Tag Archive | "Hayden Hurst"

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Ravens officially ink first-round pick Hurst to rookie deal

Posted on 20 June 2018 by Luke Jones

The Ravens have their entire 2018 draft class under contract a month before the start of training camp.

First-round tight end Hayden Hurst became the 12th and final Baltimore draft pick to come to terms, officially signing a four-year deal expected to pay him just over $11 million. Contracts for first-round picks also include a fifth-year team option, meaning the Ravens could own the rights to the South Carolina product through the 2022 season.

Hurst, 24, caught a combined 92 passes for 1,175 yards and three touchdowns over his final two seasons for the Gamecocks and was regarded as having some of the most reliable hands in the draft class. He and third-round pick Mark Andrews will be asked to bring play-making ability to the tight end position since incumbents Nick Boyle and Maxx Williams combined for just 43 catches last season and are considered stronger blockers than receivers.

Hurst will need to buck a long history of even some of the most successful NFL tight ends struggling to make a major impact as rookies, but early reviews have been positive.

“He’s just a talented guy. It matters to him. I’m excited about he and Mark,” head coach John Harbaugh said last month. “The tight ends have a lot of football on their plate. The biggest challenge that they have is to not think their way through the play. That’s always going to be the toughest thing when you have so many options as a tight end because you’re both in the run game and the pass game and the pass protection.”

One of the criticisms of Hurst during the pre-draft process was his age as he will turn 25 in August and previously played minor league baseball for Pittsburgh, leaving some pundits to suggest he has a lower NFL ceiling. However, one could argue that the 6-foot-4, 250-pound tight end is more physically mature than the typical 21- or 22-year-old rookie and better equipped to deal with failure after his well-documented experiences with his baseball career, factors that could lead to more success early in his career.

That maturity will play a role in how Hurst plans to spend his signing bonus at the very least.

“Since this is my second go-round, there’s not much that I need,” said Hurst, who signed for $400,000 as the 17th-round pick of the Pirates in 2012. “I knocked that out the first time. I got a car, so nothing really comes to mind. I’ll probably just put it all away.”

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Flacco’s eyes on present while acknowledging uncertain future

Posted on 24 May 2018 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — This time of year has typically been uneventful for longtime Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco.

Other than his rookie season or two years ago when he was still rehabbing his surgically-repaired knee back to full health, Flacco has taken part in organized team activities with no topic of discussion more significant than adjusting to another offensive coordinator or a new wide receiver or two in Baltimore. Aside from his contract season of 2012 in which he famously bet on himself before leading the Ravens to a Super Bowl title several months later, the 33-year-old has been entrenched as the franchise quarterback with no serious discussion about his future.

Of course, that changed last month when Ozzie Newsome used the final first-round pick of his illustrious run as Baltimore’s general manager to select Louisville quarterback and former Heisman Trophy winner Lamar Jackson. Members of the Ravens brass have stated more than once that Flacco remains the guy at quarterback, but the 11th-year veteran knows that Jackson’s addition clouds his future. He remains under contract through the 2021 season, but the Ravens could move on from the Super Bowl XLVII MVP as soon as next season if willing to endure $16 million in dead money on their salary cap.

“I don’t want to say I was surprised,” said Flacco, whose yards per attempt average has declined in each of the last three seasons. “Obviously, when you pick a quarterback — when you pick anybody in the first round — it means something. I don’t know what that means. I don’t know exactly what it is, but that’s not my job to worry about what it is. My job is to keep my approach exactly what it’s been for the last 10 years and help our team go win football games.”

Flacco says his focus is on the present, citing the work to be done to get on the same page with a new batch of wide receivers and tight ends to improve the league’s 29th-ranked passing game from 2017. He took special interest discussing Michael Crabtree, citing his unique style and craftiness in running routes that reminds many of former Raven Anquan Boldin.

But questions from media on Thursday predictably centered around Jackson with Flacco being asked about the lack of communication between the two in the days following the NFL draft. He called it “unfortunate” that the story was blown out of proportion and said their early interactions have been positive, adding that new quarterbacks coach James Urban has even joked with the two about the faux controversy.

“Everybody just wants to talk about it and act like I’m holding some grudge, and that’s not how it is,” Flacco said. “I think you guys have been around me for a long time and you know the way I am. We welcome Lamar here with open arms, and that’s the same for me.”

It remains to be seen how head coach John Harbaugh and the offensive staff will handle Jackson’s development, but the Ravens intend to include the rookie in this year’s offense when appropriate. The challenge will be striking the appropriate balance between maintaining the rhythm of the “traditional” offense under Flacco and identifying spots to utilize Jackson’s talents as a runner and passer.

Unlike five years ago when former offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell used backup Tyrod Taylor in some “Wildcat” plays, Flacco doesn’t seem inclined to push back on the idea of Marty Mornhinweg mixing in some special packages or gadget plays for Jackson. Of course, Flacco doesn’t hold the same clout to complain as he did then when he was less than a year removed from winning the Super Bowl.

“Listen, I want to win football games. Whatever is going to help us win,” Flacco said. “I’m probably going to maintain that I think myself under center is our best chance to win football games, but whatever helps us win football games, man, I’m game.”

He handled himself well speaking for the first time since the Ravens drafted their perceived quarterback of the future, something that couldn’t be said about Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger after the Steelers used a third-round pick on Oklahoma State’s Mason Rudolph. Considering the Ravens’ poor efforts in putting offensive talent around him in recent years, Flacco could have shared a similar sentiment to his AFC North counterpart by saying the Jackson pick could have been used on another offensive player providing a greater immediate impact.

Flacco has been described as nothing but a good teammate over the years and figures to maintain that reputation with the young quarterback. But that doesn’t mean he won’t be doing everything he can to keep his new competition on the sideline for as long as possible.

That starts with winning more games and leading the Ravens back to the playoffs for the first time since 2014.

“You pick guys in the first round — whenever you pick guys — you pick them for a reason,” Flacco said. “I don’t know what the plan is. I don’t exactly know what’s going to happen, but I’m worried about right now. I’m worried about myself getting these guys ready, winning football games, and nothing is ever promised.

“That’s the reality of it for me.”

It’s a different reality than he’s used to.

OTA attendance

Fourteen players were not taking part in Thursday’s voluntary workout as the Ravens concluded their first week of OTAs.

According to Harbaugh, wide receiver John Brown was excused to deal with a personal matter while linebacker C.J. Mosley (ankle) and cornerback Maurice Canady (knee) were resting minor ailments. The coach also said wide receiver Quincy Adeboyejo would begin the season on the physically unable to perform list after undergoing an unspecified surgery on his left leg earlier this month.

The following players were not participating due to injuries sustained last season: guard Marshal Yanda (ankle), cornerbacks Jimmy Smith (Achilles tendon) and Jaylen Hill (knee), and linebackers Albert McClellan (knee) and Bam Bradley (knee).

Defensive ends Brent Urban (foot) and Carl Davis (shoulder) took part in the early portion of Thursday’s session before leaving the field while guard Nico Siragusa (knee) was also a limited participant.

Safeties Eric Weddle and Anthony Levine, cornerback Brandon Carr, and fullback Christopher Ezeala were also absent from the field. Linebacker Terrell Suggs has regularly been at the team’s Owings Mills training facility this offseason and is said to be in great shape entering his 16th season, but Harbaugh is keeping him off the practice field until mandatory minicamp for the second straight spring.

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Ravens officially sign 2018 third-round picks Brown, Andrews

Posted on 17 May 2018 by Luke Jones

The Ravens officially signed 2018 third-round picks Orlando Brown Jr. and Mark Andrews to four-year contracts on Thursday.

Brown, the 83rd overall pick of last month’s draft, is expected to compete with veteran James Hurst for the starting right tackle job this summer. The 22-year-old was projected by some to be a first-round talent before a poor scouting combine performance hurt his stock, allowing the Ravens to grab him in the third round.

“Everybody knows I’m slow. I’m not the fastest guy — half of you could probably beat me running, honestly,” said Brown, the son of late former Ravens offensive tackle Orlando Brown. “That’s something that I continue to work on and I’m going to have to continue to work on during my career. My weight-room numbers aren’t the best, but football IQ — I’ve been around the game. My dad forced me to learn it.”

Andrews was selected with the 86th overall pick and is expected to compete for playing time in sub packages. Assistant general manager Eric DeCosta has compared him to former Raven Dennis Pitta, which could be good news for quarterback Joe Flacco and his affinity for pass-catching tight ends.

The Oklahoma product isn’t known for his blocking ability, but he has a chance to contribute immediately as a bigger slot option in sub packages.

“I haven’t got a lot of reps at doing [blocking] in college, but that’s something I’m going to learn,” Andrews said. “I think I’m going to thrive at it one day. I want to be a complete receiver, and one day I will be.”

The two signings leave first-round tight end Hayden Hurst and first-round quarterback Lamar Jackson as the only unsigned members of Baltimore’s 2018 draft class.

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Ravens sign all eight Day 3 draft picks

Posted on 05 May 2018 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The Ravens have wasted little time signing most of their team-record-tying 12 draft picks to four-year contracts.

Baltimore announced agreements with eight selections on Saturday, a list comprised of fourth-round cornerback Anthony Averett, fourth-round linebacker Kenny Young, fourth-round wide receiver Jaleel Scott, fifth-round wide receiver Jordan Lasley, sixth-round safety DeShon Elliott, sixth-round offensive tackle Greg Senat, sixth-round center Bradley Bozeman, and seventh-round defensive end Zach Sieler.

The Ravens must still sign first-round tight end Hayden Hurst, first-round quarterback Lamar Jackson, third-round offensive tackle Orlando Brown Jr., and third-round tight end Mark Andrews, but those tasks are considered little more than formalities with the structure of the current collective bargaining agreement in place since 2011. As first-round selections, both Hurst and Jackson will carry fifth-year options the Ravens will have the choice to exercise for the 2022 season.

General manager Ozzie Newsome had the entire 2017 draft class signed by May 17 last season.

Doubling up on joint practices

The Ravens hadn’t conducted any practices with other teams since 2015, but they’ll double up in ending that drought this summer.

Asked about his team’s already-announced plan to practice with the Los Angeles Rams for two days ahead of the Aug. 9 preseason game at M&T Bank Stadium, head coach John Harbaugh revealed the Ravens will also practice in Indianapolis ahead of their Aug. 20 contest at Lucas Oil Stadium.

“Both of those coaches called us,” said Harbaugh, referring to Rams head coach Sean McVay and new Colts head coach Frank Reich. “We have the longer training camp this year with our extra preseason game with the Hall of Fame game [on Aug. 2]. The way the training camp laid out, it looked like it would be good for us to create some breaks in the schedule where we could go against somebody else and organize the practices appropriately. We have to do a good job of that.”

The Ravens hosted joint practices with San Francisco in 2014 and practiced against the Eagles in Philadelphia in 2015.

Odds & ends

Nine days after being drafted, Jackson said he hasn’t yet talked to starting quarterback Joe Flacco. … Harbaugh said he was impressed with Jackson’s accuracy and “natural arm talent” during rookie minicamp. … Andrews having Type 1 diabetes wasn’t a consideration in the Ravens’ decision to draft him, according to Harbaugh. … Several players noted the challenge of the temperature rising north of 90 degrees on Friday, but Harbaugh was pleased with the rookies’ conditioning level and noted there were no major or soft-tissue-related injuries during the minicamp.

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Ravens announce rookie free-agent signings, assign jersey numbers

Posted on 04 May 2018 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — With the Ravens holding their rookie minicamp this weekend, a batch of 15 undrafted free agents joined the franchise-record-tying 12 draft selections made last week.

Baltimore announced the following signings on the offensive side of the ball: wide receivers Jaelon Acklin (Western Illinois) and Andre Levrone (Virginia), tight end Nick Keizer (Grand Valley State), offensive linemen Randin Crecelius (Portland State), Justin Evans (South Carolina State), and Alex Thompson (Monmouth), and running backs Gus Edwards (Rutgers), Mark Thompson (Florida), and De’Lance Turner (Alcorn State).

On defense and special teams, the Ravens inked linebackers Alvin Jones (UTEP) and Mason McKenrick (John Carroll), defensive end Christian LaCouture (LSU), defensive back Darious Williams (Alabama Birmingham), long snapper Trent Sieg (Colorado State), and punter Kaare Vedvik (Marshall).

The rookie camp also includes a number of undisclosed tryout players. They primarily serve the purpose of allowing the team to conduct a more functional practice, but the Ravens have also signed select tryout players after past rookie camps.

The Ravens also unveiled the jersey numbers for their 12-man draft class:

TE Hayden Hurst – No. 81
QB Lamar Jackson – No. 8
OT Orlando Brown Jr. – No. 78
TE Mark Andrews – No. 89
CB Anthony Averett – No. 28
LB Kenny Young – No. 40
WR Jaleel Scott – No. 12
WR Jordan Lasley – No. 17
S DeShon Elliott – No. 21
OT Greg Senat – No. 64
C Bradley Bozeman – No. 77
DE Zach Sieler – No. 95

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Twelve Ravens thoughts following 2018 draft

Posted on 03 May 2018 by Luke Jones

With the Ravens now finished with the draft and looking ahead to rookie minicamp this weekend, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. An organization that’s struggled to remain relevant nationally in recent years will have plenty of buzz as the Lamar Jackson watch begins. This will easily be the most interesting spring and preseason the Ravens have had in a long time.

2. Joe Flacco declining to speak to local reporters Saturday was much ado about nothing, but the Ravens created this situation and need to be prepared to handle it. Every national reporter coming through Owings Mills this year will be asking the veteran about the quarterback of the future.

3. I’m already seeing the annual overhype about the receiver competition as the Ravens added three veterans who combined for 87 catches for 1,009 yards last year and can point to Demetrius Williams as their greatest fourth- or fifth-round success story at the position in the 21st century. Pump the brakes.

4. With that said, I do like the diversity in skills and physical traits of the pass catchers added by general manager Ozzie Newsome. Even the surest thing, Michael Crabtree, coming off a down season makes you nervous, but there is enough potential and upside in this group to be hopeful.

5. Willie Snead was impressive in his press conference earlier this week, taking accountability for his difficult 2017 season without pointing any fingers for his disappearance in the New Orleans offense. Now we’ll find out if he was a byproduct of Drew Brees and Sean Payton or a productive slot option.

6. Drafting Anthony Averett gave Baltimore 11 corners on the preseason roster with as many as seven of those held in high regard. Health will factor heavily into the makeup of this group, of course, but the possibility of a late-summer trade to address another position of need still seems plausible.

7. Tight ends frequently struggle in their rookie season and his age could limit his overall ceiling, but I have little doubt that Hayden Hurst will be as good as he’s capable of being after reading this terrific piece by Bleacher Report’s Dan Pompei. He’s already dealt with failure admirably.

8. Since many have cited Marty Mornhinweg’s work with Michael Vick in Philadelphia to endorse the first-round selection of Jackson, I’ll note that Flacco’s numbers began declining as soon as Mornhinweg took over as his quarterbacks coach the year after arguably the best regular season of his career.

9. I’m curious to see how DeShon Elliott fits at the NFL level as Pro Football Focus views him as a free safety while others envision him playing more in the box. The Ravens hitting on a late-round safety after using so many resources at the position recently would be helpful.

10. Jordan Lasley is the kind of prospect on which a team should take a chance in the fifth round. His off-field issues were far from egregious, but the key will be whether his issues with drops are correctable. I still like the pick at a position lacking any long-term answers.

11. Considering their impeccable track record with undrafted free agents, the Ravens tying a franchise record with 12 picks in the draft was surprising. You just hope they didn’t miss out on some quality players in the name of adding so much quantity in the later rounds.

12. With Baker Mayfield going first overall to Cleveland, Jackson being the final pick of the first round, and first-round hopeful Mason Rudolph sliding to Pittsburgh in the third round, ESPN would have a good “30 for 30” topic if the quarterback future of the AFC North comes to fruition.

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What to expect from Ravens’ 2018 draft picks

Posted on 29 April 2018 by Luke Jones

The picks are in for the 2018 draft, so what can we now expect from the Ravens’ 12 selections?

Below is the early look at how each rookie fits:

TE Hayden Hurst
Drafted: First round (25th overall) from South Carolina
2018 projected role: Tight ends generally struggle in their rookie season, but the 24-year-old will have every chance to become the primary guy with Nick Boyle and Maxx Williams better suited as blockers.
Long-term view: His 6-foot-5, 250-pound frame and good hands offer hope that he can become Baltimore’s best all-around tight end since Todd Heap with the ability to move around formations. He will be critical in helping Joe Flacco now and aiding in Lamar Jackson’s development for the future.

QB Lamar Jackson
Drafted: First round (32nd overall) from Louisville
2018 projected role: The quarterback of the future will need time to develop as a backup, but the Ravens would be wise to pick their spots to utilize his athleticism and expose him to some game action.
Long-term view: Jackson’s throwing mechanics and ability to function with pressure in an NFL pocket are significant questions, but his tools make him an intriguing talent the Ravens have never had at the position. The hope is he ushers in a new era for the organization, but there is much work to be done.

OT Orlando Brown Jr.
Drafted: Third round (83rd overall) from Oklahoma
2018 projected role: The son of former Ravens right tackle Orlando Brown will compete with veteran James Hurst for the starting right tackle job.
Long-term view: A historically-poor combine performance didn’t wipe out how the organization felt about his strong game tape, but questions about his weight, strength, and foot speed cannot be dismissed. You love the pedigree, but Brown has much to prove to reward the Ravens’ faith in him.

TE Mark Andrews
Drafted: Third round (86th overall) from Oklahoma
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5 target will compete for situational snaps in the passing game as a big slot option and should have a real chance to make an impact inside the red zone.
Long-term view: Andrews is a wide receiver trapped in a tight end’s body and is not considered much of a blocker, meaning he’ll need to make substantial contributions in the pass game. In a perfect world, he slides into the old Dennis Pitta role, which was a big part of the Ravens’ success in the past.

CB Anthony Averett
Drafted: Fourth round (118th overall) from Alabama
2018 projected role: The 5-foot-11, 183-pound defensive back has a slew of names ahead of him on the depth chart, meaning he’ll need to be a good special-teams player to see the field as a rookie.
Long-term view: Being a two-year starter for the Crimson Tide speaks for itself, but Averett lacks the physicality of Marlon Humphrey and has more to prove. Eventually becoming a No. 2 starting cornerback isn’t out of the question, but Averett can provide valuable depth at the very least.

LB Kenny Young
Drafted: Fourth round (122nd overall) from UCLA
2018 projected role: Young has the athleticism to compete with Patrick Onwuasor for the weak-side inside linebacker spot next to C.J. Mosley, a position that wasn’t stellar for the Ravens last season.
Long-term view: A full-time starter for three seasons with the Bruins, Young has coverage skills that could add a dimension the Baltimore defense sorely needs. He should contribute on special teams immediately with the chance to eventually move into a starting role.

WR Jaleel Scott
Drafted: Fourth round (132nd overall) from New Mexico State
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5 receiver will compete for situational snaps and could get looks as a contributor inside the red zone if he shows enough during the spring and summer.
Long-term view: You love the size and Scott made some acrobatic catches last year, but he lacks speed and is the kind of raw prospect the Ravens have rarely had success developing into anything of consequence. Baltimore has lacked a jump-ball threat for years, so Scott has a chance to be just that.

WR Jordan Lasley
Drafted: Fifth round (162nd overall) from UCLA
2018 projected role: Lasley will compete for a roster spot and will need to play special teams, but he showed the big-play ability in college to potentially earn some chances at the receiver position.
Long-term view: Off-field issues and bad hands led to Lasley’s slide down the draft board, but he averaged 18.3 yards per catch and accumulated 1,264 yards and nine touchdowns in nine games last season. He’s the proverbial boom-or-bust prospect, making him a decent gamble in the fifth round.

S DeShon Elliott
Drafted: Sixth round (190th overall) from Texas
2018 projected role: Much like Chuck Clark a year ago, the first-team All-American safety will need to shine on special teams to secure a roster spot in a deep secondary.
Long-term view: Opinions are mixed, but many seem to view Elliott as more of a box safety needing to play closer to the line of scrimmage to succeed. He’ll have a difficult time carving out a defensive role early, but he has the potential to eventually develop into a hybrid option.

OT Greg Senat
Drafted: Sixth round (212th overall) from Wagner
2018 projected role: The former college basketball player has good length and will compete for a roster spot or an opportunity on the practice squad.
Long-term view: Senat needs to get stronger and unsurprisingly needs to improve his blocking technique, but this is the kind of prospect that makes perfect sense late in the sixth round. At the very least, offensive line coach Joe D’Alessandris has a good athlete with which to work.

C Bradley Bozeman
Drafted: Sixth round (215th overall) from Alabama
2018 projected role: The 6-foot-5, 315-pound lineman will compete for a roster spot or a place on the practice squad at a position lacking a long-term answer.
Long-term view: You like the pedigree of someone who made 31 career starts for the Crimson Tide, but Bozeman’s lack of athleticism and strength explain him lasting until the sixth round. His instincts and success in the SEC make him a decent developmental option with limited upside.

DE Zach Sieler
Drafted: Seventh round (238th overall) from Ferris State
2018 projected role: The Division II All-American selection will compete for a roster spot or a place on the practice squad with the defensive line being so deep.
Long-term view: Ozzie Newsome taking a defensive lineman from a small school as his final draft choice is fitting, but Sieler’s 6-foot-6, 290-pound frame fits the mold of an NFL 5-technique lineman. With Brent Urban and Carl Davis not signed beyond 2018, Sieler is at least worth keeping an eye on.

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Final chapter of Newsome’s Ravens draft legacy yet to be defined

Posted on 29 April 2018 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Emotions ran high as the Ravens concluded the final draft of Ozzie Newsome’s impeccable run as general manager.

Successor Eric DeCosta choked up as he spoke about his mentor, describing how owner Steve Bisciotti switched their chairs in the draft room to signify the changing of the guard.

John Harbaugh shared his belief that this was the franchise’s best draft in his 11 seasons as head coach. Others have wasted no time heaping praise upon Baltimore’s work.

Of course, Newsome himself brought the appropriate context in judging his 23rd and final draft.

“We did address a lot of areas, but ask me two years from now,” Newsome said. “Because now we have to get them in, we have to work with them, we have to develop them. Then, two years from now, we’ll be able to determine what job we did this weekend.”

The Ravens surely checked boxes by drafting tight ends Hayden Hurst and Mark Andrews as well as offensive tackle Orlando Brown Jr., the most heartwarming pick of the weekend. On the final day, they attempted to address other needs by taking inside linebacker Kenny Young as well as wide receivers Jaleel Scott and Jordan Lasley to develop for the future.

But make no mistake, the fate of the 2018 draft will ultimately be defined by Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson. That’s just reality when you take a quarterback in the first round, regardless of what Newsome might have given up in the trade or how the Ravens were able to secure a fifth-year option with shrewd maneuvering.

Just ask Super Bowl XXXV champion coach Brian Billick about the 2003 draft. The first round may have featured potential Hall of Fame linebacker Terrell Suggs, but quarterback bust Kyle Boller ultimately cost Billick his job four years later.

The Jackson pick isn’t a flier or a low risk as those attempting to soft-pedal the likely ousting of Joe Flacco have suggested. If he doesn’t become the franchise quarterback, the ramifications are substantial, ranging from a missed opportunity to really strengthen the roster to high-profile jobs potentially being lost.

Squandering a first-round pick is significant even when it isn’t a quarterback. Consider the many resources the Ravens have exhausted at the safety position since drafting Matt Elam five years ago. Baltimore is still dealing with the fallout of Breshad Perriman failing to develop into a functional wide receiver three years after being drafted.

Jackson’s selection following his electrifying career at Louisville has reinvigorated much of a disgruntled fan base over the last few days, but recent history suggests the odds are against him panning out. Of the 17 quarterbacks drafted 15th through 45th overall from 2007-16 — a range chosen to satisfy varying opinions of his value — only seven spent more than one full season as a starter and one of those was Geno Smith. Just three — Cincinnati’s Andy Dalton, Oakland’s Derek Carr, and Flacco — are present-day starting quarterbacks with the others either surviving as backups or out of the league entirely.

Those odds are why those now being labeled by some as Flacco apologists balked at using such valuable draft capital on his replacement rather than at another position with a higher success rate to try to help the 33-year-old who led the franchise to a championship five years ago.

Where will the Ravens be in two years?

If the talented Jackson is on his way to becoming a franchise quarterback and helping his team to the playoffs, even detractors of Thursday’s pick will need to give Newsome his due. If he isn’t, there’s no telling what the fallout could be for a team with just one playoff appearance since Super Bowl XLVII.

Of course, this is where the rest of the draft class also comes into play as any quarterback is impacted dramatically by his environment.

Is at least one of the combination of Hurst and Andrews serving as the impact tight end the Ravens have lacked since the early days of Dennis Pitta and Todd Heap before that?

Will Scott or Lasley break the mold of so many failed Day 3 wide receivers to help improve the position’s long-term outlook? That will be a critical need for the young quarterback.

Does an eventual starter and a solid backup or two emerge from the group of Brown, Young, cornerback Anthony Averett, and a quartet of sixth- and seventh-rounders?

Only the answers to these questions will determine whether the current praise for Newsome’s swansong draft is warranted.

It’s understandable for so many to want to pay tribute to the general manager after all he’s accomplished. No one can take away a body of work that includes two Super Bowl championships, 10 playoff appearances in a 15-year period, two homegrown Hall of Famers (with at least one or two more to come), and 18 homegrown Pro Bowl players. Newsome is more than deserving of being a Hall of Fame executive after being a Hall of Fame tight end.

But let’s follow his own advice and pump the brakes on declaring this draft to be his final masterpiece.

That will be determined by whether the master plan to replace Flacco with Jackson succeeds.

Remember many Ravens fans were once miffed that Jonathan Ogden was chosen over Lawrence Phillips while others initially celebrated the likes of Boller, Elam, and Perriman in past first rounds.

We’ll know the truth in two years.

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Join us in Carolina for a great weekend of Ravens football in October

Posted on 27 April 2018 by WNST Trips

Join our WNST Purple Group as we travel back to Charlotte where we had so much fun eight years ago.

We will be departing White Marsh Park and Ride at 6am on Saturday, October 27th with a stop at I-95 Catonsville at 6:30am bound for Charlotte. We’ll check in around 2:30pm and freshen up and arrive at our Purple Pep Rally at Whiskey River from 5-8pm. The rest of the night is yours and remember that the game time is 1pm on Sunday, October 28th.

We are staying just six miles from the stadium and downtown Whiskey River area. We will have a bus shuttle back to the hotel after the party on Saturday night. We’ll also be doing a Sunday pre-game tailgate before the game with a 9:30 departure from the Doubletree Airport Charlotte. Our bus will depart 90 minutes after the conclusion of the game. We expect to return home to Baltimore after midnight on Sunday night.

Here’s two videos of our last conquest of the Carolinas back in 2010:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA0xYf3IeQk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXFJ75letqo

 

We have tried to keep this trip extremely affordable and easy. If you need any assistance, please toss me an email: nasty@wnst.net.

OUR 2018 TRIP INCLUDES:

Roundtrip luxury motorcoach from White Marsh/I-95 Catonsville to Charlotte via Gunther Motorcoach (we’ll have beer, soda, water & snacks on the ride)

One night at Doubletree Charlotte Airport

Upper ticket for Ravens-Panthers on October 28

Whiskey River admission and buffet for 5-8 Purple Pep Rally

Sunday morning tailgate w/beer and snacks

 

PRICING:

(Per person based on rooming)

SINGLE – $550

DOUBLE – $500

TRIPLE – $475

QUAD – $450

How many in your room?

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