Tag Archive | "hunter harvey"

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Three Orioles prospects make Baseball America’s top 100 list

Posted on 22 January 2018 by Luke Jones

Just two years after being completely shut out on Baseball America’s list of top 100 prospects, the Orioles have three entries for the first time since 2014.

Outfielder Austin Hays, catcher Chance Sisco, and third baseman Ryan Mountcastle all appeared on the 2018 list released Monday and reflect a farm system showing some improvement in terms of its positional talent. Of course, the absence of any pitching prospects doesn’t bode well for an Orioles club still needing to fill three spots in its starting rotation for the upcoming season.

Hays ranked 21st on the list after a sensational 2017 campaign in which he hit a combined .329 with 32 home runs, 32 doubles, 95 runs batted in, and a .958 on-base plus slugging percentage between Single-A Frederick and Double-A Bowie. The third-round pick from Jacksonville University became the first player from the 2016 amateur draft to reach the majors last September, hitting .217 with one homer, three doubles, and a .555 OPS in 63 plate appearances for Baltimore. The 22-year-old is expected to compete for a major league job this spring.

Sisco made the top 100 list for the second straight year, but he dropped from No. 57 in 2017 to No. 68, which could be related to some of the doubts about his defensive skills and whether he’ll stick as a catcher at the major league level. The 2013 second-round pick will turn 23 next month and made his major league debut last September, hitting two home runs and two doubles in 22 plate appearances after batting .267 with seven homers, 22 doubles, and a .736 OPS at Triple-A Norfolk. The Orioles may still add a veteran catcher, but Sisco could find himself in a timeshare behind the plate with veteran Caleb Joseph this coming season.

Mountcastle came in at No. 71 on the list after an impressive season at the plate split between Frederick and Bowie, batting a combined .287 with 18 homers, 48 doubles, and an .802 OPS in his age-20 season. His bat is quite intriguing, but major questions persist about what position the 2015 first-round pick will ultimately play as he moved from shortstop to third base upon being promoted to Bowie last July.

The Orioles did have five pitchers on their top 10 prospect list released by Baseball America earlier this offseason, but none are considered close to making the jump to the majors. Former first-round pick Hunter Harvey is still considered the most promising of the group, but the 23-year-old has pitched just 31 1/3 innings because of various ailments over the last four years. Others such as 2016 first-round pick Cody Sedlock and 25-year-old left-hander Chris Lee have also dealt with some health concerns.

Below are the Orioles who have appeared on Baseball America’s top 100 prospects list over the last decade:

2017: C Chance Sisco (57th)
2016: none
2015: RHP Dylan Bundy (48th), RHP Hunter Harvey (68th)
2014: RHP Dylan Bundy (15th), RHP Kevin Gausman (20th), LHP Eduardo Rodriguez (65th)
2013: RHP Dylan Bundy (2nd), RHP Kevin Gausman (26th)
2012: RHP Dylan Bundy (10th), SS Manny Machado (11th), 2B Jonathan Schoop (82nd)
2011: SS Manny Machado (14th), LHP Zach Britton (28th)
2010: LHP Brian Matusz (5th), 3B Josh Bell (37th), LHP Zach Britton (63rd), RHP Jake Arrieta (99th)
2009: C Matt Wieters (1st), RHP Chris Tillman (22nd), LHP Brian Matusz (25th), RHP Jake Arrieta (67th)
2008: C Matt Wieters (12th), RHP Chris Tillman (67th), RHP Radhames Liz (69th), LHP Troy Patton (78th), OF Nolan Reimold (91st)

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Twelve Orioles thoughts counting down to spring training

Posted on 08 January 2018 by Luke Jones

With Orioles pitchers and catchers reporting to Sarasota for spring training in a little over a month, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. It bears repeating how problematic it is having a general manager whose contract expires in less than a year navigating one of the more pivotal offseasons in club history. The lack of evidence of any direction or long-term thinking from ownership is maddening.

2. That hasn’t been helped by the overall inactivity of the market as MLB Network reported only 31 of 166 free agents had signed deals entering Monday. That sounds fishy, regardless of whether you believe it’s collusion or the effect of the luxury tax and next year’s free-agent class being better.

3. No one’s suggesting the Orioles should just give Manny Machado away, but this is what happens when you punt on the future for so long. This current process should have started from the moment they knew a long-term deal very likely wasn’t in the stars.

4. Speaking of long-term deals, signing Jonathan Schoop to one should be a top priority right now, but you wonder if watching the organization’s handling of his close friend leaves him more inclined to wait for free agency after 2019.

5. Kevin Gausman changing his jersey number to honor the late Roy Halladay is a touching gesture, and the Orioles hope the 27-year-old builds off his 3.41 ERA in the second half of 2017. Home runs remained an issue, but his strikeout and walk rates improved markedly after the All-Star break.

6. Part of that improvement should be credited to Caleb Joseph as pitchers posted a 4.23 ERA throwing to him compared to a 5.60 mark with the departed Welington Castillo. I don’t think it’s coincidence that the staff has usually fared better when Joseph has caught over the last several years.

7. Chris Davis was worth minus-0.2 wins above replacement in 2017, according to Baseball Reference. He’ll only be 32 and can still turn things around, but the seven-year, $161 million deal he signed two years ago is looking more disastrous than many feared it could be at the time.

8. Looking at 2017 batting average on balls in play and remembering the league average is just below .300, Machado is a no-brainer pick to rebound after a career-worst .265 mark. On the flip side, Trey Mancini’s .352 clip makes him a candidate for some regression in his second full season.

9. The club has high hopes for Richard Bleier and Miguel Castro, but the former’s 3.7 strikeouts per nine innings and .263 opposing BABIP are worrisome for projecting future success. Castro’s 5.2 per nine strikeout rate and .231 BABIP should also temper expectations about a possible move to the rotation.

10. Hunter Harvey is a bright spot for an organization still lacking pitching prospects, but you hope the Orioles aren’t so desperate for starting pitching that they potentially compromise the 23-year-old’s health and development. Unlike Dylan Bundy two years ago, Harvey has minor-league options remaining.

11. You’ll hear plenty about Nestor Cortes and other Rule 5 picks over the next few months, but this annual exercise that’s put numerous strains on the roster has netted a total of 1.7 WAR during the Dan Duquette era, according to Baseball Reference. Way too much effort for minimal value.

12. Maybe they’ll prove us wrong in the coming weeks, but the Orioles’ approach to this offseason with a slew of expiring contracts after 2018 feels like a basketball team running a Four Corners offense while trailing by 10 points. Where’s the urgency?

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Twelve Orioles thoughts following 8-3 win over Boston

Posted on 05 May 2017 by Luke Jones

With the Orioles finishing off a rocky 3-4 road trip with an 8-3 win over the Boston Red Sox, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. The Orioles didn’t enjoy their four-game series in Boston for a variety of reasons, but you had to be impressed with their fortitude when it would have been easy to just look forward to going home Thursday night. Salvaging a split really showed something underneath the hood.

2. Considering he found out he’d be starting less than 24 hours before first pitch, Tyler Wilson turned in a crucial six-inning performance to not only give the Orioles a good chance to win but also save a pitching staff that had its rotation turned upside down a day earlier.

3. Retiring 12 of the final 13 hitters he faced, Wilson again showed he isn’t intimidated pitching at Fenway, the same place where he threw eight shutout innings in a win last season. It remains to be seen whether he can succeed in the majors long term, but the kid battles.

4. His profanity-laced rant garnered some unflattering attention — even if he made very sound points — but Manny Machado can hold his head up over how he handled himself on the field. He clobbered his third homer of the series to give the Orioles the lead in the fourth.

5. An unusual number of opposing lefty starters has limited the at-bats for Seth Smith early on, but the veteran collected four hits to raise his average from .222 to .286. His .397 on-base percentage thus far is exactly what the Orioles were looking for when they acquired him from Seattle.

6. Smith’s swipe of home on the back end of a double steal gave the Orioles their eighth and ninth stolen bases of the year after a total of 19 in 2016. With the offense not exactly firing on all cylinders, it’s been good to see them force the issue some.

7. I’m guessing more than a few fans were afraid early on that the Orioles were going to be shut down by Kyle Kendrick in his first major league appearance since 2015. It took a little while, but the third time through the order did the trick.

8. It paled in comparison to what happened at Yankee Stadium last week, but the Orioles bullpen made it interesting in the seventh as Donnie Hart and Mychal Givens combined to load the bases with two outs. You hope the group now being back to full strength will stabilize things.

9. Joey Rickard received praise for his inning-ending catch in the seventh, but Statcast rated the play as having a routine 96-percent catch probability. It wasn’t a graceful grab, but Buck Showalter was certainly relieved that he made the play.

10. Zach Britton allowed one hit and struck out Jackie Bradley Jr. on an impressive slider in a scoreless ninth inning, but he didn’t get much movement on his sinker for the second straight outing since his return from the disabled list.

11. Just over nine months removed from Tommy John surgery, Hunter Harvey will complete a 25-pitch bullpen session on Friday. That’s certainly encouraging news for the former first-round pick who’s just 22 years old.

12. Given how mentally draining these last seven games with New York and Boston were, the Orioles have to be happy to conclude a season-opening stretch of 24 of 27 games against the American League East. Nineteen of their next 22 come against opponents outside the division.

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Orioles prospect Hunter Harvey to undergo Tommy John surgery

Posted on 21 July 2016 by Luke Jones

Nearly two full years after originally being shut down with right elbow discomfort, Orioles pitching prospect Hunter Harvey will undergo Tommy John surgery on Tuesday.

The 21-year-old exited his minor-league rehab start with short-season Single-A Aberdeen on Saturday after just 1 1/3 innings due to discomfort in his right flexor mass, the original diagnosis he received in late July of 2014, his first full professional season. The ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction — which typically requires about a year to recover — will be performed by Dr. Donald D’Alessandro in Charlotte, N.C. on Tuesday.

Despite pitching to a 3.18 ERA in 87 2/3 innings with Single-A Delmarva in 2014 to establish himself as one of the top 100 prospects in baseball, Harvey has experienced an array of health problems that have threatened to derail a promising career. In addition to the recurring forearm and elbow discomfort preceding Tuesday’s surgery, the 2013 first-round pick has lost extensive time due to a broken fibula in 2015 and sports hernia surgery earlier this season, factors that likely made it more difficult to assess how Harvey’s elbow was responding to the conservative treatment used in hopes of him avoiding surgery.

Harvey did not pitch last season and had made only five combined starts between the Gulf Coast League and Aberdeen in 2016. He has posted a 2.79 ERA with 157 strikeouts in 125 2/3 career innings in the minor leagues.

While many pitchers have made successful recoveries from Tommy John surgery, this is clearly disheartening news for the Orioles, whose current starting rotation ranks among the worst in the majors. With Dylan Bundy now in the majors — and three years removed from the same procedure — Harvey was considered the top prospect in a Baltimore system lacking starting pitching depth across the board.

However, Bundy’s mere presence in the current starting rotation now is a good reminder that Harvey is far too young to write off as a potential key cog of the future.

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Orioles prospect Harvey again dealing with forearm soreness

Posted on 17 July 2016 by Luke Jones

The night before Dylan Bundy was set to make his first major league start, the Orioles saw another health concern arise with the top pitching prospect in the organization.

Right-hander Hunter Harvey left Saturday’s start with short-season Single-A Aberdeen with right forearm soreness. The 21-year-old lasted just 1 2/3 innings and threw 23 pitches before being removed from the game.

Manager Buck Showalter didn’t offer many specifics regarding Harvey prior to Sunday’s series finale at Tampa Bay, but he noted that his velocity was in the mid-90s and expressed hope that it was more of a precautionary move. Of course, this isn’t the first time that Harvey has experienced arm problems as he was shut down with right flexor mass soreness in 2014 and again experienced elbow discomfort last year.

Those concerns coupled with a fibula fracture in 2015 and sports hernia surgery earlier this year have limited the 2013 first-round pick to just 12 2/3 minor-league innings since July of 2014.

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Orioles “encouraged” by Gallardo’s progress with shoulder

Posted on 18 May 2016 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — With the Orioles about to embark on their longest road trip of the season so far, Yovani Gallardo will take another important step in his recovery from right shoulder tendinitis in Anaheim.

The veteran starting pitcher has responded well since beginning a throwing program over the weekend and is scheduled to complete his first bullpen session on Sunday. If that goes well, he’ll have another bullpen session on Tuesday with the plan of pitching a simulated game on May 27.

Orioles manager Buck Showalter said it’s possible that Gallardo would then be ready to begin a minor-league rehab assignment and probably wouldn’t need more than one or two rehab starts before potentially being activated.

“They’re all parts of the process,” Showalter said. “His arm swing and the backspin on the ball, he’s doing some things he couldn’t do before. I’m encouraged about this if we can stay on this schedule.”

The 30-year-old has been on the 15-day disabled list since April 23 after experiencing right shoulder discomfort in Kansas City a night earlier. It was the first time in his major league career that Gallardo was sent to the DL for an arm injury.

In his four starts covering 18 innings at the beginning of the season, Gallardo posted a 7.00 ERA with nine strikeouts and seven walks and was averaging a career-low 88.3 miles per hour on his fastball, down 2.2 mph from his 2015 average. He signed a two-year, $22 million contract in late February after the initial three-year, $35 million agreement was restructured due to the organization’s concerns about the health of his shoulder when he took his physical.

Showalter also said that pitching prospect Hunter Harvey will begin a throwing program on May 24 as he continues to recover from sports hernia surgery.

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Orioles keeping options open at shortstop in Hardy’s absence

Posted on 03 May 2016 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — The original Orioles lineup written out by Buck Showalter did not have Manny Machado at shortstop in the series opener against the New York Yankees on Tuesday night.

An afternoon conversation with the two-time Gold Glove third baseman, however, prompted the Baltimore manager to change his mind, shifting Machado to his natural shortstop position and moving recalled utility infielder Ryan Flaherty from short to third base. Showalter said earlier this season when Hardy was dealing with a calf issue that he slightly preferred the defensive alignment of Flaherty at third base with Machado at shortstop, but the Orioles will keep all options open with their three-time Gold Glove shortstop now expected to miss at least a month with a hairline fracture in his left foot.

Slick-fielding veteran shortstop Paul Janish remains a strong possibility to be promoted from Triple-A Norfolk in the near future, and Showalter reminded reporters that Pedro Alvarez has also started more than 500 games at the hot corner in his major league career. Of course, Alvarez at third base wouldn’t represent the optimal defensive alignment for a club that puts much emphasis in defense.

“There’s some other things that we could do,” said Showalter about his decision to move Machado to shortstop on Tuesday. “I’d keep in mind, too, that Pedro’s played a lot of third base. He’s actually played more third base than Manny has in the big leagues. There are some options there. I’d like to keep them all open; I’d also like to keep from moving guys around a lot.

“This is the way we’re going to go tonight.”

Drafted as a shortstop out of high school and having played all but two career minor-league games there before he was promoted to the majors in 2012, Machado was only making his ninth career major league start at short on Tuesday night. The Orioles know the 23-year-old can play elite defense at third base, but it remains to be seen just how good his defense would be at shortstop over the long haul.

The best defensive left side of the infield in Hardy’s absence would likely be Janish at shortstop with Machado staying at third, but the former has hit just .216 and posted a .574 on-base plus slugging percentage in parts of seven major league seasons, making him less than ideal for an everyday role. The Orioles would rather not weaken their defense at two positions, but Flaherty is a better third baseman than shortstop, which has facilitated the opportunity for Machado to play his natural position on occasion.

Perhaps the time is now to see how Machado’s incredible skill at third base translates to shortstop over an extended time as Showalter even noted that he’s seen better preparation than ever from the young superstar who was named American League Player of the Month for April.

“It’s just been so much more focused every day,” Showalter said. “You can tell by the look in his eye that he has a real passion for what he’s trying to accomplish for our team.”

Britton encouraged by ankle improvement

Closer Zach Briton was happy that a magnetic resonance imaging exam revealed no structural damage to the left ankle he jammed on Saturday, and he hopes to return at some point during the Yankees series.

The lefty reliever played catch on Tuesday afternoon to better gauge how close he was to being 100 percent from a pitching standpoint. Britton told reporters that all pain is virtually gone when he walks after he was on crutches just a couple days earlier.

“I feel a lot better. The flexibility and range of motion is back,” Britton said. “It’s just swollen. It’s got some bruising, but as long as I can manage the pain. That’s going to be the biggest issue right now. Does it hurt me doing baseball things — covering first, having to field the bunt, or what not? Those are things that I’m going to have to test out.”

Gallardo update

It remains unclear when starting pitcher Yovani Gallardo (right shoulder tendinitis) will resume throwing, but Showalter is hoping they’ll see a better pitcher than the one who posted a 7.00 ERA in 18 innings last month.

“I’m very optimistic about the return we’re going to get on some of the things that he’s doing,” Showalter said. “Hopefully, he’s moving towards throwing here before too long.”

The 30-year-old was sent to the 15-day disabled list with an arm-related ailment for the first time in his career on April 23.

Harvey sidelined again

Showalter confirmed that top pitching prospect Hunter Harvey underwent sports hernia surgery on Tuesday, the latest challenge in a career that’s been derailed by various injuries since July 2014.

However, the Orioles aren’t as concerned with the current ailment since it has nothing to do with the elbow issues he experienced in each of the previous two seasons.

“If he pitches from June, July on and finishes up strong like we think he can, I think he’s OK,” Showalter said. “But we’d really like to see him get the ball every fifth day at some point there and kind of get some of that experience he needs to finish off some things [with his development].”

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Hardy reportedly expected to miss 6-8 weeks with hairline fracture

Posted on 02 May 2016 by Luke Jones

Orioles manager Buck Showalter’s fears were realized Monday as shortstop J.J. Hardy will be sidelined with a hairline fracture in his left foot.

According to MASN, Hardy is expected to miss six to eight weeks after fouling a ball off his left foot in the fourth inning of Sunday’s loss to the Chicago White Sox. The 33-year-old infielder temporarily stayed in the game before leaving in the sixth inning as Pedro Alvarez took his place in the lineup and Manny Machado shifted from third base to shortstop.

It remains to be seen how the Orioles will handle Hardy’s absence, but it appears likely that utility infielder Ryan Flaherty will be recalled from Triple-A Norfolk to take his place on the 25-man roster. Baltimore could move Machado to shortstop with Flaherty serving as the primary third baseman, but Chris Davis and Pedro Alvarez have also played at the hot corner in the past.

Another option would be 33-year-old infielder Paul Janish, who is currently hitting .318 at Triple-A Norfolk and plays superb defense at shortstop. However, he owns a career .216 average in the majors with a .574 on-base plus slugging percentage in 1,242 plate appearances over seven seasons.

Regardless of what the Orioles decided to do, the injury is a definite blow from both offensive and defensive perspectives.

In other injury-related news, pitching prospect Hunter Harvey is expected to undergo sports hernia surgery this week and will be sidelined for several weeks.

On the positive side, MASN reports that Zach Britton’s left ankle continues to feel better and the All-Star closer could even be available to pitch at some point during the three-game series with the New York Yankees beginning Tuesday night.

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Gausman, Matusz set to begin rehab assignments

Posted on 06 April 2016 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — Orioles starting pitcher Kevin Gausman is ready for the next step in his recovery from right shoulder tendinitis that’s sidelined him since the middle of the March.

After completing a 30-pitch simulated game in Sarasota on Wednesday, the 25-year-old is traveling to Baltimore and will make a rehab start lasting three to four innings for Double-A Bowie on Saturday. He would then make a start at Single-A Frederick next week with the goal of being activated on April 19.

Left-handed reliever Brian Matusz (left intercostal strain) is even closer to making his return and is expected to pitch one inning each on Thursday and Friday at Bowie. Should those outings go well, Matusz would be activated from the 15-day disabled list on Sunday since his stint was backdated to March 25.

Pitching prospect Hunter Harvey (groin strain) threw 40 pitches in Sarasota and will pitch in a sim game on Saturday. Harvey will begin his season at Frederick when he’s ready to go.

Chris Tillman will start the series opener against Tampa Bay on Friday after the Opening Day starter threw only 22 pitches because of Monday’s rain delay. Mike Wright will make his first start on Saturday, but the Baltimore skipper has not yet revealed his No. 5 starter, who would pitch on Sunday.

Showalter didn’t try to make too much of the boos from some fans when outfielder Hyun Soo Kim was introduced on Opening Day after a turbulent spring that included him refusing a minor-league assignment.

“They’re waiting to embrace him,” said Showalter, who quipped that fans may have been calling Kim’s middle name. “So far, he hasn’t had the opportunity yet to give them anything. Hopefully, that will be there at some point. It didn’t seem to affect him. We’ll see.”

Below are Wednesday night’s starting lineups:

MINNESOTA
2B Brian Dozier
1B Joe Mauer
RF Miguel Sano
3B Trevor Plouffe
LF Eddie Rosario
DH Byung Ho Park
SS Eduardo Escobar
C Kurt Suzuki
CF Byron Buxton

SP Kyle Gibson (2015 stats: 11-11, 3.84 ERA)

BALTIMORE
3B Manny Machado
CF Adam Jones
1B Chris Davis
RF Mark Trumbo
C Matt Wieters
DH Pedro Alvarez
SS J.J. Hardy
2B Jonathan Schoop
LF Joey Rickard

SP Yovani Gallardo (2015 stats: 13-11, 3.42 ERA)

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Can Bundy, Harvey restore some faith in Orioles’ future?

Posted on 19 February 2016 by Luke Jones

The Orioles are optimistic about their chances in 2016, especially if they complete deals with starting pitcher Yovani Gallardo and outfielder Dexter Fowler as many anticipate.

But there’s no avoiding concern when you take a peek toward the future. It’s no secret that Baltimore’s farm system ranks among the worst in baseball in the eyes of multiple publications, and they now appear on the verge of forfeiting their top two choices in the 2016 amateur draft. Instead of having up to eight picks in the first 91 slots as it appeared possible at the start of the offseason, the Orioles will have four — none in the top 50 — if both Gallardo and Fowler agree to play at Camden Yards this summer.

In looking at the farm system, we once again come back to the health of pitching prospects Dylan Bundy and Hunter Harvey, who both took part in the first official workout of the spring on Friday. Injuries have derailed their promising futures, but the Orioles are expressing optimism that each pitcher is finally back on track.

With Bundy, the future is now since he enters the spring out of minor-league options. After finally appearing to be past the effects of his 2013 Tommy John surgery, the 23-year-old was limited to just 22 professional innings last year before being shut down with a sore right shoulder. He was shut down again in the Arizona Fall League with right forearm tightness, but that was deemed to be minor and he’s working without any restrictions at the start of the spring.

“He’s as good right now as I’ve seen him since he’s been with the Orioles,” director of player development Brian Graham said Thursday on MLB Network. “I think health is the major factor. He’s throwing the ball well. He looks good. He’s got a smile on his face. He’s healthy. This is a different guy right now.

“Dylan Bundy’s ready to finally be healthy and be the kind of guy that we always expected.”

The only problem is that Bundy is far from a finished product with just 38 2/3 innings above the Single-A level under his belt, and he will now be relegated to bullpen duty in the majors as a pseudo-Rule 5 pick without the benefit of being able to send him to the minors at the end of the season. Even if he remains healthy — a major question until he proves otherwise — how will a bullpen role impact his development?

You can’t help but wonder if Bundy has already reached the point of no return, at least as it relates to visions of him being the future ace in Baltimore. If effective in short relief or as a long man, the 2011 first-round pick will still have a difficult time building up innings to the point where he can be relied on as a full-time starter in the near future.

Of course, the Orioles would just like to see him healthy enough to pitch in any capacity for a full season before they start worrying about what might come next.

Meanwhile, the 21-year-old Harvey says his forearm and elbow are healthy after he’s been shut down with a strained right flexor mass in each of the last two years. The 2013 first-round pick saw his stock skyrocket with a 3.18 ERA as a 19-year-old at Single-A Delmarva in 2014 before he was shut down in late July of that season.

He hasn’t pitched in a professional regular-season game since then, but Harvey told reporters in Sarasota on Friday that he has been throwing since December and is fully cleared for spring training as a non-roster invitee. He will likely begin the 2016 season at either Delmarva or Single-A Frederick.

“All the medical reviews and the MRIs and everything he’s gone through, they say he’s 100 percent healthy,” Graham said. “If Hunter has the ability to stay healthy and pitch the way he’s capable of, he has a chance to be special. I think sometimes he might be glossed over just a little bit, and people don’t quite realize how good he is.”

At this point, the Orioles and their fans are in wait-and-see mode when it comes to both young pitchers. A clean bill of health at the start of spring training isn’t the same as being healthy in late March and in early June and for an entire season, but it’s a start.

No news is good news as it relates to the health of Bundy and Harvey, and such a development would be a much-needed shot in the arm for the Orioles’ pitching future.

No pun intended.

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