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Caps over Devils Burkie

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Burakovsky’s Bout Spurs the Caps to a 5-2 Win in New Jersey

Posted on 13 October 2017 by Ed Frankovic

“You mess with the bull, you get the horns.”

That was the message the New Jersey Devils received from the Washington Capitals on Friday night at the Prudential Center.

Nicklas Backstrom had a goal and three helpers, T.J. Oshie had two goals and an assist, Alex Ovechkin had his league leading 9th goal of the season and a gorgeous assist on Backstrom’s tally, and Evgeny Kuznetzov had two assists in a 5-2 Capitals victory that improved their record to 3-1-1 (7 points) and put them in sole possession of first place in the Metropolitan Division.

Braden Holtby made 21 saves in the cage in a solid performance and overall Washington played their most complete game of the season.

Tom Wilson returned from a bogus George Parros imposed four game suspension to bring physicality and energy to the lineup and that jump started the third line allowing the Washington stars to take over the contest. Jakub Vrana tipped in a shot from Devante Smith-Pelly late in period two for a critical tally that made it 3-1, which was big because the Caps needed some strong contributions from their bottom six forwards (Vrana is in the top six, but DSP is on the fourth line).

Perhaps the biggest development of the night, though, was Andre Burakovsky’s first fight that came 2:33 into the final frame with the Capitals clinging to a one goal lead. Blake Coleman dangerously took out Dmitry Orlov’s legs and sent him slamming hard into the boards. A penalty was being called, but #65 wasn’t about to just walk away without letting Coleman know he crossed the line. Burkie dropped his mitts and went after the bigger Devil and lost the fight, although he didn’t take any hard shots to the head. Instantly the Capitals bench stood up and applauded the “good ole fashioned guts” from Andre “Killer” Burakovsky. It was a moment of team toughness and togetherness that this club displayed and you can bet that Andre will get a lot of “ataboys” from his teammates on the way to Philadelphia for Saturday night’s tilt against the despised Flyers.

Shortly after the Burakovsky bout, Lars Eller took a high stick to the face and that’s when Osh Babe, Ovi, Backy, and Kuzy made sure that young Andre’s first NHL fight wouldn’t go for naught. The Caps scored two pretty power play goals on the double minor to salt this one away.

Then it was payback time.

With 7:29 remaining, Coleman manned up and fought Wilson. Blake was whipped so badly that “Rag Doll” by Aerosmith would’ve been a fitting song to pipe through the public address system at that moment. Simply put, Willy let it be known that Coleman wasn’t walking out of the arena nearly injuring Orlov and beating up on the previously undefeated prize pupil, Burakovsky.

This is the kind of stuff that brings an already tight team even closer together. You can see that this Caps club is in it for each other. Everyone around the league and even many in town are already writing these guys off and foolishly trying to tie the local DC baseball teams post season failures to this hockey franchise. It’s pathetic, if you ask me. Baseball has nothing to do with hockey, period.

Anyone who really knows hockey sees the immense talent on this team despite the off season subtractions due to the salary cap. Ovechkin, Backstrom, Kuznetsov, and Oshie are all top NHL players. Combined they have 37 points in just five games. To quote a famous movie from the mid-90’s, yes, “37!” These guys are good and they are still a work in progress with Vrana as a new piece in the top six and Burakovsky moving up as well for the departed Justin Williams and Marcus Johansson. Many are convinced that Oshie can’t score 33 goals again this year because of his high 2016-17 shooting percentage, but as I pointed out all summer, that shooting percentage didn’t including shots that missed the net. Oshie gets a lot of in close chances because of the guys he’s playing with and with the Gr8 on absolute fire, he’s getting more room and hitting the corners with his attempts so far. He’s notched five goals in five games, which is amazing, but when Alexander the Great already has nine, yes nine goals, it’s easy to overlook #77’s production. Last year I often wrote, “Pay the Man!” Boy am I glad the man got paid. Thanks Brian MacLellan.

Getting Wilson back reignited the third line and Brett Connolly and Eller had one of their best games of the season. When you have at least three lines going, it makes it very difficult for the opponents to match up. The Caps needed a presence from the bottom six forwards and they delivered on Friday.

On defense, things got tough with Matt Niskanen exiting the game on what appeared to be a missed slashing call by the inconsistent zebras. It was the second critical missed opponent slash in two tilts. On Wednesday night the referees failed to call a Carter Rowney slash on Kuznetsov on a rush late in that contest that would’ve given Washington a power play and a chance to tie the game.

Nisky will be reevaluated tomorrow, according to Coach Barry Trotz. That slash, with the Caps shorthanded, allowed the Devils to score on the power play and get within one goal with 3:32 to go in period two.

After Smith-Pelly’s key goal made it 3-1, things got close again in the first minute of period three when Kyle Palmieri took a great pass from Damon Severson and split Christian Djoos and Orlov for a breakaway marker.

When Orlov got dumped into the boards and stayed down on the next shift, things were looking bad for Washington, but then “Killer” Burkakovsky stepped in and took one for the team and the Capitals star players made sure to make the Devils pay the price on the scoreboard the rest of the way.

This was a feel good victory against a division opponent that was 3-0 and had just defeated the talented Toronto Maple Leafs earlier in the week.

Impressive messages were sent this night by the Capitals on the scoreboard, with their fists, and with their hearts.

On to the “City of Brotherly Love.”

Notes: Given the Capitals salary cap situation, if Niskanen can’t play on Saturday night in Filthy, it’s likely that Taylor Chorney will get a sweater because calling up Madison Bowey, a deserving right handed shooting blue liner, would require someone else to be sent to Hershey, unless #2 has to go on long term injury (which would be a bad scene)…the Caps were for 3 for 5 on the power play while New Jersey went 1 for 4…John Carlson led the Capitals in ice time with 27:26.  Niskanen only played 12:18 before exiting the contest so the other four guys played extra minutes than in a normal situation. Brooks Orpik logged 22:04, Orlov 21:12, Djoos 16:47 and Aaron Ness played 13:38…shot attempts were 52-46 in favor of the Caps…New Jersey won the faceoff battle, 39-27.  Jay Beagle went 8-5…Backstrom got hit with a puck in warmups and then notched four points…expect Philipp Grubauer to get the start in net against the Flyers on Saturday night.

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nathan-walker

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12 Caps Thoughts After Four Preseason Games

Posted on 24 September 2017 by Ed Frankovic

With the Washington Capitals completing four of their seven preseason tilts, I’ve written 12 thoughts on the Caps as we head into the final week of games that don’t count in the standings.

  1. Following Saturday’s 4-1 defeat to the Carolina Hurricanes at the Capital One Arena (formerly the Verizon Center), Coach Barry Trotz lamented about the team’s lack of even strength offense pointing out that his club has only one even strength tally in four contests (Devante Smith-Pelly’s game winner in Montreal on Wednesday night).
  2. The reason for the scoring problems are numerous, but first and foremost, has to be the instability on the back end. Puck possession begins with a defense that can get the biscuit out of its own end efficiently. Washington has two defensive openings and the coaching staff and General Manager Brian MacLellan are taking a look at several players, most of which have little to no NHL experience, for those slots. As a result, there has been a lot of turnovers and ragged positional play from the Washington blueline, thus far.
  3. The Caps have talked about promoting from within their organization and building a team with more speed. Having watched Nathan Walker play in both of his 2017-18 “auditions,” I think it’s safe to say this 23 year old, who has spent his last four seasons in Hershey, will be making “The Show” this fall. Walker’s speed opens up the ice for his teammates and creates scoring chances. His likely center, Jay Beagle, told the media on Saturday night that #79 is great with the puck and brings a lot of energy and grit to the hockey team.
  4. Also in the promoting from within department, the other pretty close to a lock to make the roster up front is 2014 first round pick, Jakub Vrana. So far #13 has a goal and an assist in three games and he’s had several quality scoring chances.
  5. Washington’s goaltending has been very solid in the preseason led by Braden Holtby and Philipp Grubauer. Both have high save percentages and they’ve looked sharp. They’re getting a lot of action because of the Caps issues in the puck possession department. Grubauer played the last 40 minutes on Saturday against Carolina and he was decent, but he did lose the third goal, by Julien Gauthier, because he struggled to pick the puck up as it left Gauthier’s long stick. As a result, Carolina received a high, short side lamplighter that pretty much ended this affair at the 2:35 mark of period three.
  6. Tyler Graovac, who was acquired this spring from the Minnesota Wild for the Caps 2018 5th round pick, was the best player on the ice in Friday’s contest against St. Louis. #91 is six foot five and can really skate. He is vying for one of the last forward spots on the roster with Smith-Pelly, Chandler Stephenson, and Alex Chiasson.
  7. Speaking of Chiasson, he had a power play goal in Saturday’s defeat to the Canes. On that tally, all five Capitals touched the disc before Chiasson deposited it into the cage from the “Oshie” spot in the slot in front of the opposing goaltender. #39 isn’t the fastest skater, but he has scored 50 goals in 320 NHL games, including 12 tallies in 81 tilts last season for the Calgary Flames. There is a very good chance that Chiasson makes the opening night roster.
  8. For the past two seasons forward Marcus Johansson, who is now with the New Jersey Devils, has been the primary forward to carry the puck into the opposing zone on the Capitals first power play unit. Now that slot belongs to Evgeny Kuznetsov and I don’t think you’ll see any drop off at all in quality zone entries. Through the first four games of this preseason #92 has been the best Cap and his skating has been stellar.
  9. There was lots of talk in the offseason that Alex Ovechkin had lost weight and was going to play faster. On the first day of training camp, the Gr8 stated that he did not lose weight, although his official roster weight is now 235 versus 239 that was listed last season. Ovi talked about training differently to get faster. It’s only been two preseason games, but so far, I’m not seeing the results of that training change. Perhaps Alex is just easing into the season? No cause for concern yet, but Washington is going to need him to be going full tilt from the get go in 2017-18.
  10. On the backend, the battle for the last two spots is fierce. Christian Djoos has been mentioned in that conversation quite a bit and on Saturday night against the Canes, he showed off his offensive talents. On one shift in the second period he displayed his ability to move around at the offensive blue line and even rush the net when given the opportunity. He did just that and ended up drawing a penalty. On the downside, though, his defensive zone needs work. On the Canes game winning goal, Djoos was outmuscled behind his own cage by Marcus Kruger and that one on one battle loss proved very costly. Djoos’ primary competition for one of the blue line spots is Aaron Ness, Madison Bowey, and Tyler Lewington.
  11. Travis Boyd, who is a bit of a long shot to make the opening night roster, drew two penalties on Saturday against Carolina. #72 will likely end up in Hershey to start the season, but I’m pretty sure he will get some NHL game action at some point in 2017-18.
  12. Tom Wilson didn’t play on Saturday night due to a two game suspension he received for interfering with the Blues Robert Thomas. #43 hit the Blues center along the boards a second or so after the puck was gone. Thomas really had no way to defend himself and “Willy” made the mistake of focusing too much on the man instead of the puck. This is Wilson’s first NHL suspension, although he’s been fined several times.

The Caps next preseason game is on Wednesday at 7:00 pm in DC against the New Jersey Devils.

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Kuznetsov Bird

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Caps Still A Contender Despite Off Season Losses

Posted on 03 July 2017 by Ed Frankovic

For the past three years Capitals General Manager Brian MacLellan built a squad to compete for the Cup with entry level or bridge contracts working in his favor. Unfortunately, despite having a complete roster this past season, which led to a second straight Presidents’ Trophy, they did not get the job done.

The Caps had the best team on paper this past spring, but when it came down to it, they couldn’t defeat Pittsburgh, once again.

Bottom line, they couldn’t handle the pressure of the top seed and they under performed.

They choked.

There is no way around that, all you have to do is go back and watch the panic they displayed in game seven after the Penguins took a 1-0 lead.

But we’ve already dissected that loss and the disappointing end to the season, so it’s time to move on.

On this journey, however, MacLellan, while talking about what he called a two year championship window (2015-16 and 2016-17), also clearly pointed out that after those two years were up that roster changes were inevitable due to the salary cap.

As the Caps GM and anyone else that closely follows this team knew all along, they had 11 players from this past spring’s roster that were up for new contracts.

Eleven!

So there was NO WAY this team was going to be the same and they were going to lose many pieces, especially with the salary cap only going up to $75M after the NHLPA mistakenly didn’t take advantage of the full escalator clause. That error is now putting many veteran NHL players out of work and could force many of them to have to take major pay cuts just to stay in the league.

So with five unrestricted free agents, six restricted free agents and the expansion draft guaranteeing one unprotected player was going to be taken by Vegas, the Caps GM had his work cut out for him.

MacLellan wisely took a strategy that focused on keeping the core of the team intact while letting players be exposed, unsigned, or traded where they had other options in the pipeline at those positions, such as on defense and at wing.

For the expansion draft he took the 7-3-1 protection approach which left them most vulnerable with either their 4th defensemen (Nate Schmidt) or the backup goalie (Philipp Grubauer). Leaving just those spots exposed was good asset management, especially when the Capitals knew they were losing one good player NO MATTER WHAT. That turned out to be the very popular, but still relatively inexperienced Schmidt. The 88 car, who is a very good skater and a positive player, was an undrafted free agent that had yet to play a full 82 game season and playoffs as a top four defensemen. The Capitals clearly liked Schmidt and openly stated the plan was for him to have the first shot at the fourth blue line slot this upcoming season, despite not having lengthy experience in that position at the NHL level.

Vegas GM George McPhee, who knew Schmidt well from his days with the Caps, opted to take Nate instead of Grubauer and the first roster hole became official.

Immediately after the expansion draft, the T.J. Oshie signing occurred allowing Washington to keep the 33 goal scorer and top line right wing at a bargain price of $5.75M for eight years.

This past weekend, with the start of free agency on July 1st, MacLellan focused his efforts on signing his restricted free agents. He inked defenseman Dmitry Orlov to a six year $30.6M deal, winger Brett Connolly to a two year $3M contract, and center Evgeny Kuznetsov to an eight year $62.4M monster extension. Over the same period unrestricted Washington free agents Karl Alzner signed with Montreal, Kevin Shattenkirk went, as expected, to the Rangers, and Justin Williams received a high paying two year deal ($9M) to return to Carolina.

The problem with the Caps signings was that the Orlov and Kuznetsov numbers came in a bit higher, especially in Kuznetsov’s case, than originally anyone expected. Both had leverage with the KHL, primarily Kuznetsov, and with Washington thin at center in the organization, Kuzy had even more extra leverage to get a big pay day. After all he could bolt to Russia, play in the Olympics and KHL this season, log another year overseas and then become an unrestricted NHL free agent in the summer of 2019. With no clear top two centers in the Capitals organizational pipeline, MacLellan had no choice but to re-sign Kuznetsov, mostly on #92’s terms. At that point, with restricted free agents Andre Burakovsky and Philipp Grubauer still the only ones needing new deals, someone was going to have to be moved now or in the future to make the overall salary cap dollars work.

The NHL allows teams to carry up to 10% over the salary cap until final roster cut downs, but with so many veteran players on the market likely to be cheaper going forward due to the small salary cap increase (bad move again, NHLPA) it was clear that the trade market was going to be decreasing rapidly going forward. Add in the fact that most teams spent a lot of money to give big increases to their own players (see Connor McDavid and Carey Price) and you can see why there hasn’t been a big trade market since the NHL expansion draft.

Case in point, just last week Vegas GM George McPhee, who selected top four defensemen Marc Methot from Ottawa in the expansion draft, was only able to obtain from the Dallas Stars a 2020 2nd round pick and goalie Dylan Ferguson (a 7th round pick in the 2017 draft) for the blue liner. You read that correctly, it’s the year 2020 for that second round pick!

So with MacLellan needing to deal because the trade market was looking bleak going forward, the Caps GM had to pick a player to move for salary cap room while also finding a dance partner. Marcus Johansson, who carries a $4.583M cap number, was the most likely candidate, especially with Burakovsky and 2014 NHL first round pick Jakub Vrana in place and ready to move up the depth chart at wing. Luckily the New Jersey Devils, who had set aside money to try and lure Shattenkirk to their club on July 1st, but failed to do so despite likely offering more money than the Rangers, had remaining budget and needed to make a splash to improve their team and appease their fan base.

So on Sunday night, just after announcing the blockbuster Kuznetsov deal, the Caps traded Jojo to the Devils and received 2018 2nd and 3rd round picks for the forward who just completed a career year in Washington with 24 goals and 58 points. 19 of those 58 points came on a first power play unit with Nicklas Backstrom, Alex Ovechkin, and Oshie, but Marcus did his share to earn those points by being the best on the team in man advantage zone entries (Kuznetsov will assume Johansson’s 1st PP spot going forward).

With the departure of the also very popular Johansson to go along with Schmidt and the three EXPECTED unrestricted free agent losses, some in the fan base and local and national media went nuts. This despite the fact that MacLellan had managed to pretty much ensure he’d re-sign six of the 11 players that needed new contracts for 2017-18 while also getting two draft picks for the departed Johansson to fill in holes that they had in the 2018 draft as a result of previously traded choices. Those draft picks should prove to be valuable going forward.

Following the Johansson trade, the fan response on Twitter and blog/Twitter posts of some in the local and national media were emotionally charged and a major overreaction in a negative sense. It seems that many conveniently forgot the facts, or chose to ignore them: the Caps were going to lose good players this off-season and when prices went up in the restricted free agent market, it likely cost them one more that they did not originally expect or could reasonably prepare for given the expansion draft.

Suddenly MacLellan, who along with Coach Barry Trotz and his coaching staff have done a wonderful job of turning around a team that was an absolute train wreck just three years ago, had become the village idiot on Twitter for losing Schmidt and Johansson. But in reality they are two replaceable players in the grand scheme of things when you look at the Capitals organizational depth. They have young quality defensemen in the organization and at wing both Burakovksy and Vrana are ready to move up to fill in the gaps left by the departure of Jojo.

Overall, the expansion draft and the upward costs of the restricted free agents resulted in the loss of those two players in addition to their unrestricted free agents (although MacLellan did keep Oshie from the UFA pile). In my opinion, however, you’d be hard pressed to pick any other two players from the 7-3-1 protected list and restricted free agent crew that make the dollars work while resulting in a better overall scenario for Washington going forward, especially given the other assets they currently have in the organization for replacements. Keep in mind that Vegas had the final say for the expansion draft, too, so the Caps did not get to choose who the Golden Knights selected. In addition, the idea of buying out Brooks Orpik was never a viable option and it would not have resulted in enough salary cap savings (only $3M) this season to allow all of the restricted free agent signings to occur (not to mention it would add wasted dollars to the salary cap for the next four seasons).

The Caps lost good players, but let’s get one thing straight in spite of everything that has transpired since the end of the season – the Capitals still have a VERY GOOD hockey team heading into 2017-18.

The projected line-up, based on input from the Caps GM during his Monday morning conference call, is now as follows:

Forwards:

Ovechkin – Backstrom – Oshie

Vrana – Kuznetsov – Burakovsky

Connolly – Eller – Wilson

TBD – Jay Beagle – TBD

Defense:

Orlov – Matt Niskanen

TBD – John Carlson

Orpik – TBD

Goalie:

Braden Holtby

Grubauer

The TBD’s at forward, right now, include the possibility of several Hershey players such as Chandler Stephenson, Nathan Walker, Travis Boyd, Riley Barber, or recently acquired players such as Tyler Graovac, Anthony Peluso or Devante Smith-Pelly (signed from New Jersey on Monday on a two way contract for the league minimum, $650,000). On defense, the TBD’s appear to be two of Taylor Chorney, Madison Bowey, Christian Djoos, Aaron Ness, and Tyler Lewington.

Yes, this is no longer a 118 or 120 point roster, but it’s still a good one, likely in the 100 to 105 point range given the strong centers, skilled scoring wingers, and quality goaltenders. In my opinion, Vegas not taking Grubauer will be a blessing in disguise for the Caps in 2017-18 because goaltending is the most important position in hockey. There will also be a lot less pressure on this team, the media and many fans have already written them off.

Finally, keep in mind that the other playoff teams in the Metropolitan Division have lost players too, due to the salary cap. In Pittsburgh, the two time defending champs saw Marc Andre-Fleury (expansion draft), Nick Bonino, Chris Kunitz, Trevor Daley, and Ron Hainsey all depart. Without Fleury, who was a great insurance policy for the oft-injured Matt Murray, the Capitals win that second round series this spring. The Rangers signed Shattenkirk, but they traded their number one center, Derek Stepan, backup goalie, Antti Raanta, and bought out defensemen Dan Girardi in the process of doing so. Columbus traded forward Brandon Saad to Chicago for Artemi Panarin, so they are still looking for a number one center to fill their biggest need. Bottom line, nobody has a roster without holes.

It’s clear the fact that the salary cap is impacting all teams gets lost in the noise when some look and analyze the Capitals.

Yes, they’ve become “top heavy” as MacLellan called them, but they are still a playoff team, at a minimum.

Fans are fans, though, so the negativity is to be expected, that’s just the way it is in professional sports. But you’d expect more out of the local and national media. Keep in mind, though, that there are critics in parts of the media who are fans, at heart, of other Metropolitan Division teams (for example, the Devils and the Flyers, to name a couple), or flat out just don’t like the Capitals organization, there’s no denying that. Then there are others who are just not experienced enough when it comes to the workings of the NHL or are trying to make their mark in their craft to move up the sports media ladder via page clicks – so please take their criticism and bashing with a grain of salt. They have an agenda.

In full disclosure, I won’t walk away from the fact that I worked for this organization for 11 seasons either, but my track record of calling the team out when they make mistakes is well documented (see my 2014 end of season fire McPhee and Oates blog or simply check out the first few paragraphs above). If I thought MacLellan did a poor job of handling this off-season, I’d call him out. But given what he was up against and the undeniable rising salary costs for the top players in the game, I think he’s done the best job he possibly could to keep the Capitals a playoff team and, depending on how the new players that make the lineup this fall pan out, still a Stanley Cup contender.

It’s now up to the Capitals star players, starting with Ovechkin, Backstrom, Kuznetsov, and Holtby, to produce their best performances to help carry this club through the regular season and deep into the postseason.

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Oshie Signs

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Caps Smartly Lock Up T.J. Oshie Long Term

Posted on 25 June 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Pay The Man!

All last season as T.J. Oshie racked up key goal after key goal for the Washington Capitals from in the paint that was the phrase I used over and over about #77, whether it was in a tweet, a blog, or on the air on WNST.

Well, the Caps have now “Paid The Man!”

On Friday, Capitals General Manager Brian MacLellan announced an eight year, $46M deal between the club and the “Osh Babe.”

Yes, T.J. and his whole family, who are must follows for their enthusiasm and passion on Instagram and Twitter will be Capitals for life.

Well done, Caps, well done.

Oshie, who will be 31 on December 30th of this year, has been the missing piece the Capitals have been searching for at right wing since Alexander Ovechkin entered the league in 2005-06. The closest they’ve come to having a true number one right wing was Alexander Semin back in the 2008 to 2010 period. But #28 was just too inconsistent, too soft on the boards, and took too many bad penalties to be counted on long term. Bottom line, that guy had all of the talent in the world, but he really didn’t have the interest or drive to put in the time or effort to be great at hockey. He was and still is one of the most maddening Capitals players to watch in club history.

Fast forward five years and Washington, under Coach Barry Trotz in his first season (2014-15), squeaked into second place in the Metropolitan Division on the last day of the regular season and parlayed that into a trip to the second round against the New York Rangers. The Caps would lose a three to one series lead and immediately afterwards in the summer of 2015, MacLellan stated that the Capitals needed to add to their top six up front to compete for the Stanley Cup. Specifically, he was looking for players who would go to the net and score, but also be able to compliment the skill they had up front in Ovechkin, Nicklas Backstrom, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Marcus Johansson, and Andre Burakovsky. Enter Oshie in a trade for Troy Brouwer and Justin Williams via free agency and the Caps had players that knew how to win the one on one battles and keep pucks alive on the wall where previously they struggled to do so. Washington went on to win back to back Presidents’ Trophies before losing the Stanley Cup Final each spring in the second round to the eventual repeat Champions, the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Yes, they were devastating defeats, but let’s be honest, the Capitals were the second best team in hockey both seasons, but they had to face the best in round two because of the playoff format. As I wrote in my end of season blog, the biggest reason the Caps lost to the Penguins this spring was because they didn’t have enough players willing to go to the net and pay the price for the ugly goals. Oshie, Williams, and Johansson were the three Washington players who did that much better than any of the others on the club this past season.

Unfortunately for MacLellan, there is only so much money to go around and with the salary cap rising to just $75M and Kuznetsov, Dmitry Orlov, and some others due for big raises, including Oshie, he was in a bind and could not keep this entire team intact for 2017-18.

In addition, they knew they were going to lose a decent player in the expansion draft to Vegas and it turned out to be defensemen Nate Schmidt. The 88 car, after being the sixth or seventh defensemen much of the regular season, really stepped up in the playoffs and was slated by MacLellan to be a top four blue liner with the Caps in 2017-18, despite having never done that at the NHL level for a full 82 games plus playoffs. Since the Golden Knights opted to draft Nate instead of goalie Philipp Grubauer (also a restricted free agent), Schmidt will likely play top four minutes for a full 82 games next season, but he won’t be going to the playoffs with the roster former Caps GM George McPhee has assembled for its inaugural season.

But back to Oshie, on the open market he could’ve easily grabbed a contract for four or five years at or above $7M a season. However, the Osh Babe made it clear he enjoyed playing in Washington and wanted to stay. Therefore, he opted for much longer term and lower money in the out years, which essentially results in a discount for the Capitals in the first five years of this deal. Oshie will get $32.5M ($6.5M AAV) yet only count $5.75M each year ($28.75M) against the salary cap in season’s one through five.

Again, looking more closely at the way this deal is structured, Oshie receives $22M of the $46M in the first three years. However, the Capitals could not afford a salary cap hit of $7.333M in the near term nor could they handle a five year deal where the cap hit was $6.5M.

Without T.J. though, they are simply not Stanley Cup contenders. There is no one on this club that dogs the puck like he does. He is a true number one right wing and they have no one in the pipeline in the organization that fits that role. I repeat, there is no top line right wing anywhere else in the organization. So the trade off to keep Oshie, which was a must do, was adding in years six through eight, where the Caps are on the hook for another $13.5M, for a player who will start the season at ages 35, 36, and 37, respectively.

Some are making this out to be a bad contract, but it really isn’t when you factor in salary cap growth and also the discount they receive for the player in years one through five.

Upon inception in 2005-06, the NHL salary cap was set at $39M and has grown over 13 seasons to the $75M figure it will be in 2017-18. Using linear regression of those 13 data points and extrapolating that into the future, the salary cap projects to be as follows: $79.4M in 2018-19, $82.13M in 2019-20, $84.87M in 2020-21, $87.60M in 2021-22, $90.33M in 2022-23, $93.07M in 2023-24, and $95.81 in 2024-25. Simply put, if the NHL continues to grow the game at the same rate it’s done since 2006, and that’s certainly achievable given that they overcame a lengthy lockout in 2012-13 that resulted in a flat salary cap from 2011-12 to 2013-14, then that $95.81M number is certainly achievable.

This is important because as Oshie ages it is natural to expect his production to decrease, especially in years six through eight. In year six he will be 35 years old to start the season, yet Williams just proved, that with quality players around him, you can still produce at a high level at that age and you’d have to expect that in those out years T.J. will have either Backstrom or Kuznetsov feeding him the puck.

Some will also point out that T.J.’s high shooting percentage in 2016-17 is not sustainable. Sure, based strictly on those numbers that’s likely true, but looking at where Oshie gets his shots from, it’s easy to see why he had 33 goals in just 68 games. Keep in mind that the 2016-17 shooting percentage figure does not take into account all of the shots he had in close that he missed the net on, either. Bottom line, #77 was the player who was likely to score the most goals as a Capital based on where his shots are coming from. All shots are not created equal and on this club, Oshie has gotten much better scoring chances than he ever did in St. Louis for some big reasons. First, he plays the right way by going to the net and secondly, you have to credit the highly skilled forwards on this club, primarily Backstrom and Ovechkin, his usual linemates, for helping open up the ice for T.J. Let’s not forget that many of those chances for all three of them often came as a result of Oshie’s ability to keep pucks alive in the offensive zone as well as get them out of his own end. He’s an elite player and he deserved to get paid that way.

The past two years Oshie’s salary cap hit was $4.5M which accounted for 6.3% (2016) and 6.16% (2017) of the Washington total. He was a super bargain at $4.5M, no doubt. There are no bargains out there for MacLellan to snag now for a number one right wing. Adding in the cap hits for Ovechkin and Backstrom, the trio combined for 25.25% and 24.44% of the total, in 2016 and 2017, respectively. In 2018, Oshie will account for 7.67% of the Capitals total yet the trio will be at 25.1% of the team total, which is lower than in 2016. As the salary cap increases, Oshie’s individual total drops and based on my league salary cap total projections, is only 6.36%, 6.18%, and 6.0% in years six, seven, and eight of the deal, respectively. Those percentages are certainly not horrible, and keep in mind that Ovechkin’s current salary cap figure will be off of the books starting in year five of Oshie’s deal.

Bottom line, if MacLellan doesn’t offer the eight year deal, there is no deal that keeps Oshie with the Capitals and that top line right wing hole becomes a much bigger one to fill than the fourth defensemen slot they vacated due to the losses of Karl Alzner and Kevin Shattenkirk to free agency and Schmidt to the Golden Knights.

Washington does have some very promising up and coming young defensemen in the system in Madison Bowey, Tyler Lewington, Christian Djoos, Jonas Siegenthaler, and Lucas Johansen, who should be able to step up at the NHL level in the near future, especially given how well Trotz and assistant coach Todd Reirden have done in developing both Orlov and Schmidt. So keeping Oshie in the top right wing slot instead of allocating the money for a fourth defensemen to be named later at an over market price is another reason why the Capitals got this one right.

Notes: Washington drafted four players in the 2017 NHL Draft. Defensemen Tobias Geisser, Sebastian Walfridsson, and Benton Maas were selected with the 120th, 151st, and 182nd picks, respectively. With the 213th pick of the draft (7th round), they took left wing Kristian Marthisen who was born in Norway but played in Sweden this past season…the Caps will host their annual development camp at Kettler Ice Plex this week from Monday to Saturday. Practices are open to the public.

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12 Caps Thoughts Heading Into the Playoffs

Posted on 10 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

After losing to the Florida Panthers, 2-0, on Sunday night at the Verizon Center, the Washington Capitals completed their 2016-17 regular season with a 55-19-8 record (118 points). Here are twelve Caps thoughts, including quotes from several players, as we move into the most wonderful time of the year, the Stanley Cup Playoffs

What a classy move by Caps GM Brian MacLellan, Coach Barry Trotz and the entire organization rewarding forward Garrett Mitchell, a 6th round pick in the 2009 draft and captain of the Hershey Bears for the last two seasons, with his first NHL game on Sunday night. The 25 year old has been a regular in Chocolatetown for six straight seasons without making “The Show.” Mitchell, who is a free agent after the spring, not only played, but started the game with Nicklas Backstrom and Alex Ovechkin. Nicky even got himself thrown out of the opening draw so that Mitchell could begin his NHL debut taking the face off. Kudos to all involved and afterwards you could not wipe the smile off of Garrett’s face. It was truly a feel good moment for a player who has done everything asked of him since he’s been drafted.

With the Columbus Blue Jackets rallying from a 2-0 hole on the Toronto Maple Leafs on Sunday night to win, 3-2 in regulation, the Caps will now face the Leafs instead of the Bruins in round one. This is a matchup that I’ve wanted for several weeks and now Washington has a chance to show why it favors the Capitals. Toronto is certainly faster than Boston, but they are far less experienced than the B’s and they have a blue line that the Caps should be able to expose. Defenseman Nikita Zaitsev was also injured in game 82 for the Leafs and his status for game one on Thursday is in question.

The Capitals won the Jennings Trophy for the first time since 1983-84 for allowing the fewest goals per game in the NHL over the course of 82 contests. Coach Trotz credited all three aspects of the team’s game, offense, defense, and goaltending for the achievement, but he put extra emphasis on what Braden Holtby and Philipp Grubauer have done in net. Trotz stated that you really need strong goaltending in this league and he noted that if you look at the numbers for the Holtbeast and Grubauer they are very similar, especially in terms of save percentage.

Washington is at its best when they are playing a structured game and not giving up odd man rushes. Following Sunday night’s season finale, forward Daniel Winnik provided insight into the key to limiting them. “I think a lot of that just has to do with, you know I’d love to see our goal differential from when we’ve had the set lines and set d-pairings since December. I think that’s made a huge difference and tightening up our overall defensive game. A lot of that has come from limiting turnovers at the offensive blue line. I think we’ve done less of exchanging chances with teams. I think we have the best five on five goal differential in the league.”

T.J. Oshie (33), Marcus Johansson (24), and Justin Williams (24) all had career highs in goals this season and those three players have been very good at getting to the front of the opposing team’s net, something that is very important in playoff hockey. I asked Jojo on how the Caps have improved their ability to do that this season. “We’ve talked about [net presence] a lot. When it comes down to the playoffs most goals are scored from there. We have to get to those dirty areas and I think it’s shown that when you go there you are going to get goals and get rewarded. So I’m going to keep doing it.”

The addition of Kevin Shattenkirk from St. Louis at the NHL trade deadline has been a big one for the Caps. I asked Shattenkirk about the change in systems between the two clubs. “It seems like here we play a little more defense skating forward. We’re pushing up on teams and really trying to squeeze all of their time and space out of them. I think in St. Louis we received the rush a little more and allowed forwards to back check and apply pressure. But here I like that, I like playing on my toes. It keeps me engaged the whole game, it sets up well for me.”

I followed up with Shattenkirk by saying that I thought Coach Trotz’ system fits his skill set better. Here’s what Shatty had to say in reply, “It does, it does. I think especially when we turn pucks over in the neutral zone I think the skill that we have up front, the way that these forwards present themselves, our system allows us to turn back on teams and I think that’s a strong area of my game, getting those pucks and finding that outlet pass that we can turn right back on teams and get instant offense on it. All of that stuff really starts to feed into my game.”

Shattenkirk has been paired primarily with 2009 Stanley Cup Champion Brooks Orpik for the first time in his career. Here’s Kevin’s take on how he sees things working out so far. “I knew the style of defensemen I was going to be playing with here and he’s surprised me a bit. Playing here the last few years he’s changed his game in a way that he makes some poised plays. He’s not just an off of the wall and out kind of guy anymore, he makes plays through the middle and he makes plays at the blue line. We’ve been moving a lot from our offensive blue line and creating a lot of space for our forwards. He’s a guy that can dive in and dive back out. Every game has seemed to go better and better and I really like the way that we’re going.”

There’s no doubt that the addition of #22 has strengthened the Capitals power play and I asked him about the key to finding his role on that unit. “It’s great. For me it was a matter of the first couple of games, I think just like any player who would get that opportunity, you’re looking for Ovi all the time. I’m looking to go back to Nicky and let him make the plays. It wasn’t until the third or fourth game I started realizing that I had to shoot some pucks. Teams weren’t really worrying about me shooting pucks and that’s something we’ve worked on in practice, me just getting pucks into T.J. and Marcus, who are great around the net. Once I started to establish that, it seems like those other plays really opened up, the big plays, and Ovi only needs one shot a game to make it count and I just want to make sure that when that time comes I’m putting it in the right spot for him.”

The Capitals have yet to win a Stanley Cup, but both Williams (three times) and Orpik have raised Lord Stanley. Shattenkirk also went to the Western Conference finals last season while many of the Caps have yet to advance past the second round. I asked Shattenkirk what it takes to advance that deep in the postseason. “That’s a loaded question. There are a lot of things that factor into it. One is being even keeled. I think that we [in St. Louis] were the same last year as this team is now. We were the team that was out in the first and second round for four straight years. There’s no rhyme or reason to it, you just have to stick with it. You have to have resiliency about your team and make sure that you realize there’s going to be lows; you can’t put too much pressure on yourselves throughout the playoffs. The way we ride those waves is going to be important and like you said the two guys that we have with the most experience here [Williams and Orpik], we’re going to lean on those guys, hopefully I can be a fresh voice and we just have to keep the hunger there. This team has everything that we need in the locker room to win playoff games; we just have to make sure that we don’t beat ourselves up too bad.”

Coach Trotz has done an outstanding job of spreading minutes around the blue line this season, but once Shattenkirk came on board, things evened out more. I asked #22 if that allows the Caps to play faster. “It does and more than anything it’s the rhythm. In St. Louis it was more situational when I would play more minutes, here it’s we’ve got three pairs that can play. Depending what happens with penalties and power plays, that can skew things a little bit, but for the most part we’re all rolling and I think for us to have that rhythm as a defensive pair and as a defensive unit, it’s great for our team because you don’t want to have guys sitting three, four minutes in a row, especially in the playoffs in critical situations.”

The Capitals finished the season on an 11-2-1 run and you can pretty much throw that last loss to Florida out since it was a Hockey North America like no checking affair. Winnik was asked if he thinks momentum matters heading into the Stanley Cup Playoffs. “Completely. I think it matters how you play before the playoffs. I think Pittsburgh proved that, the previous winners, LA, so I think playing the way we are hopefully its good foreshadowing.”

Here’s the official Caps-Leafs first round schedule:

Date                                 TIME (ET)                                                            

Thursday, April 13             7 p.m.                   Toronto at Washington

Saturday, April 15             7 p.m.                   Toronto at Washington

Monday, April 17              7 p.m.                   Washington at Toronto

Wednesday, April 19        7 p.m.                   Washington at Toronto

*Friday, April 21                TBD                       Toronto at Washington

*Sunday, April 23              TBD                       Washington at Toronto

*Tuesday, April 25            TBD                       Toronto at Washington

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Caps Keep Rolling in Beantown

Posted on 08 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

On Saturday afternoon in Beantown, the Washington Capitals just kept on rolling, defeating the Boston Bruins, 3-1, with goals from Marcus Johansson, Kevin Shattenkirk, and Justin Williams. Philipp Grubauer received the start in the cage and he stopped 21 shots. #31 was excellent between the pipes, once again, to run his 2016-17 record to a very impressive 13-6-2.

For the Caps (55-18-8, 118 points), this was a meaningless game in terms of standings points. They’ve already won the Federal League, er, Presidents’ Trophy, and are just trying to figure out who they’ll play in round one, which will likely start at the Verizon Center on Thursday night. The Bruins are one of the teams they could face and if there was any hesitation from Washington on wanting to play them, the Caps could’ve tanked this affair to ensure that they wouldn’t face Brad Marchand and company.

Instead the Capitals dominated the Bruins like they’d gladly take on a team that they’ve now gone 9-0 against since Barry Trotz took over as Washington’s bench boss (h/t to Ben Raby). The Caps were physical early on and very structured defensively. Boston, who was missing their top scorer Marchand due to suspension (he speared a Bolt earlier in the week and was feeling shame in the press box for two games), had a hard time getting through Washington’s neutral zone and defense and most of their 48 shot attempts came from the perimeter, which made it difficult to put a biscuit by Grubauer.

On offense, the Capitals were sloppy at times, but when they fired the puck, they got it to the net to the tune of 32 shots on goal. Washington’s first tally, just 4:21 into the contest, came on a speedy three on two rush led by Jojo. Marcus carried the puck up the center of the ice and as he crossed the offensive blue line he worked a great give and go around Zdeno Chara with Justin Williams that culminated with Jojo beating Anton Khudobin on the backhand for his career high 24th marker.

Boston was already missing their best offensive blue liner, Torrey Krug, and things got worse for the Bruins defense when Brandon Carlo was injured on a play in the left wing corner. Carlo went back to gather in a loose puck with Alex Ovechkin in hot pursuit. Carlo was skating into the corner and with the Gr8 expecting him to turn to play the puck, he went to finish his check. However, #25 lost an edge and went down awkwardly right as Ovi was going to deliver the boom. Fortunately Ovechkin let up, but Carlo still crashed hard into the boards and had to leave the game. You could see Alex felt bad about it, he gave him the stick tap as Carlo was working his way up, but it was just a hockey play gone wrong. Washington led, 1-0, after 20 minutes and in shot attempts, it was 20-15 for the good guys.

In the middle frame, things were tight checking and calm for the first 12 minutes or so, but Evgeny Kuznetsov took a lazy hooking penalty (Move Your Feet!) and that gave Boston some life. They would not score on the man advantage, but after Kuzy came out of the box he made a terrible own zone turnover that Colin Miller would deposit behind Grubauer on a rebound. Simply put, it was back to back bad shifts by #92 that allowed the game to be tied up, and he knows better than to make those two mistakes – they must cease starting on Thursday because he is critical to the Caps post season success.

Washington, however, would not be deterred by that tally. They amped up the pressure and scored the next three goals, but only two of them counted due to bad zebras. First, Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom made two sensational passes to set Shattenkirk up in the slot for a sweet tally. That goal was just 56 ticks after the Bruins had tied the contest and it clearly deflated Boston. Shattenkirk would score again just 1:22 later, but the NHL reviewers in Toronto and the on ice zebras combined to call goalie interference on Williams, who was shoved partly into the Qdoba guy in net by his own player. That play was similar to the goal Dallas scored against the Caps to open the game back on March 6th where the reviewer ruled Brooks Orpik pushed the Stars player into Braden Holtby so the goal stood. In this case, a nowhere near as egregious infraction occurred, but they waved the tally off. Spin the wheel NHL, you continue to make no sense or have any consistency on these calls! Simply put, it’s a big joke the way these reviews and rulings go down.

Anyways, the next Capitals goal would have no chance of being reviewed and overturned. Washington won an offensive zone faceoff back to Nate Schmidt (+3) and he spotted Kuznetsov wide open on the right side of the slot. Kuzy took Schmidty’s great pass and slid the puck perpendicularly through a seam in the Bruins defense to Williams, who quickly buried it into a wide open cage for his career high 24th goal of the season. That was a thing of beauty with 50 seconds left in period two. The Caps still had the edge in shot attempts, 40-33, and 24-15 in shots on goal.

With Khudobin out of the game due to “not feeling well,” Tuukka Rask came in to play the final 20 minutes. After some heated earlier moments in this tilt, this last stanza was glorified preseason hockey with neither club wanting to risk any injuries. When the final horn sounded, the shot attempts ended up, 52-48, for the Caps and 32-21 in terms of shots on goal.

The Bruins were clearly missing their leading scorer in this one, but they still have some punch up front with Patrice Bergeron, David Backes, David Pastrnak, and David Krejci. Washington did a great job at keeping Boston from the paint and at the other end, the Caps took advantage of a slow blue line to score some pretty goals. If the Capitals do get Boston, it is a good matchup from a pace of play perspective. Washington is faster than Butch Cassidy’s crew and the only downside would be the chippy after the whistle type of stuff Boston likes to get into. They are nowhere near as dirty as the Flyers, but I’d still prefer to not have to go to battle against those guys. The Caps would have a great chance at prevailing, but like last year’s first round matchup against those smelly guys from Filthy, it would likely come at a physical price.

The best news of all, however, was that Washington appeared to come out of the game unscathed in terms of injuries and will have one more regular season contest on Sunday at the Verizon Center, against Florida, before the post season begins. John Carlson, who has missed three straight games with a lower body injury, is supposed to suit up to shake off the rust.

The Caps will want to stay healthy and not get anyone suspended, so I expect a “friendly” game against Jaromir Jagr and company.

With Toronto defeating the Penguins, 5-3, on Saturday night, Washington will now face either Boston or Toronto in the first round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs. If the Leafs earn at least a point on Sunday evening against Columbus, it’s the Caps vs. Boston.

Notes: The 3 pm scheduled puck drop did not occur until 3:28, thanks NBC (NOT!)…Brett Connolly missed the matinee due to illness, he did not even make the trip. Paul Carey took his place in the lineup and played well in 13:21 of ice time. His great skating ability was a big advantage against some cement laden skaters on the Bruins…the Caps were 0 for 4 on the power play, but two for two on the penalty kill…Shattenkirk was brilliant again in this one and led the Caps in time on ice with 22:54. That guy is good and getting better and better in Trotz’ system…the Caps are 19-0-0 against the Bruins when #19 gets a point (h/t to Rob Carlin of Comcast)…Jay Beagle was clipped by a careless Krejci high stick late in the game. A double minor was called…the Capitals are 10-1 in their last 11 games.

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Caps Move Closer to Home Ice for the Playoffs With Win in Toronto

Posted on 04 April 2017 by Ed Frankovic

With three road wins in four tries on a season long five game trip, the Washington Capitals kept the hammer down in the Big Smoke on Tuesday night with a dominating 4-1 victory over the Toronto Maple Leafs. Philipp Grubauer made 27 saves in the triumph and the Caps are now 53-18-8 (114 points). They are just a Capitals point gained or a point lost by the Pittsburgh Penguins during the last three games from clinching the Metropolitan Division title and their third Presidents’ Trophy.

With the Leafs playing in Buffalo on Monday night, it was imperative that Washington get up on Toronto to make a weary team expend a lot of energy playing catch up. The Caps game plan was pretty simple early and throughout the contest, get pucks deep on the Leafs D and forecheck them. Alex Ovechkin (1 assist) was really bringing the hammer on Coach Mike Babcock’s players and his four hits definitely opened up the ice for Washington while wearing out Toronto.

From the get go, the Capitals third line of Brett Connolly (two assists), Lars Eller (goal), and Andre Burakovsky (assist) were superior to any Toronto line they faced, which was predominantly the James Van Riemsdyk, Mitch Marner, and Tyler Bozak trio. Eller would break the ice for the Caps at 14:34 of period one when Burakovsky made a great play to negate an icing call and then the triumvirate cycled the puck beautifully until #65 found Eller in the slot and #20 buried it by Curtis McElhinney for his 12th goal of the season.

Washington would dominate that opening frame with a 13-3 lead in shots on goal and a 22-14 margin in shot attempts. Toronto had very few scoring chances on Grubauer because the Caps had the puck a lot and they defended the front of their own net very well.

Speaking of beautiful, that is a goal that really broke this game open, a bit. Eller drew a holding the stick call on Marner and that put the Caps on the man advantage 8:34 into period two. Boy did the Caps power play look daunting, too. With Nicklas Backstrom and Kevin Shattenkirk running the show at the half wall and top of the point, respectively, and the other three guys moving around well, the Leafs had no clue what to defend. It all broke down for Toronto when Ovechkin rotated to the top of the point and #22 went into Ovi’s office. With the Leafs so focused on the Gr8, the cross ice lane from Backstrom to Shattenkirk across the top of the circles was wide open. Backstrom’s feed to Shattenkirk was perfect and Kevin one-timed it home for his first goal as a Capital. That made it 2-0 at the game’s halfway point.

From there, Washington really played smart and forced Toronto to have to go into their own end and retrieve pucks often. While the Leafs closed the gap by one in shot attempts after two periods, to 41-34, the shots on goal were 26-13.

In the third period, the Caps didn’t sit back and they upped their lead to 3-0 when Nate Schmidt tallied off of a great feed from Connolly at 8:11. #88 was in the game because John Carlson was a late scratch due to a lower body injury (He is day to day and will not play against the Rangers on Wednesday night). Schmidty was excellent in this affair and he was paired for the first time in recent memory with Karl Alzner. They were the lowest pair in terms of time on ice, but with Coach Trotz playing the matchups against Babcock, Washington’s depth took over and those guys were +3, with two of those goals coming with the Eller line.

The last goal for Washington was tallied by Tom Wilson on a breakaway. Daniel Winnik and Jay Beagle made great plays inside the Caps defensive zone to get the puck out and then #26 flipped it high in the air over the Leafs defensemen and #43 flew in and beat McElhinney on the backhand. It was a well deserved goal for Wilson, who protected his goalies and teammates all night from some Toronto cheap stuff (Matt Martin’s push of Matt Niskanen into the net and Marner’s ice spray face wash of Grubauer).

The Leafs would get a very late PP goal from Marner to avoid being shut out.

Overall, this was a very solid game by the Capitals. Their defensive posture has really improved over the last two contests and what I really liked against Toronto was that I’m having a hard time remembering if the Leafs even had an odd man rush in this affair. Recently the Caps have been breaking down and giving those up en masse. That was not the case in the Big Smoke and as everyone knows, “Defense Wins Championships.”

The defense was certainly there on Tuesday night and the Capitals used their size and depth up front to dominate a Toronto team that is on the verge of clinching a playoff berth. It was a confidence building win for Washington against a club they very well could face in the first round of the playoffs.

Notes: final shots on goal were 38-28 and shot attempts were 58-55 for the Caps…Eller and Connolly were both +2 and Burakovsky was +1. Eller drew two penalties…the only mistake that line really made all night was #65’s penalty with 2:15 remaining which ultimately cost Gruabuer the shutout…the Caps lost the face off battle, 30-28, but Eller was 8-4…Niskanen led the Caps in ice time with 23:34 and his partner, Dmitry Orlov logged 22:10…Schmidt played 14:11 while Alzner had 16:00 of time on ice…the Caps-Rangers game is at 8 pm on Wednesday night on NBC Sports Channel. It will likely be Braden Holtby against Henrik Lundqvist in net.

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Caps Hold On For a Big Win in Colorado

Posted on 30 March 2017 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals raced out to a 4-1 lead just past the midpoint of Wednesday’s late game with Colorado and then hung on for the last 26 plus minutes to eke out a 5-3 victory at the Pepsi Center.

The Caps, who played in Minnesota the night before while the last place Avs rested, were sloppy in the opening frame, but managed to forge a 2-1 advantage. Washington’s third line of Lars Eller, Andre Burakovsky, and Brett Connolly, who struggled against the Wild on Tuesday, were dominant on their first shift and #10 drew a penalty just 2:27 into the contest.

Alex Ovechkin and company were red hot on the man advantage, having gone three for four on Tuesday, so to get an early power play, was big for Coach Trotz’ crew. The first unit was unable to score, but the second unit fended off an Avalanche shorthanded rush and caught the cellar dwellers with a four on one rush of their own. Burakovsky made a sweet feed to Kuznetsov, and with Justin Williams driving to the net, #92 dropped one to John Carlson coming hard in the slot, and #74 buried it top shelf at the 4:00 mark of this game.

Washington was not sharp in the opening twenty, and as a result Colorado was generating speed coming through the neutral zone and getting scoring chances. One of those would go in at the 11:11 mark, but Jay Beagle restored the Capitals lead when he deflected home a sweet point shot from Kevin Shattenkirk just 37 seconds later. That was a good omen, because coming into the game the Caps were 10-0-0 this season when #83 scores a goal (h/t Adam Miller) and 33-1-5, all time.

Colorado had a 21-18 advantage in shot attempts after one period.

In the middle stanza, it was mostly all Capitals. Washington chucked the kitchen sink at Calvin Pickard (30 saves) and it took a deflection goal off of a Shattenkirk shot that first hit T.J. Oshie’s stick and then Marcus Johansson’s chest to get a biscuit by #31 on the power play. The Caps really had their legs going and when Jojo made a great rush down the left wing and fed Kuznetsov for an easy goal at 11:03 it looked like the rout was on.

Just a minute and 35 seconds later, Shattenkirk made another great pass, this time to Beagle in the slot, and #83 fired it quickly, but it hit the cross bar. While he was shooting he was cross checked badly in the rib section from behind by Matt Duchene, but no penalty was called as the zebras were once again officiating the score. That non call would prove costly and started to change the game.

The Avs would pull to within two goals 62 seconds later on a two on one rush. Matt Niskanen was hung out to dry and he tried to block the pass by leaving his feet, but he failed badly and Matt Nieto had a lay up tally. Coach Trotz’ squad kept the pressure on and nearly scored again, especially late in the period on a power play, but the Avs were saved by the bell. For those middle 20 minutes the Capitals outshot attempted the Avalanche, 27-9. It was pure domination, but Pickard made some big stops and had some luck to keep Colorado with a chance at getting even by game’s end.

In the third period, after an early flurry that saw Pickard flat out rob Williams, it was clear that the Capitals legs were growing weary. Just 4:29 into the frame, Nathan MacKinnon made a great rush up the ice and he went inside out on Dmitry Orlov and beat Philipp Grubauer (32 saves). An iffy cross checking call on Brooks Oprik, after #44 was felled much worse in the crease by a cross check just beforehand, gave the Avalanche a power play and they nearly tied it, but Gruabuer was strong. For the remainder of the game, #31 was super solid as the Caps literally hung on to their one goal lead. Finally, with Pickard on the bench for the extra attacker, Shattenkirk and then Tom Wilson made good defensive plays, and that allowed Eller to fire the puck from his own blueline into the vacant cage with 1:22 remaining.

Grubauer, who was really good in this one, made a few more big saves down the stretch and the Capitals gladly were ready to leave the Mile High City with two important standings points.

Shattenkirk was clearly the best player for Washington in this one. He logged a team high 21:22, had two assists, and was +2. He is really fitting in well, especially on the power play, where the Caps went two for three. That is five for seven over the course of these two back to back games and a huge reason why Washington won both tilts.

The Caps third line, after a rough outing in Minnesota and reduced ice time, stepped up in this game and played a big role in the win. I still would’ve liked to have seen them get a few more shifts, they only had 14 together, but if they keep playing like that and shooting the puck (they had 12 shot attempts) they will see their time on ice go up.

Overall, this was not a pretty victory, but the Caps did what they had to do to move to 110 points (51-17-8) and they take a five point lead over the Columbus Blue Jackets and seven points on the Penguins in the Metropolitan Division. The Blue Jackets have a game in hand, which they’ll play on Thursday, at Carolina. Washington will be in Arizona on Friday night before taking on Columbus at Nationwide Arena at 6 pm on Sunday.

Notes: The Avs dominated the third period and ended up winning the shot attempt battle, 63-57…the Caps were a perfect three for three on the penalty kill…Johansson and Kuznetsov each had a goal and an assist…Washington’s top line, which carried the team on Tuesday in Minnesota, looked exhausted on Wednesday. Luckily lines two through four really stepped up to get the win…the faceoff battle was tied at 28. Nicklas Backstrom was 9-5.

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Holtby Holds the Fort In Caps 3-2 Win Over Montreal

Posted on 04 February 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Heading into Saturday afternoon’s game against the Montreal Canadiens at the Bell Centre, the Washington Capitals were 31-1-5 in franchise history when Jay Beagle scores a goal and 8-0 this season (thanks Adam Miller).

Just 3:06 into the matinee, #83 sniped one by Carey Price after a sweet feed from Daniel Winnik following a strong play by Tom Wilson in the neutral zone to keep the play onside.

So you know how this one turns out, right? It would be a Caps victory in Quebec.

However, it wasn’t easy.

After Beagle’s tally there was a lengthy delay (about 11 minutes) due to a hole in the bottom of the boards behind Braden Holtby (20 saves). Montreal took advantage of that Super Bowl 47 like stoppage to right their ship and tie the game up at one less than three minutes after play resumed. Nate Schmidt tried an ill advised centering pass on the right wing boards in his own zone and that allowed Alexander Radulov to snipe one to get the Habs back in the game. Schmidt needed to either eat the puck along the boards there until he could get help or reverse the play by putting the disc along the boards behind his own cage.

The Caps would then settle down and they began carrying the play again with lots of offensive zone pressure. Washington’s third line of Lars Eller, Brett Connolly, and Andre Burakovsky was especially good. When the Caps turned the puck over or Montreal took a hold of it, Washington ferociously back checked and reclaimed the biscuit. They did an excellent job in the first two frames of going up and down the ice in five man units and that prevented the very fast Habs squad from turning this game into a track meet.

The two way effort paid off midway through the middle frame. Eller sprung Connolly up the ice on a three on two with Burakovsky and Schmidt. #88 then atoned for his previous mistake by making a very smart play as he crossed the blue line with speed – he kept driving to the net. By doing that he took the Habs defensemen with him and that opened up a passing lane for #10, who laid a sweet cross ice feed to #65 and he snapped it short side, top shelf by Price for a 2-1 lead.

Washington would continue pressing the play in period two and they had several good looks. Alex Ovechkin hit the post and was also denied in tight by #31. Justin Williams had a great shot from the slot, but he didn’t elevate the puck and Price got his pad on it. After 40 minutes, shots on goal were 24-12 for the Caps and 41-26 in terms of shot attempts. In short, they were playing a super road game to that point.

In the third period, they did a good job of keeping Montreal to the outside early in the frame and when Radulov took a hooking penalty on the Gr8, the Caps cashed in on the power play. With the Habs overplaying the pass to Ovechkin, Nicklas Backstrom alertly chose to fire a shot from the middle of the ice up high and with Price leaning right, the puck eluded him to give Washington a 3-1 lead with 14:44 to go.

Things then got interesting. Montreal really put the pressure on and at 7:49 of period three Max Pacioretty cut the lead to one when they totally outworked the Caps fourth line for a goal. The game would go back and forth with teams trading some chances and when the Caps received a power play with 5:46 to go, they looked to close this one out. However, the Caps made a big offensive zone turnover and Torrey Mitchell received a shorthanded breakaway. As he was about to shoot, the puck bounced on him a bit, so he didn’t get all of the rubber, but the Holtbeast was already in good position and he made a huge stop. Braden would make a few more quality saves down the stretch and the Capitals did a decent job of not allowing the Habs to penetrate the paint until the final horn sounded.

When it was all said and done, the Capitals would head out of the hallowed hockey city with a 3-2 victory to improve to 35-11-6 (76 points) on the season.

This was a game that I was not worried about for Washington from a motivational standpoint. Every NHL player LOVES to play in Montreal. It is a great city and has a lot of hockey history. Simply put, if you can’t get up to play there, you don’t have a pulse.

As I routinely write, when the Caps are motivated, they are hard to beat because of their skill, depth, and goaltending. Montreal gets paid to play, too, and they are fighting for their division title, so the Habs really brought it, especially late. Both Price and Holtby put on net minding clinics and it is easy to see why they are the best two goalies in the NHL.

This was a fun hockey game to watch and Washington benefitted from winning the special teams battle going 1 for 4 with the man advantage and stopping all three Habs power plays.

Both teams could’ve won this affair, although I thought the Caps were the better team for the majority of the tilt, until they earned the two goal lead. They then hung on to win and as the stats dictate, when Beagle scores a goal, it’s pretty much points in the bank for Washington.

Woof!

Notes: The Caps won the shot attempt battle, 51-49. Ovechkin and Beagle each had five shots on net. This was by far #83’s best outing since he went down with a virus just before the all star break. “Flip Phone” Beags seemed to finally have his legs back…John Carlson took his first penalty of the season, but he played solidly and led the Caps in ice time with 24:16…Holtby is now 11-0-0 in his last 13 starts…the Caps won the face off battle, 28-25. All Star Backstrom was 15-4 and Beagle was 9-6…Burakovsky and Beagle now both have 11 goals on the season. #65 and that whole line has been a huge difference maker for Coach Barry Trotz’ club….the Caps will face the Los Angeles Kings at noon on Super Bowl Sunday at the Verizon Center on NBC. LA defeated the Flyers on Saturday, 1-0, in overtime….the Kings are coming in hot, they’ve won five in a row as they make their way to DC. Expect to see Philipp Grubauer between the pipes for the Caps.

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Caps Rally to Win in Overtime in Dallas

Posted on 22 January 2017 by Ed Frankovic

The Capitals may want to think about bringing their “Dad’s” along in the post season this spring.

Washington tallied twice on the power play in the 3rd period after trailing, 3-1, and then Jay Beagle scored from the paint 19 seconds into overtime after a super feed from Evgeny Kuznetsov to give the Caps a 4-3 victory in Dallas over the Stars.

It was the first time the Capitals have won in the Lone Star State since October of 2008 and their all time record on the “Dad’s/Mentor’s trip” is now 12-5.

Clearly this club, which plays it’s best when highly motivated, reached down deep to pull out a victory that they may not have achieved had their collective group of “old men” not been present. Down two pucks, they killed off a double minor high sticking penalty on Dmitry Orlov that carried into the start of the final frame, and then an Alex Ovechkin laser followed by T.J. Oshie’s deflection of Matt Niskanen’s (3 assists) rocket from the center of the ice squared things up in Big D with 14:34 remaining in regulation.

Philipp Grubauer (32 saves) would then make one of the best saves of the season for Washington on a Stars late power play when he somehow got his blocker on a shot by Tyler Seguin that was targeted for the twine. It was an incredible stop and #91 dropped his stick afterwards in disbelief.

That set the stage for the short overtime that began with Beagle winning the draw for the Caps. Possession is so important in three on three overtime and #83 is Washington’s best face off man.

The Caps started out fast in this one and received another first goal from Andre Burakovsky and the smoking hot third line. Brett Connolly fired a shot from the high slot and with Lars Eller screening in front, Kari Lehtonen struggled with the rebound and that allowed #65 to bang the biscuit home just 2:17 into this one.

But the prosperity would be short lived as the Capitals took back to back delay of game penalties and the Stars had a 1:22 five on three. Washington would kill that off with some great work by Brooks Orpik and Karl Alzner on the blue line with Nicklas Backstrom and then Beagle up front. They then worked off the remaining time on the five on four. Unfortunately, just 38 seconds after the game was back to five on five, the Stars scored on a point blast by Jordie Benn that Adam Cracknell tipped and Grubauer never saw.

Washington would get outworked by an ornery Stars squad that started two fights in three seconds midway through period one. Dallas picked up momentum from those bouts and they outskated and outhit the Capitals for the remainder of the period, but they couldn’t take the lead.

The strong play by Dallas would not change in period two and the scoreboard would indicate that, as well. Patrick Eaves scored on a rebound 6:47 into the middle stanza and then after Connolly was jailed for boarding, Jamie Benn made it a two goal cushion at 15:59, just two seconds before #10 was due to exit the sin bin. The Caps had only four shots on net in period two.

With it 3-1, Orlov took the careless double high sticking minor on Benn and it was looking like there would be no post game Caps dancing in this one.

Washington’s penalty killing, which has been fabulous this season, would step up and then the power play answered with two goals on two attempts. Actually, had the officials called things correctly, the Caps would’ve had another power play after Oshie’s game tying tally since Antoine Roussel’s high stick on Alzner drew all kinds of blood. Zebras Steve Kozari and Jon McIsaac ignored it despite Caps Coach Barry Trotz’ insistence that they look at King Karl’s face and note the red stuff flowing out of his mouth.

Overall, the Caps were not very good in this tilt. They were outshot 35-22 and out attempted, 62-50. Part of that was the six minor penalties they took and you can only really argue the Taylor Chorney hold in the third period, the others were all clear cut. Still, Dallas should’ve been jailed at least a couple of more times for minor infractions, but that’s hockey. Washington was able to even this game up thanks to their great special teams. They were five of six while shorthanded and a perfect two for two with the power play.

The Capitals clearly wanted this game and they found a way to prevail without anything close to their “A” game. They really miss John Carlson on the back end, too. Good teams find ways to win when they don’t have their best stuff and Coach Trotz’ crew did just that to move to 31-9-6 (68 points) and maintain their two point lead on Columbus. The Blue Jackets knocked off the Hurricanes, 3-2, on Saturday afternoon.

Those who follow the Capitals Twitter and Facebook feeds saw the video of Lars Johansson dancing and then doing “the bump” with Trotz to Hall & Oates after the win in St. Louis on Thursday. For 40 minutes on Saturday night it looked like there would no encore on the final game of this season’s “Dad’s” trip.

But a motivated Caps team clawed back and then won the contest setting in motion another post game celebration with ABBA’s Dancing Queen fittingly being the song of the night. Jojo’s dad once again didn’t disappoint and showed that he indeed is the Swedish Dancing King, with another assist from Coach Trotz.

The Dallas curse is over.

Notes: Orpik was +1 and now leads the Caps at +23 overall…Ovechkin now has 22 goals on the season. He had three shots on net in just 15:46 of ice time (low due to all of the PK time). He led both teams in hits with five…Niskanen logged 25:24 to lead the Caps in ice time. Orpik played 23:01 and was outstanding…the Caps won the faceoff battle, 32-31. Beagle was 13-8…Beagle has 10 goals and 10 assists on the season in just 46 games…Oshie now has 17 goals…next up for the Caps are the Carolina Hurricanes at the Verizon Center on Monday night.

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