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Ravens Modell, McNair, Holmes, Anderson; Towson’s Landeta on HOF nominee list

Posted on 12 September 2013 by WNST Staff

The complete list of modern-era candidates for the Class of 2014 consists of 126 nominees was announced exclusively during a one-hour special on NFL Network Wednesday night.

From the list, that includes 16 first-year eligible candidates, the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee will choose 25 candidates who will advance as semifinalist nominees. The list of 25 semifinalist nominees will be announced in late November. That semifinalist list will be further reduced by a mail ballot to 15 modern-era finalists and announced in early January.

The Class of 2014 will be selected from the list of the 15 modern-era finalists plus the two senior nominees (former Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders punter Ray Guy and former Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Claude Humphrey) who were selected last month by the Hall of Fame’s Senior Selection Committee. The actual voting for the Class of 2014 will be conducted at the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee’s annual meeting, which will be held in New York City on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, the day before Super Bowl XLVIII. The election results will be announced at a live announcement show that evening.

LIST OF MODERN-ERA NOMINEES FOR THE CLASS OF 2014

#First-year eligible; *Finalist in 2013

-OFFENSE-

QUARTERBACKS

DREW BLEDSOE – 1993-2001 New England Patriots, 2002-04 Buffalo Bills, 2005-06 Dallas Cowboys Played in 194 career games during 14-year career. Completed 3,839 of 6,717 pass attempts for 44,611 yards and 251 touchdowns. Named to four Pro Bowls and Second-Team All-AFC twice.

RANDALL CUNNINGHAM  – 1985-1995 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997-99 Minnesota Vikings, 2000 Dallas Cowboys, 2001 Baltimore Ravens Named first- or second-team All-Pro four times and selected to play in four Pro Bowls during 16-year career. Racked up 29,979 yards and 201 touchdowns through the air, while adding 4,928 yards and 35 touchdowns on the ground.

DOUG FLUTIE – 1986 Chicago Bears, 1987-89, 2005 New England Patriots, 1998-2000 Buffalo Bills, 2001-04 San Diego Chargers. Played in 91 games during 12-year NFL career. Completed 1,177 of 2,151 for 14,715 and 86 touchdowns. Added 1,634 yards and 10 touchdowns rushing on 338 carries. Selected to one Pro Bowl.

#TRENT GREEN – 1997-98 Washington Redskins; 1999-2000, 2008 St. Louis Rams, 2001-06 Kansas City Chiefs, 2007 Miami Dolphins Battled back from serious knee injuries to play 11 seasons in the NFL, three of which passed for more than 4,000 yards. A two-time Pro Bowler, led the Chiefs to a 13-3 record and the AFC West Division title in 2003.

STEVE MCNAIR – 1995-2005 Houston/Tennessee Oilers/Titans. 2006-07 Baltimore Ravens Completed 2,733 of 4,544 passes for 31,304 yards and 174 touchdowns during 13-year playing career. Added 3,590 yards and 37 touchdowns on the ground. Selected to two Pro Bowls. Named the NFL’s MVP in 2003.

PHIL SIMMS – 1979-1993 New York Giants Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl XXI. Completed 2,576 of 4,647 passes for 33,462 yards and 199 touchdowns. Was named first-team All-Pro in 1986 and selected to two Pro Bowls during 14-year career.

RUNNING BACKS

#SHAUN ALEXANDER – 2000-07 Seattle Seahawks, 2008 Washington Redskins Seahawks all-time TD leader (112) and rushed for 9,453 yards during nine-year career. Named league MVP in 2005 after ran for a league-high 1,880 yards and scored then-NFL record 28 TDs.

OTTIS ANDERSON – 1979-1986 St. Louis Cardinals, 1986-1992 New York Giants MVP of Super Bowl XXV. Named first-team All-Pro and All-NFC once and voted to two Pro Bowls. Rushed for 10,273 yards and 81 touchdowns, and caught 376 passes for 3,062 yards and 5 TDs in 14-season career.

TIKI BARBER – 1997-2006 New York Giants Rushed for more than 1,500 yards in each of last three seasons of 10-year career and amassed a career total of 10,449 yards. Added 5,183 yards on 586 receptions. Voted to two Pro Bowls and named All-Pro once.

*JEROME BETTIS – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers Played on five division championship teams and member of Super Bowl XL champions. Named All-Pro twice and voted to six Pro Bowls. Rushed for career total of 13,662 yards, fifth most at retirement, and caught 200 passes for 1,449 yards.

LARRY CENTERS – 1990-98 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 1999-2000 Washington Redskins, 2001-02 Buffalo Bills, 2003 New England Patriots Set then-record for career receptions and receiving yards by a running back that included a single-season record of 101 catches in 1995. Named All-Pro once and voted to three Pro Bowls. Retired with 827 catches for 6,797 yards, and rushed for 2,188 yards on 615 carries in 198 career games.

ROGER CRAIG – 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings First player in NFL history to have 1,000 yards rushing and receiving in same season. Named All-Pro once, voted to four Pro Bowls, and won three Super Bowls. Career totals included 8,189 yards rushing and 566 catches for 4,911 yards.

STEPHEN DAVIS – 1996-2002 Washington Redskins, 2003-05 Carolina Panthers, 2006 St. Louis Rams Rushed for 8,052 yards and scored 65 TDs during 11-season career. Recorded four 1,000-yard seasons over five-season span. Voted to three Pro Bowls and named All-NFC and Second-Team All-Pro in 1999.

TERRELL DAVIS – 1995-2001 Denver Broncos Recorded four straight 1,000-yard seasons to start career including 2,000-yard season. Named All-Pro and voted to Pro Bowl three straight times. Played on back-to-back Super Bowl champions and was named MVP of Super Bowl XXXII. Picked to the NFL’s All-Decade Team of 1990s.

#WARRICK DUNN – 1997-2001, 2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-07 Atlanta Falcons Possessed game-breaking speed and quickness as a runner and receiver. Three-time Pro Bowler, ran for 10,967 yards and 510 receptions for 4,443 yards during 12-year career.

EDDIE GEORGE – 1996-2003 Houston/Tennessee Oilers/Titans, 2004 Dallas Cowboys Rushed for 1,000 yards seven times in nine-season career. In all, rushed for 10,441 yards and scored 68 TDs and 2,227 yards on 268 receptions and 10 touchdowns.

PRIEST HOLMES – 1997-2000 Baltimore Ravens, 2001-05, 2007 Kansas City Chiefs Set then-NFL record with 27 rushing touchdowns in 2003. In all, rushed for 8,172 yards and scored 86 TDs in 11-season career. Had 339 catches and 8 receiving touchdowns. Named All-Pro and voted to Pro Bowl three straight years.

DAVE MEGGETT (also PR/KR) – 1989-1994 New York Giants, 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998 New York Jets Twice named All-Pro as a punt returner, played on five divisional championship teams and won one Super Bowl. Multi-faceted running back who had 336 career catches and amassed nearly 14,000 all-purpose yards during 10 NFL seasons.

ERIC METCALF (also WR/PR/KR) – 1989-1994 Cleveland Browns, 1995-96 Atlanta Falcons, 1997 San Diego Chargers, 1998 Arizona Cardinals, 1999 Carolina Panthers, 2001 Washington Redskins, 2002 Green Bay Packers Accumulated more than 17,000 all-purpose yards during 13-season NFL career. Twice named All-Pro and voted to three Pro Bowls as kick returner. Career total included 541 receptions. Led NFL once in kickoff return yardage, punt return yardage and punt return average.

HERSCHEL WALKER – 1986-89, 1996-97 Dallas Cowboys, 1989-1991 Minnesota Vikings, 1992-94 Philadelphia Eagles, 1995 New York Giants, 1996-97 Dallas Cowboys Versatile player who racked up more than 18,000 all-purpose yards during 12 seasons. Recorded two 1,000-yard rushing seasons and accumulated 512 career receptions. Also averaged 23.6 yards per kickoff return over career. Voted to two Pro Bowls.

RICKY WATTERS – 1992-94 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-97 Philadelphia Eagles, 1998-2001 Seattle Seahawks Played on four divisional title and one Super Bowl championship team. Rushed for 10,643 career yards and topped 1,000-yard mark seven times. Also added 467 career catches for 4,248 yards. Selected to five Pro Bowls.

WIDE RECEIVERS

*TIM BROWN (also KR) – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Nine-time Pro Bowl selection. Recorded 1,094 receptions for 14,934 yards and 100 touchdowns during 17-year career. Added 3,320 yards on punt returns, 1,235 yards on kickoffs and 190 rushing yards for 19,679 career yards.

GARY CLARK – 1985-1992 Washington Redskins, 1993-94 Phoenix /Arizona Cardinals, 1995 Miami Dolphins Two-time Super Bowl Champion caught 699 passes for 10,856 yards and 65 touchdowns during 11 playing seasons. Named to four Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro twice (1987, 1991).

MARK CLAYTON – 1983-1992 Miami Dolphins, 1993 Green Bay Packers Compiled 8,974 yards on 582 receptions and 84 touchdowns during 11-year career. Selected to five Pro Bowls and led the league in touchdown receptions in both 1984 (18) and 1988 (14).

HENRY ELLARD  (also PR) – 1983-1993 Los Angeles Rams, 1994-98 Washington Redskins, 1998 New England Patriots Three-time first-team All-Pro selection. Played in 228 games and recorded 814 receptions for 13,777 yards and 65 touchdowns in 16 seasons. Returned 135 punts for 1,527 yards and four touchdowns. Named to three Pro Bowls.

#MARVIN HARRISON – 1996-2008 Indianapolis Colts A six-time first-team All-Pro selection and named to eight Pro Bowls. Led NFL in receiving two seasons. Finished career with 1,102 receptions for 14,580 yards and 128 touchdowns. Set single-season mark with 143 catches, 2002.

KEYSHAWN JOHNSON – 1996-99 New York Jets, 2000-03 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-05 Dallas Cowboys, 2006 Carolina Panthers Recorded 70 or more receptions in nine seasons. Totaled 814 receptions, 10,571 receiving yards and 64 receiving touchdowns during 11-season career. Named to Pro Bowl three times.

KEENAN MCCARDELL – 1991, 2007 Washington Redskins, 1992-95 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2001 Jacksonville Jaguars, 2002-03 Tampa Bay Buccaneeers, 2004-06 San Diego Chargers Career receiving totals include 883 receptions, 11,373 yards and 63 touchdowns during 17 seasons. Selected to two Pro Bowls. Recorded 70 receptions in a season seven times.

*ANDRE REED – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins Helped lead Bills to unprecedented four straight Super Bowls. Seven-time Pro Bowl selection, caught 951 receptions for 13,198 yards and 87 touchdowns in 16 seasons. All-Conference four times and Second-Team All-Pro three consecutive seasons.

STERLING SHARPE – 1988-1994 Green Bay Packers Three-time first-team All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl selection. Led the NFL in receptions three times in seven seasons. Finished career with 595 receptions, 8,134 receiving yards and 65 touchdowns.

JIMMY SMITH – 1992 Dallas Cowboys, 1995-2005 Jacksonville Jaguars    In 12 playing seasons, amassed 862 receptions, 12,287 receiving yards and 67 receiving touchdowns. Led the NFL in receptions in 1999 and was selected to the Pro Bowl five times.

ROD SMITH – 1995-2006 Denver Broncos Two-time Super Bowl champion and three-time Pro Bowl selection. Recorded 849 receptions for 11,389 yards and 68 touchdowns during 183 games over 12 playing seasons. Totaled eight career 1,000-yard receiving seasons including six straight.

TIGHT END

MARK BAVARO – 1985-1990 New York Giants, 1992 Cleveland Browns, 1993-94 Philadelphia Eagles Recorded 351 receptions for 4,733 yards and 39 touchdowns during 126 games in nine seasons. Two-time first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selection and won two Super Bowl championships.

OFFENSIVE LINEMEN

#WILLIE ANDERSON – T – 1996-2007 Cincinnati Bengals, 2008 Baltimore Ravens Played in a total of 195 games with a string of 116 straight starts. Named to four Pro Bowls from 2004-07 and selected first-team All-Pro three seasons 2004-06.

TONY BOSELLI – T – 1995-2001 Jacksonville Jaguars, 2002 Houston Texans (injured reserve) Played in 91 career games over seven playing seasons. Selected to five Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three straight seasons (1997-99).

LOMAS BROWN – T – 1985-1995 Detroit Lions, 1996-98 Arizona Cardinals, 1999 Cleveland Browns, 2000-01 New York Giants, 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Named to the Pro Bowl seven consecutive times over an 18-year career. Selected as a first- or second-team All-Pro six times. Played in 263 career games, winning four division, two conference and one Super Bowl championships.

JIM COVERT – T – 1983-1990 Chicago Bears Helped the Bears to six division, one conference and one Super Bowl championships during eight-year career. Played in 111 career games. Named first-team All-Pro twice and selected to two Pro Bowls.

JAY HILGENBERG – C – 1981-1991 Chicago Bears, 1992 Cleveland Browns, 1993 New Orleans Saints Seven-time Pro Bowl selection during 13 playing seasons. Named first-team All-Pro three times and All-NFC seven consecutive seasons (1985-1991). Played in 188 career games.

CHRIS HINTON – G/T – 1983-89 Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts, 1990-93 Atlanta Falcons, 1994-95 Minnesota Vikings  Selected first- or second-team All-Pro five times as both a guard and a tackle. Named to the Pro Bowl seven and All-Conference six times during 13-year career. Played in 177 games.

KENT HULL – C – 1986-1996 Buffalo Bills Helped lead the Bills to six division and four conference championships. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and named to three Pro Bowl teams. During 11 seasons, played in 170 games and a full 16-game schedule nine times.

JOE JACOBY – T – 1981-1993 Washington Redskins Three-time first-team All-Pro helped the Redskins win four division, four conference and three Super Bowl championships. Played in a total of 170 games and named to four Pro Bowls during 13 seasons.

#WALTER JONES – T – 1997-2008 Seattle Seahawks A nine-time Pro Bowler and six-time All-Pro during 12-year career. Played in a total of 180 games while helping the Seahawks to five division titles and one conference championship.

MIKE KENN – T – 1978-1994 Atlanta Falcons Over 17 seasons, played 251 games which is the most in Falcons history. Named first-team All-Pro three times and All-NFC five times. Selected to play in five consecutive Pro Bowls.

JIM LACHEY – T – 1985-87 San Diego Chargers, 1988 Los Angeles Raiders, 1988-1992, 1994-95 Washington Redskins  Named to the Pro Bowl three times and played in a total of 131 games during 10 seasons. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and All-Conference four times.

DON MOSEBAR – C – 1983-1994 Los Angeles Raiders Helped the Raiders to three division titles, one conference championship and one Super Bowl victory over 12-year career. Played in 173 games and was named first-team All-Pro once. Selected to play in three Pro Bowls.

TOM NALEN – C – 1994-2007 Denver Broncos Played in 194 total games during a 14-year career. Helped lead the Broncos to three division, two conference and two Super Bowl titles. Selected to five Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three times.

NATE NEWTON – G – 1986-1998 Dallas Cowboys, 1999 Carolina Panthers During 198- game, 14-season career, teams won six division, three conference and three Super Bowl titles. Named to six Pro Bowls, selected first-team All-Pro twice and All-NFC four times.

*WILL SHIELDS – G – 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs Named to Pro Bowl 12 consecutive times. Played in a total of 224 games over 14 seasons, never missing a game. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and All-AFC seven times.

STEVE WISNIEWSKI – G – 1989-2001 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders Played in 207 games missing only two games during a 13-year career. Named to eight Pro Bowls and selected first- or second-team All-Pro as well as All-AFC seven times.

-DEFENSE-

DEFENSIVE LINEMEN

JEROME BROWN – DT – 1987-1991 Philadelphia Eagles A dominant figure on defensive line. Earned two All-Pro, All-NFC, and Pro Bowl selections. Promising career cut short in 1992 when killed in car accident.

*CHARLES HALEY – DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys One of the most gifted pass rushers of era. Only player in NFL history to win five Super Bowls. Registered 10 or more sacks six times during 12 playing seasons.

ED “TOO TALL” JONES – DE – 1974-78, 1980-89 Dallas Cowboys Played 224 games during 15 seasons and never missed a game except  for the 1979 season when he boxed. A dominant passer rusher for the Cowboys’ “Doomsday Defense,” earned three Pro Bowl selections.

DEXTER MANLEY – DE – 1981-89 Washington Redskins, 1990 Phoenix Cardinals, 1991 Tampa Bay Buccaneers One of most feared pass rushers of the 1980s. During a four-year span between 1983 and ’86, logged 57.5 sacks. Key contributor during two Redskins championship teams. Finished 11-season career with 97.5 QB takedowns.

CHARLES MANN – DE – 1983-1993 Washington Redskins, 1994 San Francisco 49ers (12 playing seasons) A mainstay on the defensive line throughout 12-year career, had four seasons in which recorded 10 or more sacks. A four-time Pro Bowler, helped the Redskins to three Super Bowl victories.

STEVE MCMICHAEL – DT/NT – 1980 New England Patriots, 1981-1993 Chicago Bears, 1994 Green Bay Packers One of the most durable lineman of era, played 213 games during 15-year career. A three-time All-Pro choice,  ecorded 95.5 overall sacks and three safeties.

FRED SMERLAS – NT – 1979-1989 Buffalo Bills, 1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991-92 New England Patriots One of first great nose tackles, anchored the Buffalo Bills “Bermuda Triangle” defense in the early-1980s. A three-time All-Pro choice, earned five Pro Bowl selections.

*MICHAEL STRAHAN – DE – 1993-2007 New York Giants Set NFL single-season record with 22.5 sacks in 2001 and finished 15 playing seasons with 141.5 QB drops. Selected to seven Pro Bowls and a five-time All-Pro choice.

TED WASHINGTON – DT/NT – 1991-93 San Francisco 49ers, 1994 Denver Broncos, 1995-2000 Buffalo Bills, 2001-02 Chicago Bears, 2003 New England Patriots, 2004-05 Oakland Raiders, 2006-07 Cleveland Browns A four-time Pro Bowl choice and All-Pro selection in 2001, played in 236 games during 17-year career. A regular anchor on the defensive line, logged a total of 34.5 sacks and one safety.

BRYANT YOUNG – DE – 1994-2007 San Francisco 49ers One of the most disruptive defensive players during 14-year career. Named to four Pro Bowls, two All-Pro teams and Comeback Player of the Year, 1999.

LINEBACKERS

CORNELIUS BENNETT – 1987-1995 Buffalo Bills, 1996-98 Atlanta Falcons, 1999-2000 Indianapolis Colts Won eight division and five conference championships during 14 seasons. The 1991 Defensive Player of the Year. Three-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl selection with 71.5 career sacks.

#DERRICK BROOKS – 1995-2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Named to Pro Bowl 11 times in 14-year career and selected first-team All-Pro six seasons. Played on four division championship and one Super Bowl winning team. Recorded 25 career interceptions, six of which were returned for TDs.

#TEDY BRUSCHI – 1996-2008 New England Patriots Leader of Patriots defense for 13-season, 189-game career. Voted to one Pro Bowl, recorded 30.5 sacks, intercepted 12 passes. Played on eight division title teams and three Super Bowl champions.

*KEVIN GREENE (also DE) – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers Retired after 15-season career as NFL’s third all-time leading sacker (160). A member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1990s and five-time Pro Bowler. Had 10 seasons with 10 or more sacks.

KEN HARVEY – 1988-1993 Phoenix Cardinals, 1994-98 Washington Redskins A two-time All-Pro choice and was selected to four straight Pro Bowls (1995-98). Recorded 89.0 sacks and one safety during 11-year career.

CLAY MATTHEWS – 1978-1993 Cleveland Browns, 1994-96 Atlanta Falcons When retired after 19 seasons, had played more games (278) than any other linebacker in NFL history and third most all-time. Selected to four Pro Bowls and one All-Pro team.

KARL MECKLENBURG – 1983-1994 Denver Broncos Accumulated 70.0 sacks, five interceptions, two fumble recoveries for a TD, and one safety during 12-year career. A six-time Pro Bowl selection and an All-Pro choice four seasons.

#WILLIE MCGINEST (also DE) –1994-2005 New England Patriots, 2006-08 Cleveland Browns Recorded 86 sacks in 212-game career that spanned 15 seasons. A two-time Pro Bowl pick, was member of six divisional championship teams and won three Super Bowls (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX).

SAM MILLS – LB – 1986-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-97 Carolina Panthers A long-time leader on defense, earned five Pro Bowl selections and three first-team All-Pro nods. Accumulated 20.5 career sacks, 11 interceptions and three fumble recoveries for a TD.

DARRYL TALLEY – LB – 1983-1994 Buffalo Bills, 1995 Atlanta Falcons, 1996 Minnesota Vikings Key contributor of the Bills defense for 13 seasons. Played in 216 games in 15 total seasons.  Logged career numbers of 38.5 sacks and 12 interceptions. A two-time Pro Bowl and All-Pro choice.

#ZACH THOMAS – 1996-2007 Miami Dolphins, 2008 Dallas Cowboys Named first-team All-Pro five times, second-team All-Pro two seasons and elected to seven Pro Bowls. Topped 100 tackles in each of first 11 seasons and recorded 17 interceptions during 184-game career.

DEFENSIVE BACKS

ERIC ALLEN – CB – 1988-1994 Philadelphia Eagles, 1995-97 New Orleans Saints, 1998-2001 Oakland Raiders A six-time Pro Bowl choice, recorded 54 interceptions for 826 yards and 8 touchdowns during 14 seasons. Selected first- or second-team All-Pro three times and first- or second-team All-NFC five times. Played 217 games.

STEVE ATWATER – S – 1989-1998 Denver Broncos, 1999 New York Jets Recorded 24 interceptions for 408 yards, 8 touchdowns and 5 sacks during 11-year, 167-game career. Selected to play in eight Pro Bowls, named first- or second-team All-Pro four times and All-AFC six times. Helped lead teams to four division, three conference and two Super Bowl titles.

JOEY BROWNER – S – 1983-1991 Minnesota Vikings, 1992 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10-year pro, registered 37 career interceptions for 465 yards, 3 touchdowns and 9.5 sacks in 145 games. Selected as first-team All-Pro four straight seasons and named to six Pro Bowls.

LEROY BUTLER – S – 1990-2001 Green Bay Packers Totaled 38 interceptions for 533 yards and 1 touchdown during 12-year career. Recorded 20.5 sacks in 181 games and was named to four Pro Bowls. Selected first-team All-Pro four times.

#RODNEY HARRISON – S –  1994-2002 San Diego Chargers, 2003-08 New England Patriots Retired as the NFL’s all-time leader in sacks for a defensive back (30.5). Tallied 34 interceptions over 15 seasons that included six divisions, four conference, and two Super Bowl championships.

ALBERT LEWIS – CB – 1983-1993 Kansas City Chiefs, 1994-98 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders Played in 225 games over 16 seasons. Earned two All-Pro and three All-AFC nods and four Pro Bowl selections.

JOHN LYNCH – S – 1993-2003 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-07 Denver Broncos One of the most decorated safeties in history, nine Pro Bowls at the position is second only to Hall of Famer Ken Houston. Registered 26 interceptions and three All-Pro and All-Conference selections during 15-year career.

#SAM MADISON – CB – 1997-2005 Miami Dolphins, 2006-08 New York Giants Earned four Pro Bowl, three All-AFC, and two All-Pro selections during 12-year career. Stole 20 passes in three-year period (1998-2000). Finished career with 38 total interceptions.

#PATRICK SURTAIN – CB – 1998-2004 Miami Dolphins, 2005-08 Kansas City Chiefs Played both corners and intercepted 37 passes in 11-season career. Named first-team All-Pro in back-to-back years (2002-03) and voted to three straight Pro Bowls.

TROY VINCENT – CB/S – 1992-95 Miami Dolphins, 1996-2003 Philadelphia Eagles, 2004-06 Buffalo Bills, 2006 Washington Redskins Picked off 47 passes for 711 yards and 3 TDs during 15-season career. Named All-Pro once and voted to five straight Pro Bowls. Played on five divison championship teams.

EVERSON WALLS – CB – 1981-89 Dallas Cowboys, 1990-92 New York Giants, 1992-93 Cleveland Browns
Recorded 57 interceptions during 13-year career. Led the league in interceptions three times. Voted to four Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three times. Played on three division championship teams and won one Super Bowl.

*AENEAS WILLIAMS
 – CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams
Registered 55 interceptions for 807 yards and nine TDs in 14-season career. A member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1990s, voted to eight Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro four times.

DARREN WOODSON – S – 1992-2003 Dallas Cowboys
A four-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl pick, played on six division championship teams and won three Super Bowls. Recorded 23 interceptions for 271 yards in career

-SPECIAL TEAMS-

KICKERS/PUNTER

MORTEN ANDERSEN – K – 1982-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta Falcons, 2001 New York Giants, 2002-03 Kansas City Chiefs, 2004 Minnesota Vikings The NFL’s all-time leading scorer with 2,544 points accumulated over a 25-season career. Connected on 849 PATs and 565 field goals. Named All-Pro five times and selected to seven Pro Bowls.

GARY ANDERSON 
– K – 1982-1994 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1995-96 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997 San Francisco 49ers, 1998-2002 Minnesota Vikings, 2003-04 Tennessee Titans
In 23 NFL seasons, connected on 538 field goals and 820 extra points for a career total of 2,434 points. Named to four Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro twice, played on seven division championship teams. Set then-record 164 points, 1998.

SEAN LANDETA – P – 1985-1993 New York Giants, 1993-96, 2003-04 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1997 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1998 Green Bay Packers, 1999-2002, 2005 Philadelphia Eagles
Helped teams win six division, two conference and two Super Bowl championships. In 284 games over 21 seasons amassed 60,707 yards on 1,401 punts for a net average of 43.3. Named to two Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro three times.

NICK LOWERY – K –  1978 New England Patriots, 1980-1993 Kansas City Chiefs, 1994-96 New York Jets
Converted 383 field goals and 562 extra points for 1,711 points in 18-season career. Eclipsed the 100-point total 11 times. Voted to three Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro four times.

SPECIAL TEAMS/POSITION PLAYER

BRIAN MITCHELL – RB/KR/PR – 1990-99 Washington Redskins, 2000-02 Philadelphia Eagles, 2003 New York Giants

One of the most productive kick/punt returners in NFL history. Ranks first in record book in number of returns and yards in both categories. A two-time All-Pro choice, 23,330 combined net yards is second all-time.

STEVE TASKER – ST/WR – 1985-86 Houston Oilers, 1986-1997 Buffalo Bills
Earned seven Pro Bowl invitations as a special teams player. Only person in NFL history to earn Pro Bowl MVP honors at that position (1993). All-Pro choice five times and All-AFC seven seasons.

-COACHES-
BILL ARNSPARGER – 1964-69 Baltimore Colts, 1970-73, 1976-1983 Miami Dolphins, 1974-76 New York Giants
Total of 20 seasons included three as head coach. Mastermind of Dolphins defense that captured six division, four conference championships and two Super Bowls. Also had one division, two conference championships and one league championship with the Colts.

DON CORYELL – 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers
Revolutionized the modern passing game and led the NFL into an era of explosive offensive football. Coached teams to a 114-89-1 record and six division championships. Named 1974 Coach of the Year.

BILL COWHER – 1992-2006 Pittsburgh Steelers
A two-time NFL Coach of the Year (1992 and 2004). Led Steelers to eight division championships and a victory in Super Bowl XL. Overall record in 15 seasons: 161-99-1.

#TONY DUNGY – 1996-2001 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-08 Indianapolis Colts
Suffered only one losing season in 13 years as head coach. Won six division titles, one conference championship, and one Super Bowl victory. Named to the 2000s NFL All-Decade Team.

TOM FLORES – 1979-1987 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-94 Seattle Seahawks
One of only 13 coaches who have won two or more Super Bowls. Led teams to an overall record of 105-90 record. 1982 AFC Coach of the Year, 1982.

#JON GRUDEN – 1998-2001 Oakland Raiders, 2002-08 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Compiled 100-85 overall record during 11-year career. Led teams to five division crowns, one conference championship and one Super Bowl title. Named NFL Coach of the Year by ESPN in 2002.

#MIKE HOLMGREN – 1992-98 Green Bay Packers, 1999-2008 Seattle Seahawks
Led teams to an overall 174-122 record over a 17-year career. Compiled 14 winning seasons during career including eight straight from 1992-99. Led teams to eight division titles, three conference championships and one Super Bowl win.

JIMMY JOHNSON – 1989-1993 Dallas Cowboys, 1996-99 Miami Dolphins
Helped develop the Cowboys into the team of the ‘90s. Led them to two Super Bowl titles in just five years with the team. The 1990 NFL Coach of the Year, logged an 89-68 overall record in nine total seasons.

CHUCK KNOX – 1973-77, 1992-94 Los Angeles Rams, 1978-1982 Buffalo Bills, 1983-1991 Seattle Seahawks
A three-time NFL coach of the Year and  four-time conference Coach of the Year recipient. Led teams to seven division championships and 193-158-1 record in 22 seasons.

BUDDY PARKER – 1949 Chicago Cardinals, 1951-56 Detroit Lions, 1957-1964 Pittsburgh Steelers
The 1956 NFL Coach of the Year,  led the Detroit Lions to back-to-back NFL championships in 1952-53. In 15 seasons as a head coach, compiled a 107-76-9 record.

RICHIE PETITBON – 1974-77 Houston Oilers, 1978-93 Washington Redskins
As Redskins defensive coordinator for 15 seasons, helped coach the team to five divisions, four conference and three Super Bowl championships.

DAN REEVES – 1981-1992 Denver Broncos, 1993-96 New York Giants, 1997-2003 Atlanta Falcons
Earned NFL Coach of the Year honors (1984, 1993, 1998) with all three teams he coached. Won six division and four conference championships. Overall record is 201-174-2.

LOU SABAN – 1960-61 Boston Patriots, 1962-65, 1972-76 Buffalo Bills, 1967-1971 Denver Broncos
Two-time AFL Coach of the Year and led the Bills to back-to-back AFL championships (1964-65). Career record after 16 seasons, 97-101-7.

MARTY SCHOTTENHEIMER – 1984-88 Cleveland Browns, 1989-1998 Kansas City Chiefs, 2001 Washington Redskins, 2002-06 San Diego Chargers
Led three teams to a total of eight division championships. Earned 2004 NFL Coach of the Year honors. Overall record in 21 seasons was 205-139-1.

CLARK SHAUGHNESSY – 1944-47 Washington Redskins, 1948-49 Los Angeles Rams, 1951-1962 Chicago Bears
Longtime assistant coach for George Halas and the Chicago Bears. Regarded as one of the greatest football minds. Devised multiple schemes on offense and defense, most notably the T-formation.

DICK VERMEIL – 1976-1982 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997-99 St. Louis Rams, 2001-05 Kansas City Chiefs
Two-time NFL Coach of the Year (1979, 1999), Led three different teams to division championships. Led Rams to Super Bowl XXXIV victory. Overall record is 126-114-0 in 15 seasons.

-CONTRIBUTORS-

K. S. (BUD) ADAMS, JR. – Owner – 1960-Present Houston Oilers/Tennessee Oilers/Titans
Founder of franchise and member of the “Foolish Club” as one of original AFL owners. Has been at helm of franchise that claimed nine division titles, 21 playoff appearances, two AFL championships, and one Super Bowl berth.

BOBBY BEATHARD – Team Executive/General Manager  – 1966-67 Kansas City Chiefs, 1968-1971 Atlanta Falcons, 1972-77 Miami Dolphins, 1978-1988 Washington Redskins, 1990-99 San Diego Chargers
As a longtime general manager in the NFL,  built multiple teams into winners. Collectively, clubs have claimed 10 division crowns, one AFL title, and four Super Bowl championships.

GIL BRANDT – Team Executive/Personnel Director – 1960-1988 Dallas Cowboys, 1995-present National Football League
Vice President of Personnel that helped the Cowboys become one of the most dominating teams in league history. Noted for innovative scouting and personnel systems that are today standard practice in the NFL.

LEO CARLIN – Team Administrator – 1960-Present Philadelphia Eagles
Vital member of Eagles organization and has managed ticket operations for the team since 1960s. Pioneered many innovations in the ticketing industry.

RED CASHION – Official – 1972-1996 National Football League
Served for 25 seasons as on-field official, first as a line judge before becoming a referee, from 1972 to 1996. Officiated nearly 500 NFL games that include 20 postseason contests. Served as referee for two Super Bowls (XX and XXX).

JACK KENT COOKE – Owner – 1974-1997 Washington Redskins
Washington franchise won more than 200 games during tenure as the team owner.  The team qualified for the playoffs 11 times and advanced to the Super Bowl four times that included victories in Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI.

OTHO DAVIS – Trainer – 1971-72 Baltimore Colts, 1973-1995 Philadelphia Eagles
Spent two-plus decades in the NFL as an athletic trainer. Was recognized as Professional Trainer of the Year five times (1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, and 1987).

*EDWARD DEBARTOLO, JR. – Owner – 1977-2000 San Francisco 49ers
During tenure, 49ers captured 13 divisional titles, made 16 playoff appearances, advanced to the NFC championship game 10 times and became the first NFL franchise to win five Super Bowls. San Francisco posted the best winning percentage in the NFL in both the 1980s and 1990s.

RON GIBBS – Official – 1940-1962 National Football League Served as a referee for 23 seasons in the NFL. He worked every NFL championship game except four between 1942 and 1960 that included one stretch of five straight title games.

JERRY JONES – Owner/President/General Manager – 1989-present Dallas Cowboys Innovative leader on team and league level. Took over Cowboys in 1989 and quickly transformed team into Super Bowl champions. Under guidance, Cowboys have won eight division, three NFC, and three Super Bowl championships. Guiding force behind concept, design, and completion of the state-of-the-art AT&T Stadium.

EDDIE KOTAL – Scout – 1947-1961 Los Angeles Rams Regarded as NFL’s first full-time scout, pioneered modern scouting techniques and earned reputation of discovering hidden talent across the country. During service with the Rams, the team won four division titles and the 1951 NFL championship.

ROBERT KRAFT – Owner – 1994-Present New England Patriots Led dramatic turnaround of franchise and created dynasty team. In two decades of ownership, franchise has captured 12 division titles, six AFC crowns, and three Super Bowl titles. The team’s six conference titles and six Super Bowl appearances are the most of any NFL owner in the Super Bowl era.

ELMER LAYDEN – Commissioner – 1941-46 National Football League Named NFL’s Commissioner in 1941. Reign came at critical period as America officially entered World War II. Worked during difficult times to maintain the momentum NFL gained in the 1930s.

ART MCNALLY – Official/Administrator – 1959-present National Football League Spent nine seasons (1959-1967) as on-field official, one year as field judge and eight as referee. In 1968, he was appointed as the NFL’s Supervisor of Officials. Credited with bringing technology to the NFL and implemented in-depth training for official by using video.

*ART MODELL – Owner – 1961-1995 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2011 Baltimore Ravens Spent 43 seasons of full ownership in NFL. Influential chairman of the NFL’s Broadcast Committee for 21 years. In all, Browns made seven NFL/AFC championship game appearances and the Ravens played in three AFC championship games and won Super Bowl XXXV.

BILL POLIAN – Team President/General Manager – 1978-1982 Kansas City Chiefs, 1984-1992 Buffalo Bills, 1993-94 National Football League, 1995-97 Carolina Panthers, 1998-2011 Indianapolis Colts Built three franchises into winners. In all, guided teams to 13 division titles, five conference championships, and one Super Bowl victory.

STEVE SABOL – President, NFL Films – 1964-2012 Distinguished filmmaker whose artistic vision helped revolutionize the way fans watch the NFL. Won 35 individual Emmys in numerous categories and in 2003 was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Emmy from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

PAUL TAGLIABUE – Commissioner – 1989-2006 National Football League During 17-year tenure as the NFL’s Commissioner, oversaw growth of the league from 28 to 32 teams, supported the construction of 20 new stadiums, negotiated successive labor agreements, create league-wide Internet network, and secured the largest television rights deals in entertainment history.

JIM TUNNEY – Official – 1960-1991 National Football League Served as NFL referee for 32 seasons. Among 29 playoff assignments were ten championship games and serving as the referee for three Super Bowls (VI, XI, XII).

RON WOLF – Team Executive/General Manager – 1991-2001 Green Bay Packers Orchestrated turnaround of once down-trodden franchise. Under tutelage and excellent drafting of players, the Packers claimed back-to-back NFC championships, three straight division crowns, and a victory in Super Bowl XXXI.

GEORGE YOUNG – Team Executive/General Manager – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League Noted for excellent personnel evaluation knowledge, greatest fame came when turned around the Giants franchise. Under leadership, the team ended long postseason draught by capturing four NFC East titles and victories in Super Bowls XXI and XXV.

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Former Terp White among Hall of Famers in head injury letter to Goodell

Posted on 01 August 2013 by WNST Staff

(AP) Seventeen Pro Football Hall of Famers and Dave Robinson, who will be inducted this weekend, have signed a letter telling NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell they are concerned about medical care for former players and the league’s “continued denial of the link between repeated head impacts and permanent brain damage.”

The letter, obtained by The Associated Press on Wednesday and signed by NFL greats including Tony Dorsett, Floyd Little, Leroy Kelly and Paul Krause, comes just a few days ahead of the Hall of Fame festivities in Canton, Ohio.

The league is being sued by about 4,200 players who say they suffer from dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological conditions, which they believe stem from on-field concussions. Ten of the letter’s signees are plaintiffs in the ongoing legal fight: Dorsett, Kelly, Krause, Lem Barney, Chris Doleman, Mel Renfro, Tommy McDonald, Randy White, Rayfield Wright and Joe DeLamielleure.

Goodell and the NFL insist that player safety has always been a top priority, and league spokesman Greg Aiello told the AP in an email Wednesday night that the players don’t have their facts right.

“We have not seen the letter, but we make no such denial regarding concussions,” Aiello said. “In fact, our concussion poster for players in every locker room, created in conjunction with the CDC a few years ago, states: `Repetitive brain injury, when not managed promptly and properly, may cause permanent damage to your brain.’”

In the concussion legal dispute, a federal judge in Philadelphia has ordered the two sides into mediation over how the complaints will be litigated — in court or in arbitration. U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody asked for a progress report by Sept. 3 and put a gag order on the lawyers involved.

Clearly, there was no silencing of the Hall of Famers, many of whom plan to be in Canton for the 50th anniversary of the football shrine.

“Legions of former players suffer short-term memory loss and other neurological issues, and many cannot even remember taking part in some of the NFL’s greatest moments,” they wrote to Goodell. “In the meantime, the NFL publicly touts the `benefits’ it provides to former players with brain injuries, while denying these players necessary medical monitoring, long-term care, and security.

“No one wants to see another generation of players suffer this fate. As former players, we refuse to stand by quietly and watch men who unknowingly sacrificed their health and future to the NFL go without the care they desperately need.

“Mr. Goodell, we ask you, as the commissioner of the league, to provide the security and care all former players and their families deserve.”

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

Posted on 30 July 2013 by Glenn Clark

Honorable Mention: MLL-Rochester Rattlers @ Chesapeake Bayhawks (Saturday 7pm from Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium live on ESPN3.com); WNBA: Los Angeles Sparks @ Washington Mystics (Sunday 4pm from Verizon Center live on NBA TV/Monumental Network); Action Sports: X Games Los Angeles (Thursday-Sunday from Los Angeles/Carson, CA live on ESPN/ABC/ESPN3.com)

10. Maze feat. Frankie Beverly/Morris Day & The Time (Sunday 7pm Pier Six Pavilion); O.A.R. (Thursday 5pm Merriweather Post Pavilion), Summer Spirit Festival feat. D’Angelo/Busta Rhymes/Erykah Badu (Saturday 5pm Merriweather Post Pavilion); Wiz Khalifa (Thursday 6pm Jiffy Lube Live), Black Sabbath (Friday 7:30pm Jiffy Lube Live); Beyonce (Tuesday 8pm Verizon Center), Lil Wayne (Friday 7pm Verizon Center); SOJA/John Butler Trio (Wednesday 7pm Wolf Trap), Bruce Hornsby & The Newsmakers (Sunday 8pm Wolf Trap); Pietasters (Friday 8pm Power Plant Live); Corey Smith (Friday 9pm Rams Head Live), Carbon Leaf (Saturday 8pm Rams Head Live); Ted Leo & The Pharmacists (Tuesday 8pm Ottobar); Dick Dale (Friday 8pm Rams Head on Stage); Michael Kiwanuka (Wednesday 7pm 9:30 Club), Robert Randolph & The Family Band (Friday 8pm 9:30 Club); Todd Rundgren (Monday 7:30pm Birchmere); Frank Turner (Thursday 8pm Fillmore Silver Spring); Brett Dennen/Kopecky Family Band (Thursday 5pm Mount Vernon Park); Matthew Perryman Jones (Thursday 7:30pm The Hamilton); Jonny Lang (Saturday 9pm State Theatre); Robin Thicke “Blurred Lines”, Buddy Guy “Rhythm & Blues” and Michael Franti & Spearhead “All People” available in stores/on iTunes (Tuesday)

The last time I saw O.A.R. they played with an orchestra. A G-D ORCHESTRA!

Carbon Leaf is coming to town? You couldn’t ask for a better day.

While I’ve got Robert Randolph on my mind, I’d like to take you back to the night where I heard the greatest sounds ever composed. Ever.

I’ve been waiting for some time to share Matthew Perryman Jones’ version of “Motherless Child.” I simply have no words. Just listen.

9. Aisha Tyler (Friday & Saturday Baltimore Comedy Factory); Gilbert Gottfried (Friday-Sunday DC Improv); Baltimore Summer Restaurant Week (Tuesday-Sunday throughout Charm City); Carroll County Fair (Tuesday-Friday Carroll County Agricultural Center); “The Big Glen Burnie Carnival” (Tuesday-Saturday Glen Burnie Improvement Association); Baltimore Improv Festival (Wednesday-Sunday Creative Alliance); Shore Leave 35 (Friday-Sunday Marriott Hunt Valley Inn); The Gathering-Food Truck Rally (Friday 5pm Kenwick Castle); Howard County Fair (Wednesday-Monday Howard County Fairgrounds); Maryland Latino Festival (Sunday Timonium Fairgrounds); “2 Guns” out in theaters (Friday); G.I. Joe: Retalliation” available on Blu-Ray/DVD (Tuesday)

I have been asking Ryan to get Aisha Tyler to stop by our broadcast at Hooters Friday afternoon (and you should stop by too!) for the last three weeks. There’s one reason. You all know what it is.

Look. Judge all you want. Also, she’s funny. (Even if language NSFW.) There’s zero chance I don’t propose within seconds if she posts.

(Continued on Page 2…)

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Former Terp Perazic named to Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame

Posted on 27 July 2013 by WNST Staff

July 27, 2013 - The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame announced its 16th group of inductees, the Class of 2014, on ABC during the WNBA All-Star Game at the Mohegan Sun. The six members of the Class of 2014 are: Lin Dunn (coach), Michelle Edwards (player), Mimi Griffin (contributor), Yolanda Griffith (player), Jasmina Perazic (player), and Charlotte West (contributor). The Class of 2014 will be formally inducted into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame onJune 14, 2014 in Knoxville, TN. For more information on the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony please visit www.wbhof.com.

 

With the addition of the Class of 2014, the WBHOF will recognize the 1976 USA Olympic Team for their contributions to the game in a display at the Hall entitled “Trailblazers of the Game”. The 1976 team will join the All American Red Heads, Edmonton Grads, the Former Helms/Citizens Savings/Founders Bank, and the Wayland Baptist Flying Queens as the only five groups recognized as “Trailblazers of the Game”.

 

The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame’s Board of Directors serves as the selection committee in determining which individuals will be inducted each year and which groups will be honored as “Trailblazers of the Game”. Voting is based on various factors, which include moral character, integrity, sportsmanship, record of performance, ability, national or international recognition, and contributions to the game of women’s basketball.

 

In order to be considered for selection for induction, an individual must meet the following prerequisites:

 

Player:             Must be retired from the highest level of play for at least five years

Coach:             Must have coached the women’s game at least 20 years

Referee:          Must have officiated the women’s game at least 10 years

Contributor:    Must have significantly impacted the game of women’s basketball

For information regarding the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame or the 2014 Induction Ceremony please visit www.wbhof.com.

 

The mission of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame is to “honor the past, celebrate the present, and promote the future” of women’s basketball.

Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame – Class of 2014

 

LIN DUNN (Coach)

Dunn has been a professional head coach for 11 seasons, leading the Indiana Fever to the 2012 WNBA Championship. She was named the 1998 American Basketball League (ABL) Coach of the Year and was the 2009 Runner-up for the WNBA Coach of the Year. As a collegiate coach, Dunn has over 400 victories, being named Big Ten Coach of the Year twice (1989, 1991).

MICHELLE EDWARDS (Player)

Edwards played for the University of Iowa, leading the Hawkeyes to a 102-22 record from 1984-1988. She is the only Hawkeye women’s basketball player to have her jersey retired. Edwards was named a 1988 Kodak All-American, Naismith All-American, USBWA All-American, Big Ten Conference Player of the Year, and the University of Iowa’s Athlete of the Year. She also played 5 seasons in the WNBA.

MIMI GRIFFIN (Contributor)

Griffin is considered to be the first broadcast expert for women’s basketball. She served as the “face” for women’s basketball in its’ early television exposure and laid the foundation for women’s basketball on television. Griffin was the first woman color analyst for a NCAA men’s tournament game on ESPN in 1990. She was also named the 1994 WBCA Mel Greenberg Media Award winner.

YOLANDA GRIFFITH (Player)

Griffith is a two-time Olympic gold medalist and four-time WNBA All-Star. She was the 1999 WNBA MVP, Defensive Player of the Year, and Newcomer of the Year. She lead the Sacramento Monarchs to the 2005 WNBA Championship. In college, Griffith was a 1991 Kodak Junior College All-American, a 1993 WBCA Division II Player of the Year, and a1993 Kodak Division II All-American.

JASMINA PERAZIC (Player)

Perazic played for the University of Maryland, leading the Terps’ to the 1982 NCAA Final Four and a final ranking of No. 3 in the country. She was named a 1983 Kodak All-American and co-ACC tournament MVP. Perazic was a two-time member of the Yugoslavian Olympic Team leading them to the bronze medal in 1980. She played one season in the WNBA for the New York Liberty.

CHARLOTEE WEST (Contributor)

West was a huge advocate for women’s sports and pioneer for Title IX. From 1960 to 1986 she served as the director of athletics for women at Southern Illinois University. She helped transform the department from its meager beginnings into a nationally recognized program with a budget of more than $1 million dollars for 11 sports. West was the 1983 WBCA Administrator of the Year and was the first recipient of the Honda Award.

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Salisbury coach Berkman, former Maryland women elected to Lacrosse Hall of Fame

Posted on 22 May 2013 by WNST Staff

BALTIMORE — The 2013 induction class for the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame has been approved by the US Lacrosse Board of Directors. This year’s eight-person class will be officially inducted in a ceremony, sponsored by Bollinger Sports Insurance and the Markel Insurance Company, on Saturday, October 26, at The Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, Md.

The members of the 2013 induction class are: Jim Berkman, Quinn Carney, Michele DeJuliis, Sue Heether, Bill Miller, Tracy Stumpf, Ryan Wade, and Michael Watson.

Tickets for the 2013 National Lacrosse Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be available to the public for purchase beginning August 1. Tickets will be sold online at www.uslacrosse.org/HOF.

The National Lacrosse Hall of Fame, a program of US Lacrosse, was established in 1957 to honor men and women who by their deeds as players, coaches, officials and/or contributors, and by the example of their lives, personify the great contribution of lacrosse to our way of life. More than 380 lacrosse greats are honored in the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame, which is located with the Lacrosse Museum at US Lacrosse Headquarters in Baltimore.

Brief bios for this year’s inductees follow, with more detailed career accomplishments listed further below:

Jim Berkman
Berkman will be inducted as a truly great coach. He completed his 25th season as the head coach at Salisbury (Md.) University in 2013 and his 26th year overall as a head coach. Berkman is the all-time winningest coach in NCAA men’s lacrosse history, with a 428-48 career record through the 2013 season. Berkman has won the NCAA Division III national championship 10 times (1994, 1995, 1999, 2003-05, 2007, 2008, 2001, 2012) – all at Salisbury – and finished as the national runner-up four other times. He also has the highest winning percentage (90.1%) of any men’s college coach in history. Berkman has coached Salisbury to seven undefeated seasons and 17 conference championships. He has been recognized three times as the USILA’s national coach of the year (1991, 2008, 2012), and eight times as his conference’s coach of the year.

Quinn Carney
Carney will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter as a midfielder at the University of Maryland, Carney was a two-time All-American, earning first team honors in 2001 and third team honors in 1999. She helped to lead the Terrapins to four straight NCAA national championships from 1998-2001, and three straight ACC Championships from 1999-2001.

Carney was a three-time All-ACC selectee (1999-2001) and was also selected to the ACC’s 50th Anniversary Team in 2002. She finished her Maryland career ranked third on the school’s all-time list in assists (110), fifth in goals (162) and fifth in points (265). She was a two-time member of the U.S. Women’s World Cup Team (2001, 2005) and named to the All-World Team in 2005. Carney holds the record for most goals scored in World Cup play (37) by a U.S. player.

Michele DeJuliis
DeJuliis will be inducted as a truly great player. She was a four-time All-American at Penn State University, earning first team honors in 1995, 1996 and 1997, and third team honors in 1994. DeJuliis finished her career ranked sixth on Penn State’s all-time scoring list with 203 points, and led the Nittany Lions in scoring in 1994, 1995 and 1996. As a senior, she served as team captain and was selected for the North-South All-Star Game. DeJuliis was a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team Program from 1994-2009, and served as captain of the 2009 World Cup team that won the world championship. She has received both the Amy Willard Award (1997) and the Beth Allen Award (2009) as a participant in US Lacrosse’s Women’s National Tournament, and has been honored twice as MVP of the Vail Shootout Tournament.

Sue Heether
Heether will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter at Loyola University Maryland, Heether was a first-team All-American in 1990 and also selected as the IWLCA’s national goalie of the year that season. She was a three-time member of the U.S. Women’s World Cup Team (1993, 1997, 2001), helping Team USA capture the world championship in each of those years. She also served as an alternate to the team in 1989 and 2005. Heether ranks second all-time in saves (53) by a U.S. player in World Cup competition. Following her playing career, she added a fourth World Cup title as head coach of the U.S. team in 2009. Heether was recipient of US Lacrosse’s Beth Allen Award in 2005 as the most outstanding U.S. team player at the National Tournament.

Bill Miller
Miller will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a four-time All-American at Hobart (N.Y.) College, earning first team honors in 1989, 1990 and 1991, and honorable mention status in 1988. Additionally, Miller was a two-time winner of both the USILA’s national Division III player of the year award and national attackman of the year award (1990, 1991). He helped lead Hobart to four NCAA Division III national championships (1988-1991) during his career, and finished as Hobart’s all-time leader in goals (173), and second all-time in assists (145) and points (318). Miller played professionally in the indoor NLL for the Philadelphia Wings from 1991-1998, and was MVP of the NLL’s championship game in 1998. He was also a two-time member of the U.S. Men’s National Team, helping Team USA to world championships in 1994 and 1998.

Tracy Stumpf
Stumpf will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter on defense at the University of Maryland, Stumpf was a two-time, first team All-American, earning the honor in both 1985 and 1986. She was also named to the NCAA’s All-Tournament Team three times (1984, 1985, 1986) and was team captain for the Terrapins’ first national championship team in 1986. Stumpf played in the North-South All-Star Game in 1986. Additionally, she was named to the ACC’s 50th Anniversary Team in 2002, and the NCAA’s 25th Anniversary Team in 2006. Stumpf spent seven years (1986-1993) as a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team Program, and was a member of the 1989 championship-winning U.S. World Cup Team. She served as an alternate for the 1986 U.S. World Cup Team.

Ryan Wade
Wade will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a three-time All-American at the University of North Carolina, earning first team honors in 1993 and 1994, and second team honors in 1992. Additionally, Wade was tabbed as the USILA’s midfielder of the year in 1993. Wade was the ACC’s player of the year in both 1993 and 1994, and was a four-time selectee to the All-ACC team (1991-1994). North Carolina won four ACC championships during his tenure, and also captured the NCAA national championship in 1991. Wade was a member of three U.S. national teams, playing on the U-19 squad in 1992 and the world champion U.S. Men’s National Team in both 1994 and 1998. He was selected to the All-World Team in 1998, and also named as winner of the Best and Fairest Player Award (MVP) at the 1998 world championship.

Michael Watson
Watson will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-time All-American at the University of Virginia, Watson earned first team honors in 1996 and 1997, second team honors in 1995, and third team honors in 1994. He was also named as the USILA’s attackman of the year in 1996. Watson won the ACC’s Rookie of the Year Award as a freshman in 1994 and the ACC’s Player of the Year Award as a senior in 1997. He was also a four-time All-ACC team selectee. Watson helped lead the Cavaliers to the NCAA national championship game in both 1994 and 1996, and was named the NCAA Tournament’s most outstanding player in 1996. He finished his career ranked second on UVA’s all-time scoring list with 141 goals. Watson was a member of the 1998 U.S. Men’s National Team, and a five-time all-star professionally in Major League Lacrosse.

 

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Former Ravens QB Testaverde, Navy coach Hardin to enter College Football HOF

Posted on 07 May 2013 by WNST Staff

NFF Proudly Announces Stellar 2013 College Football Hall of Fame Class

12 players and two coaches from the Football Bowl Subdivision to enter college football’s ultimate shrine.

NEW YORK, May 7, 2013 – From the national ballot of 77 candidates and a pool of hundreds of eligible nominees, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame announced today the 2013 College Football Hall of Fame Football Bowl Subdivision Class, which includes the names of 12 First-Team All-America players and two legendary coaches.

2013 COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME CLASS
Players
· TED BROWN – TB, North Carolina State (1975-78)
· TEDY BRUSCHI – DE, Arizona (1992-95)
· RON DAYNE – RB, Wisconsin (1996-99)
· TOMMIE FRAZIER – QB, Nebraska (1992-95)
· JERRY GRAY – DB, Texas (1981-84)
· STEVE MEILINGER* – E, Kentucky (1951-53)
· ORLANDO PACE – OT, Ohio State (1994-96)
· ROD SHOATE (deceased) – LB, Oklahoma (1972-74)
· PERCY SNOW – LB, Michigan State (1986-89)
· VINNY TESTAVERDE – QB, Miami, Fla. (1982, 1984-86)
· DON TRULL – QB, Baylor (1961-63)
· DANNY WUERFFEL – QB, Florida (1993-96)

* Selection from the FBS Veterans Committee

Coaches

· WAYNE HARDIN – 118-74-5 (61.2%); Navy (1959-64) and   Temple (1970-82)

· BILL McCARTNEY – 93-55-5 (62.4%); Colorado (1982-94)

 

“We could not be more proud to announce the 2013 College Football Hall of Fame Class,” said Archie Manning, NFF Chairman and a 1989 College Football Hall of Famer from Ole Miss. “These players and coaches are some of the greatest to have ever participated in our sport, and we offer our most sincere congratulations to each of them for this incredible achievement. Gene Corrigan and the NFF Honors Court deserve the utmost respect for selecting another tremendous group of inductees.”

The 2013 College Football Hall of Fame Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Class will be inducted at the 56th NFF Annual Awards Dinner on December 10, 2013, at the Waldorf=Astoria in New York City. They will be honored guests at the National Hall of Fame Salute at the Allstate Sugar Bowl in New Orleans on January 2, 2014 and officially enshrined in the summer of 2014.

Today’s announcement was made from The NASDAQ OMX MarketSite in Times Square, which has hosted the event for the past five consecutive years. XOS Digital produced the NFF digital broadcast for the third consecutive year, and ESPN3 carried the event live for the third year as well.


2013 Football Bowl Subdivision

College Football Hall of Fame Class Notes


PLAYERS
:

· SEVEN unanimous First Team All-Americans (Bruschi, Dayne, Gray, Pace – 2x, Shoate, Snow, Testaverde)
· SEVEN consensus First Team All-Americans (Brown, Bruschi, Frazier, Gray, Shoate, Trull, Wuerffel)
· SEVEN multi-year First Team All-Americans (Bruschi – 2, Dayne – 3, Gray – 2, Meilinger – 2, Pace – 2, Shoate – 2, Wuerffel – 2)
· FOUR members of national championship teams (Frazier – 2, Shoate, Testaverde, Wuerffel – 2)
· THREE Heisman Trophy winners (Dayne, Testaverde, Wuerffel)
· SIX winners of college football major awards (Dayne – Walter Camp, Maxwell, Doak Walker; Frazier – Johnny Unitas; Pace – Outland, Lombardi – 2; Snow – Butkus, Lombardi; Testaverde – Walter Camp, Maxwell, Davey O’Brien; Wuerffel – Walter Camp, Maxwell, Davey O’Brien – 2, Johnny Unitas)
· SEVEN conference player of the year honorees (Bruschi, Dayne, Frazier, Gray – 2, Pace, Shoate – 2, Wuerffel – 2)
· SEVEN members of conference championship teams (Dayne – 2, Frazier – 4, Gray, Pace, Shoate – 3, Snow, Wuerffel – 4)
· TWO NFF National Scholar-Athletes (Trull, Wuerffel – Campbell Trophy)
· EIGHT offensive players (Brown, Dayne, Frazier, Meilinger, Pace, Testaverde, Trull, Wuerffel)
· FOUR defensive players (Bruschi, Gray, Shoate, Snow)
· FIVE decades represented: 1950s (1) – Meilinger; 1960s (1) – Trull; 1970s (2) – Brown, Shoate; 1980s (3) – Gray, Snow, Testaverde; 1990s(5) – Bruschi, Dayne, Frazier, Pace, Wuerffel

COACHES:

· ONE national championship (McCartney)
· THREE conference championships (McCartney – 3)
· 12 bowl berths (Hardin – 3, McCartney – 9)
· FIVE top five finishes (Hardin – 2, McCartney – 3)
· NINE top 20 finishes (Hardin – 3, McCartney – 6)
· 23 First-Team All-Americans coached (Hardin – 5, McCartney – 18)

· SEVEN major award winners coached (Hardin – Joe Bellino, Steve Joachim, Roger Staubach; McCartney – Deon Figures, Chris Hudson, Rashaan Salaam, Alfred Williams)

· THREE NFF National Scholar-Athletes coached (Hardin – Joe Ince, Navy; McCartney – Jim Hansen (Campbell Trophy), Eric McCarty)

SELECTION CRITERIA
1. First and foremost, a player must have received First Team All-America recognition by a selector organization that is recognized by the NCAA and utilized to comprise their consensus All-America teams.

2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the Foundation’s honors courts ten years after his final year of intercollegiate football played.

3. While each nominee’s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post football record as a citizen is also weighed.  He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man.  Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.

4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*.  For example, to be eligible for the 2013 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1963 or thereafter.   In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.

5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years of age.  Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age.  He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage*.

* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME QUICK FACTS

· Including the 2013 FBS class, only 930 players and 202 coaches, have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame from the nearly 4.92 million who have played or coached the game during the past 144 years. In other words, only two one-hundredths of one percent (.0002) of the individuals who have played the game have been deemed worthy of this distinction.

· Founded in 1947, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame inducted its first class of inductees in 1951. The first class included 32 players and 19 coaches, including Illinois’ Red Grange, Notre Dame’s Knute Rockne, Amos Alonzo Stagg and Carlisle’s Jim Thorpe.

· 294 schools are represented with at least one College Football Hall of Famer.

· Induction for this class of Hall of Famers will take place December 10, 2013 at the 56th NFF Annual Awards Dinner in New York City’s historic Waldorf=Astoria.


TED BROWNNorth Carolina State

Tailback, 1975-78
One of the truly great runners of his era, Ted Brown dominated the Atlantic Coast Conference in the late 1970′s. He becomes the fifth member of the Wolfpack to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

Brown left Raleigh as the most accomplished rusher in ACC history, holding the league’s career records for rushing yards (4,602) and touchdowns (51) – marks which he still holds today. The 1978 consensus First-Team All-America led N.C. State to three bowl games, including victories in the 1977 Peach Bowl and 1978 Tangerine Bowl, in which he garnered MVP honors. He capped off his senior year by rushing for his third consecutive 1,000-yard season and amassing 27 career 100-yard games. He was the first player in league history to earn First-Team All-ACC distinction all four years and was named the conference’s Rookie of the Year in 1975. Brown played under legendary Hall of Fame Coach Lou Holtz and coach Bo Rein.

The High Point, N.C., native was chosen in the first round of the 1979 NFL Draft by the Minnesota Vikings. He spent eight years in the professional ranks, all with the Vikings. He finished his career as the fifth-leading rusher in franchise history (4,546 yards and 53 TDs).

He currently works as a juvenile probation officer in the Ramsey County (Minn.) court system and enjoys helping at-risk youth throughout the state. Brown was a 1995 inductee into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, and his No. 23 jersey was the first football jersey retired at N.C. State.

TEDY BRUSCHI
University of Arizona
Defensive End, 1992-95

One of the most feared defenders of his era as a member of the storied “Desert Swarm” defense, Tedy Bruschi concluded his career at Arizona tied for the NCAA FBS record in career sacks with 52 quarterback takedowns. He becomes the fourth Wildcat to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

A two-time All-American (1994 – consensus, 1995 – unanimous), Bruschi’s celebrated senior season included the 1995 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year title and winning the Morris Trophy as the league’s best defensive lineman. He was a two-time finalist for the Lombardi Award and graduated with 74 tackles for loss, which ranked sixth in FBS history. Bruschi was named all-conference three times, and he led the Wildcats to three bowl berths under coach Dick Tomey.

The San Francisco native was a third-round selection by the New England Patriots in the 1996 NFL Draft. Bruschi enjoyed a 13-year career, winning three Super Bowls with the franchise. The Pro Bowler was named the Associated Press’ Comeback Player of the Year in 2005 following a stroke.

A committed spokesman and advocate for stroke survivors, Bruschi founded Tedy’s Team, in conjunction with the American Stroke Association, which has raised more than $1.5 million. He wrote a book, “Never Give Up: My Stroke, My Recovery, and My Return to the NFL,” detailing his NFL comeback after his own stroke in 2005. Bruschi is also an active participant in the Make-A-Wish Foundation, granting wishes for numerous children through the organization. Bruschi currently works as an NFL analyst on ESPN.

RON DAYNE
University of Wisconsin
Running Back, 1996-99

Concluding his career with 7,125 career rushing yards, Wisconsin’s Ron Dayne set a new standard for running backs when he became the all-time leading rusher and first player to reach the 7,000-yard plateau in FBS history during the 1999 season. Dayne becomes the eighth Badger to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Dayne won the 1999 Heisman Trophy in a landslide, after topping the 2,000-yard mark for the second time in his career. The three-time First-Team All-America (1997, 1998 – consensus, 1999 – unanimous) also claimed the Walter Camp, Maxwell and Doak Walker awards, and he was named the National Player of the Year by numerous outlets his senior season. He led the Badgers to four consecutive bowl games, earning MVP honors in three of those appearances, including back-to-back Rose Bowl titles in 1999 and 2000. The Big Ten’s first three-time rushing champion in league history, Dayne led Wisconsin to two conference titles under Hall of Fame Coach Barry Alvarez.

Drafted in the first round of the 2000 NFL Draft by the New York Giants, Dayne played seven seasons in the pro ranks with the Giants, Broncos and Texans. He helped New York to a 2001 Super Bowl appearance.

The Berlin, N.J., native was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 2011, and he became a member of the University of Wisconsin Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009. Dayne actively volunteers in numerous community events and fundraisers, placing a special emphasis on initiatives involving children or children’s groups and serving as an ambassador for the University of Wisconsin.

TOMMIE FRAZIER
University of Nebraska
Quarterback, 1992-95

A legend among legends in a long line of transcendent Big Eight quarterbacks, Tommie Frazier helped College Football Hall of Fame coach Tom Osborne and Nebraska to back-to-back perfect national championship seasons in 1994 and 1995. He becomes the 16th Cornhusker to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

The 1995 consensus First-Team All-American and Johnny Unitas Award winner was runner-up for the 1995 Heisman Trophy and a finalist for the Walter Camp and Maxwell awards. Frazier led Nebraska to four consecutive bowl appearances, claiming MVP honors in the 1995 Orange and 1996 Fiesta bowls en route to the national title. Frazier missed seven games during the 1994 season due to blood clots, but the junior was able to return and direct Nebraska’s come-from-behind win over Miami in the national title game. The 1995 Big Eight Player of the Year set a conference record with a 33-3 overall career record as a starter. Frazier won the Big Eight title in all four of his seasons, posting three straight years of undefeated league play.

Frazier played for the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League in 1996 before trying his hand at the coaching profession. He coached  at Baylor and Nebraska before being named the 32nd head coach at Doane College (Neb.), spending two seasons at the school.

Coached by legendary Hall of Famer Tom Osborne, Frazier was named to Sports Illustrated’s All-Century Team, and his jersey has been retired by Nebraska. Following his football days, the Bradenton, Fla., native settled in Omaha, Neb., where he works for a healthcare foundation.

JERRY GRAY
University of Texas
Defensive Back, 1981-84

Known as one of the fiercest defensive stalwarts of the old Southwest Conference, Jerry Gray was instrumental in helping the Texas defense shut down some of the decade’s most high-powered offenses. He becomes the 15th Longhorn to be selected to the College Football Hall of Fame.

A two-time First-Team All-American (consensus – 1983, unanimous – 1984), Gray led Texas to four consecutive bowl games, including a 1982 Cotton Bowl victory and a No. 2 final national ranking. He was a two-time Southwest Conference Player of the Year (1983, 1984), and he helped the Longhorns win the 1983 conference title under coach Fred Akers. The two-time team MVP recorded 297 career tackles, 16 interceptions, and 20 pass breakups during his time in Austin.

Taken in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams, Gray enjoyed a nine-year career, playing for the Rams, Houston Oilers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers and appearing in four Pro Bowls. Following his playing days, Gray spent time as a position football coach in both the college and professional ranks. He has served as the defensive coordinator for the Tennessee Titans since the 2011 season.

The Lubbock, Texas, native established the Jerry Gray Foundation for underprivileged youth, which provides athletic and academic scholarships. He also founded and coordinated the Jerry Gray/Young Life Skills and Leadership Football Camp, and he is active in the Boys and Girls Club of Orchard Park and the United Way. Gray became a member of the Longhorn Hall of Honor in 1996.

STEVE MEILINGER
University of Kentucky
End, 1951-53

One of the most acclaimed two-way stars of the mid-20th century, Steve Meilinger gained fame as “Mr. Anywhere” for his versatility and value to the Kentucky football program. He becomes the fourth Wildcat to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

The two-time First-Team All-America (1952, 1953) selection, under Hall of Fame head coach Bear Bryant, Meilinger led Kentucky to victory in the 1952 Cotton Bowl over TCU. The three-year All-Southeastern Conference honoree played end, halfback and quarterback on offense, while covering end, linebacker and defensive back on defense.  He also served as the Wildcats’ two-year starting punter while returning punts and kickoffs.

A first round selection by the Washington Redskins in the 1954 NFL Draft, Meilinger played six seasons in the league for the Redskins, Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers. He spent the entirety of his non-football life in military or public service. Immediately following his selection by the Redskins, Meilinger served two years as a tank commander in the U.S. Army’s 100th Tank Battalion of the 1st Armored Division before embarking on his pro football career. From 1962-83, Meilinger was a United States Marshal, and he was one of the original six marshals who founded the U.S. Federal Witness Protection Program. He also served two stints as a property valuation officer for the state of Kentucky.

The Bethlehem, Pa., native is a member of the State of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the University of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the Fork Union Military Academy Hall of Fame, the Lehigh Valley (Penn.) Hall of Fame and the Liberty High School Hall of Fame.

ORLANDO PACE
Ohio State University
Offensive Tackle, 1994-96

Known as the “Pancake Man” for flattening his opponents with his exceptional blocking techniques, Orlando Pace finished fourth in the 1996 Heisman balloting, the highest finish for a lineman since 1980. Pace becomes the 24th Buckeye to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

A two-time unanimous First-Team All-American (1995, 1996), Pace was the first player in history to repeat as the Lombardi Trophy winner, earning the honors as a sophomore and junior. In addition, Pace claimed the 1996 Outland Trophy while leading Ohio State to a share of the Big Ten title. He did not allow a sack during his final two seasons, blocking for Hall of Fame and 1995 Heisman Trophy-winning running back Eddie George as well as NFF Campbell Trophy winner Bobby Hoying. The 1996 Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year started every game of his career, and he led the Buckeyes to three straight bowl appearances under Hall of Fame coach John Cooper.

Chosen with the first overall pick by the St. Louis Rams in the 1997 NFL Draft, Pace enjoyed a decorated 13 seasons in the league, culminating with the Rams’ Super Bowl XXXIV Championship in 1999. Pace was named All-Pro five times, and he earned seven Pro Bowl selections.

The Sandusky, Ohio, native has been a spokesman for Our Little Haven’s ‘Safe & Warm’ expansion project since 1998, and he assists with the efforts for the Diversity Awareness Partnership. Pace also regularly purchases NFL tickets for underprivileged youth.

ROD SHOATE
University of Oklahoma
Linebacker, 1972-74

Combining the speed of a running back with exceptional strength, Rod Shoate became a dominant defensive force at perennial football powerhouse Oklahoma in the early 1970s. Shoate becomes the 20th Sooner to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

A two-time First-Team All-American (consensus – 1973, unanimous – 1974), Shoate guided OU to a perfect 11-0 season and the National Championship in 1974, building on a 10-0-1 record the year before. The Sooners went 29-4-1 during Shoate’s career, never finishing with a national ranking lower than No. 3. He was twice named the Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year as the Sooners claimed the conference crown in each of those seasons. As a freshman, he led Oklahoma to a 14-0 shutout of Penn State in the 1972 Sugar Bowl.

Shoate led the Sooners in tackles for three straight seasons and currently ranks sixth in school history with 420 career tackles. He was the second player in OU annals to be named a three-time All-American (Second Team, 1972) while playing for coach Chuck Fairbanks and Hall of Fame coach Barry Switzer.

Picked by New England in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, Shoate enjoyed a six year career with the Patriots before playing two seasons in the USFL. The Spiro, Okla., native passed away on Oct. 4, 1999.

PERCY SNOW
Michigan State University
Linebacker, 1986-89

The first player in college football history to win both the Butkus and Lombardi trophies in the same season, Percy Snow served as the backbone of Michigan State’s famed “Gang Green” defense in the late 1980s.  Snow becomes the seventh Spartan to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

Voted a unanimous First-Team All-American selection as a senior, Snow led the team in tackles for three consecutive seasons, and he still ranks second all-time in total tackles (473) at MSU. Snow was a three-time all-conference selection, helping the Spartans to the 1987 Big Ten title and a 1988 Rose Bowl win in which he earned MVP honors after recording 17 tackles against Southern California. He also led MSU to the Gator and Aloha bowls under head coach George Perles after the 1988 and 89 seasons, respectively. The winner of the MSU “Governor of Michigan” award as the team MVP, he reached double figures in tackles 11 times as a senior, including a career-high 23 versus Illinois.

Selected in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft by Kansas City, Snow played in the NFL for four seasons with the Chiefs and Chicago Bears.

Active in the community, he has volunteered as an assistant coach for a little league flag football team, and he has served as a longtime assistant coach in the Babe Stern Youth Baseball League. The Canton, Ohio, native was inducted into the Michigan State Hall of Fame in 2010.

VINNY TESTAVERDE
University of Miami
Quarterback, 1982, 1984-86

One of the most celebrated players in a Hurricane program stocked with mythical talent, Miami’s Vinny Testaverde claimed virtually every major award during his senior season in 1986. He becomes the sixth Hurricane to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

As a senior, Testaverde earned unanimous First-Team All-American honors, and he won the Heisman Trophy, the Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell, Davey O’Brien and UPI Player of the Year awards. He led the Canes to three consecutive bowls, including the 1987 Fiesta Bowl National Championship game. He finished his collegiate career with more than 6,000 passing yards and 48 touchdown passes, and he still ranks in the top five in virtually every passing category in school history. Testaverde, who was a redshirt on Miami’s 1983 national championship team, went 23-3 as a starter playing for legendary coaches Howard Schnellenberger and Hall of Famer Jimmy Johnson.

Tampa Bay selected Testaverde as the No. 1 overall selection in the 1987 NFL Draft, and his pro career spanned 21 seasons with seven different teams. The 1998 All-Pro and two-time Pro Bowl selection finished his NFL career seventh all-time in passing yards (46,233) and eighth in touchdowns (275).

The Elmont, N.Y., native currently resides in Florida where he plays an active role with the Children’s Cancer Center of Tampa. Testaverde remains among only four Hurricanes to have their jerseys retired at Miami.

DON TRULL
Baylor University
Quarterback, 1961-63

Passing for more than 4,000 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career, Don Trull left an indelible mark on the Baylor record books while becoming the school’s first-ever NFF National Scholar-Athlete. Trull becomes the seventh Bear to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

A 1963 First-Team All-American and First-Team All-Southwest Conference selection, Trull led the nation in touchdowns and passing yards his senior season. He was a two-time winner of the Sammy Baugh Award for leading the country in completions (1962, 1963), and he finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior. A trailblazer on the field and off, Trull became Baylor’s first two-time First-Team Academic All-American honoree in 1962 and 1963 as well as the school’s first NFF National Scholar-Athlete (1963). Trull led the Bears to the 1961 Gotham Bowl and the 1963 Bluebonnet Bowl under coach John Bridges.

The Oklahoma City native enjoyed an eight-year career in the professional ranks, playing for the Houston Oilers and Boston Patriots as well as the CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos. Following his playing days, he served as an assistant coach at Arkansas from 1972-74.

Trull is the 2013 president-elect for the NFF Touchdown Club of Houston Chapter. His many other roles include NFL Alumni Director, vice chairman of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo and a member of the Fort Bend County Water Board of Directors. Trull is a Baylor Hall of Fame inductee, and he was named to the school’s all-decade team.

DANNY WUERFFEL
University of Florida
Quarterback, 1993-96

The first player in history to win the Heisman as well as the NFF’s William V. Campbell Trophy, Danny Wuerffel dominated the college football landscape both athletically and academically during his senior season. He becomes the seventh Gator to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

A two-time First-Team All-American, Wuerffel claimed the 1996 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell Award, Davey O’Brien Award, Unitas Golden Arm and the Sammy Baugh Trophy. The two-time SEC Player of the Year and First-Team All-SEC selection posted a 45-6-1 career mark, leading the Gators to the 1996 National Championship. Wuerffel finished his career with nearly 11,000 passing yards and 33 school records, taking Florida to bowl games in each of his four seasons under coach Steve Spurrier (a 1986 Hall of Fame player inductee himself also at Florida). In addition to the 1996 Campbell Trophy, Wuerffel was named a two-time Academic All-American and two-time Scholar-Athlete of the Year. He now becomes the first winner of the Campbell Trophy to enter the College Football Hall of Fame.

The Ft. Walton, Fla., native was drafted in the fourth round of the 1997 NFL Draft by New Orleans, and spent six season in the league with the Saints, Packers, Bears and Redskins.

Wuerffel became executive director of Desire Street Ministries after Hurricane Katrina, currently leading the organization’s various community outreach activities. He was a presidential appointee to the White House Council for Service and Civic Participation from 2006-08; a member of the Board of Directors for Professional Athletes Outreach; and a national spokesman for Caps Kids. As the quintessential student-athlete and humanitarian, the All Sports Association established the Wuerffel Trophy in 2005, which recognizes a college football player for his exemplary community service.

WAYNE HARDIN
United States Naval Academy, Temple University
Head Coach, 118-74-5 (61.2%)

The most successful coach in Temple football history and the coach of Navy’s only two Heisman Trophy winners, Wayne Hardin created a Hall of Fame career, leading the Midshipmen and Owl programs to unprecedented accomplishments.

Navy’s head coach from 1959-64 Hardin coached Hall of Famers and Heisman Trophy winners Joe Bellino (1960) and Roger Staubach (1963).  Hardin ranks fifth all-time at Navy in wins (38), and his teams beat archrival Army in five of his six seasons. His five consecutive defeats of Army stood unsurpassed until 2007. He took Navy to the 1960 Orange Bowl and the 1963 Cotton Bowl, and he twice led the Midshipmen to a top five ranking (No. 4, 1960 and No. 2, 1963). He also coached NFF National Scholar-Athlete Joe Ince (1963).

The all-time leader in wins at Temple, Hardin served as head coach of the Owls from 1970-82. He led Temple to its only 10-win season in program history during the 1979 season, finishing at No. 17 in both major polls and beating favored California in the Garden State Bowl. Hardin also mentored Owl quarterback Steve Joachim who led the nation in total offense and won the Maxwell Trophy in 1973.

Hardin attended the College of the Pacific, playing football for College Football Hall of Fame coach Amos Alonzo Stagg. A 1998 Pacific Athletics Hall of Fame inductee, Hardin earned 11 varsity letters before graduating college in 1948.

BILL McCARTNEY
University of Colorado
Head Coach, 93-55-5 (62.4%)

The Colorado head coach from 1982-94, Bill McCartney guided the Buffaloes to their first national title and to more bowl games than any other coach in CU football history.

McCartney and the Buffs finished in the Top 20 in each of his last six seasons in Boulder, including the 1990 national crown and back-to-back appearances in the 1989 and 1990 title games. He claimed unanimous 1989 National Coach of the Year honors, and his extraordinary accomplishments include leading the Buffs to nine bowls in 13 seasons and to three Big Eight titles. His 1988-92 teams went 25 consecutive games (23-0-2) without a loss in league play, the fourth-longest streak in conference history.

McCartney coached 1994 Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam; Hall of Famer and 1990 Butkus winner Alfred Williams; two Jim Thorpe award winners, Deon Figures (1992) and Chris Hudson (1994); 1992 Campbell Trophy winner Jim Hansen; and 1987 NFF National Scholar-Athlete Eric McCarty.

The three-time Big Eight Coach of the Year was inducted into the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame in 1999, and he was enshrined in CU’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2006. Active in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, he was voted the 1986 FCA’s “Man-of-the-Year” in Colorado.

 

 

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Zimmerman headlines new class entering Hopkins Hall of Fame

Posted on 10 April 2013 by WNST Staff

BALTIMORE, MD — Johns Hopkins University will induct nine new members into its Athletic Hall of Fame in ceremonies scheduled for Saturday, April 20. The nine-member class is the 19th to be inducted since the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame was formed in 1994 and raises the total number of members to 150.

The group will be honored at induction ceremonies scheduled to take place at 6:30 pm in the Newton White Athletic Center on the Johns Hopkins campus. Festivities will include a cocktail reception with heavy hors d’oeuvres from 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm, the induction ceremony at approximately 8 pm and a post-induction reception.

Individuals interested in attending the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame induction ceremonies can contact Lewis Williams in the Blue Jays Unlimited office to secure a reservation. Williams can be reached by phone (410/516-6132) or email (lwill132@jhu.edu).

Below is a look at the nine individuals who comprise the 2013 class of inductees for the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame.

Krissy Brinsley - Class of 2002
Women’s Swimming
(Krissy Brinsley will not be able to attend this year’s induction ceremony and will be honored with the 2014 induction class. She is officially a member of the 2013 Hall of Fame class).

The Johns Hopkins women’s swimming program has ranked among the elite in Division III for more than 30 years. In a program with such national acclaim, Brinsley is, quite simply, the most decorated performer in school history.

Competing in an array of individual events and relays, Brinsley remains the school record-holder with 23 All-America honors and is one of just four individuals in JHU history to earn All-America honors 20 or more times.

Brinsley held nine school records at the end of her career, including marks in the 50 free, 100 back, 200 back and 200 IM. In addition, she was a member of five relay teams that held school records when she graduated.

A steady performer throughout her career, Brinsley was at her best when the lights went on at the NCAA Championships as she earned the maximum seven All-America finishes as a sophomore and six each as a junior and senior. She finished in the top nine in the nation in all 11 of her individual swims at the NCAA Championships, with one runner-up finish and a pair of third, fourth and fifth-place finishes to her credit. In addition, six of her 12 relay All-America finishes were first team (top eight).

A CoSIDA Academic All-District and MACDA Postgraduate Scholarship recipient as a senior, Brinsley also won 11 conference titles (eight individual • three relay) in her career, garnered UAA Co-Swimmer-of-the-Year honors as a freshman and earned Johns Hopkins’ Catherine P. Cramer Award as the top senior female athlete in 2002.

Brinsley’s individual successes were key elements to the team’s overall success during her career. Johns Hopkins placed 11th, eighth, fifth and fifth at the NCAA Championships during her career and added three straight runner-up finishes at the UAA Championships. The back-to-back fifth-place finishes as the NCAAs remain two of the three top-five finishes in school history.

Kelly Carver – Class of 1993
Women’s Lacrosse

In an era when the Johns Hopkins women’s lacrosse team was regularly making appearances in the NCAA Division III Championships with a high-scoring offense, Kelly Carver was leading an equally dominating Blue Jay defense. Carver was a four-year starter and remains one of the most decorated defensive players in school history.

Carver helped lead Johns Hopkins to a four-year record of 41-18, one Middle Atlantic Conference Championship, three MAC West titles, two trips to the NCAA Tournament and one appearance in the Final Four.

A two-time team captain, Carver totaled one goal, 49 caused turnovers and 70 ground balls and led the team in ground balls (26) as a sophomore and caused turnovers (17) as a junior. Carver’s exploits weren’t just noticed by her coaches and teammates at Johns Hopkins, she also grabbed the attention of opposing coaches, who were quick to honor her with an array of post-season honors.

Carver earned Third Team Brine/IWLCA All-America honors as a junior, when she also grabbed First Team All-Region and First Team All-MAC West honors. She closed her career in 1993 by earning First Team All-America honors from two different organizations – the IWLCA and USWLA – and repeated as a First Team All-Region and All-MAC West selection.

Now 20 years since her career ended, Carver remains one of just three defenders in the history of the Johns Hopkins women’s lacrosse program to earn First Team All-America honors.

John Del Monaco • Class of 2000
Men’s Soccer

The Johns Hopkins men’s soccer program enjoyed a resurgence in the 1990s and one of the great four-year runs in school history took place from 1996-99. One of the leaders during this run of national prominence for the Blue Jays was John Del Monaco, among the most versatile players ever to don the Columbia Blue and Black.

Del Monaco, who set a then school record for career games played (78), totaled 20 goals and 17 assists in his career, but numbers hardly tell the story of his career.

Del Monaco developed into one of the top forwards in the Centennial Conference early in his career and earned Second Team All-Centennial honors there as a sophomore. Demonstrating his all-around ability and team-first mentality, he went on to earn First Team All-Centennial honors in each of his final two seasons – as a defender!

His transition to defense was so smooth that he earned First Team All-Region and Second Team All-America honors as a junior and senior. He remains one of just five players – and the only defender – to twice earn All-America honors.

Del Monaco helped the Blue Jays to a 64-11-4 record during his career, including a 32-3-1 mark in the Centennial. He helped Johns Hopkins to the Centennial Conference title in 1996 and 1998 and an ECAC title in 1999. The Blue Jays also advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each of his first three seasons and made a stunning run to the NCAA Quarterfinals in 1998; only a triple-overtime loss kept the Blue Jays from making a trip to the national semifinals that year.

While his exploits on the field are well documented, Del Monaco was also one of the top student-athletes in the nation as well. He received the William Howard Award as the Johns Hopkins senior athlete who most excelled in athletics and academics and earned an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship as a senior. He remains one of just three Johns Hopkins men’s soccer players to earn one of these prestigious awards.

Dave Eikenberg • Class of 1991
Men’s Basketball

He came to a basketball ghost town; sold on Homewood by a new coach with the opportunity to help build something out of the Blue Jay basketball program. Four years after arriving as a member of head coach Bill Nelson’s first recruiting class, Dave Eikenberg and his classmates had put the Johns Hopkins men’s basketball program on the map.

Eikenberg was the glue of Nelson’s early teams as he was the starting point guard from the time he arrived on campus and helped the Blue Jays compile a 68-40 record during his career – the 68 wins exactly matching the number Johns Hopkins had accumulated in the nine previous years combined.

Eikenberg graduated as Johns Hopkins’ career leader in assists (399) and steals (181) and no player in the last 20 years has come within 150 assists of his record and only one has come within 50 steals of his mark in that time. He remains the only player in school history with 100 or more assists in two different seasons (145, 113) and the only player with 55 or more steals in two different seasons as well (59, 58). He led the team in assists and steals three times each during his career and finished his career ranked second in games (105) and minutes played (2,634).

To say that Eikenberg left the basketball program better than he found it would be an understatement. In addition to the 68 wins the Blue Jays amassed during his career, he helped JHU to a Middle Atlantic Conference title as a senior and a runner-up finish as a junior. The MAC title was the first for Johns Hopkins since 1974. He also led JHU to the first two of what would eventually become five consecutive trips to the NCAA Tournament. Included is the program’s only trip to the Sweet 16 (1990).

A.J. Haugen • Class of 2000
Men’s Lacrosse

One of the most creative, elusive and dangerous midfielders in school history, A.J. Haugen enjoyed a career matched by few midfielders in the storied history of the Johns Hopkins men’s lacrosse program.

Haugen earned First Team All-America honors as a sophomore (1998), junior (1999) and senior (2000) and is one of just four players in school history to earn First Team All-America honors three times as a midfielder; the others include Rick Kowalchuk, Del Dressel and Paul Rabil. In a span of 18 years (1989-2007), Haugen was the only Johns Hopkins player to earn All-America honors three times (regardless of position)

Haugen finished his career with 85 goals and 23 assists for 108 points. He ranks third in school history in career goals scored among players who played exclusively midfield and punched up 23 or more goals in each of his final three seasons, including a career-high 27 as a sophomore and senior.

Johns Hopkins posted a 40-15 record during Haugen’s career and advanced to the NCAA Semifinals in each of his final two years. In the final game of his career against top-ranked Syracuse in the 2000 national semifinals, Haugen tied the Johns Hopkins record for most goals scored in a semifinal game as he netted a career-high five before the Blue Jays fell late to the Orange. The effort remains one of Hopkins’ top individual performances in an NCAA Tournament game.

Haugen capped his career at Johns Hopkins by being awarded the C. Gardner Mallonee Award, which is presented annual to the senior male who has made the most outstanding contribution in athletics.

George Kennedy
Men’s and Women’s Swimming Coach

One of the most successful head coaches in Division III swimming history, George Kennedy recently completed his 28th season as the head coach of the Johns Hopkins men’s and women’s teams.

Kennedy’s men’s team has compiled a record of 180-106 (.629) and didn’t lose a dual meet to a Division III opponent from November 19, 1989 – February 4, 2006. The Blue Jays have won 15 conference titles under his guidance, including 11 UAA, two Middle Atlantic Conference and two ECAC championships.

The Blue Jays have routinely parlayed the success of the regular season and at the conference championships into top finishes at the NCAA Championships. Including the recently completed 2012-13 season, Kennedy has guided Johns Hopkins to 25 top-10 finishes, 13 top-five finishes and three national runner-up showings.

In all, Kennedy has coached Blue Jay men’s swimmers to 14 individual and relay national championships, while there have been 301 individual All-Americans and 123 All-America relay teams.

Kennedy has enjoyed similar success with the Johns Hopkins women’s team, which has compiled a dual-meet record of 156-138-2 (.522) while competing against a national schedule that has included numerous Division I opponents.

Like the men, the women have also had a run of success at the conference and national level. Johns Hopkins has won nine conference titles under Kennedy, including five Blue Grass Mountain titles and four UAA Championships.

The Blue Jay women’s team has compiled two individual national championships, one relay national title, 161 individual All-Americans and 95 All-America relay teams.

Kennedy and his coaching staff have earned national coaching staff of the year honors six times since he arrived at Homewood and the success of both programs has not been limited to the pool. Members of the men’s and women’s teams have combined to earn seven NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships and 10 CoSIDA Academic All-America nods. In addition, four of Kennedy’s former swimmers have been inducted into the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame, including fellow 2013 inductee Krissy Brinsley.

Steve Milo • Class of 1999
Baseball

Steve Milo was a four-year standout on the baseball team for head coach Bob Babb and helped the Blue Jays to a four-year record of 115-47-1 (.709). Johns Hopkins won two Centennial Conference titles (1997, 1998), two UAA titles (1998, 1999) and made two trips to the NCAA Tournament (1997, 1998) during his career. The 115 wins he and his classmates were a part of were, at the time, tied for the third most in school history.

Among the great pure hitters in school history, Milo concluded his career among Johns Hopkins’ all-time leaders in batting average (.367), hits (160), home runs (20), doubles (35) and RBIs (126).

While there have been some truly remarkable individual seasons in school history, few compare with the one Milo enjoyed as a junior in 1998. That year he hit .456 with 72 hits, 18 doubles, 57 RBIs and 53 runs scored. His 18 doubles that season were a school record at the time and his marks for batting average, runs scored and triples (4) were all among the top totals in school history at the time.

Milo still holds one school record that has rarely been challenged in the time since he graduated as his 32-game hitting streak – the seventh-longest in NCAA Division III history at the time – remains a Johns Hopkins record.

In helping the Blue Jays to a 36-4 record, the Centennial Conference and UAA titles and a top five national ranking in 1998, Milo earned First Team ABCA All-Region, First Team All-Centennial, First Team All-ECAC and Second Team All-UAA honors. The Blue Jays were the top seed in the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional Championship and finished the season ranked 25th in the nation.

Sarah Parola • Class of 2001
Women’s Soccer

The Johns Hopkins women’s soccer program was still in its infancy when Sarah Parola arrived on campus in 1997. The Blue Jays had broken through and grabbed their first-ever Centennial Conference title the year before, but Parola’s arrival provided the Blue Jays with one of the top goal-scoring threats in the nation and JHU quickly transformed from a young program to a regional power.

Parola burst on the scene as a freshman, setting then school records for goals scored (20) and points (49) in a season. How unique were her efforts that season? Her mark for goals scored stood as a Johns Hopkins record until 2012, while her 49 points were the standard until 2011.

Despite injuries that brought two of her four seasons to a premature end, Parola concluded her career as Johns Hopkins’ career leader in goals scored (46) and points (105); those records held until 2011 and she remains one of just two players in school history to score 15 or more goals and total 34 or more points in two different seasons.

Parola’s individual success went hand-in-hand with the elevation of the program. She helped the Blue Jays to a four-year record of 60-15-4 (.785) with one Centennial Conference title (1997), one ECAC title (2000) and two trips to the NCAA Tournament (1997, 1998). The Blue Jays’ appearance in the 1997 NCAA Tournament was the first in school history.

With her breakout performance as a freshman in 1997, Parola was named the Centennial Conference Player of the Year; she remains the only player in league history to grab this honor as a freshman. She earned All-Centennial honors three times, including first team nods as a freshman and sophomore, and First Team All-Region honors in each of those years as well. She was the first player in school history to earn First Team All-Region, remained the only two-time first team selection in school history until 2010 and was the only JHU freshman to earn top regional honors before 2011.

Parola is the first Johns Hopkins women’s soccer player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame strictly because of her efforts on the soccer field.

Don Zimmerman • Class of 1976
Men’s Lacrosse (Player and Coach) • Men’s Soccer Coach

One of the most successful coaches in the storied history of the Johns Hopkins men’s lacrosse program, Don Zimmerman guided the Blue Jays to a seven-year run that ranks among the best in school history, even by the lofty standards of the most successful program in college lacrosse history.

Leading the Blue Jays from 1984-90, Zimmerman compiled a remarkable 73-15 (.830) record, won three national championships (1984, 1985, 1987) and guided the Blue Jays to the NCAA Tournament in each of his seven seasons. JHU also advanced to the national championship game in 1989 and Zimmerman was the first head coach in college lacrosse history to win an NCAA title in his first season. JHU was nearly unbeatable at Homewood Field during his reign as the Blue Jays compiled a remarkable 40-7 (.851) record in the home whites under his guidance.

In addition to the national titles and NCAA Tournament appearances the Blue Jays compiled under his guidance, the team also collected numerous individual awards during Zimmerman’s tenure.

Johns Hopkins players compiled 21 First Team All-America honors, 47 overall All-America nods, two National Player of the Year, two Midfielder of the Year, three Defenseman of the Year and four Goalie of the Year awards under Zimmerman.

Zimmerman graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1976 after playing his final two years under legendary coach Henry Ciccarone. He earned Honorable Mention All-America honors as a midfielder as a junior and helped Johns Hopkins to the NCAA Semifinals.

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Former Terp McMillen to be inducted into National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame

Posted on 02 April 2013 by WNST Staff

Former Maryland star to be inducted into National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY – Former Maryland star Tom McMillen headlines a list of seven inductees selected for enshrinement in the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame class of 2013.

 

Joining McMillen are 1977 national consensus player of the year Marques Johnson of UCLA and coaching legends Gene Keady and Rollie Massimino. Bob Hopkins of Grambling and contributors George Raveling of Nike and George Killian of FIBA round out the class. In addition, the barrier-breaking 1963 Loyola University (Chicago) team will become the first team inducted.

 

McMillen led Maryland to a 73-17 record in the early 1970s. He averaged 21 points and 10 rebounds for his career. He was a first-team all-Atlantic Coast Conference player twice and was the most valuable player of the 1972 National Invitation Tournament championship game – a 100-69 victory over Niagara.

 

A 6’ 11” power forward/center, McMillen was a member of the 1972 United States Olympic team that won a silver medal after a controversial finish in the gold-medal game against Russia. He went on to be a Rhodes Scholar and served as a U.S. Congressman from 1987-93.

 

“We’re thrilled for Tom to receive this much deserved honor,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “Tom set the standard for what it meant to be great at Maryland and we’re so happy that he is being honored by the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.”

 

“We talk a lot to our team about tradition and pride and what it means to play basketball at Maryland,” said head coach Mark Turgeon. “Tom helped establish those high standards. Before we made it to New York for the NIT semifinals, I told our guys about some of the great players that have graced Madison Square Garden – Tom is one of those players. He helped lead Maryland to the 1972 NIT title and is one of the all-time greats.”

 

The Founding Class members of 2013 will be announced at a later date. Founding Class members were automatically included in the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2007 and are gradually being inducted at the official event in Kansas City each year.

 

The Class of 2013 will be inducted into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame Sunday, November 24, 2013, at the Midland Theatre in Kansas City as part of a three-day celebration of college basketball. The hall of fame is located in the College Basketball Experience, a world-class entertainment facility that provides a multi-faceted interactive experience for fans of the game. The College Basketball Experience Hall of Fame Classic will take place November 25-26 at Sprint Center. The four host teams will be announced April 15 and tickets go on sale the following day.

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Baltimore’s Wiseman inducted to PBA Hall of Fame

Posted on 31 March 2013 by WNST Staff

Doug Kent of Newark, N.Y., the winner of 10 Professional Bowlers Association Tour titles including four major championships, and Danny Wiseman of Baltimore, a 12-time Tour winner with one major title, were inducted into the PBA Hall of Fame for superior performance during ceremonies at the Indianapolis Marriott North Saturday night.

Wiseman, 45, joined the PBA in 1987 and has earned just over $1.55 million. Kent, also 45, joined the PBA in 1988 and has earned just over $1.51 million during his career. In the voting for the 50 Greatest Players in PBA History during the organization’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2009, Wiseman was ranked 42nd and Kent 43rd.

Among Kent’s major titles are the 1991 United States Bowling Congress Masters, his first title, the 2002 PBA World Championship, and the 2006 USBC Masters and Denny’s PBA World Championship. Winning two majors in 2006 led to the Chris Schenkel PBA Player of the Year award. He is one of only nine players ever to win two major titles in the same season.

“As a young player I never thought about Halls of Fame or Player of the Year awards,” Kent said. “All I wanted to be was like my hero Mark Roth.

“I want to thank PBA for the opportunity to be a professional bowler and to live a dream.”

Kent joins his brother-in-law, Parker Bohn III, in the PBA Hall of Fame. Kent’s wife is the former Chrissie Beamish; Bohn’s wife is the former Leslie Beamish. They are the second set of brothers-in-law in the PBA Hall, joining Mike Aulby and Steve Cook, who also married sisters.

Wiseman, who won the first of his 11 standard titles in the 1990 Fair Lanes Open in his hometown in his first television appearance, won the historic 2004 USBC Miller High Life Masters which was staged on a special lane installation inside Miller Park in Milwaukee – the first time a bowling championship had been conducted inside a major league baseball stadium.

Wiseman also had memorable performances in the 1992 Tournament of Champions and 2009 USBC Masters, finishing second in both tournaments.

Early in his career, Wiseman defined himself by compiling the winningest television record in PBA history at that time (21-5), and by introducing a colorful persona that branded him as something of a maverick.

“I never had a lot of natural ability and often wondered how I got to this point,” Wiseman said. “I have to give my parents a lot of the credit. I learned to strive for perfection from dad and to never give up from my mom.

“I took what I learned from a lot of the greats in the sport, combined it with my own ability and made a career out of it.”

Including the Class of 2013, the PBA Hall of Fameconsists of 61 performance, 27 meritorious service and three PBA50 (formerly senior) inductees.

The PBA Hall of Fame ceremonies were held in conjunction with the Barbasol PBA Tournament of Champions which concludes Sunday at Woodland Bowl. Pete Weber, Jason Belmonte, Sean Rash, Tommy Jones and Osku Palermaa will compete for the $50,000 first prize in the live stepladder finals at 2:30 p.m. ET on ESPN.

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Three former Ravens on College Football Hall of Fame ballot

Posted on 05 March 2013 by WNST Staff

2013 College Football Hall of Fame Ballot Released

 

Seventy-seven players and five coaches vie for college football’s ultimate honor; Announcement of the 2013 FBS Hall of Fame Class to be made live May 7 from Times Square in New York City.

 

 

DALLAS, March 5, 2013 – The National Football Foundation (NFF) announced today the names of 77 players and five coaches who comprise the 2013 Football Bowl Subdivision Ballot for induction into the College Football Hall of Fame.

“Having a ballot and a voice in the selection of the inductees is one of the most cherished NFF member benefits,” said NFF Chairman Archie Manning, a 1989 Hall of Fame inductee from Ole Miss. “There is no group more knowledgeable or passionate about college football than our membership, and the tradition of the ballot helps us engage them in the lofty responsibility of selecting those who have reached the pinnacle of achievement in our sport.”

The ballot was mailed this week to the more than 12,000 NFF members and current Hall of Famers whose votes will be tabulated and submitted to the NFF’s Honors Court, which deliberates and selects the class.  Chaired by Gene Corrigan, a former ACC Commissioner and NCAA president, the 14-member NFF Honors Court includes an elite and geographically diverse pool of athletics directors, conference commissioners, Hall of Famers and members of the media.

“It’s an enormous honor to just be on the ballot when you think that more than 4.92 million people have played college football,” said NFF President & CEO Steven J. Hatchell. “The Hall’s requirement of being a First-Team All-American creates a much smaller pool of only 1,500 individuals who are even eligible to be on the ballot, so being in today’s group of 77 names means an individual is truly among the greatest to ever have played the game, and we are proud to announce their names today.”

The FBS Hall of Fame Class will be announced live in New York City during a noon press conference on May 7 from the NASDAQ OMX Market Site and inducted at the 56th NFF Annual Awards Dinner December 10, 2013 at the landmark Waldorf=Astoria Hotel in New York City.

To be eligible for the ballot, players must have been named a First Team All-America by a major/national selector as recognized and utilized by the NCAA for their consensus All-America teams; played their last year of intercollegiate football at least ten years prior; played within the last 50 years and cannot be currently playing professional football.  Coaches must have coached a minimum of 10 years and 100 games as a head coach; won at least 60% of their games; and be retired from coaching for at least three years. If a coach is retired and over the age of 70, there is no waiting period. If he is over the age of 75, he is eligible as an active coach.  In both cases, the candidate’s post-football record as a citizen may also be weighed.

Once nominated for consideration, all player candidates are submitted to one of eight District Screening Committees, depending on their school’s geographic location, which conducts a vote to determine who will appear on the ballot and represent their respective districts.  Each year, approximately 15 candidates, who are not selected for the Hall of Fame, will be named automatic holdovers and will bypass the district screening process and automatically appear on the ballot the following year. Additionally, the Veterans Committee may make recommendations to Honors Court for exceptions that allow for the induction of players who played more than 50 years ago.

Of the 4.92 million individuals who have played college football since Princeton first battled Rutgers on November 6, 1869, only 918 players have earned induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, or less than .0002 percent of those who have played the game during the past 144 years. From the coaching ranks, 200 individuals have achieved Hall of Fame distinction.

 

Today’s ballot, which was mailed to NFF members, also contains the 92 players and 27 coaches for the divisional ranks who are up for Hall of Fame consideration this year. The divisional class will be announced May 16 via a national press release from Dallas, Texas.

 

The 2013 Divisional College Football Hall of Fame Class will be inducted and enshrined simultaneously this summer in Atlanta, Ga., at the NFF Annual Enshrinement Festival. They will be joined during the festival by the 2012 Football Bowl Subdivision Hall of Fame Class, which was inducted this past December in New York City.

If you would like to become a member and receive a voting sheet for this year’s ballot, please contact NFF Director of Membership Ron Dilatush at rdilatush@footballfoundation.com.

Ballots without valid membership numbers will be invalidated.

- A list of candidates and capsule bios are provided on the following pages. -


2013 PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

 

Trev Alberts, Nebraska-Linebacker-Named unanimous First Team All-America, BIG-8 Defensive Player of the Year and Academic All-America in 1993…Recipient of the 1993 Butkus Award and two-time First Team All-Conference pick…NFF National Scholar-Athlete in 1993.

Erick Anderson, Michigan-Linebacker-
1991 Butkus Award winner who led Wolverines to four bowl games and top 10 finishes all four seasons of career… 1991 Big Ten Co-Defensive Player of the Year and only player in UM history to lead team in tackles all four seasons.

Bob Berry, Oregon-Quarterback-
Guided the Ducks to three consecutive winning seasons… First Oregon quarterback to surpass 1,000 yards in two different seasons…16 TD passes in 1963 and 39 career touchdowns passes were school records for 20 years.

Eric Bieniemy, Colorado-Running Back-
Played in two national championships, leading Buffs to 1990 national title…Unanimous First Team All-America and finished third in 1990 Heisman voting… Two-time All-Big Eight pick, still holding eight CU records.

Tony Boselli, Southern California-Offensive Tackle-Two-time First Team All-America in 1992 and 1994 (consensus-1994)… 1994 Outland Trophy finalist…Named top offensive lineman in Pac-10 (1994)… 1994 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.


Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma-Linebacker
-Two-time consensus First Team All-America pick (1985-86)…Set school record for tackles in a game (22) and named Butkus Award winner in 1985 and ’86…Led Sooners to three consecutive Orange Bowls and ’85 national championship.

Jerome Brown, Miami (Fla.)-Defensive Tackle-
1986 Unanimous First Team All-American and finalist for both the Outland and Lombardi trophies as senior…Helped Canes to four consecutive New Year’s Day bowl games…Ranks 10th in school history with 21 career sacks.

Ted Brown, North Carolina State-Tailback
-1978 consensus First Team All-America, helping NC State to three bowl berths… Only four-year First Team All-ACC pick in league history… Led team in rushing four-straight years and still holds five school records.

Bob Breunig, Arizona State-Linebacker
-Named 1974 First Team All-America selection…Led ASU to 1972 WAC title and to consecutive Fiesta Bowl wins in 1972 and ’73… Three-time All-WAC pick who ranks third all-time in career solo tackles (206) and fifth in career tackles (353) at ASU.

Tedy Bruschi, Arizona-Defensive End-
Two-time First Team All-America (consensus-‘94, unanimous-’95)…Tied the NCAA career record with 52 sacks…1995 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year and three-time First Team All-Pac-10 selection…Led Arizona to three bowls.

Brandon Burlsworth, Arkansas-Offensive Guard
-1998 First Team All-America and First Team All-SEC selection…Helped Arkansas to two postseason berths and to SEC Western Division titles in 1995 and ’98…Former walk-on who later started 34 consecutive games.

Larry Burton, Purdue-Split End-
Named Outstanding College Athlete of America in 1974 and a First Team All-Big Ten selection…Led the team in receiving in both 1973 and 1974… Named team captain and team MVP in 1974.

Dave Butz, Purdue-Defensive Tackle-
1972 consensus First Team All-America… Finalist for the Lombardi Award in 1972 and named First Team All-Conference…Named Defensive MVP of the Senior Bowl.

Mark Carrier, Southern California-Safety
-Two-time First Team All-America (1988-89) – unanimous in 1989… 1989 Jim Thorpe Award winner… Two-time First Team All-Conference selection… Led the Pac-10 in interceptions in 1989 with seven.

Marco Coleman, Georgia Tech-Linebacker
-1991 First Team All-America pick…Two-time First Team All-ACC, leading Jackets to the national championship and an 11-0-1 record in 1990…28 career sacks ranks 12th all-time in ACC history.

Tom Cousineau, Ohio State-Linebacker-
Two-time consensus First Team All-American and three-time All-Big Ten performer… Recorded 572 career tackles, ranking second all-time in OSU history… Held nine school records at career’s end, still holding six.

Bob Crable, Notre Dame-
Linebacker-Two-time consensus First Team All-America in 1980 and 1981… Set ND records for most career tackles (521), most tackles in a season (187), most tackles in a game (26)… Played in 1981 Hula Bowl.

Eric Crouch, Nebraska-Quarterback-
2001 Heisman, Walter Camp, and Davey O’Brien Award winner who led Huskers to 2001 national title game…Holds NCAA record for career rushing TDs by a quarterback (59)…Led team to 42-9 record and four bowl berths.

Randall Cunningham, Nevada-Las Vegas-Punter-
Named First Team All-America as a punter in 1983 and Second Team All-America as a punter and Honorable Mention as a quarterback in 1984…Led UNLV to their first-ever Bowl game…Broke 18 UNLV records.

Ron Dayne, Wisconsin-Running Back-
All-time leading rusher in FBS history who won the 1999 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp, Maxwell and Doak Walker awards…Three-time First Team All-American…First player in college history to rush for more than 7,000 yards in career.

Eric Dickerson, SMU-Running Back
-Named unanimous First Team All-America and finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1982…Twice named SWC Player of the Year, he holds 14 SMU records including career rushing yards (4,450).

John Didion, Oregon State-Center-
Two-time All-American, earning unanimous First Team honors in 1968… Member of Oregon State team known as the “Giant Killers”… 1968 First Team All-Pac-8 selection who helped team finish in the AP Top 20 all three years of career.

D.J. Dozier, Penn State-Running Back
- Named 1986 consensus First Team All-America and led PSU to perfect 12-0 season and national championship (1986)… Finished eighth in 1986 Heisman voting… First PSU back to lead the team in rushing for four consecutive seasons.

Jumbo Elliott, Michigan-Offensive Tackle-
 Two-time First Team All-American (consensus-’87)… Two-time All-Big Ten First Team selection and member of 1986 Big Ten Co-Champions…Paved the way for Jamie Morris, who had three-straight 1,000-yard seasons.

Tony Franklin, Texas A&M-Plackekicker
-Two-time First Team All-America (1976-consensus, ’78)…Led A&M to four bowl appearances…Set seven NCAA records, including most 50 yards-plus field goals made (15) and most points scored by a kicker in a career (291).

Tommie Frazier, Nebraska-Quarterback
-1995 consensus First Team All-America and Johnny Unitas award winner… 1995 Heisman trophy runner-up and Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year… Led Huskers to back-to-back perfect national championship seasons in 1994 and ’95.

William Fuller, North Carolina-Defensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1983… Holds school record with 57 career TFL and broke Lawrence Taylor’s season record with 22 TFL in 1981…Three-time First Team All-ACC pick.

Kirk Gibson, Michigan State-Wide Receiver
-Named First Team All-America, led Big Ten in receiving in league play and helped the Spartans to a Big Ten Co-Championship and a No.12 national ranking in 1978…Played MLB for 17 seasons.

Charlie Gogolak, Princeton-Placekicker-
1965 First Team All-American…Set seven NCAA records and led Princeton to an 8-1 season (1965)… Two-time First Team All-Ivy…Holds four school records… Revolutionized the kicking game utilizing the soccer-style technique.

Jerry Gray, Texas-Defensive Back-
 Two-time First Team All-American (consensus-’83, unanimous-’84)… Two-time SWC Player of the Year… Member of 1983 SWC championship team and four bowl teams…297 career tackles, 16 career interceptions, 20 pass breakups.

Al Harris, Arizona State-Defensive End-
Named unanimous First Team All-America and Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy finalist in 1978…Named First Team All-Conference, he set an ASU record with 19 sacks in 1978.

Leotis Harris, Arkansas-Offensive Guard
-1977 consensus First Team All-America who led Razorbacks to wins in the 1976 Cotton Bowl and ’78 Orange Bowl… First-ever African-American All-American player at Arkansas…Led Arkansas to 1975 SWC Co-Championship.

Randy Hughes, Oklahoma-Defensive Back-
Member of 1974 national championship team and three Big Eight championship teams… Tied school record for pass breakups in a season (12) and finished fourth on OU’s career interceptions list (14)…1974 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Raghib Ismail, Notre Dame-Wide Receiver-
Two-time First Team All-American earning consensus honors in 1989 and unanimous laurels in 1990…Walter Camp Player of the Year and Heisman Trophy runner-up in 1990…Led ND to national championship at the Fiesta Bowl and two Orange Bowls.

Dick Jauron, Yale-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1972…A three-time First Team All-Conference selection, he received the Asa S. Bushnell Cup as the Ivy League’s Player of the Year…Graduated as Yale’s career rushing leader with 2,947 yards.

Ernie Jennings, Air Force-Wide Receiver-
1970 consensus First Team All-American, finishing eighth in 1970 Heisman Trophy voting…Led Air Force to 1971 Sugar Bowl berth… Holds every single-season and career receiving record at Air Force.

Greg Lewis, Washington-Running Back
-1990 First Team All-America and Doak Walker award winner… Named Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year in 1990, leading Huskies to 1990 conference title… Finished seventh in 1990 Heisman voting and recorded 15, 100-yard games.

Jess Lewis, Oregon State-Defensive Tackle-
Named First Team All-America in 1967…Played in the College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game and Coaches All-America Bowl in 1970…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967, 1969).

Robert Lytle, Michigan-Running Back-
Named consensus All-America in 1976…Finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting… Named Big Ten MVP in 1976 and led UM to two conference championships.

Bobby Majors, Tennessee-Defensive Back-
1971 unanimous First Team All-America… Led Vols to wins in 1971 Sugar Bowl and 1972 Liberty Bowl… Holds school records for punt returns in a career (117 for 1163 yards, 4 TDs) and season (42 for 457 yards, 2 TDs).

Buddy McClinton, Auburn-Defensive Back-
Three-time All-American who earned consensus First Team honors in 1969… Auburn’s all-time leader in interceptions (18) and holds record for interceptions in a season (9 in 1969)… Set SEC career interception record (18).

Duncan McColl, Stanford-Defensive End-
1976 First Team All-America…Two-time First Team All-Pac-8…Holds Stanford records for most QB sacks in season (17) and most TFL in season (26)…1976 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Cade McNown, UCLA-Quarterback-
1998 Consensus First Team All-American and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award recipient…1998 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year who led UCLA to consecutive Pac-10 titles in 1997 (shared) and 1998…Holds numerous school records.

Paul Naumoff, Tennessee-Linebacker
-Named First Team All-America and All-Conference in 1966…Named team MVP in 1966…Played in the College All-Star Game and Senior Bowl in 1967.

Darrin Nelson, Stanford-
1981 First Team All-American who was the first player in NCAA history to rush for over 1,000 yards and catch more than 50 passes in one season…Finished career as NCAA’s all-time leader in all-purpose yardage (6,885)… Four-time All-Pac-10 pick.

Ken Norton, Jr., UCLA-Linebacker-
1987 First Team All-America, leading Bruins to four consecutive bowl wins… Member of the 1985 conference championship team… Led team in tackles in 1986 (106) and in 1987 (125) and ranks sixth in school history with 339 career tackles.

Tom Nowatzke, Indiana-Fullback-
Named First Team All-America in 1964…A two-time All-Conference selection (1963-64), he led the Big Ten in rushing in 1963…Played in the East/West Shrine Game, Senior Bowl and Coaches All-American Game.

Philip Olsen, Utah State-Defensive End-
1969 consensus First Team All-America…1969 team captain and Utah State Athlete of the Year…Selected to play in the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl…Brother of College Football Hall of Famer Merlin Olsen.

Jim Otis, Ohio State-Fullback-
Named consensus First Team All-America in 1969…Member  of the 1968 National Championship team…Named First Team All-Big Ten conference in 1969 and led the Buckeyes to two conference titles…Led the team in rushing three times.

Orlando Pace, Ohio State-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time unanimous First Team All-American and first player in history to win Lombardi Trophy twice…1996 Outland Trophy winner who led Buckeyes to share of 1996 Big Ten title… Did not allow a sack during his last two seasons.

Paul Palmer, Temple-Running Back-
1986 unanimous First Team All-America…Led the nation in rushing yards (1,866), rushing yards per game (169.6) and all-purpose yards (2,633) in 1986… Set 23 school records and was named ECAC Player of the Year in 1986.

Anthony Poindexter, Virginia-Defensive Back
-Two-time First Team All-America, earning consensus honors in 1998… Three-time All-ACC pick and 1998 ACC Defensive Player of the Year…Holds five school records and finished career with 342 tackles and 12 interceptions.

Antwaan Randle El, Indiana-Quarterback-
2001 First Team Consensus All-American…First player in FBS history to pass for 6,000 yards and rush for 3,000 yards in career…Rushed for more yards than any QB in FBS history upon conclusion of career.

Ron Rivera, California-Linebacker-
1983 consensus First Team All-America…Lombardi Award finalist in 1983 and named East-West Shrine Game Most Valuable Player…Selected as Pac-10 Co-Defensive Player of the Year in 1983…Led team in tackles from 1981-83.

Willie Roaf, Louisiana Tech-Offensive Lineman
-1992 consensus First Team All-America and finalist for Outland Trophy… Led team to 1990 Independence Bowl berth and two-time All-South Independent selection.

Mike Ruth, Boston College-Nose Guard-
1985 consensus First Team All-America and Outland Trophy winner…Three-time All-East and All-ECAC selection…Member of three bowl teams and recorded 344 career tackles, including 29 sacks.

Lucius Sanford, Georgia Tech-Linebacker
-Named First Team All-America in 1977…A three-time First Team All-Conference selection, he led Georgia Tech in tackles in 1975 (121) and 1976 (117)…Named to the Georgia Tech Hall of Fame and the school’s All-Time Team in 1991.

Sterling Sharpe, South Carolina-Wide Receiver
-1987 First Team All-America…Two-time First Team All-Conference…Set nearly every school receiving record by career’s end, including career receptions (169), single-season receiving yards (1,106) and career receiving yards (2,497).

Rod Shoate, Oklahoma-Linebacker-
1973 consensus and 1974 unanimous First Team All-America…Finished seventh in the 1974 Heisman Trophy voting and twice named Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year…Ranks third in school history with 420 career tackles.

Percy Snow, Michigan State-Linebacker-
1989 unanimous First Team All-America and 1989 Butkus Award winner… Led MSU to 1987 Big Ten title and Rose Bowl win… Ranks second all-time in career tackles (473).

Bob Stein, Minnesota-Defensive End-
1967 First Team All-American… Two-time First Team All-Big Ten selection who led Gophers to co-share of the 1967 Big Ten title…1969 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Art Still, Kentucky-Defensive End-
1977 Unanimous First Team All-American… Two-time First Team All-SEC performer who led Cats to 1976 SEC Championship…1977 SEC Defensive Player of the Year who set school record for 22 TFL in 1977 (still standing).

Matt Stinchcomb, Georgia-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (consensus-’98)…Two-time First Team All-SEC and 1998 recipient of Jacobs Blocking Trophy…1998 NFF William V. Campbell Trophy recipient and NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Aaron Taylor, Notre Dame-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in ‘92 and unanimous in ’93… 1993 Lombardi Award winner and named College Interior Lineman of the Year by Touchdown Club of Columbus (Ohio)…Led Irish to four bowl games.

Vinny Testaverde, Miami (Fla.)-Quarterback-
Winner of 1986 Heisman, Walter Camp, Maxwell Award, and Davey O’Brien…Led Canes to three bowl berths, including 1987 Fiesta Bowl to determine national championship… Finished career with 6,058 passing yards and 48 TD passes.

Derrick Thomas, Alabama-Linebacker
-1988 unanimous First Team All-America and Butkus award winner… Led Tide to four consecutive bowl berths, earning 1988 SEC Defensive Player of the Year… Set SEC record for sacks in a season (27) and finished career with 74 TFL.

Zach Thomas, Texas Tech-Linebacker-
Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous honors in 1995…Two-time Consensus SWC Defensive Player of the Year (1993, 94) who led Red Raiders to 1994 SWC title…Ranks fifth all-time at Tech with 390 career tackles.

Andre Tippett, Iowa-Defensive End-
1981 Consensus First Team All-American who led Hawkeyes to 1982 Rose Bowl berth…Two-time First Team All-Big Ten performer, leading Iowa to 1981 Big Ten championship…Holds Iowa record for TFL yardage (153 yards/20 TFL).

LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU-Tailback-
2000 Unanimous First Team All-American and 2000 Doak Walker Award winner…1999 WAC Offensive Player of the Year who led TCU to consecutive co-shares of WAC title… Holds 15 school records and is TCU’s all-time leading rusher.

Don Trull, Baylor-Quarterback-
Named consensus First Team All-America  and led the nation with 22 touchdowns in 1963…Named First Team All-Conference, he set a school record with 174 completions in 1963…Twice named First Team Academic All-America.

Jackie Walker, Tennessee-Linebacker-
1970 and ’71 First Team All-American…Set NCAA record for career interceptions returned for TD by a linebacker (5)… Two-time First Team All-SEC selection who helped Vols to 1969 SEC Championship.

Wesley Walls, Mississippi-Tight End-
1988 First Team All-America and First Team All-SEC selection…Played as a two-way player his senior season (DE-TE)…Tallied 36 receptions for 426 yards and three touchdowns in one season at tight end…1988 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Lorenzo White, Michigan State-Running Back
-Two-time First Team All-America, earning unanimous (’85) and consensus (’87) honors…Led State to 1987 Big Ten title and Rose Bowl win…Led nation in rushing (1985), first MSU player to lead team in rushing four-straight seasons.

Clarence Williams, Washington State-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America and All-Conference in 1964…Twice led the Cougars in rushing, scoring and kickoff returns…Played in the Hula Bowl, East-West Shrine and All-West Coast All-Star Games in 1964.

Steve Wisniewski, Penn State-Offensive Guard-
1988 First Team All-America…Member of 1986 12-0 national championship team…Helped Blair Thomas rush for 1,414 yards and 11 touchdowns in 1987 and D.J. Dozier attain First Team All-America honors in 1986.

Scott Woerner, Georgia-Defensive Back-Named First Team All-America, All-Conference and team Most Valuable Back in 1980…Twice named Georgia’s Outstanding Special Teams Player of the Year (1977, 1980)…Led team to the 1980 National Championship.

Danny Wuerffel, Florida-Quarterback-
1996 winner of NFF Campbell Trophy, Heisman, Walter Camp, Maxwell, and consecutive Davey O’Brien awards… Two-time SEC Player of the Year who led Gators to 1996 National Championship and four SEC championships.

 

 

 

Consensus All-America: Listed as a First Team All-America by at least half of the recognized publications.
Unanimous All-America: Listed as a First Team All-America by all recognized publications.


2013 COACH CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Jim Carlen-West Virginia (1966-69), Texas Tech (1970-74), South Carolina (1975-1981)-Led teams to eight bowl games and 13 winning seasons in 16 years as head coach…1973 National Coach of the Year…Three-time Southwest Conference Coach of the Year… Coached Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers at South Carolina.


Wayne Hardin-Navy (1959-64), Temple (1970-82)-
Led Navy to a No. 2 ranking in 1963 and Temple to a No. 17 ranking in 1979…Ranks third in wins (38) all-time at Navy and beat Army in five of six seasons…Temple’s all-time leader in wins (80), he led them to their only 10-win season and the Garden State Bowl in 1979.

Bill McCartney-Colorado (1982-94)-
Led Buffs to 1990 National Championship and three Big Eight Conference titles…Three-time Big Eight Coach of the Year and 1989 National Coach of the Year…Helped CU to nine bowl games in 13 seasons…Coached 18 First Team All-America players, including Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam.

Billy Jack Murphy-Memphis (1958-71)-
All-time winningest coach in Memphis history…Had 11 winning seasons and retired as the 15th winningest coach in the nation…Member of the Memphis Hall of Fame and Mississippi State Hall of Fame.

Darryl Rogers-Cal State-Hayward (1965), Fresno State (1966-72), San Jose State (1973-75), Michigan State (1976-79), Arizona State (1980-84)-
Took Fresno State to two bowl games.  Achieved an unprecedented national ranking at San Jose State…Was Big Ten Coach of the Year in 1977 and National Coach of the Year by Sporting News in 1978…Won the Big Ten title in 1978.

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