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Loyola, NSU square off Saturday in matchup of 2012 Tourney teams

Posted on 17 November 2012 by WNST Staff

Opponent Norfolk State Spartans | Basketball HOF Tip-Off Tourn.
Date Saturday, November 17, 2012
Time 12:00 p.m.
Location Uncasville, Conn. | Mohegan Sun Arena

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland will take part in the Basketball Tip-Off Tournament at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn., for a pair of games this weekend.

The Greyhounds will take on Norfolk State on Saturday, November 17, in the first game at 12 noon. The winner of the game will face the winner of Albany and Missouri-Kansas City at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 18, with the losers of the two games meeting at 11:30 a.m. Sunday.

 

Series History

Loyola and Norfolk State will be meeting for the first time when they take the floor on Saturday.

The Greyhounds are 16-13 all-time against teams from the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, the majority of those games being played against Baltimore foes Coppin State and Morgan State.

Loyola will face two opponents for the first time this weekend, as the Greyhounds have not previously played either Albany or Missouri-Kansas City.

 

Last Time Out

Four Loyola players scored in double figures, as the Greyhounds eased past UMBC, 86-70, on Wednesday night in a game televised on MASN.

Erik Etherly scored 17 of his team-high 22 points after halftime, while Dylon Cormier and Tyler Hubbard each scored 14 of their 17 in the first stanza. Robert Olson added 10 for the Greyhounds, while Jarred Jones and Franz Rassman scored nine and eight, respectively.

Rassman, who saw the first extended playing time of his collegiate career with 20 minutes, led all players with nine rebounds and tied for game-high honors with three blocked shots.

UMBC led 13-9 in the early going, but the Greyhounds finished the half by scoring 36 of 53 points to lead 45-30 at the break.

 

Guards Early, Posts Late

A pair of Loyola guards, Dylon Cormier and Tyler Hubbard, each scored first half against UMBC, and Robert Olson chipped in six, leading the Greyhounds to a 45-30 advantage at halftime over the Retrievers.

The Greyhounds then turned to the post in the second half where Erik Etherly scored 17 after the break en route to a team-high 22. He made 5-of-8 from the field, including stepping out for his first three of the season, and 6-of-6 from the free-throw line in the second half.

Jarred Jones added seven second-half points, knocking down both his shots form inside and going to the line for 3-of-4.

 

Freshmen Produce

A trio of Loyola freshmen combined for 34 points and 15 rebounds on Wednesday night, as Tyler Hubbard (a redshirt freshman) scored 17, while Jarred Jones and Franz Rassman had eight and nine.

The group also had five assists, six blocked shots and four steals in the win.

Combined the three played 70 minutes against the Retrievers.

 

Board Work

Loyola outrebounded UMBC, 45-28, on Wednesday night, marking the second time this season the Greyhounds have outrebounded a team by 14 or more (also, Binghamton, 35-21).

The Greyhounds have outrebounded opponents by an average of nine this season, 38-29, in three games.

On the offensive glass, Loyola has grabbed 45 rebounds, while its opposition has pulled down just 59 defensive boards. The Greyhounds are recording offensive boards in 43-percent of opportunities at that end of the floor, while allowing their foes to get second chances just 28.8-percent of the time.

In the UMBC game, Loyola had more offensive rebounds (15) than the Retrievers had defensive boards (14).

 

Etherly Plays To Form

Erik Etherly, the MAAC Preseason Player of the Year, has averaged 16 points per game in three contests after scoring 22 to go with eight rebounds on Wednesday against UMBC.

His 7.3 rebounds per game also top the team, and he is tied for the lead with five blocked shots, all coming in the last two games, three at Washington and two versus UMBC.

 

Cormier Leads

Dylon Cormier has led the Greyhounds in scoring in two of the first three games and is averaging an 19 through those contests. He has made 20-of-43 (.465) from the field and 3-of-6 from 3-point range.

Cormier scored 13 points in the first half of the season opener against Binghamton and finished with 21 points, the ninth time in his career her has reached the 20-point plateau. As a sophomore in 2011-2012, Cormier scored 20 or more seven times en route to earning All-MAAC Second Team honors with a 13.4 points per game average. At Washington, he finished with 19 and was just two off his career-best with seven rebounds. He is also averaging 5.5 boards per game this year.

The junior has been a fast starter this season, averaging a team-high 12.3 points per game during the first half. He has scored 10 or more in all three games (13, 10, 14).

Cormier has led Loyola in scoring 15 times during his career, and the Greyhounds are 11-4 in those games.

 

Jones Making Early Impact

Freshman Jarred Jones has started the first three games of his collegiate career and made a difference on the court for the Greyhounds. A two-time All-Metro honoree by The Baltimore Sun at John Carroll High School, Jones scored nine points and had six rebounds on Sunday evening at Washington. He followed that with a box-score filling nine points, five rebounds, three blocks, three steals and two assists versus UMBC.

In his first game, he debuted with just one point, but he filled several box-score categories in his effort. Jones tallied three rebounds and two each of blocked shots, steals and assists.

 

Rassman Versus The Retrievers

Freshman Franz Rassman saw his first extended playing time of the season on Wednesday against UMBC and scored eight points in 20 minutes. He led all players with nine rebounds, and he also swatted three shots.

 

Hubbard From Behind The Line

Tyler Hubbard knocked down all but one of his 3-point attempts on Wednesday against UMBC and has made 8-of-17 this season from long distance. He scored a career-best 17 points against the Retrievers and also had two assists and a steal.

His eight 3-pointers made lead the team, and he is fourth on the squad in scoring with a 10.3 points per game average.

In his collegiate debut against Binghamton, he made 4-of-9 shots, 3-of-7 from 3-point range, and finished the night with 11 points in his collegiate debut. In the process, he became the first player to reach double figures in his first collegiate game since Jawaan Wright came off the bench to score 10 on November 19, 2005, against Towson University.

 

Brooks’ Big Game

Julius Brooks provided 20 solid minutes in the post off the bench for the Greyhounds, recording eight points and a game-high seven rebounds versus Binghamton. Those numbers were not career-highs for the senior, but they were the best he’s put up in some time.

Brooks saw limited action in 29 games last season, averaging just 4.7 minutes per game, but matched his career-high with 28 minutes. His eight points were his most since scoring a career-best 10 on January 31, 2010, as a freshman, and his seven boards were his high since February 25, 2011, when he had eight. Both of those games came against Niagara University.

At Washington, he scored five, had a pair of rebounds, an assist and a blocked shot against the Huskies.

He made his first start since February 2010, his freshman season, on Wednesday night against UMBC.

 

First Impressions

Four players made their collegiate debuts for Loyola last Friday night, starting with Jarred Jones who made a start in his first game as a Greyhound. Redshirt freshman Tyler Hubbard got into the game early in the first half for his first game action, and Jones’ classmates Eric Laster and Franz Rassman both entered the contest in the second half.

Jones played 25 minutes, and while his box score line did not show it, he made a large impact on the game. He scored just one point, but he had three rebounds, handed out two assists, picked up two steals and led all players with two blocked shots.

Laster saw three minutes of action, scored on a 15-foot jumper and grabbed an offensive rebound. Rassman played six minutes, and had a block and a rebound.

 

Defensive Work

Loyola held Binghamton scoreless twice for stretches of eight or more minutes Friday night. The Greyhounds limited the Bearcats to 35.5-percent from the field and forced 16 turnovers. Binghamton also made just 18.2-percent of 3-point attempts.

On the glass, Loyola held the Bearcats to just five offensive rebounds, grabbing 24-of-29 boards on the defensive glass (82.7-percent).

 

MAAC Preseason Poll & Player of the Year

The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference unveiled its preseason coaches’ poll and the league’s Preseason Player of the Year on Friday night in a live Preseason Awards Show on ESPN3. Loyola was named the team to beat in 2012-2013, and Erik Etherly was tabbed the Preseason Player of the Year by the coaches. (Complete poll and All-MAAC teams at left).

This is the first time Loyola has been selected No. 1 in the MAAC preseason poll in 24 years in the league, nor had a Greyhound player been named Preseason Player of the Year prior to Etherly.

 

Preseason MAAC Honors

Three Loyola players were named to the various Preseason All-MAAC teams as voted on by the coaches of the league.

Erik Etherly earned an All-MAAC First Team nod, while Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson were named to the Second Team.

The MAAC will announce its preseason poll of order of finish in the league on its Preseason Awards Show that will be aired on ESPN3 this Friday at 8:15 p.m.

 

Classy Senior

Senior guard Robert Olson was named one of 30 candidates for the prestigious Senior CLASS Award last week. An acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School®, the Senior CLASS Award focuses on the total student-athlete and encourages students to use their platform in athletics to make a positive impact as leaders in their communities.

Olson was the Greyhounds’ third-leading scorer last season with 11.1 points per game and enters this season Loyola ranked fourth at Loyola in 3-point percentage (138-of-336, .4107) sixth in career 3-pointers made (138) and eighth in 3-pointers attempted (336).

Last season, Olson was one of four Loyola players to earn All-MAAC honors, picking up Third Team mention and later All-Tournament honors.

 

High Marks

The Loyola men’s basketball team scored the highest amongst squads in the State of Maryland in the most recent NCAA Graduation Success Rate report. The Greyhounds checked in with a 91-percent GSR, tops among the state’s nine Division I schools, for players who entered the school between 2002-2005.

 

Saint Peter’s Game At The Meadowlands

The Loyola-Saint Peter’s Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game slated for Saturday, December 8, has been moved from the Peacocks’ Jersey City campus to the IZOD Center in East Rutherford, N.J., at the Meadowlands complex.

The Greyhounds and Peacocks will tip-off at 12 noon prior to the second game of the doubleheader between Duke and Temple.

 

Second NCAA Trip

Last year, Loyola made its first trip to the NCAA Tournament in 18 seasons, a span of 17 years, 11 months and 23 days. In all, it was 6,569 days between NCAA Tournament Games for the Greyhounds.

Last year’s true freshmen – Tyler Hubbard and R.J. Williams – were less than one year old the last time Loyola played in an NCAA match.

 

MAAC Title

Loyola won its second MAAC Championship in 23 years in the conference on Monday, March 5, 2012, defeating Fairfield University, 48-44, in the lowest scoring championship game in league history.

The Greyhounds held Fairfield to just six second-half field goals and 28.8-percent shooting in the game.

Loyola, which finished second in the conference during the regular season and earned the No. 2 seed in the league tournament, defeated Niagara University and Siena College in the MAAC Quarterfinals and Semifinals, respectively.

 

Turnaround…Check

Loyola completed the turnaround from finishing the 2003-2004 season with the lowest RPI in NCAA Division I basketball. The Greyhounds finished that season with a 1-27 record the season before Jimmy Patsos took over as head coach.

Since then, Loyola has gone 122-123 and culminated the turnaround by winning a school Division I record 24 games  in 2011-2012.

Patsos is one of only three coaches at the Division I level in the last 20 years to take over a program that had won zero or one game the year prior to then win 100 games at the school. He joins Steve Cleveland (BYU) and Pat Douglass (UC-Irvine) as the others.

 

Outstanding Performance By Etherly

Erik Etherly was named the MAAC Tournament Most Outstanding Player after averaging a team-best 17.3 points and 5.7 rebounds over the three games.

Etherly was in double figures in each of the three games, including back-to-back 20-point games for the first time in his career in the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds. He followed that with 10 points, seven rebounds and a career-high five blocks in the MAAC title game vs. Fairfield. He shot 20-for-38 (.526) from the floor and 11-for-14 (.786) from the foul line, while finishing with nine blocks.

Last season, Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team after averaging 13.7 points and 7.5 rebounds per game, both tops for the Greyhounds.

He also became the second player in school history to earn National Association of Basketball Coaches All-District honors, when he joined Mike Powell (1997) and earned Second Team laurels.

 

Patsos Named Coach & Man Of The Year

Jimmy Patsos became the first Loyola coach to earn The Rock/Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors by a vote of his peers in the league.

Patsos guided the Greyhounds to a school Division I high 24 wins and a program MAAC record 13 victories. He earned his 100th career coaching victory in November 2012 and led the Greyhounds to the No. 2 seed in the MAAC Championships.

Later in March, Patsos was named the Skip Prosser Man of the Year award for his work on and off the court, an honor presented by CollegeInsider.com.

 

2012 All-MAAC Honors

For the first time since the league expanded to three All-MAAC teams in 1998, four Greyhounds received all-league honors, topping all teams in the conference. Erik Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team, Dylon Cormier to the Second, and Justin Drummond and Robert Olson to the Third.

Loyola led all teams in the MAAC with its four selections, just in front of Iona’s three.

The Greyhounds’ previous high was at the end of the 1997-1998 season when Mike Powell (1st), Jason Rowe (2nd) and Roderick Platt (3rd) earned All-MAAC honors.

Etherly led Loyola in scoring (13.7), rebounding (7.5) and blocked shots (50), while finishing second on the team with 63 assists. He shot .530 from the field, good for third in the conference

Cormier was second on the team in scoring, just back of Etherly, with a 13.4 points per game average while improving his field-goal percentage nearly 10 points from his freshman season to .461 as a sophomore.

Drummond has come off the bench in 29 of the Greyhounds’ 33 games last year and is fourth on the team with 11.1 points per game. The guard as also third in rebounding (3.9), and he has scored in double figures 17 times this year.

Olson was one of the top 3-point shooters in the conference last year. He shot .431 from behind the arc, third-best in the MAAC, and averaged 11.1 points per game. The guard entered the month of January averaging less than nine points per game, but from that point forward, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at nearly 13 a contest.

 

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road last season. Patsos, who is now in his ninth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 124 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

 

 

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Four players – junior guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), junior forward Jordan Latham (City) and sophomore guard R.J. Williams and freshman forward Josh Forney (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Jarred Jones, John Carroll, 20.5; Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

 

What’s Next

Following the weekend at Mohegan Sun Arena, the Greyhounds will take the better part of the week off before traveling to Kingston, R.I., for a Friday night game at Rhode Island.

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Loyola visits Washington for Hall of Fame Tournament battle

Posted on 11 November 2012 by WNST Staff

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland takes its first, and longest, road trip of the season to play the University of Washington on Sunday, November 11, 2012, in Seattle.

The Greyhounds and Huskies will play in a game that is part of the Basketball Hall of Fame Tip-Off Tournament. Loyola will play in the Springfield Bracket of the tournament, taking on Norfolk State University on Saturday, November 18, before facing either the University of Albany or the University of Missouri-Kansas City the following day at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn.

 

Far From Home

Loyola’s Baltimore campus is 2,326 miles from Alaska Airlines Arena, as the crow flies, making this the third-furthest from home the Greyhounds have played in the contiguous United States (the Greyhounds played in a holiday tournament at the University of Hawaii in December 1987).

The two locations of Loyola’s furthest games from home are Stanford (2,444) and UC-Davis (2,402).

 

Tune In

Sunday’s game will be televised by the new Pac-12 Network. Kevin Calabro will call the play-by-play, while Basketball Hall of Famer Lenny Wilkens will provide the color analysis.

 

Series History

Loyola and Washington will meet for the first time when the teams take the court on Sunday.

The Greyhounds are 0-3 all-time against teams currently affiliated with the Pac-12 Conference. The last time Loyola played a current Pac-12 team was when it faced the University of Arizona in the NCAA First Round on March 18, 1994, in Sacramento, Calif. The Wildcats won the meeting – Loyola’s first-ever NCAA Tournament game – 81-55 en route to the Final Four.

 

For Openers

Loyola won its season-opener on Friday night with a 71-45 decision against Binghamton University in a sold-out Reitz Arena.

The Greyhounds’ 26-point margin of victory was their largest since it defeated Howard University by 34, 85-51, on December 19, 2009.

Binghamton scored the game’s first two points, but Loyola held the Bearcats scoreless for 10-minutes, 30-seconds as part of a 19-0 run that helped the Greyhounds build a 17-point advantage. They would hold that same margin at the half, 39-22. Binghamton cut it to 14, 41-27, with 17:25 to play, but an Erik Etherly dunk spurred a 22-5 run that covered nearly nine minutes and put Loyola ahead, 61-32, with 8:58 left in the game.

Dylon Cormier led all scorers with 21 points, one of four Loyola players to reach double figures. Erik Etherly, Tyler Hubbard and Robert Olson all scored 11. Julius Brooks finished with eight points and a game-best seven rebounds.

 

Cormier Leads

Dylon Cormier scored 13 points in the first half Friday night against the Bearcats and finished with 21 points, the ninth time in his career her has reached the 20-point plateau. As a sophomore in 2011-2012, Cormier scored 20 or more seven times en route to earning All-MAAC Second Team honors with a 13.4 points per game average.

On Friday, Cormier made 8-of-14 shots from the field, 1-of-2 from behind the 3-point line and 4-of-5 at the free-throw line. He also had three assists, a block, a steal and four rebounds.

Cormier has led Loyola in scoring 14 times, and the Greyhounds are 11-3 in those games.

 

Brooks’ Big Game

Julius Brooks provided 20 solid minutes in the post off the bench for the Greyhounds, recording eight points and a game-high seven rebounds. Those numbers were not career-highs for the senior, but they were the best he’s put up in some time.

Brooks saw limited action in 29 games last season, averaging just 4.7 minutes per game, but he made his presence felt in the opener. His eight points were his most since scoring a career-best 10 on January 31, 2010, as a freshman, and his seven boards were his high since February 25, 2011, when he had eight. Both of those games came against Niagara University.

 

First Impressions

Four players made their collegiate debuts for Loyola on Friday night, starting with Jarred Jones who made a start in his first game as a Greyhound. Redshirt freshman Tyler Hubbard got into the game early in the first half for his first game action, and Jones’ classmates Eric Laster and Franz Rassman both entered the contest in the second half.

Jones played 25 minutes, and while his box score line did not show it, he made a large impact on the game. He scored just one point, but he had three rebounds, handed out two assists, picked up two steals and led all players with two blocked shots.

Laster saw three minutes of action, scored on a 15-foot jumper and grabbed an offensive rebound. Rassman played six minutes, and had a block and a rebound.

 

Hubbard Goes For 11

Tyler Hubbard made 4-of-9 shots, 3-of-7 from 3-point range, and finished Friday night with 11 points in his collegiate debut. In the process, he became the first player to reach double figures in his first collegiate game since Jawaan Wright came off the bench to score 10 on November 19, 2005, against Towson University.

 

Defensive Work

Loyola held Binghamton scoreless twice for stretches of eight or more minutes Friday night. The Greyhounds limited the Bearcats to 35.5-percent from the field and forced 16 turnovers. Binghamton also made just 18.2-percent of 3-point attempts.

On the glass, Loyola held the Bearcats to just five offensive rebounds, grabbing 24-of-29 boards on the defensive glass (82.7-percent).

 

MAAC Preseason Poll & Player of the Year

The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference unveiled its preseason coaches’ poll and the league’s Preseason Player of the Year on Friday night in a live Preseason Awards Show on ESPN3. Loyola was named the team to beat in 2012-2013, and Erik Etherly was tabbed the Preseason Player of the Year by the coaches. (Complete poll and All-MAAC teams at left).

This is the first time Loyola has been selected No. 1 in the MAAC preseason poll in 24 years in the league, nor had a Greyhound player been named Preseason Player of the Year prior to Etherly.

 

What’s Back

Loyola returns eight of 12 players who saw game action, including four players – forward Erik Etherly and guards Dylon Cormier, Robert Olson and R.J. Williams – who started in the NCAA Tournament game last season.

In all, the eight returning players accounted for 73-percent of Loyola’s minutes last year, 70-percent of rebounds, 80-perecnt of assists, 79-percent of steals, 65-percent of blocked shots and 71-percent of points.

 

So Long

Four players departed from last year’s roster, including J’hared Hall and Shane Walker who graduated from Loyola in May and two players who elected to transfer – Justin Drummond (Toldeo) and Pierson Williams (Cal State-Dominguez Hills).

Walker started all 33 games in the post for Loyola last year and averaged 9.0 points and 6.3 rebounds per game while dishing out 50 assists and blocking 42 shots. Drummond was an All-MAAC Third Team honoree and MAAC Sixth Player of the Year while scoring 10.7 points per game a year ago.

 

Preseason MAAC Honors

Three Loyola players were named to the various Preseason All-MAAC teams as voted on by the coaches of the league.

Erik Etherly earned an All-MAAC First Team nod, while Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson were named to the Second Team.

The MAAC will announce its preseason poll of order of finish in the league on its Preseason Awards Show that will be aired on ESPN3 this Friday at 8:15 p.m.

 

Classy Senior

Senior guard Robert Olson was named one of 30 candidates for the prestigious Senior CLASS Award last week. An acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School®, the Senior CLASS Award focuses on the total student-athlete and encourages students to use their platform in athletics to make a positive impact as leaders in their communities.

Olson was the Greyhounds’ third-leading scorer last season with 11.1 points per game and enters this season Loyola ranked fourth at Loyola in 3-point percentage (138-of-336, .4107) sixth in career 3-pointers made (138) and eighth in 3-pointers attempted (336).

Last season, Olson was one of four Loyola players to earn All-MAAC honors, picking up Third Team mention and later All-Tournament honors.

 

High Marks

The Loyola men’s basketball team scored the highest amongst squads in the State of Maryland in the most recent NCAA Graduation Success Rate report. The Greyhounds checked in with a 91-percent GSR, tops among the state’s nine Division I schools, for players who entered the school between 2002-2005.

 

Saint Peter’s Game At The Meadowlands

The Loyola-Saint Peter’s Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game slated for Saturday, December 8, has been moved from the Peacocks’ Jersey City campus to the IZOD Center in East Rutherford, N.J., at the Meadowlands complex.

The Greyhounds and Peacocks will tip-off at 12 noon prior to the second game of the doubleheader between Duke and Temple.

 

Second NCAA Trip

Last year, Loyola made its first trip to the NCAA Tournament in 18 seasons, a span of 17 years, 11 months and 23 days. In all, it was 6,569 days between NCAA Tournament Games for the Greyhounds.

Last year’s true freshmen – Tyler Hubbard and R.J. Williams – were less than one year old the last time Loyola played in an NCAA match.

 

MAAC Title

Loyola won its second MAAC Championship in 23 years in the conference on Monday, March 5, 2012, defeating Fairfield University, 48-44, in the lowest scoring championship game in league history.

The Greyhounds held Fairfield to just six second-half field goals and 28.8-percent shooting in the game.

Loyola, which finished second in the conference during the regular season and earned the No. 2 seed in the league tournament, defeated Niagara University and Siena College in the MAAC Quarterfinals and Semifinals, respectively.

 

Defense Wins Championships

The Greyhounds played outstanding defense in the MAAC title game, holding Fairfield to 44 points and 28.8-percent shooting for the game. The 44 points were the fewest Loyola had allowed in a game this season. It was the fewest points a Loyola opponent had scored since the Greyhounds held Dartmouth to 41 in a 58-41 decision on November 24, 2009.

Loyola allowed the Stags to shoot just 6-for-31 (.194) in the second half, scoring only 22 points, the fewest points against the Greyhounds in any half this season.

After trailing by four points (30-26) at halftime, Loyola held Fairfield without a point for the first 7:48 of the second half, and without a field goal for the first 8:48. In that period, the Greyhounds outscored the Stags 11-1 to take a 37-31 lead.

 

Turnaround…Check

Loyola completed the turnaround from finishing the 2003-2004 season with the lowest RPI in NCAA Division I basketball. The Greyhounds finished that season with a 1-27 record the season before Jimmy Patsos took over as head coach.

Since then, Loyola has gone 122-123 and culminated the turnaround by winning a school Division I record 24 games  in 2011-2012.

Patsos is one of only three coaches at the Division I level in the last 20 years to take over a program that had won zero or one game the year prior to then win 100 games at the school. He joins Steve Cleveland (BYU) and Pat Douglass (UC-Irvine) as the others.

 

Outstanding Performance By Etherly

Erik Etherly was named the MAAC Tournament Most Outstanding Player after averaging a team-best 17.3 points and 5.7 rebounds over the three games.

Etherly was in double figures in each of the three games, including back-to-back 20-point games for the first time in his career in the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds.

He followed that with 10 points, seven rebounds and a career-high five blocks in the MAAC title game vs. Fairfield.

He shot 20-for-38 (.526) from the floor and 11-for-14 (.786) from the foul line, while finishing with nine blocks.

Last season, Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team after averaging 13.7 points and 7.5 rebounds per game, both tops for the Greyhounds.

He also became the second player in school history to earn National Association of Basketball Coaches All-District honors, when he joined Mike Powell (1997) and earned Second Team laurels.

 

Cormier Continues Upswing

Dylon Cormier led the Greyhounds in scoring 13 times during the 2011-2012 season and scored 20 or more points on seven occasions as a sophomore, earning All-MAAC Second Team honors.

The Baltimore native made a huge jump in production from his freshman year when he averaged 8.1 points per game and started 28 games for Loyola. He showed a marked improvement in shooting as a sophomore, hitting 46.1-percent of his shots form the field after making just 37.9-percent as a freshman.

 

20-Win Season

The Greyhounds’ victory over Boston University on February 19, 2012, was their 20th of the season, setting a school Division I record.

Loyola, which moved to NCAA Division I in 1981-1982, had won 19 games in 2007-2008 and 18 in 2006-2007.

The overall school record for victories, 25, came in 1948-1949.

 

Patsos Named Coach & Man Of The Year

Jimmy Patsos became the first Loyola coach to earn The Rock/Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors by a vote of his peers in the league.

Patsos guided the Greyhounds to a school Division I high 24 wins and a program MAAC record 13 victories. He earned his 100th career coaching victory in November 2012 and led the Greyhounds to the No. 2 seed in the MAAC Championships.

Later in March, Patsos was named the Skip Prosser Man of the Year award for his work on and off the court, an honor presented by CollegeInsider.com.

 

2012 All-MAAC Honors

For the first time since the league expanded to three All-MAAC teams in 1998, four Greyhounds received all-league honors, topping all teams in the conference. Erik Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team, Dylon Cormier to the Second, and Justin Drummond and Robert Olson to the Third.

Loyola led all teams in the MAAC with its four selections, just in front of Iona’s three.

The Greyhounds’ previous high was at the end of the 1997-1998 season when Mike Powell (1st), Jason Rowe (2nd) and Roderick Platt (3rd) earned All-MAAC honors.

Etherly led Loyola in scoring (13.7), rebounding (7.5) and blocked shots (50), while finishing second on the team with 63 assists. He shot .530 from the field, good for third in the conference

Cormier was second on the team in scoring, just back of Etherly, with a 13.4 points per game average while improving his field-goal percentage nearly 10 points from his freshman season to .461 as a sophomore.

Drummond has come off the bench in 29 of the Greyhounds’ 33 games last year and is fourth on the team with 11.1 points per game. The guard as also third in rebounding (3.9), and he has scored in double figures 17 times this year.

Olson was one of the top 3-point shooters in the conference last year. He shot .431 from behind the arc, third-best in the MAAC, and averaged 11.1 points per game. The guard entered the month of January averaging less than nine points per game, but from that point forward, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at nearly 13 a contest.

 

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road last season. Patsos, who is now in his ninth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 123 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

 

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Four players – junior guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), junior forward Jordan Latham (City) and sophomore guard R.J. Williams and freshman forward Josh Forney (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Jarred Jones, John Carroll, 20.5; Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

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Should Steroid users be allowed in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Posted on 06 November 2012 by BaltimoreSportsNut

This morning on “Morning Reaction” here at WNST, Luke and Drew were debating on the issue of steroid users and if they should be allowed in the Baseball Hall of Fame. This is a very good question, but one that does not have a sheer cut answer.

I say yes, because it was the era that they played in and the true definition of a Hall of Famer is a player who dominated during his era. Was Barry Bonds a dominant player during his era? YES! Roger Clemens? YES. Also, many of the players in this era, including the two aforementioned players, never tested positive for steroids although many people feel they used them. I am with Drew though, as he stated they should be allowed in but there has to be something on on their plaque that states that they tested positive or were found guilty of using. I say this because if you look back in the History of baseball, you could make an arguement for every era that there should be an asterisk.

When you look at baseball history, you could make an arguement during the era that guys who played before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier should have an asterisk or something on their plaque that states African American players were not permitted in baseball, thus “x-player” was not purely competing against the best baseball players. Also, beer used to be allowed in the dugouts! Why not mention something on plaques about that?

It is just too dificult to keep these guys in the steroid era out of the Hall of Fame when it was the era that they played in. During the “Raised Mound era” pitchers were dominant, but how many of those pitchers would have been as dominant with the lower mound? Shouldn’t pitchers from that era in the Hall of Fame have something listed on their plaque? Again, it is too tough to justify keeping the steroid era players out of the Hall of Fame.

What do you think?

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Ozzie Newsome reflects on impact of Art Modell in his life

Posted on 06 September 2012 by WNSTV

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My snapshots & memories of the great life of Arthur B. Modell…

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My snapshots & memories of the great life of Arthur B. Modell…

Posted on 06 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

It’s been a crazy morning to awaken with such enthusiasm for the Orioles and mourn the loss of Art Modell, who died at 4 a.m. this morning at Johns Hopkins Hospital with David and John by his side.

On a personal level, it’s devastating. I loved Art Modell. And he always brightened my day with some kind words, jokes and he brought the Baltimore Ravens to this city and it changed my life. I’ll be eternally grateful.

I have so many memories with Art that it’s hard to even formulate them this morning. So, I’m putting together some of my memories here on this blog as my own therapy to remember our many great times together.

The last time I saw him was about two months ago in Owings Mills. He was always on a golf cart, always calling me over to tell me a joke or make me smile.

Here’s a WNSTV video I shot in 2008 of his big night at Sports Legends Museum:

 

I also famously lobbied Pro Football Hall of Fame voters many times on behalf of Art Modell, who deserves to be in Canton on the merit of his contributions and accomplishments for the NFL. It’s a crime that he died this morning never having been inducted.

So, in 2009, I went to Canton and inducted him myself:

 

Click on Page 2 to see more of my personal memories

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Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

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Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

Posted on 23 August 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

As Mike Mussina makes his triumphant return to Baltimore this weekend for the Orioles Hall of Fame activities it’s certainly a thought-provoking time to be a long-time observer and fan of the franchise.

Sure, the Orioles are once again relevant — playing meaningful and exciting games every night — which harkens to the days of 1996 & 1997 when “Moose” was an integral part of the magic of being an Orioles fan every fifth day during the zenith of Camden Yards’ passion and Inner Harbor energy.

Mussina has been gone from Baltimore – except for three visits a year in New York Yankees pinstripes – for 12 years now. So long ago that time has seemingly dimmed the glory of his deeds and his departure serves as a truly seminal moment in the awfulness of the Orioles franchise under the stewardship of Peter Angelos since 1993.

In the 1970’s it was routine for the Orioles to lose players to owners, markets and franchises that had more wealth, population and revenue. Many members of the franchise “Hall of Fame” and “Oriole Way” stalwarts left like Mayflowers in the middle of the night for greener pastures including Don Baylor, Bobby Grich, Reggie Jackson, Wayne Garland and Doug DeCinces and later Eddie Murray, Mike Boddicker, Mike Flanagan, B.J. Surhoff and Mike Bordick were all dealt away to save cash and get younger players.

But in the 1980’s and 1990’s, replete with a fan base from six states that pumped unprecedented money into the franchise and reached into the state’s funds to build Camden Yards and turn Baltimore into a spigot for Major League Baseball profitability, the Orioles never lost a player they wanted to keep.

Not until they lost the best player and pitcher of his generation of Baltimore baseball when Mike Mussina wore the “turncoat” label and bolted for the New York Yankees.

After the 2000 season, tired of three years of losing and Angelos’ low-balling and obvious meddling and mismanagement, Mussina simply took the advice of his agent Arn Tellem and played out his option and walked. On Dec. 7, 2001 after years of eschewing the notion of playing in big, bad New York he signed a six-year, $88.5 million deal to play for the Evil Empire.

I’ll share my many personal memories and my friendship with Mussina later in this blog but I can remember the surreal nature of watching that press conference from The Bronx from Chicago’s Sporting News Radio studios with my jaw open. It was the definitive signal that quality Major League Baseball players simply didn’t want to be in Baltimore anymore and it had little to do with crab cakes or the American League East.

Mussina was thought to be “irreplaceable” at the time and 11 years later time has borne out that diagnosis.

Mussina left the Baltimore Orioles because the owner stunk. He knew it and everyone in baseball knew it.

So, Mussina will finally return and don Orioles colors this weekend for the final time and he’ll find a few fresh statues on the veranda, a team in the midst of its first pennant run in 15 years and a seemingly soulless shell of a former love affair for baseball in Baltimore.

There’ll be plenty of empty seats and shoulder shrugs at his mostly sweet and sour induction into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame this weekend. Certainly a worthy candidate if there ever were one, Mussina’s time as a starter for the Birds is only eclipsed by the deeds of Jim Palmer, who as I’ve said many times is the greatest (and most underappreciated) Oriole of all time by any measurement.

Palmer let loose with a haughty pronouncement on a MASN broadcast earlier this week in promoting this weekend’s festivities. “The Moose is going to Cooperstown – at least I hope. He’s got 270 wins,” said Palmer, who went on to proclaim that in the steroid era to win all of those games and Gold Gloves and remain a “clean figure” in the needle witch hunt of the Mitchell Report should get him a Hall of Fame ballot punched in 2014.

For “real” Orioles fans, he’ll always be known as the Benedict Arnold of the modern generation for leaving the

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

Posted on 31 July 2012 by Glenn Clark

Honorable MentionPro Wrestling: Ring Of Honor (Friday 7:30pm Du Burns Arena); Soccer: MLS Columbus Crew @ DC United (Saturday 7:30pm from RFK Stadium live on Comcast SportsNet); Pro Lacrosse: Long Island Lizards @ Chesapeake Bayhawks (Saturday 7pm from Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium live on CBS Sports Network); Boxing: Friday Night Fights-Mercito Gesta vs. Ty Barnett (Friday 10pm from Las Vegas live on ESPN2)

10. Summer Spirit Festival feat. Erykah Badu, Common, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings (Saturday 3pm Merriweather Post Pavilion); George Thorogood & The Destroyers (Wednesday 7:30pm Wolf Trap), The Temptations/The Four Tops (Thursday 8pm Wolf Trap); 12 Stones (Sunday 6pm Recher Theatre); Old Crow Medicine Show (Thursday 7pm Friday 8pm 9:30 Club), Our Lady Peace (Saturday 8pm 9:30 Club); Toadies (Tuesday 8pm Fillmore Silver Spring), Ted Nugent (Friday 8pm Fillmore Silver Spring); Dick Dale (Tuesday 7:30pm Birchmere); Daughtry (Wednesday 8pm Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric), Lyle Lovett (Saturday 8pm Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric); Aaron Neville (Sunday 8pm Howard Theatre); Civil Twilight (Friday 8pm Rock & Roll Hotel)

It’s really tough for me to choose whether I enjoy Sharon Jones or the Dap-Kings more…

Do people throw Wagon Wheels at OCMS shows? Should they just be called Old Crow Medicine Shows?

We all know America > Canada, but what do we make of the fact that Our Lady Peace is from Canada???

I’m man enough to admit I’m excited about Daughtry. Are you?

9. Tracy Morgan (Thursday 7:30pm & 10pm Howard Theatre); Jerry Seinfeld (Friday 7pm Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts); John Mulaney (Friday & Saturday DC Improv); “Hatfields & McCoys” available on Blu-Ray/DVD (Tuesday); “Totall Recall” out in theaters (Friday)

Total Recall is about three days away from release. The number three seems to be relevant for some other reason I can’t think of ohyeah…

Oh and also, here’s Tracy Morgan giving birth. Neat!

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After being named Caps coach, Oates elected to Hall of Fame

Posted on 26 June 2012 by WNST Staff

TORONTO (June 26, 2012) — Bill Hay, Chairman and CEO of the Hockey Hall of Fame, Jim Gregory and Pat Quinn, Co-Chairmen of the Hockey Hall of Fame’s Selection Committee, announced today Pavel Bure, Adam Oates, Joe Sakic and Mats Sundin have been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in the Player Category. The vote took place today at the annual meeting of the Selection Committee in Toronto.

“The Hockey Hall of Fame is proud to welcome these four hockey legends as Honoured Members,” said Jim Gregory. “Their contributions to the game of hockey are well documented and their election to the Hockey Hall of Fame is richly deserved.”

Pavel Bure, a native of Moscow, Russia, joined the Vancouver Canucks for the 1991-92 NHL season and that season won the Calder Trophy as the NHL’s Rookie of the Year. A six-time NHL All-Star, he was named to the first team in 1994. As a Florida Panther, he was the NHL’s top goal scorer for two consecutive seasons, from 1999 to 2001, before finishing his career with the New York Rangers in 2003.

Adams Oates played three seasons with RPI of the ECAC before signing as an undrafted free agent with the Detroit Red Wings in 1985. He went on to play 19 NHL seasons with seven teams, including four 100-plus point seasons. The sixth all-time NHL career leader in assists with 1,063, Oates retired in 2004.

“Growing up I was a guy who was kind of overlooked and I was fortunate to have the opportunity to go to RPI and have the time for my game to mature,” said Oates. “This is a tremendous honour and I look back and realize how lucky I was to have great coaches to help me along the way.”

Joe Sakic grew up in Burnaby, British Columbia, before starring with the Swift Current Broncos of the Western Hockey League, winning the CHL’s Player of the Year Award in in 1987-88. Drafted 15th overall by the Quebec Nordiques in the 1987 Entry Draft, Joe moved with the team to Colorado and went on to play his entire 20-year career with the same organization. Sakic captained the team for 17 seasons, second longest in NHL history and won Stanley Cups in 1996 and 2001. An NHL First Team All-Star on three occasions, Sakic also played for Canada at three Olympic Games, winning gold and being named MVP in 2002.

“As a kid I always dreamed about making the NHL, but never really thought at all about the Hockey Hall of Fame,” said Sakic. “I was fortunate to play 20 seasons, which gave me the opportunity to build on my list of accomplishments. Having great teammates and coaches was a key component of this.”

Mats Sundin was born in Bromma, Sweden and was the first European born player to be drafted first overall in the NHL Entry Draft, in 1989 by the Quebec Nordiques. Mats spent 13 seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs, becoming the franchise’s all-time leader in goals with 420 and assists with 567. Sundin is the first Swedish-born player to reach 1,000 points in the NHL. He represented his home country internationally on 14 occasions, with the culmination being an Olympic gold medal in 2006.

“Three years have passed since I retired and it makes me realize how privileged I was to play my entire career in Canada, where hockey really matters,” said Sundin. “Having my hobby and love for a sport become my livelihood really allowed me to live out my dream.”

The 2012 Induction Celebration will be held on Monday, November 12th at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.

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HOF Russ Grimm proud of son Dylan’s run to title with Loyola

Posted on 31 May 2012 by WNST Audio

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Former Navy coach Meade takes Furman post

Posted on 27 May 2012 by WNST Staff

FOXBOROUGH, MASS. — Furman University director of athletics Dr. Gary Clark announced today that U.S. men’s national senior team coach Richie Meade has been named the school’s first men’s head lacrosse coach.

The announcement was made by Clark and Furman president Rod Smolla at a press conference at Gillette Stadium, site of the 2012 NCAA Division I Men’s Lacrosse Championship.

Furman, a private, co-educational university of 2,700 students in Greenville, S.C., and member of the Southern Conference, announced on Feb. 9 that it would add men’s and women’s lacrosse to its Division I athletics program.  The teams will begin varsity competition by the 2014-15 academic year.

“Richie Meade is the ideal person to jump start our new men’s lacrosse program at Furman,” Clark said.  “He sports a tremendous combination of experience and leadership to help grow lacrosse in a non-traditional area of the country.  We are thrilled to have Richie join the Furman family.”

Said Meade, “My family and I are very excited with the opportunity to join the Furman community. I am grateful to President Smolla and Gary Clark for their faith and trust in me.  We will build our program with integrity, substance, and toughness.  Our goal will be to compete with passion, skill and honor, and to graduate individuals who will make a difference in the world and reflect the values of a great American university.”

Meade was named head coach of the U.S. men’s national senior team by US Lacrosse in December. He is the 12th head coach in the history of the men’s senior team program, and he will lead Team USA in its title defense at the 2014 Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) World Championship in Denver, Colo., July 10-19.

“We are very pleased that such a well-respected and highly qualified coach as Richie Meade has agreed to lead our men’s lacrosse program,” said Smolla.  “His connections in the sport are unparalleled, and he has enjoyed great success in coaching and recruiting at the national level.  We welcome Richie and his family to the Furman community, and we look forward to seeing the men’s lacrosse program grow and prosper under his guidance.”

A 35-year veteran of collegiate coaching, Meade most recently served as head coach for the United States Naval Academy men’s team from 1994-2011, where he led the Midshipmen to a 142-97 (.589) record. In his 21-year career as a head coach, including four years at the University of Baltimore, Meade compiled a 162-120 (.585) ledger.

During Meade’s head coaching tenure at Navy, his teams claimed five Patriot League regular season and tournament titles, appeared in seven NCAA tournaments, and racked up 39 All-America citations. In 2004, Navy advanced to the national championship game and Meade was honored with the Morris Touchstone Memorial Award as National Coach of the Year. He also was twice named Patriot League Coach of the Year (2004 & ’07).

Meade began his coaching career as an assistant at Duke University in 1977. Following a two-year stint in Durham, he moved on to the University of North Carolina, where he served as an assistant for one year before accepting his first head coaching job at the University of Baltimore (1980-83).  In 1984 he was named defensive coordinator at Navy (1984-88) before returning to Chapel Hill (1989-90) for a two-year stint as offensive coordinator.  He accepted the same post, as well as an instructor’s role in physical education, at the United States Military Academy in 1991, remaining there for three seasons, before returning to Navy as head coach in 1994, becoming the seventh lacrosse mentor in school history.

In addition his coaching duties with the Midshipmen, he also served as a tenured professor of physical education and is a Senior Fellow at the Vice Admiral James B. Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership at the Naval Academy.

He has served the sport in a variety of administrative positions, including the U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association Rules Advisory Committee, U.S. Lacrosse Men’s Coaches Council, and NCAA Rules and Equipment Committee.  Since 2005, he has been president of the Intercollegiate Men’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IMLCA) and over the last two years has served as executive director of the Wounded Warrior Project Lacrosse.

A native of Williston Park, N.Y., Meade attended and played lacrosse at Nassau (N.Y.) Community College.  He then transferred to the University of North Carolina, from which he graduated with a B.A. in 1976 with a degree in parks and recreation administration.  He later added an M.S. from UNC in 1979.

Meade is a member of both the New York Metropolitan Long Island Lacrosse Hall of Fame and University of Baltimore Athletic Hall of Fame.

He and his wife, Sue, have three daughters:  Jillian, Shannon Grace, and Cassidy.

WHAT THEY’RE SAYING ABOUT FURMAN’S RICHIE MEADE… 

“Richie Meade represents everything that is good about college lacrosse. Furman University hit a home run. Coach Meade is a well-respected individual that brings instant credibility to Furman. He is an outstanding coach, strong recruiter and dynamic leader. Most importantly, he is a tremendous human being. Hats off to Furman for recognizing what a special individual Coach Meade is.”

Dave Pietramala
Men’s Lacrosse Coach
Johns Hopkins University

“The announcement of Furman adding Division I men’s lacrosse was exciting to all who love the game and want to witness its growth. The hiring of Coach Meade shows great conviction and dedication by Furman to get the absolute best lacrosse man possible to lead that charge.  I am thrilled for Richie, his family, the university, and all of lacrosse, that this great coach is back in the college game.”

Bill Tierney
Men’s Lacrosse Coach
University of Denver
National Lacrosse Hall of Fame Inductee

“Rarely does a start-up program have the chance to hire someone with the experience and ability of Richie Meade. Furman University is fortunate to have a proven winner, a man of integrity and a committed leader like Richie.”

Kevin Corrigan
Men’s Lacrosse Coach
University of Notre Dame

“Furman is not only hiring one of the best lacrosse coaches of all time, but they are hiring one of the best leaders, a tremendous motivator and a wonderful person. You build a program from the ground floor up and this foundation with Coach Meade is rock solid. I couldn’t be happier for both Furman and Coach Meade.”

David Cottle
Chesapeake Bayhawks (MLL)

“Furman University has hit a home run with this hire.  No one is more capable of building a Division 1 lacrosse program from scratch to national prominence than coach Meade.  He is one of the most respected coaches in lacrosse.  He is a proven winner and, most importantly, a leader, teacher and mentor of young men.  Coach Meade’s passion for and commitment to developing leaders of integrity who are also athletes will reverberate across the Furman campus in the same manner that it did at the Naval Academy. I congratulate the search committee on their excellent choice of coach Meade to lead the Furman lacrosse program.”

Dr. Tom Virgets
Senior Associate Athletics Director/ Head Physical Education
United States Naval Academy

“Richie Meade, USA Team head coach, is arguably the best collegiate lacrosse coach in the country.  With the hiring of Coach Meade to head up its new program, Furman University has stamped its name on the lacrosse collegiate landscape in a most prominent way.  He is an absolute winner. The boys who will experience his leadership will be better men for it and Furman, as time passes, will be increasingly proud to call Richie Meade their head lacrosse coach.”

Coach Jack Emmer
National Lacrosse Hall of Fame Inductee

“This is absolutely a tremendous hire by Furman University!  Richie Meade is one of the most respected, admired and revered men’s lacrosse coaches in the history of our sport. Furman lacrosse has just now burst onto the Division 1 lacrosse world. For Furman to land the next Team USA head job is just brilliant. The future of Paladin lacrosse could not be brighter. I am so happy for Richie, his family, and Furman athletics.”

Mike Pressler
Men’s Lacrosse
Coach 
Bryant Univeristy
Head Coach, Team USA 2010

“Furman’s hiring of Richie Meade as its lacrosse coach is great news for the sport of lacrosse and also for one of college lacrosse’s most respected coaches. The announcement of a new Division I lacrosse program in South Carolina at a school with Furman’s athletic reputation is a positive step in the growth of the men’s game. Having Richie Meade as the individual responsible for the leadership of a start-up program is another positive in ensuring that Furman lacrosse is in most capable hands.  I think the kids who compete for Furman will benefit by having Richie as their coach.  The people involved in anything you do are the most important and significant factors.  Richie will get good kids. Their experience as undergraduates and lacrosse players will be enhanced by studying at Furman and having a coach like Richie Meade.”

Willie Scroggs
Senior Associate Athletics Director
University of North Carolina
National Lacrosse Hall of Fame Inductee

“Furman’s announcement that coach Meade has been hired to lead the men’s lacrosse program is evidence of the excellence that is a hallmark of the university. Coach Meade brings national credibility to the upstart Furman program, and it is the perfect pairing of a coach whose integrity and coaching prowess have turned young men into leaders and a university whose priorities and goals are perfectly aligned with the coach.  It is a great match.”

Dan Einstein
Furman Lacrosse Advisory Committee

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