Tag Archive | "ed reed"

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ravens awarded four compensatory picks at Owner’s Meetings

Posted on 24 March 2014 by WNST Staff

Last year’s off-season after the Super Bowl was painful for Ravens fans, but now the team is being rewarded for its troubles and patience in free agency.

At the NFL Owner Meetings today in Orlando, the Baltimore Ravens learned more about their off-season approach in May as they received the league maximum number of compensatory picks possible for free agent losses.

The team received a third (99th overall),  two fourth-round (134th, 138 overall), and a fifth-round pick (175th overall).

The picks were rewarded for the losses of DE Paul Kruger (Cleveland), MLB Dannell Ellerbe (Miami), CB Cary Williams (Philadelphia), and FS Ed Reed (Houston) in free agency.

Because the Ravens did not sign any unrestricted free agents in the 2013 off-season, the team was not docked any picks from their total.

DE Elvis Dumervil, DL Chris Canty, DL Marcus Spears, S Michael Huff, and MLB Daryl Smith were all signed after teams cut them or late into training camp.

All-in-all, the Ravens will have eight picks as their disposal in May.

Follow all your Ravens news on @WNST on Twitter! WNST-We Never Stop Talking Sports!

 

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , ,

Former Ravens safety Reed reportedly has $50K stolen from car

Posted on 13 February 2014 by Luke Jones

Former Ravens safety Ed Reed is reportedly the victim of a crime for the second time in a little over a year.

According to multiple reports, the 35-year-old allegedly had $50,000 stolen from his car in Houston after someone broke the passenger side window as he was visiting a second bank. Reed had withdrawn the money from the first bank, and police suspect he was followed to the second location.

The future Hall of Fame safety signed a three-year, $15 million contract with the Houston Texans but was cut midway through the year and finished the season with the New York Jets, intercepting three passes but continuing to struggle in pass coverage. He was back in Houston to move out of his apartment and resolve his affairs.

Reed was allegedly the victim of another crime last year after his Maryland home was broken into during the week of Super Bowl XLVII.

Comments (3)

SP FBN BENGALS RAVENS

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Ravens Need A Leader

Posted on 05 January 2014 by Tom Federline

The City of Baltimore and Ravens fans were spoiled. We have been spoiled since the Ravens came to town and Game One of September 1996. The guy that secured the middle linebacker position and posed as a motivational speaker for 17 seasons, spoiled us. You are not going to replace a Ray Lewis in one year. You are not going to replace a Ray Lewis in two years. Ray can be replaced, everyone is replaceable. It’s a matter of who and how the team adapts to their approach. What seperates leaders from the average person is communication, passion and the ability to reach a performance level that 99% of the population simply cannot attain. There just aren’t that many Ray Lewis’ out there. So Ravens don’t lose him.

Now Ray-Ray wasn’t running solo in providing the leadership role on the field. He had a little help along the way. How about starting with Art Modell. Then how about some other notable teammates; Jonathan Ogden, Matt Stover, Micheal McCrary, Ed Reed, Matt Birk, Derek Mason, etc. Feel free to add to the list. Did anyone see any consistent leadership qualities from any current Raven on the field this year? How about the sidelines? How about up in the Owners Suite? The Ravens use to have leaders, they all gone.

Week by week it became more apparent – no one was going to step up and take the reigns Ray Lewis had left on the wagon. You would think at the very least, the coach would attempt to take command. Yeah right. You would think at the very least, the rewarded 20 million dollar per year quarterback, would step up into that role. Flacco is a winner, he is not a leader. You would think that in the year following a championship season, there would be player candidates graciously accepting a move into that role. Yeah right. Most of the Ravens games this past year were embarassing. The Ravens finished 8 – 8 and in my book, they should have been 3 – 13. Nice way to follow up a Super Bowl win, huh?

Did they actually, beat any team this year? I can think of one. And really up unitl 2:30 left in the first half, that game was typically sloppy and up for grabs. The Ravens finished that game by beating the Houston Texans, Game 3 of the season, 30 – 9. Luckily, I was there to witness it. It just so happened Ray Lewis was in the house, also. It was Ray Lewis Day – he was getting inducted into the Ravens Ring of Honor. Hmmmmm, convincing win with Ray in the house – interesting. The Ravens were a mediocre to poor team this year. After getting fed up watching the Ravens ineptness, I would turn the station and witness the majority of other NFL teams actually moving the ball with confidence and wondering to myself – Why can’t the Ravens do that?

The Ravens year of 2013 was definately a ride of “Good Times/Bad Times” – Led Zepplin). 2013 started off “Good”, but ended up “Bad”. The Super Bowl Run/Ray Lewis’ last ride, was better than good – it was awesome. The 2013 regular season was challenging to watch. They were lucky to survive without losing face. Actually they did lose face, right out of the gates – Game 1 vs. Denver. The season was a bust. Thirty-three minutes of the Texans game and two minutes five seconds of a Vikings snow game. The rest, was a waste of time. There were some positives: Justin Tucker, Marlon Brown, Justin Tucker, Daryl Smith, Justin Tucker, Jacoby Jones, Justin…..ok, dig the reoccuring theme? The kicker was as close as the Ravens got to a Leader.

Ok, you win the Super Bowl and the team gets dismantled. So who do you rely on? Front office? Yes, do your job and replenish. Coaches? Yes, that should go without saying. Did any of that happen? No. The Front office blows it, recogmize and correct next year. The Coach doesn’t step up – that’s a big problem. The guy who rode Rays coat-tails, did not step up. When Flacco did not step up, when Suggs did not step up, when Rice did not step up, somebody had to and nobody did. Come on, John Horribaugh, you maybe paid the least compared to star players, but it is your job to at least get those overpaid steroid boys to show up and perform.

The Ravens need a leader or two on the field and they need a leader on the sidelines. Right now, they have neither. Gut checks are in order, (along with a revamped offensive line). Candidates: Defense – Elam. Offense – it has to be Flack Nut. Coaching? – I’m not a John Horribaugh fan, never have been. Can the Ravens get his brother Jim? Now there’s a coach in my book.

We were spoiled. The only game the Ravens actually WON, Ray Lewis was in the house. Hmm???? Hey Ray, whatcha ya gonna do when you get done playing TV analyst? Let’s start out with Director of Player personnel and Motivational Speaker, then linebackers coach and Inspirational speaker, then defensive coordinator and Motivational speaker. Then by that time, hopefully you would have mentored somebody to take over the reigns. Who knows? There just may come a day, when Ray Lewis on the sideline again. If not on the sideline, get him under a lifelong contract as part of the organization. Front office….. step up! Nobody else did.
T-minus 53 days until O’s first Spring Training Game.

D.I.Y.
Fedman

Comments (5)

Who helped the Jets more Sunday: Ed Reed or the 15-7-0?

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Who helped the Jets more Sunday: Ed Reed or the 15-7-0?

Posted on 18 November 2013 by Glenn Clark

15 positive observations from the weekend of football, seven not so positive observations and we acknowledge a “zero” from outside the world of football. A reminder, there’s never any Ravens game analysis here. We do plenty of that elsewhere. It’s a trip through the weekend of football via videos, GIFs, memes, pictures, links, Tweets and shtick. This isn’t where we do Ravens stuff. You can find plenty of that…like…everywhere else on the site.

The 15-7-0 is happy to congratulate Jimmie Johnson on his 6th NASCAR title. I say that as a fellow six time NASCAR champ myself. What’s that, you don’t believe me? Then prove me wrong. Name ONE other NASCAR champion besides Jimmie Johnson.

That’s what I thought.

15 Positive Observations…

1. The Bengals are running away with the AFC North again. This would probably be a more exciting development in Cincinnati but, you know, history and all.

But don’t try to tell Cincy’s finest they shouldn’t be amped up about a big win!

2. Hey there, Terps football fan. Remember how everyone in the office was bragging about their Holiday vacations last year? Mike in finance went to St. Thomas and Jill in accounts payable went to Barbados while you just sat around and ate fruitcake? Well this year you’re going to be the talk of the water cooler because CONGRATULATIONS, YOU’RE HEADED TO BEAUTIFUL SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA! (Or Annapolis). So long, suckers!

Could someone check in to see if Randy Edsall is excited about bowl eligibility?

Elsewhere in the ACC, Florida State’s game against Syracuse was not competitive, but there WAS some competition at the game!

3. When Ed Orgeron replaces Charlie Weis at Kansas this offseason, do you think he’ll bring his sword with him? Like to take it around on recruiting trips? “Hi, I’m Ed Orgeron and this is my sword.” Damn that sounds awesome. If you haven’t picked out a wedding gift for me yet, please make it a sword.

Lee Corso kinda hopes the answer is “no”.

Another question is whether or not he’ll bring his own Doctor.

And also, will he bring his Marqise Lee?

Kansas actually won a game Saturday. This guy got to keep a piece of the goalpost everyone else threw in the lake.

4. In the span of seven days and two wins, Ben Roethlisberger went from a declaration that he’s a “Pittsburgher” to being dressed exactly like a Hamburglar.

I like Jim Schwartz. I do not like this call.

Why did the Lions lose? Because this guy showed up to the game wearing THIS.

5. Denver is the best team in the AFC West. In a related story, a bear was seen relieving himself in an area filled mostly with trees.

There were like 16 people that showed up at the game with this exact sign. I was right about everything I said about you, Denver.

Your reaction, Denver mascot?

Also…this is a thing? Although I’m not surprised Andy Reid would care so much about his postgame spreads.

There’s a big game coming up next week and Tom Brady is apparently a Batman movie villain now.

(Continued on Page 2…)

Comments (0)

Bears passing game dangerous despite backup McCown under center

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bears passing game dangerous despite backup McCown under center

Posted on 14 November 2013 by Luke Jones

(This blog brought to you by Atlantic Remodeling. Visit www.atlanticremodeling.com to learn about their Red Cent Guarantee!)

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The Chicago Bears are one of the NFL’s cornerstone franchises built around a reputation of menacing defense that’s stretched across decades of professional football.

However, this year’s team under new head coach Marc Trestman centers around an explosive passing game despite injuries that have sidelined starting quarterback Jay Cutler and thrust 34-year-old journeyman Josh McCown into action for the better part of the last month. With Cutler sidelined for Sunday’s tilt against the Ravens, McCown will again serve in a starting capacity, but the number of pass-catching targets at his disposal qualifies as a new version of the “Monsters of the Midway.”

Of course, the Baltimore defense did exceptional work against Cincinnati’s talented group of receivers led by A.J. Green last Sunday, but the Bears bring a level of physicality that the tall but wiry Bengals receivers do not provide. Leading the way is the 6-foot-4, 230-pound Brandon Marshall, who is coming off back-to-back Pro Bowl seasons and ranks ninth in the NFL with 786 receiving yards and tied for sixth with eight touchdown catches.

“He catches the ball no matter where you put it,” said cornerback Lardarius Webb, who is coming off his best game of the season in Week 10. “If you put it somewhere around him, he can make the catch. That’s what makes him so dangerous. You have to know where he’s at at all times on the field. Wherever he’s lined up, we need to know because he’s a game-changer.”

What makes Marshall so dangerous is Trestman’s willingness to line him up in a variety of places on the field, making it difficult for defenses to find the best matchup consistently. Even if the Ravens are able to harness Marshall, the emergency of second-year receiver Alshon Jeffery has forced pass defenses to pick their poison when electing to bracket coverage on Marshall, leaving the 2012 second-round pick matched up in single coverage.

After an underwhelming rookie season in which he caught just 24 passes for 367 yards, the 6-foot-3 Jeffery is 13th in the league with 735 receiving yards, giving the Bears one of the best pass-catching duos in the NFL. With the Ravens possessing only one cornerback taller than six feet — starter Jimmy Smith — Webb and No. 3 cornerback Corey Graham will need to play in a physical manner similar to how they played last week against the Bengals.

“[Jeffery] catches everything. He goes up and gets the ball,” cornerback Corey Graham said. “I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen him drop a pass on film. If you’re not attacking the ball and going up and making a play, he’s going to get it.”

The news doesn’t get much better beyond that as 6-foot-6 tight end Martellus Bennett has caught four touchdowns and running back Matt Forte is regarded as one of the most dangerous receivers in the league out of the backfield. The Ravens will find size everywhere they look in the Bears passing game, making their ability to pressure McCown that much more critical in Sunday’s tilt at Soldier Field.

It remains to be seen whether defensive coordinator Dean Pees will once again use Webb inside in the nickel package, but the ability of safeties James Ihedigbo and Matt Elam to gain good position in coverage against Bennett will be a major challenge in containing the Chicago passing attack, especially inside the red zone.

Even with an array of power forward-like targets to throw to, McCown must still deal with a defense tied for third in the NFL with 32 sacks. The Ravens were able to harass Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton into throwing three interceptions and will look for similar results against the career backup, who has completed 60 percent of his passes for four touchdowns and no interceptions in three games this season.

Baltimore has talked all week about the takeaway outburst against Cincinnati being the result of preparation finally coming together and will try to prove it wasn’t simply the result of some different defensive looks mixed with good fortune against their division rivals in the 20-17 overtime win.

“You all just happened to see a byproduct of all the work that we put in,” linebacker Jameel McClain said. “We got put in the position to get those plays. I always like to say that turnovers and interceptions are an accumulation of preparation and luck. Some of those plays, [the ball] landed in the perfect position. It’s luck, but it’s preparation for being there.”

Rare chance for running game

The struggles of the Ravens’ historically-poor running game have been discussed ad nauseam, but Sunday may represent their best last chance of hope that the ground production can improve in the second half of the season.

The Bears rank 31st in the league against the run and are giving up just under 130 rushing yards per game this season. The season-ending loss of defensive tackle Henry Melton in September and the current shoulder injury sidelining outside linebacker Lance Briggs haven’t done the defense any favors as the Bears have needed to lean heavily on offense to build a 5-4 record.

It remains to be seen how offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell will handle the workload in the running game after head coach John Harbaugh suggested performance will dictate how many carries struggling starter Ray Rice and backup Bernard Pierce will receive moving forward. Rice is averaging just 2.5 yards per carry while Pierce isn’t much better at 2.8 as both have battled injuries this season.

“We’re working to get better,” Rice said. “I know I’ve worked my butt off to get back on the field to play at a high level. I’ve just got to keep myself motivated, because I know once the opportunity comes and we rip off one of those big gains, we’ll be saying, ‘Well there it goes.’ The day will come.”

If the day doesn’t come Sunday against one of the league’s worst run defenses, it may be time to close the book on any hope for improvement in the Ravens’ rushing attack.

Hester the home-run hitter

CONTINUE ON NEXT PAGE >>>>>

Comments (1)

Reed’s firing in Houston gives Ray Lewis even more value

Tags: , , ,

Reed’s firing in Houston gives Ray Lewis even more value

Posted on 13 November 2013 by Drew Forrester

Add Ed Reed to the long list of ex-Ravens who left Baltimore for a different pasture and wound up looking foolish.

And, while doing so, Reed also stuck another feather in the career cap of Ray Lewis, who knew when his time had come and refused to do the one-time money grab like Reed and others have done.

Ed Reed embarrassed himself in Houston.  Ray Lewis went out like a world beater in Baltimore, holding up the trophy and telling  the city he loved them on a Tuesday afternoon last February.

Reed now joins the club occupied by guys like Ed Hartwell, Adalius Thomas, Bart Scott, Tony Weaver and plenty more.  A few years from now when they all have their summer reunion of “The Guys Who Left Baltimore And Weren’t The Same”, Dannell Ellerbe and Paul Kruger can share jokes with Reed about how they got paid and got laughed at when the well went dry quickly after they arrived in their new city.

It’s fair to note that Reed was at the end of his career when he left Baltimore for a one-time heist in Houston.  A lot of others left here in their prime to try and “cash in” and wound up doing so — only to see the grass WASN’T greener on the other side.  That said, a Hall of Famer getting $15 million for three years and not making it to Thanksgiving isn’t something to put on your career resume.

Ray Lewis, Super Bowl win or not, wouldn’t have been retained by the Ravens after the 2012 season.  None of that mattered, of course, once “52″ announced his retirement last December, but had Ray wanted to continue playing into ’13 and beyond, some team – the Texans perhaps – with the thought they were “one guy away” would have ponied up money for the Hall of Fame linebacker.

Ray’s career ended the way he wanted it.  In Baltimore.  As a champion…with no regrets about playing a half-dozen games for the Dolphins or Cowboys or Redskins before Father Time brought him into the office on a Tuesday in November and told him to pack his bags.

Ed Reed’s career ended on Tuesday when a 2-7 team told him to get out — and keep the money he stole from them.

He’ll be a Hall of Famer, of course, and every highlight the NFL Network shows in 2019 or 2020 will have him making plays in purple, not in that incredibly gorgeous Texans helmet he wore for a weekend or two, but Ed Reed took the money from Houston and gave them nothing in return.

He might as well have worn a bandit’s mask to practice in Houston.  When he practiced, that is.

Ray Lewis never, ever did that.

One guy was smart enough to know his playing days were over — and he ended it on his terms.

One guy didn’t care about anything except getting paid one more time.  He won on that account.  But he lost another battle with Ray Lewis along the way.

Ray was always just a little better, a little more popular and a little more valuable to the Ravens than Ed Reed.

A fact Ed proved for a final time yesterday when the Texans kicked him out.

Comments (8)

Former Ravens safety Reed cut by struggling Texans

Tags: , , , , ,

Former Ravens safety Reed cut by struggling Texans

Posted on 12 November 2013 by Luke Jones

(This blog brought to you by Atlantic Remodeling. Visit www.atlanticremodeling.com to learn about their Red Cent Guarantee!)

After recently being benched and making critical comments about his new team, former Ravens safety Ed Reed was cut by the Houston Texans on Tuesday.

Spending the first 11 years of his career in Baltimore and finally tasting Super Bowl glory last February, Reed signed a three-year, $15 million deal that included $5 million guaranteed in March to join the Texans, who were seeking defensive leadership and help at safety. However, Reed underwent hip surgery in the offseason, forcing him to miss the Texans’ first two games before he made his debut with his new team against the Ravens on Sept. 22.

Reed’s play was disappointing as he collected 16 tackles with no interceptions or pass breakups in seven games. Reed eventually lost the starting free safety job and was critical after the 2-7 Texans’ loss to Arizona on Sunday, saying his team was “outplayed” and “outcoached” after he played only 12 snaps against the Cardinals.

Houston is in the midst of a seven-game losing streak and replaced Reed in the starting lineup two weeks ago with Shiloh Keo.

The 2004 AP Defensive Player of the Year is subject to waivers and owed roughly $400,000 for the remainder of the 2013 season. Considering the minimal interest the Ravens showed in retaining Reed this offseason and his lackluster play as a 35-year-old safety coming off a second hip surgery in four years, an on-field reunion with Baltimore appears highly unlikely despite the Ravens essentially playing with two strong safeties in the secondary this season.

A Pro Football Talk report has already said the Ravens will not put in a waiver claim for their former free safety.

The sides parted amicably in the offseason and Reed joined his former teammates to visit the White House in early June as the Super Bowl XLVII champions were honored by President Barack Obama, but the most likely scenario that involves Reed returning to the Ravens would be a ceremonial one-day contract in the offseason. Such a gesture would allow the future Hall of Famer to retire as a member of the organization that drafted him out of the University of Miami in 2002.

Comments (2)

Does John Harbaugh’s style need changing?  It’s a fair question…

Tags: , , , , ,

Does John Harbaugh’s style need changing? It’s a fair question…

Posted on 05 November 2013 by Drew Forrester

Football players can’t change much, but a coach sure can.

Can John Harbaugh change?

Should he?

Will he?

Those are all fair questions now as the Ravens are in the midst of only their second 3-game losing streak in Harbaugh’s outstanding 6-year run as Baltimore’s NFL coach.

First, let’s get this straight from the start:  In and of itself, a 3-game losing streak is NOT a reason to panic.  It’s NOT a reason to change the great things you’ve done.  And it’s NOT incumbent upon one person to say, “I’ll fix this whole thing…”

That said, when you’ve been around for five-plus seasons, any significant bump in the road – and a 3-game losing streak, to a high-level franchise like the Ravens, is SIGNIFICANT – has to be looked at by the head coach as an opportunity to evaluate himself and his work.

I hope John is doing that today in Owings Mills.

Anyone who has read my work here or listened to my radio show knows what I think about John Harbaugh.  For the record, again, I’ll simply say this:  John is an outstanding football coach.  He’s an equally outstanding “man”.  He’s a champion.  And, of course, he still has plenty to learn in his profession.

I’ve been around athletes for the last thirty years of my life and one thing I can say for sure is that players rarely change their own style.  They can’t, really.  They are what they are.  If you’re a striker in professional soccer and you’re a right footed player with little or no ability to play left-footed, you’re always going to be a player that goes to his right and uses his right foot to pass or shoot the ball.  The same goes for a basketball player who’s a “right sided” player.  You’re going to your right, virtually every time, and that’s just the way it goes.  You do what got you there, for lack of a better term.  Football players are the same.  Their style is their style.  Some of that is predicated on things outside of their control — size and speed are two factors — but for the most part, a pro football player is going to use the tools that got him there in the first place.

Coaches are different.

They can change.

That doesn’t mean they have to undergo a wholesale change that comes across as “obviously phony”.

But, a coach who’s soft can develop a new, stronger edge and a coach that’s known to be a drill sergeant can soften his edges and  learn to be more accomodating with his players.  The most obvious NFL example of the latter is Tom Coughlin in New York, who has worked hard over the last five years to listen more and yell less.  It’s worked, of course.  He’s a 2-time Super Bowl champion and likely headed for the Hall of Fame someday.

I’d ask John Harbaugh to go through the same self-evaluation as Coughlin did five years ago.

I’m not TELLING John to change.  That’s not the point of this.

I’m simply suggesting to the coach that now, season six of his tenure, might be the time to carefully evaluate his style to see if it still works with this group of players he has in Baltimore.

One thing I know for sure.  If John Harbaugh thinks his style can be tweaked, improved or altered and doing so would help the team win, he’d surely consider doing it.  Another thing I know without hesitation:  No one on the football team or football staff wants to win more than Harbaugh.  No one.  He’d sell his mother to win a football game.  And then he’d pay double to get her back afterwards.  He wants to win, badly.

Then again, the players want to win, too.  How you get them to win, though, is the challenge.  As someone in the Ravens organization said to me last week, “We have an interesting collection of players.  Some of the veterans need an ass-kicking and some don’t.  Some of our young players get it and some of them don’t.  Usually, the vets don’t need to be reminded to take every snap seriously and the kids do, but our locker room is a unique blend of guys, for some reason.”

One of those veteran players who needed an ass kicking got it last week.  Michael Huff was sent packing after three months of showing little desire to do anything except pick up a paycheck.  Marcus Spears was also let go, but that was much more about his degenerative knee condition limiting him, physically.  Cornerback Asa Jackson returns this week after his 2nd run-in with the league’s Substance Abuse Policy.  He’s on life number eight of his nine lives in Baltimore.  Will he take advantage of it or will he fall from grace the way most people in Owings Mills assume he will?

And, how does John Harbaugh go about his own business now, dealing with a locker room that’s reeling with three straight losses and has both sides of the ball stinking it up at crucial times during the games?  A fractured locker room is a bad locker room.  Once the offense and defense start taking up sides, you’re in big trouble.  I can only guess there’s an element of that existing right now at 1 Winning Drive, but that atmosphere likely exists in most locker rooms of 3-5 teams.

This, again, is on Harbaugh’s shoulders right now.

Is he working with a depleted roster, minus eleven critically important players from a season ago?

Absolutely.

If you suddenly re-inserted these jerseys in the Ravens locker room, would the team be a lot better?  Dennis Pitta, Ray Lewis, Ed Reed, Bernard Pollard, Cary Williams, Brendon Ayanbedejo, Anquan Boldin, Matt Birk, Bryant McKinnie, Paul Kruger and Dannell Ellerbe.

Answer, of course:  Yes.

But, that was then, this is now.  Those guys are gone.  And this new edition of Ravens football might not react to the head coach the way the championship team did a season ago.

Is John just going with his style because it’s his style or is willing to look at himself and say, “For this team, now, I might need to change the way I do things?”

More bible verses?  Or less bible verses?

Harder practices?  Lighter practices?

More hugs to the special team players…the fringe guys?  Or less hugs and more questions like “Are you ever going to be good enough to start in this league?”

More critical analysis of his coaching staff?  Longer days?  Shorter days?  More “come to Jesus” meetings with position coaches who see their own struggling game in and game out?

More thorough review of John’s own in-game style and strategy?  More of a gambler?  Less of a gambler?

I don’t know the answers to any of those questions and I’m not suggesting any, honestly.

I’m merely asking the coach if his style, the one that has made him a champion, is etched in stone and non-negotiable?

Or, like the truly GREAT coaches in all sports, can he re-invent himself and use his strengths to mold a new character that changes with the seasons and the players he leads?

Comments (5)

Loss of a dozen starters has really hurt the Ravens

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Loss of a dozen starters has really hurt the Ravens

Posted on 22 October 2013 by Drew Forrester

Everywhere I went on Monday, the question was basically the same:  ”What’s wrong with the Ravens?”

A few folks who asked that of me quickly followed up with, “You shouldn’t be this bad a year after winning the Super Bowl.”

Well, what’s wrong with the Ravens is, in fact, a by-product of winning the Super Bowl in New Orleans last February.

The 2013 edition of John Harbaugh’s team isn’t the same one that won the title in 2012.  Simple, right?  Well, yes, it sort of IS that simple, actually, even though people are always trying to find the “hidden secret” or “untold story” of the team.

Try this simple exercise for a second.  You’re going to have to put your pre-conceived negative opinions of John Harbaugh, Joe Flacco and Ray Rice on the side for a moment, because this little game won’t work if you can’t do that.

OK…ready?

I want you to rewind your brain all the way back to last January.  The Ravens have just finished 10-6, won the AFC North, and get to take on the Colts in the first round of the playoffs.  If they win there, their “prize” is a trip to Denver to take on a Peyton Manning team that rocked you in Baltimore a month earlier.  And, if you’re somehow fortunate enough to get past the Broncos, the last remaining hurdle between you and the Super Bowl is a visit to Tom Brady’s house in Foxboro.

Still with me?

OK — the week before the Colts game, a crippling virus races through the Ravens locker room and these ten players are deemed OUT for the remainder of the playoffs:  Anquan Boldin, Matt Birk, Dannell Ellerbe, Ed Reed, Ray Lewis, Paul Kruger, Brendon Ayanbedejo, Bernard Pollard, Cary Williams and Dennis Pitta.  Add Bryant McKinnie to the mix after Monday’s trade and that makes eleven key players gone. (Keep in mind, as much as people like to beat up McKinnie, the Ravens are 0-2 since they jettisoned him to the bench in favor of Eugene Monroe.)

Could the Ravens have won four straight games in January and February without those eleven players a year ago?

Honestly?

Of course not.  They wouldn’t have moved past Indianapolis in the first round of the playoffs given those ten starters missing the game due to the mythical “virus” I described above.

Well — of those eleven players I listed, nine of them were STARTERS from a year ago who haven’t played a single down for the Ravens this season.  McKinnie played 5 of 7 games before they sent him packing on Monday afternoon.

Of the players listed above, only Dennis Pitta remains on the roster, and he’s injured and was unavailable through seven games of 2013.

If you’re looking for the biggest reason why the Ravens are 3-4 at the bye, you just saw ten of them above.  There are, generally speaking, 22 “starters” in any game.  Ayanbedejo wasn’t technically a starter, but he WAS a special teams ace, so I deem him to be an important cog in the machine.  So, ten starters – out of 22 – are gone.  That’s not quite 50%, but it’s a huge chunk of quality missing that needed to be replaced.

(Please see next page)

Comments (6)

MobTown Sports Beat Monday Ravens Roundup

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MobTown Sports Beat Monday Ravens Roundup

Posted on 23 September 2013 by Thyrl Nelson

 

The Ravens improved to 2-1 on the season yesterday with a one-sided, 30-9 win over the Houston Texans. After the way that the Texans handled the Ravens last season, there were a number of reasons to be concerned beforehand. Truth be told, I had a much worse feeling about what might happen against Houston than I did before the beat down the Ravens suffered in Denver in Week1. Hindsight however is 20/20, so here’s a quick rundown of what we know now after the Ravens latest victory:

5. Justin Tucker is Back on Track

…for now at least. Maybe it was the reception that Billy Cundiff received from the Ravens faithful last week that had Tucker out of sorts. Maybe it was just the presence of Cundiff in the building that infected Tucker’s right foot last Sunday. Regardless, Tucker made enough big kicks in his rookie year to have some equity built up with fans. That equity though wouldn’t have lasted through too many 0-for-2 performances like he had last week vs. Cleveland, especially if those misses began to cost the Ravens games.

While concern over the kicking game was mild at most, it was nice to see Tucker get back on track with a 3-for-3 game against the Texans, hitting from 28, 45 and 43 yards. Even though the two from 40+ came in late, low leverage situations, any concerns fans had about the Ravens kicking game can be shelved…for now.

4. Dirty Birds

After struggling with penalties last year, the Ravens still appear to have some work to do in that regard. The 2013 Ravens have 20 penalties for 181 yards through 3 games, including 10 for 87 yards in yesterday’s affair. Despite their most penalized performance of the season vs. Houston, the Ravens still managed to win the “penalty battle” as the Texans racked up 14 for 113 yards.

3. Cheering for Laundry

On the day that Ed Reed returned to Baltimore as a member of a new team, and Ray Lewis returned to be honored by the Ravens, it was the guys who suited up in their places that stole the show. James Ihedigbo picked up 9 tackles, 2 for a loss along with 2 defended passes and simply seemed to be everywhere while covering Ed Reed’s old spot. Daryl Smith, playing in Ray Lewis’ former domain plucked a Matt Schaub pass away from a waiting Owen Daniels, and at a time where the Ravens offense was struggling to make hay, made some on his own, hustling it 37 yards to pay dirt.

For all of the Ravens off-season pick-ups, Daryl Smith might have been the least heralded. He was grabbed on the same day the Ravens visited the White House and his signing went basically under the radar. If he continues to play like he did on Sunday, he could be the team’s most impactful addition. It’s also pretty encouraging that his big play came defending a tight end, which has been an issue for the Ravens of late.  

2. Doss is a Boss

What more can you say about a guy who was shown the door by the team when they pared down to their final 53 men, only to come back with an emphatic impact? Life out of football, brief as it may have been, seems to have brought out the best in Tandon Doss who is making the most out of his second chance with the Ravens. Maybe in the coming weeks Doss can become more a part of the Ravens passing game, and finally show fans those hands we heard so much about from the team about throughout his first 2 seasons. It’s not like the Ravens offense couldn’t use a pair of hands that they can trust between the hash marks.

1. Who Says Joe Flacco Can’t Act?

While Joe Flacco’s increased, post-Super Bowl public profile has led to some pretty clunky performances as a pitchman in various commercials, Flacco’s acting skills were on full display yesterday. After last season’s debacle at the hands of the Texans, JJ Watt and the rest of the Houston pass rush broke the huddle with their ears pinned back more often than not on Sunday. Flacco used that aggression against the Texans inducing 5 encroachment or defensive offsides penalties on the anxious Texans defense.

Elsewhere in the AFC North

The Bengals picked up a big win and remain tied with the Ravens at 2-1 atop the division. For now at least, it’s shaping up to be an interesting battle between these 2 for the division. They’ll meet again in Week 17 this year, maybe with something actually on the line this time.

The Steelers looked really bad to start against the Bears on Sunday night, but showed some real resilience closing the gap from 24-3 to 27-23. It looked like Pittsburgh had really found their resolve in the face of an 0-3 start. In the end though, their comeback attempt was little more than a chance for Ben Roethlisberger to cough up the ball in a late critical situation…it’s kind of their thing.

Leave it to the Browns to all but announce that they’re going into full tank mode by trading RB Trent Richardson and skipping right over Jason Campbell on the depth chart to 3rd stringer Brian Hoyer to replace injured starter Brandon Weeden, and then pick up a win on Sunday. There are even reports that the Browns are shopping receivers Josh Gordon and Greg Little. Of course the Browns can’t even tank right. If they had only known that the best way to win was to actually try to lose, they could have saved themselves and their fans years of heartache.

Comments (0)