference call, is now as follows:

Forwards:

Ovechkin – Backstrom – Oshie

Vrana – Kuznetsov – Burakovsky

Connolly – Eller – Wilson

TBD – Jay Beagle – TBD

Defense:

Orlov – Matt Niskanen

TBD – John Carlson

Orpik – TBD

Goalie:

Braden Holtby

Grubauer

The TBD’s at forward, right now, include the possibility of several Hershey players such as Chandler Stephenson, Nathan Walker, Travis Boyd, Riley Barber, or recently acquired players such as Tyler Graovac, Anthony Peluso or Devante Smith-Pelly (signed from New Jersey on Monday on a two way contract for the league minimum, $650,000). On defense, the TBD’s appear to be two of Taylor Chorney, Madison Bowey, Christian Djoos, Aaron Ness, and Tyler Lewington.

Yes, this is no longer a 118 or 120 point roster, but it’s still a good one, likely in the 100 to 105 point range given the strong centers, skilled scoring wingers, and quality goaltenders. In my opinion, Vegas not taking Grubauer will be a blessing in disguise for the Caps in 2017-18 because goaltending is the most important position in hockey. There will also be a lot less pressure on this team, the media and many fans have already written them off.

Finally, keep in mind that the other playoff teams in the Metropolitan Division have lost players too, due to the salary cap. In Pittsburgh, the two time defending champs saw Marc Andre-Fleury (expansion draft), Nick Bonino, Chris Kunitz, Trevor Daley, and Ron Hainsey all depart. Without Fleury, who was a great insurance policy for the oft-injured Matt Murray, the Capitals win that second round series this spring. The Rangers signed Shattenkirk, but they traded their number one center, Derek Stepan, backup goalie, Antti Raanta, and bought out defensemen Dan Girardi in the process of doing so. Columbus traded forward Brandon Saad to Chicago for Artemi Panarin, so they are still looking for a number one center to fill their biggest need. Bottom line, nobody has a roster without holes.

It’s clear the fact that the salary cap is impacting all teams gets lost in the noise when some look and analyze the Capitals.

Yes, they’ve become “top heavy” as MacLellan called them, but they are still a playoff team, at a minimum.

Fans are fans, though, so the negativity is to be expected, that’s just the way it is in professional sports. But you’d expect more out of the local and national media. Keep in mind, though, that there are critics in parts of the media who are fans, at heart, of other Metropolitan Division teams (for example, the Devils and the Flyers, to name a couple), or flat out just don’t like the Capitals organization, there’s no denying that. Then there are others who are just not experienced enough when it comes to the workings of the NHL or are trying to make their mark in their craft to move up the sports media ladder via page clicks – so please take their criticism and bashing with a grain of salt. They have an agenda.

In full disclosure, I won’t walk away from the fact that I worked for this organization for 11 seasons either, but my track record of calling the team out when they make mistakes is well documented (see my 2014 end of season fire McPhee and Oates blog or simply check out the first few paragraphs above). If I thought MacLellan did a poor job of handling this off-season, I’d call him out. But given what he was up against and the undeniable rising salary costs for the top players in the game, I think he’s done the best job he possibly could to keep the Capitals a playoff team and, depending on how the new players that make the lineup this fall pan out, still a Stanley Cup contender.

It’s now up to the Capitals star players, starting with Ovechkin, Backstrom, Kuznetsov, and Holtby, to produce their best performances to help carry this club through the regular season and deep into the postseason.

Comments Off on Caps Still A Contender Despite Off Season Losses

Jojo Rebound

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Thoughts on the Caps As They Head into Game Two

Posted on 28 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals lost game one to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Thursday night by a 3-2 count. The Pens lead the second round best of seven series with game two slated for Saturday night at 8 pm at the Verizon Center.

Here are 10 thoughts on this series after 60 minutes of hockey.

1. Before anyone goes jumping off of the ledge, the Caps, who are 1-8 in all time playoff series’ against Pittsburgh, were 8-1 in game one action in those nine previous encounters. So the Penguins have certainly proven that it’s not how you start the series, it’s how you finish it.

2. Speaking of starts, the Capitals did not have a strong start, especially the beginning of the second period where Sidney Crosby scored twice in 64 seconds after terrible turnovers by Washington. As I blogged before this series began, the Pens love to generate chances off of the rush and get odd man breaks. They did that well enough in the first game to overcome an 83-41 Caps advantage in shot attempts. The Capitals were very good for stretches of this contest, but their start was weak and they made too many “big mistakes.”

3. Washington did a great job of containing Crosby in last spring’s playoffs, but along with Marc-Andre Fleury (33 saves), he was the biggest reason it’s 1-0 Penguins. The Capitals cannot afford to turn pucks over carelessly when he’s on the ice and on the second goal, nobody on the Caps finds #87 and covers him. As a result he scored on an easy rebound goal. You simply cannot not know where Crosby is on the ice, so the Capitals must be more attentive to where the best player in the NHL is, at all times!

4. That was one great hit by John Carlson on Evgeni Malkin that led to the Caps first goal by Alex Ovechkin. Carlson is playing the best hockey of his season. He was dynamite last spring and Washington needs him to be dominant on the back end if they are going to win this series. #74 seems to really raise his game against Pittsburgh.

5. Turnovers are certainly something that has plagued the Capitals when they don’t win and game one was no exception. Without Kris Letang on defense, the Pens are not as fast, so Coach Mike Sullivan really has his two defensemen focused on cutting off the middle of the ice at the their own blue line and on back to Fleury. In the series opener, the Caps had their highest success on zone entries carrying the puck wide on the Penguins defense across the blue line. When they tried to cut to the middle too soon, it resulted in turnovers and that opens up Pittsburgh’s massive rush offense. So zone entries wide and carrying the puck deep needs to be the modus operandi going forward.

6. There is a lot of talk in hockey about luck deciding outcomes in a contest, or bad luck, as Washington suffered in game one. Jake Guentzel saved a sure goal by T.J. Oshie in the crease in period one and there were pucks around Fleury all night that the Capitals just couldn’t get to and bury. Fleury was good, but he was also fortunate. Washington just needs to keep doing what they are doing with pucks and bodies to the cage and it will pay off. They don’t need to get frustrated and change the game plan. Getting pucks deep on the Pittsburgh defense is so important.

7. After the Capitals called timeout with 26 seconds remaining with the Holtbeast pulled, Ovechkin found himself at the point and Kevin Shattenkirk was in the “Ovi spot” in the left wing circle. The Gr8 passed the puck to #22, but he missed the net on a great look. The Penguins had to be very happy to have Shattenkirk shooting from there instead of Ovechkin. I’m not sure if that configuration was planned coming out of the timeout or not, but it would seem that going forward that the Capitals coaching staff needs to find a way to get the Gr8 more of the critical looks? Alex only had eight shot attempts in game one and just three of them made it on net.

8. Given the intensity of game one and Washington’s domination in terms of puck possession, it was pretty upsetting to see the only two power plays go to Pittsburgh. Surely zebras Dan O’Halloran and Kevin Pollock could’ve called at least one infraction on the Pens, who were masters of the clutch, grab, and hold in this modern day style of game? It sure looked like there was delay of game on Bryan Rust in the slot on that loose puck late in the third period. I also didn’t like either call on the Caps, especially the late third period slashing penalty on Matt Niskanen when he was just going for the rebound of a loose puck off of Fleury’s pads. There were a lot of rebounds allowed by Fleury in this tilt and that play happens hundreds of times during games in the regular season and playoffs with a penalty very rarely called. The fact that it came at that point in the game and it was on Washington sure is fishy. Coach Barry Trotz labeled it “a pretty light call” afterwards, especially given everything else that was let go during the contest. Be better and more consistent zebras (although I’ve long given up on the arrogant O’Halloran)!

9. The Caps are at their best when they press the play on the Penguins and force their defense to have to make plays and work. Unfortunately, that strategy sometimes opens the Capitals up to the possibility of the Pens getting some quick offense on a stretch pass, if Washington does not stay structured. Somehow Pittsburgh was able to connect on one in the last 10 minutes to win the game. That cannot happen going forward. There were several mistakes made on that play by Washington. Shattenkirk needs to keep Scott Wilson wide at the defensive blue line and prevent a cross ice pass while Brooks Orpik was too far to his left and up the ice, and Nick Bonino exploited the gap with his superior speed. The Caps forwards also need to make sure someone is in position to stop that long pass or at least ensure that they are with any opposing forwards charging up the ice. As Coach Trotz said afterwards, all three Penguins goals were very preventable.

10. With the Capitals having lost the last six games they’ve played in Pittsburgh, it is imperative that Washington plays their best game on Saturday night to even this series up. It won’t be easy, but if they minimize their mistakes and bring the effort they brought the last 25 plus minutes of game one (they had the puck way more and also out hit the Penguins, 41-17), then they should be in good shape.

Comments Off on 10 Thoughts on the Caps As They Head into Game Two

Jojo SWG

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Johansson’s OT Tally Wins the Series for the Caps

Posted on 24 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

It took six close games, five of them decided in overtime, for the Washington Capitals to finally extinguish the Toronto Maple Leafs with Marcus Johansson tallying his second goal of the night to give the Caps a 2-1 victory 6:31 into the extra session. The Caps will now move on to face the Pittsburgh Penguins in round two, starting on Thursday night at the Verizon Center, in what is a rematch of last spring’s second round battle.

Like game five, this was another tight defensive battle with strong goaltending. Neither team scored through 40 minutes, with the Leafs owning the lead in the shot attempt totals, at 47-38, but the Caps had the better of the scoring chances, especially their second line.

In the third period, it was anyone’s game, but Washington started to take over with their depth. The Capitals had several good scoring chances, but then a weird bounce and a missed defensive assignment cost them the first goal.

Morgan Reilly dumped the puck in to the Caps end and it took a crazy carom off of the glass into the slot. Auston Matthews, who is already a star in this league at age 19, jumped on the puck and went in alone on Braden Holtby (37 saves). The kid from the desert went top shelf on the Holtbeast to make it 1-0 just 7:45 into the final frame. It was a fortuitous break for Toronto, but the goal was preventable. Had Evgeny Kuznetsov kept skating instead of gliding at the Caps defesnsive blue line, he could have beaten Matthews to the puck. It’s a good lesson for #92 and the whole team to learn in the playoffs – a single missed stride can cost your team a goal.

In the past, the Matthews tally might have devastated the Caps bench, but not this year. No, this team amped their game up and started taking the play to the Maple Leafs and just over five minutes after #34 had all of Yonge Street thinking there was going to be a game seven, the Caps tied it up.

Lars Eller made a strong offensive zone entry on the left wing boards and he fed a streaking Johansson in the slot. Marcus pushed the puck ahead to escape the Leaf defender and then he pinballed one in off of Frederik Andersen (34 saves) into the net with just 7:09 remaining. It was a monstrous tally and it came because the Capitals started to push the play.

Washington would continue to do that and then in the overtime, they took their game to 11.

The Caps had no thoughts of sitting back on Coach Mike Babcock’s squad and they thoroughly outworked and dominated a young Leafs team in the overtime. They had several scoring chances, Comcast’s Alan May had it 7 to 1, with Jojo getting his second of the night and the series winner on a play where he simply did what he had done all season long to score a career high in goals (24), he went to the front of the net.

A Leafs icing forced Babcock to leave a tired crew on the ice, which included game one goat, Martin Marincin, as well as his fourth line (Kasperi Kapanen-Brian Boyle-Matt Martin). Coach Barry Trotz took his third line off and inserted Johansson, Kuznetsov, and Mr. Clutch, Justin Williams. Kuznetsov, who like many other Caps centers struggled on draws all game, won a huge face off against Boyle. When Stick received the puck from John Carlson on the right wing half wall, he smartly fired it on net. Jojo was parked in the slot above the paint and he appeared to tip the initial shot into Andersen’s pads and then fought off Marincin to bury the game and series clincher.

Wow, what a game and what a performance by the Caps once they were down, 1-0! They pushed the play and looked like the team that won the Presidents’ Trophy this season. It’s the way they’ll need to play in the second round if they want to defeat the defending Stanley Cup Champions.

Winning the first round is always the toughest; ask any hockey player, coach or executive and they’ll back me up. It was even harder for Washington because everyone picked them to win quickly and the Leafs had nothing to lose. Simply put, there was a TON OF PRESSURE on the Capitals to win this series and move on to face the Penguins for the rematch from last spring.

As Coach Barry Trotz told me, Nestor Aparacio, and the great crowd at Greenmount Station back on March 20th, every series takes a piece out of you. Toronto took some pieces out of the Caps. Karl Alzner didn’t play after game two due to an upper body injury, Nazem Kadri put a cheap shot on Alex Ovechkin and knocked Ovi out for two plus minutes of game five (but the Russian Machine Never Breaks), and Leo Komarov put a dirty hit on Nate Schmidt late in game six (but the 88 car also returned to play four shifts after the hit, including being on the ice for the game winner).

Luckily the Gr8 and Schmidt, plus T.J. Oshie, who I could see mouth “I’m all right” to Caps trainer Greg “Smitty” Smith after blocking a shot right before the winning goal, should be ready for Thursday night’s game one against the Penguins at the Verizon Center. The Leafs may have taken some pieces out of the Caps, that’s still to be determined how much, but in my book, Washington was able to ramp their game up to a tempo they’ll need to be at against Pittsburgh. I’m not sure they get to that pace level in a series against the Bruins or Ottawa. So I’m still glad the Capitals faced the Leafs. It was a very hard series, but they overcame an inordinate amount of pressure and persevered.

Anyways, the Penguins series should be one heck of a rematch. The Caps have waited a whole year for it, but we’ll talk more about it as the week progresses, but let’s hope there’s a Rocky 2 type of ending this spring.

Notes: Final shot attempts were 70-67, for Washington. It was all Caps after the Leafs marker…Ovechkin had 12 shot attempts, including seven on goal, in 22:45…the Caps lost the face off battle, 39-22, but they won some key ones, including right before the series winning tally. Kuznetsov was 6-8 (best Caps percentage)…Oshie had another strong game with five shots on goal in 19:35…the Caps were shorthanded for just 22 seconds and they had 2:22 of power play time…the Holtbeast was outstanding in this tilt, which included a huge save on Komarov, who was all alone after he took his run at Schmidt and #88 limped to the bench…Dmitry Orlov led the Caps in ice time with 25:38 and his partner, Matt Niskanen, logged 25:15. They played the hard minutes and that allowed Carlson and Schmidt to help the Capitals drive the play when they were on the ice…the Caps won the last three games of this series, which came after Coach Trotz tweaked his forward lines right before game four (bumped Tom Wilson up to the third line).

Comments Off on Johansson’s OT Tally Wins the Series for the Caps

Willy GWG

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wilson and Williams Lead Caps to 3-2 OT Victory in Game One

Posted on 14 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Tom Wilson picked a perfect time to score his first career NHL playoff goal. Willy batted down a poor clear up the boards by Leafs defenseman Martin Marincin with his glove and before Toronto goalie Frederik Andersen could get fully set, he fired the biscuit top shelf over the left shoulder of #31 as he went down into the butterfly position. The perfect shot gave the Washington Capitals a come from behind, 3-2, victory just 5:15 into overtime in the first game of their best of seven series.

The Caps are now up 1-0 and to quote the great Tom Hanks from Castaway.

Wilson! Wilson!!!! Wiiiilllllllllsssssooonnnnnn!!!

All season long the Capitals have had some issues when playing on more than a day’s rest and this game was no exception. Coach Barry Trotz did not like his teams first 30 minutes, at all, since Washington did not move their feet and they were extremely sloppy with their passes. It was bad hockey and as a result Toronto raced out to a 2-0 lead just 9:44 into the post season. Mitch Marner opened the scoring for the Leafs at 1:35 with a shot from the slot. Then with Nazem Kadri parked in the crease after cross checking Alex Ovechkin, Jake Gardiner’s shot from the slot went by Braden Holtby (35 saves). The zebras initially waved it off, but upon Coach Mike Babcock’s challenge they reversed the on ice call. Afterwards, the Holtbeast gave his take on how the Capitals should have handled that situation.

“I don’t know. I think that’s the right call. It’s more, in the future, us kind of pushing him out more, myself too, creating that goalie interference to create more space throughout the rest of the game. It’s kind of what you need to do when they are going to put a guy in the crease like that and wait for you to hit him. It was a common theme throughout the night so you look for patterns like that and we’re going to adjust next game.”

Speaking of patterns, for most of the first 30 minutes the Capitals were “playing slow,” as Nicklas Backstrom called it afterwards. Their passing was not crisp and they were not getting enough shots on net. Defensively, they were out of sync and the Leafs had 27 shots on goal just past the game’s halfway mark. It was not the type of hockey we’ve grown accustomed to seeing from Washington, but Trotz pointed out “there was no panic.”

Kevin Shattenkirk, who had an assist and nine shots on net in this tilt, told me on Sunday that the team would have stretches in the post season where they would not play well, but the key was just to stay on an even keel. Coach Trotz’ crew did just that and fortunately Mr. Game Seven, Justin Williams, scored the first two goals for the Capitals to even things up. “Stick’s” first goal came just after a five on three power play ended. Shattenkirk was winding up to shoot, but as he did so his stick broke and the puck slid over to T.J. Oshie to the left of the net. Most players would shoot from that position, but Osh Babe saw #14 wide open in front of the net and he put the puck right on Stick’s tape for an easy marker. That goal, which came less than three minutes after the Leafs went up two pucks, settled the Caps down a bit, but they still couldn’t take control of the game.

In the middle frame, Washington went over eight minutes without a shot on net, mainly because they were trying too much for the perfect play and as a result they over passed themselves out of position. But on a rush up the ice late in period two, Evgeny Kuznetsov found Matt Niskanen alone in the slot and #2 fired the puck on net. As Nisky told me afterwards, it wasn’t a great shot, but Andersen didn’t know where it was and with the puck under him he got up. That allowed Williams, who alertly hit the brakes at the top of the crease, to poke it in past the Leafs net minder to even the game up with four minutes to go.

“It was kind of a weird one, I was playing the wing at first on the breakout and then I was the fourth guy on the rush, probably not much of a chance of that shot going in, but Stick was able to pounce on a loose rebound, so I was just the fourth guy in the middle there. I was able to find just enough ice, it was a nice play by Kuzy,” said Niskanen on how he got the puck to set up the rebound goal for Wiliams.

Washington then received a late power play when Matt Martin was jailed for cross checking, but the Leafs were aggressive on the PK and only gave up one good look, to Shattenkirk. After two periods the Leafs had a 46-44 edge in shot attempts, including 28-25 in shots on goal.

In the third period, the Caps depth started to take over and the ice tilted Washington’s way, but Toronto still had some good chances. Coach Trotz’ crew had a 24-12 advantage in shot attempts and a 13-7 margin in shots on goal. It was much better hockey, but the Leafs still did a good job at jamming the walls on the Caps breakout forcing Washington to make a difficult zone exit or simply dump the puck in the air over the Leafs D.

In the overtime, the Capitals dominated with their depth and eventually it was Washington’s fourth line that got the game winner. With the Caps top trio not having a real quality game, it was imperative that a goal come from the bottom six, and Wilson delivered.

Overall, the Caps have to be really happy that their second line kept them in the game early on. Williams is known for his leadership and his ability to score big goals. He did just that in this one by paying the price and going to the net.

“He knows what time of year it is. You can see he goes to where you score goals. He’s so good at board battles and making little plays that move the game along, but he knows where the money’s at and that’s in the crease, so he goes there and really got us going tonight, for sure,” stated Niskanen on #14.

“Big time plays out of Justin Williams, he’s no stranger to them and he was someone who we really rallied around tonight,” added Shattenkirk.

Goaltending, on both sides, was very good in this game. Holtby had some rebound issues early, but as the game went on, he shut the door and made several big stops. Andersen was under siege a great deal as time progressed and the Caps ended up with 44 shots on goal. He made many saves, and Shattenkirk praised him when asked afterwards.

“He was [very good], and I think my biggest mistake was I was taking too long to shoot. I was allowing him to set on me and really just take away all of the angles. I have to be a little bit quicker with how I’m shooting the puck. I’m happy that I was putting myself in the right positioning to get those chances,” started #22.

As for the lack of shots in that eight plus minute stretch in the middle frame, Shattenkirk had an answer for it, as well.

“They did a good job of boxing out and sometimes we were just waiting for guys to get to the net and when we do that, it’s hard, because he’s a big goalie and when he sets himself he’s hard to score on from outside the tight areas.”

So the message going forward is for the Caps to shoot the puck quicker. Wilson proved that method will work with his game winning tally.

The Capitals took a while to find their rhythm on Thursday night after three days off against a talented and speedy Leafs squad, but now they get back to a game every other day schedule, one that has worked well for them this season. Coach Trotz stated afterwards that this contest was a wake up call and finished with the following:

“I’m sure you’ll see a much different team next game.”

Notes: Dmitry Orlov led the Caps in ice time with 25:22. Niskanen logged 24:36…The Leafs rode their top four D hard. Gardiner played 26:27, Matt Hunwick logged 26:04, Morgan Reilly was in at 24:24, and Roman Polak had 23:52. Connor Carrick and Marincin, the third pair, were right around 14 minutes…Washington’s third line had 17 shifts together for a total of 10:39 of ice time. Like most of the team, they were at their best in the third period…the Caps lost the face off battle, 38-33. Kuznetsov was 8-2, but Lars Eller was 3-11…game two is at the Verizon Center on Saturday at 7 pm.

Comments Off on Wilson and Williams Lead Caps to 3-2 OT Victory in Game One