Tag Archive | "Huskies"

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Edsall expects negative reaction in return to UConn Saturday

Posted on 10 September 2013 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — As much as Maryland coach Randy Edsall would like to pretend otherwise, the matchup between the Terrapins and Connecticut this Saturday isn’t just another game.

It couldn’t be, given Edsall’s 12-year tenure as the Connecticut head coach before he abruptly left to take the job at Maryland after the 2010 season.

Edsall got his first head coaching job at Connecticut in 1999. He took the program from the Football Championship Subdivision level to the Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the Big East.

He was the school’s all-time leader in wins (74) and games coached (144).

Although UConn beat Maryland last year at Byrd Stadium, this will be Edsall’s first trip back to East Hartford’s Renscheler Field. His list of priorities begins with helping the Terrapins improve to 3-0 for the first time since 2001.

“I have a lot of great memories of Rentchler Field and coaching there and a lot of good game splayed there and good fan support,” Edsall said Tuesday. “But you’ve got to put that behind you because the attention and the focus need to be on preparing this week and playing the best game we can in a hostile environment.”

Maryland will be playing its first road game of the season after two lopsided victories at home against Florida International (43-10) and Old Dominion (47-10). The Terrapins can expect to be surrounded by a home crowd more energetic than usual because of the circumstances surrounding Edsall’s departure.

Edsall coached the Huskies in their 48-20 loss to Oklahoma in the 2010 Fiesta Bowl. Afterward, he flew to Maryland for a job interview rather than returning home with his team. Many of the players learned of his departure through the news media. Edsall wasn’t able to meet with all the players personally to explain his decision, but did talk to most of the players on a conference call.

Edsall said last year that he regretted how he handled the situation. He expects he’ll hear plenty about it while on the Maryland sideline during the game.

“Anytime you go on the road, they’re going to boo you and they’re not gonna like you,” Edsall said. “I wouldn’t expect anything different. I’m sure there will be some people — maybe my golf buddies — that might cheer for us.”

Connecticut coach Paul Pasqualoni expects Edsall to receive a mixed reaction upon his return.

“Some people probably really appreciated the years and the work that Randy put in here,” Pasqualoni said. “I’m sure that there’s that population out there. There are other people that are probably still a little upset in the way things sorted out in the end.”

UConn senior defensive end Jesse Joseph expects the Huskies (1-1) to use Edsall’s return as motivation.

“There’s some guys on the team who feel like, because it’s Edsall, we need to come out as high as we can, more focused more violent than ever before,” Joseph said. “And that could be a good thing.  We could always use that. Some people do use that. I could use that, and that’s something that you’ll definitely see on the field.”

Maryland’s players have been made aware of what to expect from the crowd. But they have their own reasons for wanting to win, and it’s got nothing to do with their head coach.

“We’re rolling right now and we just want to keep it going,” linebacker Matt Robinson said. “We’ve just got to go out there and do what we’ve been doing.”

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Terps expect hungry UConn team coming off bye, Towson loss

Posted on 10 September 2013 by WNST Staff

Linebacker Matt Robinson

On his versatility:

“It’s been a change, but I think I’ve adapted pretty well. I’ve always had a good grasp on the defense so just moving down into the box wasn’t that hard to adjust to, just the physical nature and how fast it comes.”

On this game week being any different:

“Just approaching it as another game on the schedule; first opportunity a lot of us have had to be 3-0 as Terps.  We’re just really focused on that. It doesn’t really matter who the opponent is, just going up there to get a win.”

Quarterback C.J. Brown

On the offense through two games:

“We’re going out and executing, that’s the biggest thing. We’re all on the same page, we’re just going out and doing what we do in practice. Go out there have fun, put the ball in playmakers’ hands and guys are going out and making plays. The biggest thing is we’re not shooting ourselves in the foot, we’re not going out and turning the ball over or having a lot of penalties.”

On what it will take to defeat Connecticut:

“They just had a bye week so we don’t have too much film on them this year. They have a new defensive coordinator.  They showed a lot of man coverage so it’ll be interesting to see how they play against us.  If they want those matchups on the outside, maybe they do, maybe they don’t.  We just gotta go in there and play our game.”

Linebacker Yannick Ngakoue

On the defense’s expectations for Connecticut:

“I’m expecting it to be a pretty good game because they just lost to Towson so I know they’re going to play with a chip on their shoulder.  Basically, I expect it to be a dogfight and it’s going to be a pretty good game.”

On preparing for Connecticut’s offense:

“We have to prepare this week, all day on and off the field; watching film, studying the tendencies.  Also, we got to practice hard, practice how you play.”

On being the first road game of the season:

“It’s going to be pretty fun because it’s my first road game of my college football career.  So it’ll be pretty fun like bonding; flying on the plane with my teammates so it should be a pretty good experience.”

Defensive Back Dexter McDougle

On how the secondary performed against Old Dominion with defensive back Jeremiah Johnson in the lineup:

“I think we stepped up to the challenge. We knew ODU was going to pass the ball and they did, but we prepared all week, we were ready even if JJ couldn’t play.  Before the game, I knew Isaac [Goins] was going to make some plays, you know he had an interception and Will [Likely] is always going to make plays.  So I think we played pretty well, but there is always room to improve.”

On the confidence level with defensive backs Isaac Goins and William Likely in the lineup:

“I’m real confident; I know those guys put the work in.  They want to be good, they want to be great.  DBs just feel like this is our year, we want to step up and do whatever we got to do and that’s what we’ve been doing.”

On the expected reception by the Connecticut fans:

“Since he was the coach there a couple years ago, you know they are probably just going to ‘boo’ us, but we expect that.  We’ll let the fans do what they got to do and we’ll do what we got to do.”

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Maryland hoops opener tip-off time announced

Posted on 26 July 2013 by WNST Staff

The University of Maryland’s game against the University of Connecticut on Nov. 8, 2013, in Brooklyn will tip-off at 6:30 p.m. ET and be aired on ESPN2, Barclays Center announced Friday.

 

Maryland will be playing in Barclays Center for the second straight season. Last year, the Terrapins fell to then-No. 3 Kentucky, 72-69, in the season opener for both teams.

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Maryland to open 2013 season against UConn in Brooklyn

Posted on 02 April 2013 by WNST Staff

Terps and Huskies to play in Barclays on Nov. 8, 2013

BROOKLYN – The University of Maryland men’s basketball team will face the University of Connecticut in its 2013-14 season opener on Nov. 8 in Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.

It will be the first meeting between the schools since March 24, 2002, when the Terrapins defeated the Huskies 90-82 in the NCAA East Regional on the way to their first national championship. UConn holds a 3-2 edge all-time in the series.

“We’re looking forward to returning to Barclays Center to play a quality opponent in Connecticut,” said head coach Mark Turgeon. “This will be a great experience for our players and fans.”

“It was a great experience to play at a first-class facility like Barclays Center last season,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “We’re looking forward to returning and taking on a great opponent in front of an energetic and enthusiastic crowd.”

The Terrapins played Kentucky in the opener last season in front of a sold out Barclays Center crowd. Last month, Maryland signed a multi-year agreement to continue play at Barclays Center.

Entering Tuesday night’s NIT semifinal vs. Iowa, Maryland (25-12) has matched its most wins in a season since also winning 25 games in 2006-07. Connecticut went 20-10 in 2012-13, the first season under coach Kevin Ollie.

Tickets for Maryland vs. Connecticut will go on sale soon and will be available through Ticketmaster by visiting www.barclayscenter.com or www.ticketmaster.com, or by calling 800-745-3000.

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Loyola visits Washington for Hall of Fame Tournament battle

Posted on 11 November 2012 by WNST Staff

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland takes its first, and longest, road trip of the season to play the University of Washington on Sunday, November 11, 2012, in Seattle.

The Greyhounds and Huskies will play in a game that is part of the Basketball Hall of Fame Tip-Off Tournament. Loyola will play in the Springfield Bracket of the tournament, taking on Norfolk State University on Saturday, November 18, before facing either the University of Albany or the University of Missouri-Kansas City the following day at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn.

 

Far From Home

Loyola’s Baltimore campus is 2,326 miles from Alaska Airlines Arena, as the crow flies, making this the third-furthest from home the Greyhounds have played in the contiguous United States (the Greyhounds played in a holiday tournament at the University of Hawaii in December 1987).

The two locations of Loyola’s furthest games from home are Stanford (2,444) and UC-Davis (2,402).

 

Tune In

Sunday’s game will be televised by the new Pac-12 Network. Kevin Calabro will call the play-by-play, while Basketball Hall of Famer Lenny Wilkens will provide the color analysis.

 

Series History

Loyola and Washington will meet for the first time when the teams take the court on Sunday.

The Greyhounds are 0-3 all-time against teams currently affiliated with the Pac-12 Conference. The last time Loyola played a current Pac-12 team was when it faced the University of Arizona in the NCAA First Round on March 18, 1994, in Sacramento, Calif. The Wildcats won the meeting – Loyola’s first-ever NCAA Tournament game – 81-55 en route to the Final Four.

 

For Openers

Loyola won its season-opener on Friday night with a 71-45 decision against Binghamton University in a sold-out Reitz Arena.

The Greyhounds’ 26-point margin of victory was their largest since it defeated Howard University by 34, 85-51, on December 19, 2009.

Binghamton scored the game’s first two points, but Loyola held the Bearcats scoreless for 10-minutes, 30-seconds as part of a 19-0 run that helped the Greyhounds build a 17-point advantage. They would hold that same margin at the half, 39-22. Binghamton cut it to 14, 41-27, with 17:25 to play, but an Erik Etherly dunk spurred a 22-5 run that covered nearly nine minutes and put Loyola ahead, 61-32, with 8:58 left in the game.

Dylon Cormier led all scorers with 21 points, one of four Loyola players to reach double figures. Erik Etherly, Tyler Hubbard and Robert Olson all scored 11. Julius Brooks finished with eight points and a game-best seven rebounds.

 

Cormier Leads

Dylon Cormier scored 13 points in the first half Friday night against the Bearcats and finished with 21 points, the ninth time in his career her has reached the 20-point plateau. As a sophomore in 2011-2012, Cormier scored 20 or more seven times en route to earning All-MAAC Second Team honors with a 13.4 points per game average.

On Friday, Cormier made 8-of-14 shots from the field, 1-of-2 from behind the 3-point line and 4-of-5 at the free-throw line. He also had three assists, a block, a steal and four rebounds.

Cormier has led Loyola in scoring 14 times, and the Greyhounds are 11-3 in those games.

 

Brooks’ Big Game

Julius Brooks provided 20 solid minutes in the post off the bench for the Greyhounds, recording eight points and a game-high seven rebounds. Those numbers were not career-highs for the senior, but they were the best he’s put up in some time.

Brooks saw limited action in 29 games last season, averaging just 4.7 minutes per game, but he made his presence felt in the opener. His eight points were his most since scoring a career-best 10 on January 31, 2010, as a freshman, and his seven boards were his high since February 25, 2011, when he had eight. Both of those games came against Niagara University.

 

First Impressions

Four players made their collegiate debuts for Loyola on Friday night, starting with Jarred Jones who made a start in his first game as a Greyhound. Redshirt freshman Tyler Hubbard got into the game early in the first half for his first game action, and Jones’ classmates Eric Laster and Franz Rassman both entered the contest in the second half.

Jones played 25 minutes, and while his box score line did not show it, he made a large impact on the game. He scored just one point, but he had three rebounds, handed out two assists, picked up two steals and led all players with two blocked shots.

Laster saw three minutes of action, scored on a 15-foot jumper and grabbed an offensive rebound. Rassman played six minutes, and had a block and a rebound.

 

Hubbard Goes For 11

Tyler Hubbard made 4-of-9 shots, 3-of-7 from 3-point range, and finished Friday night with 11 points in his collegiate debut. In the process, he became the first player to reach double figures in his first collegiate game since Jawaan Wright came off the bench to score 10 on November 19, 2005, against Towson University.

 

Defensive Work

Loyola held Binghamton scoreless twice for stretches of eight or more minutes Friday night. The Greyhounds limited the Bearcats to 35.5-percent from the field and forced 16 turnovers. Binghamton also made just 18.2-percent of 3-point attempts.

On the glass, Loyola held the Bearcats to just five offensive rebounds, grabbing 24-of-29 boards on the defensive glass (82.7-percent).

 

MAAC Preseason Poll & Player of the Year

The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference unveiled its preseason coaches’ poll and the league’s Preseason Player of the Year on Friday night in a live Preseason Awards Show on ESPN3. Loyola was named the team to beat in 2012-2013, and Erik Etherly was tabbed the Preseason Player of the Year by the coaches. (Complete poll and All-MAAC teams at left).

This is the first time Loyola has been selected No. 1 in the MAAC preseason poll in 24 years in the league, nor had a Greyhound player been named Preseason Player of the Year prior to Etherly.

 

What’s Back

Loyola returns eight of 12 players who saw game action, including four players – forward Erik Etherly and guards Dylon Cormier, Robert Olson and R.J. Williams – who started in the NCAA Tournament game last season.

In all, the eight returning players accounted for 73-percent of Loyola’s minutes last year, 70-percent of rebounds, 80-perecnt of assists, 79-percent of steals, 65-percent of blocked shots and 71-percent of points.

 

So Long

Four players departed from last year’s roster, including J’hared Hall and Shane Walker who graduated from Loyola in May and two players who elected to transfer – Justin Drummond (Toldeo) and Pierson Williams (Cal State-Dominguez Hills).

Walker started all 33 games in the post for Loyola last year and averaged 9.0 points and 6.3 rebounds per game while dishing out 50 assists and blocking 42 shots. Drummond was an All-MAAC Third Team honoree and MAAC Sixth Player of the Year while scoring 10.7 points per game a year ago.

 

Preseason MAAC Honors

Three Loyola players were named to the various Preseason All-MAAC teams as voted on by the coaches of the league.

Erik Etherly earned an All-MAAC First Team nod, while Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson were named to the Second Team.

The MAAC will announce its preseason poll of order of finish in the league on its Preseason Awards Show that will be aired on ESPN3 this Friday at 8:15 p.m.

 

Classy Senior

Senior guard Robert Olson was named one of 30 candidates for the prestigious Senior CLASS Award last week. An acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School®, the Senior CLASS Award focuses on the total student-athlete and encourages students to use their platform in athletics to make a positive impact as leaders in their communities.

Olson was the Greyhounds’ third-leading scorer last season with 11.1 points per game and enters this season Loyola ranked fourth at Loyola in 3-point percentage (138-of-336, .4107) sixth in career 3-pointers made (138) and eighth in 3-pointers attempted (336).

Last season, Olson was one of four Loyola players to earn All-MAAC honors, picking up Third Team mention and later All-Tournament honors.

 

High Marks

The Loyola men’s basketball team scored the highest amongst squads in the State of Maryland in the most recent NCAA Graduation Success Rate report. The Greyhounds checked in with a 91-percent GSR, tops among the state’s nine Division I schools, for players who entered the school between 2002-2005.

 

Saint Peter’s Game At The Meadowlands

The Loyola-Saint Peter’s Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game slated for Saturday, December 8, has been moved from the Peacocks’ Jersey City campus to the IZOD Center in East Rutherford, N.J., at the Meadowlands complex.

The Greyhounds and Peacocks will tip-off at 12 noon prior to the second game of the doubleheader between Duke and Temple.

 

Second NCAA Trip

Last year, Loyola made its first trip to the NCAA Tournament in 18 seasons, a span of 17 years, 11 months and 23 days. In all, it was 6,569 days between NCAA Tournament Games for the Greyhounds.

Last year’s true freshmen – Tyler Hubbard and R.J. Williams – were less than one year old the last time Loyola played in an NCAA match.

 

MAAC Title

Loyola won its second MAAC Championship in 23 years in the conference on Monday, March 5, 2012, defeating Fairfield University, 48-44, in the lowest scoring championship game in league history.

The Greyhounds held Fairfield to just six second-half field goals and 28.8-percent shooting in the game.

Loyola, which finished second in the conference during the regular season and earned the No. 2 seed in the league tournament, defeated Niagara University and Siena College in the MAAC Quarterfinals and Semifinals, respectively.

 

Defense Wins Championships

The Greyhounds played outstanding defense in the MAAC title game, holding Fairfield to 44 points and 28.8-percent shooting for the game. The 44 points were the fewest Loyola had allowed in a game this season. It was the fewest points a Loyola opponent had scored since the Greyhounds held Dartmouth to 41 in a 58-41 decision on November 24, 2009.

Loyola allowed the Stags to shoot just 6-for-31 (.194) in the second half, scoring only 22 points, the fewest points against the Greyhounds in any half this season.

After trailing by four points (30-26) at halftime, Loyola held Fairfield without a point for the first 7:48 of the second half, and without a field goal for the first 8:48. In that period, the Greyhounds outscored the Stags 11-1 to take a 37-31 lead.

 

Turnaround…Check

Loyola completed the turnaround from finishing the 2003-2004 season with the lowest RPI in NCAA Division I basketball. The Greyhounds finished that season with a 1-27 record the season before Jimmy Patsos took over as head coach.

Since then, Loyola has gone 122-123 and culminated the turnaround by winning a school Division I record 24 games  in 2011-2012.

Patsos is one of only three coaches at the Division I level in the last 20 years to take over a program that had won zero or one game the year prior to then win 100 games at the school. He joins Steve Cleveland (BYU) and Pat Douglass (UC-Irvine) as the others.

 

Outstanding Performance By Etherly

Erik Etherly was named the MAAC Tournament Most Outstanding Player after averaging a team-best 17.3 points and 5.7 rebounds over the three games.

Etherly was in double figures in each of the three games, including back-to-back 20-point games for the first time in his career in the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds.

He followed that with 10 points, seven rebounds and a career-high five blocks in the MAAC title game vs. Fairfield.

He shot 20-for-38 (.526) from the floor and 11-for-14 (.786) from the foul line, while finishing with nine blocks.

Last season, Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team after averaging 13.7 points and 7.5 rebounds per game, both tops for the Greyhounds.

He also became the second player in school history to earn National Association of Basketball Coaches All-District honors, when he joined Mike Powell (1997) and earned Second Team laurels.

 

Cormier Continues Upswing

Dylon Cormier led the Greyhounds in scoring 13 times during the 2011-2012 season and scored 20 or more points on seven occasions as a sophomore, earning All-MAAC Second Team honors.

The Baltimore native made a huge jump in production from his freshman year when he averaged 8.1 points per game and started 28 games for Loyola. He showed a marked improvement in shooting as a sophomore, hitting 46.1-percent of his shots form the field after making just 37.9-percent as a freshman.

 

20-Win Season

The Greyhounds’ victory over Boston University on February 19, 2012, was their 20th of the season, setting a school Division I record.

Loyola, which moved to NCAA Division I in 1981-1982, had won 19 games in 2007-2008 and 18 in 2006-2007.

The overall school record for victories, 25, came in 1948-1949.

 

Patsos Named Coach & Man Of The Year

Jimmy Patsos became the first Loyola coach to earn The Rock/Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors by a vote of his peers in the league.

Patsos guided the Greyhounds to a school Division I high 24 wins and a program MAAC record 13 victories. He earned his 100th career coaching victory in November 2012 and led the Greyhounds to the No. 2 seed in the MAAC Championships.

Later in March, Patsos was named the Skip Prosser Man of the Year award for his work on and off the court, an honor presented by CollegeInsider.com.

 

2012 All-MAAC Honors

For the first time since the league expanded to three All-MAAC teams in 1998, four Greyhounds received all-league honors, topping all teams in the conference. Erik Etherly was named to the All-MAAC First Team, Dylon Cormier to the Second, and Justin Drummond and Robert Olson to the Third.

Loyola led all teams in the MAAC with its four selections, just in front of Iona’s three.

The Greyhounds’ previous high was at the end of the 1997-1998 season when Mike Powell (1st), Jason Rowe (2nd) and Roderick Platt (3rd) earned All-MAAC honors.

Etherly led Loyola in scoring (13.7), rebounding (7.5) and blocked shots (50), while finishing second on the team with 63 assists. He shot .530 from the field, good for third in the conference

Cormier was second on the team in scoring, just back of Etherly, with a 13.4 points per game average while improving his field-goal percentage nearly 10 points from his freshman season to .461 as a sophomore.

Drummond has come off the bench in 29 of the Greyhounds’ 33 games last year and is fourth on the team with 11.1 points per game. The guard as also third in rebounding (3.9), and he has scored in double figures 17 times this year.

Olson was one of the top 3-point shooters in the conference last year. He shot .431 from behind the arc, third-best in the MAAC, and averaged 11.1 points per game. The guard entered the month of January averaging less than nine points per game, but from that point forward, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at nearly 13 a contest.

 

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road last season. Patsos, who is now in his ninth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 123 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

 

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Four players – junior guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), junior forward Jordan Latham (City) and sophomore guard R.J. Williams and freshman forward Josh Forney (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Jarred Jones, John Carroll, 20.5; Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

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That was just about the last thing Randy Edsall needed…

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That was just about the last thing Randy Edsall needed…

Posted on 15 September 2012 by Glenn Clark

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — This one probably wouldn’t have been quite as bad had Maryland never seen the ball again.

If the Connecticut Huskies (2-1) had simply managed to run out the remaining 4:39 on the clock after Perry Hills pulled the Maryland Terrapins (2-1) within 24-21 thanks to a 10 yard TD run, this one might not have been quite as stinging.

Unfortunately for Terps head coach Randy Edsall Saturday, his first meeting with his former school did end with that same 24-21 score, but it didn’t end that way.

Instead UConn gave Maryland the ball right back with plenty of time (3:29 left), two timeouts and good field position (the Maryland 42) needing only a field goal to force overtime.

What happened in those final moments will cause greater consternation for Edsall than even a blowout loss may have.

Instead of marching down to tie things up-or perhaps finish off a victory which would allow Maryland to surpass their win total of a season ago and start thinking about the possibility of bowl eligibility, the Terrapins absolutely imploded.

It started out well enough. Freshman quarterback Perry Hills (who struggled to final numbers of 11-25, 122 yards, 1TD and 1INT) pushed the Terps just outside the edge of field goal range thanks to a 12 yard completion to WR Kerry Boykins. That was followed by a six yard run by freshman RB Wes Brown, leaving the Terps on UConn’s 37 yard line with roughly three minutes to play.

From the 37 yard line with 3:00 to play, the Terps would ultimately end up running 2:35 off the clock running six plays that would gain a total of -3 yards and end with a turnover on downs.

There was one positive mixed in (an 11 yard catch and run from Hills to WR Stefon Diggs good for a first down), but otherwise there were sacks, quarterback scrambles, WR drops and a bizarre 3rd and long call that resulted in a four yard loss after a completed pass.

There were no timeouts called until the Terps stared down the barrel of 4th and 18 with 25 seconds to play. The timeout allowed Maryland to set up a Hail Mary pass that went through the back of the endzone.

Edsall was asked about his decision to not use a timeout after the game.

“I didn’t think about taking a timeout there” the coach said. “That’s something that we haven’t been good at even in practice…that two minute situation. Sometimes guys just try to do too much. That’s where we as coaches just have to continually teach.”

He’s right to point out that Boykins exacerbated their troubles by dropping a ball along the sideline that would have left them with third and manageable instead of 3rd and long, but it doesn’t absolve Edsall (or Offensive Coordinator Mike Locksley) of fault for the final drive.

(More on Page 2…)

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Maryland, UConn meet for “Edsall Bowl” Saturday

Posted on 14 September 2012 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, MD. - After a momentum-building win at Temple last weekend, the Maryland football team returns home to face Connecticut in Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium. It will be the first time head coach Randy Edsall coaches against his former school (the Terps will make a return trip to Connecticut in 2013) and just the second time in history the football programs have met, with the only other meeting coming in 1942, a 34-0 Maryland win.

First-and-10

• The youthful Terps showed improvement from week one to week two in dispatching of Temple 36-27. Maryland played 12 true freshmen in the season opener, the most for a Maryland team in at least 15 years, and seven players made their first career starts in the season opener. Quarterback Perry Hills received ACC Rookie of the Week honors for his play against the Owls.

• Defense has set the tone for a young but talented Maryland team in the first two games of the season. The Terps have been very tough against the run with an experienced front seven highlighted by senior defensive linemen Joe Vellano and A.J. Francis, and senior linebacker Demetrius Hartsfield. Those three have played a big role in holding opponents to an average of just 1.95 yards per rush, which ranks 10th nationally. It’s also been a disruptive defense – Maryland’s seven sacks tie for 13th in the FBS and its 17 tackles for loss are tied for 20th. Overall, the Terps are allowing just 229.5 yards per game, which ranks ninth nationally.

• Maryland has also had a knack for forcing timely turnovers in the first two games. In the closing moments of the 7-6 win over William & Mary in week one, cornerback Jeremiah Johnson forced a fumble on a sack that Hartsfield recovered to seal the game. In week two vs. Temple, the defense forced fumbles on the Owls’ first two possessions of the game and Hartsfield again helped seal the win by intercepting a tipped pass with 2:05 remaining to preserve the 36-27 victory.

• The biggest area of improvement for the Terps from week one to week two came with the offense, which is being directed by Hills, a true freshman. Hills, who became the first freshman to start a season opener for Maryland since Calvin McCall in 1999, had an excellent outing against Temple. The Pittsburgh, Pa., native went 11 of 21 for 190 yards and two touchdowns and also ran for a touchdown. He also made several momentum-changing plays on third down: he ran for an 11-yard TD on third-and-goal after fumbling the snap; he hit Marcus Leak for a 39-yard gain on third-and-17 in the third quarter; and finally, hooked up with Stefon Diggs down the sideline for 38 yards on a third-and-11 with under 4:00 left and Maryland clinging to a 29-27 lead. Hills was named ACC Rookie of the Week for his play against the Owls.

• Diggs has been Maryland’s most electric player with his contributions on offense and in the return game. The true freshman leads the team with 218 all-purpose yards, with 135 of those coming against Temple last week. He’s done it in a variety of ways, totaling 89 yards on receptions, 84 on punt returns, 25 on kickoff returns and 20 on rushes. Additionally, his 12.82 yards per touch ranks sixth in the nation among freshmen who are averaging at least 108 all-purpose yards per game.

• Justus Pickett has worked his way into the feature role at running back. After scoring what proved to be the game-winning touchdown in week one against William & Mary, Pickett saw his role increase in week two. He carried the ball a career-high 21 times for 69 yards against Temple and seemed to get stronger as the game went on. In the fourth quarter alone, Pickett rushed seven times for 36 yards, including a bulldozing seven-yard touchdown run with 2:51 remaining that put the game out of reach. Beyond Pickett, the Terps have plenty of depth in freshmen Wes Brown and Albert Reid. Redshirt freshman Brandon Ross, who had been named the starter in the preseason, missed the first two games with an injury.


Quick Hitters

• Maryland allowed William & Mary to gain just 229 yards of total offense and held Temple to 230 yards. That marks its best defensive performance in a two-game span since holding Villanova to 187 yards and FIU to 163 yards in the first two games of the 2007 season.

• Maryland won its first two games despite committing more turnovers than its opponent in each contest. All eight of the Terrapins turnovers (three interceptions, five fumbles) have come from freshmen.

• The Terps have done a good job controlling the clock. In two games, Maryland has had the ball for an average of 31:23 to 28:38 for the opponent. That’s a major upgrade compared to 2011, when Maryland averaged just 25:16 a game to 34:44 for the opponent.

• Seven players made their first career starts in the season opener against William & Mary: quarterback Perry Hills, running back Albert Reid, safety Sean Davis, defensive back Jeremiah Johnson, linebacker Cole Farrand, nose tackle Darius Kilgoand offensive lineman Nick Klemm.

• In addition to the seven first-time starters, 14 players saw their first action against William & Mary. And of the 44 players that saw time against the Tribe, 25 of them were underclassmen.

• Maryland has 14 true freshmen listed on its two-deep (excluding return men), which is the third most in the FBS (Colorado – 16, Texas – 15).

• The Terps are holding opponents to 1.95 yards per carry, which ranks 10th nationally. Of the opponents 80 rushing attempts this season, 56 have been for three yards or less (28 of 41 vs. William & Mary; 28 of 39 vs. Temple).

• Demetrius Hartsfield recorded a double-digit tackle game against William & Mary by finishing with 13. Hartsfield had seven double-digit efforts in nine games last season. Hartsfield also had a fumble recovery with 1:11 left that sealed the win.

• Head coach Randy Edsall handed out game balls for the win over Temple. Sal Conaboy got the game ball for offense,Demetrius Hartsfield for defense and A.J. Francis for special teams.

• The five Maryland players who received 2011 postseason recognition returned to the squad this year – DL Keith Bowers(freshman All-ACC), LB Lorne Goree (freshman All-ACC), LB Demetrius Hartsfield (honorable mention All-ACC), DL Andre Monroe (freshman All-American) and DL Joe Vellano (second team All-American; first team All-ACC).

• Maryland was hit hard by injuries in the preseason. Thirteen players missed the season opener due to various injuries and ailments, and 14 were out against Temple. Seven of those were potential starters on offense and defense: defensive linemanAndre Monroe; defensive backs A.J. Hendy and Matt Robinson; linebacker Kenneth Tate; quarterback C.J. Brown; running back Brandon Ross; offensive lineman Josh Cary. Place-kicker Nick Ferrara also missed the first two games. Both Monroe and Brown are out for the season.

• Perry Hills became the first true freshman starter at quarterback for Maryland since Latrez Harrison in 1999. He also became the first freshman to start a season opener since redshirt freshman Calvin McCall on Sept. 2, 1999, in a 6-0 win over Temple.

• Maryland had 15 seniors on the 2011 roster, but just 12 of those players were listed on the two-deep at some point during the year. There are 17 seniors listed on the 2012 roster.

• Eleven of the top 13 tacklers from 2011 are back this season, including Hartsfield, who had a team-high 108 stops, and safety Eric Franklin, who was second with 106.

• Three Terps ended 2011 ranked among the top 12 in the ACC in tackles. Hartsfield was second at 12.0 per game and Franklin was sixth at 8.8. Vellano was 12th with 7.8 per contest.

• There are just two returning starters (Bennett Fulper and Justin Gilbert) on Maryland’s offensive line, but six players entered the season with starting experience. De’Onte Arnett, Josh Cary, Sal Conaboy and Peter White have also started on the o-line.

• Nine bowl teams from last year appear on Maryland’s 2012 schedule: Temple (Gildan New Mexico Bowl), West Virginia (Discover Orange Bowl), Wake Forest (Franklin American Mortgage Music City), Virginia (Chick-fil-A Bowl), NC State (Belk Bowl), Georgia Tech (Hyundai Sun Bowl), Clemson (Discover Orange Bowl), Florida State (Champs Sports Bowl) and UNC (AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl).


Maryland-Connecticut Series History

• Maryland and Connecticut have played just once in school history, a 34-0 Terrapin win in College Park in 1942.

 

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FB Cierski out, OL Arnett questionable for Terps against UConn

Posted on 14 September 2012 by WNST Staff

University of Maryland Football Injury Report

vs. Connecticut

Position

Name

Injury

Status

QB C.J. Brown Knee Out for the season
DL Andrew Monroe Knee Out for the season
RB Tyler Cierski Head Out
DB Rashid Conteh Ankle Out
PK/P Nick Ferrara Hip Out
DB A.J. Hendy Ankle Out
LB Abner Logan Leg Out
LB Kenny Tate Knee Out
OL De’Onte Arnett Ankle Questionable
RB Brandon Ross Hamstring Probable
DL Joe Vellano Foot Probable

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OC Locksley expects Don Brown defense to be “headache” for Terps Saturday

Posted on 12 September 2012 by WNST Staff

Quotes from Maryland Offensive Coordinator Mike Locksley and Defensive Coordinator Brian Stewart

Offensive Coordinator Mike Locksley

On Don Brown’s Connecticut defense:

“It’s definitely a headache. They play great, solid defense, statistically and on film you can see why they’re ranked where they are defensively. He outnumbers the box, he disguises well. It’s been a trying week for us offensively just to come up with a scheme for ourselves to have some success. As we get through the week we’re feeling better and better about playing, and we feel we can go out and execute.”

On if he’s talked to the veteran defensive players about Don Brown’s former schemes:

“You know some of the guys like Kenny Tate and Joe [Vellano] have come in and given their two cents as to the background of the defense and what it entails. But you can watch the tape and what you see is pretty consistent with what we’ve heard when you do your research on it. We did a preliminary game plan in the summer so we’ve had some time to evaluate it. As we get into it this week after we’ve seen the two games they’ve played really well.”

On the importance of last week’s tempo for Perry Hills:

“It’s good to see he made the strides that you like to see all of our guys making from week one to week two. I thought Perry improved, and that’s the goal for us. He’s still a guy that got off the yellow school bus last year, and our goal is for each week to give him a plan that he can go out and be comfortable with. It’s not what we want to do, it’s what he can get accomplished and what he’s comfortable with. I think he took some steps, but we have to consistently do it.”

On Hills’ ability to throw the deep ball:

“I thought all camp long he did some nice things, and that’s how he earned the right to be the guy when we had the injuries. So, when you recruit a guy you recruit him to have the skill-set to do what you want to do on offense. I’m very pleased with his skill set and how it fits in to what we do.”

On Tyler Cierski’s injury status and how the depth at tight end allowed that to not be a major limitation:

“Well any time you don’t have Tyler it’s a blow to us offensively. He brings toughness, and his ability to get us to run downhill. As you said, the luxury of having four tight ends going into the season would give us strength at that position. Having that personnel grouping allowed us to have some flexibility to continue to be able to get under center and run some of our downhill, power pro-style run plays. A guy like Devonte Campbell coming in, or a guy like Matt Furstenburg being able to fill those roles.”

On ball security and Wes Brown bouncing back this week:

“Well I think when you look at the turnovers that’s the one thorn in my side from an offensive standpoint. You can’t turn the ball over and be a good team. That’s the one thing we’ve stressed from day one, is not beating ourselves. We’ve been very fortunate here the past couple of weeks to come away with wins when you turn the ball over seven times as an offense. I think the young guys understand the importance of it. We’ve done some things to try and reemphasize ball security. I have no doubt in my mind that a guy like Wes will bounce back, those guys understand he’s been playing that position a long time. He understands the importance of it and I expect him to bounce back and as an offense the goal is to come out of this thing without turning it over and beating ourselves.”

On if he’d be satisfied with a 3-0 start:

“There’s no satisfaction because we have a long season and we’re playing a bunch of young players. It’s been my experience having done this quite a bit in my career that you like to see the consistency out of a young team where you’re able to do it. But every week is a new week with a young ball club and young players. For us, there will be some satisfaction if we can find a way to come away with the win. But it all starts back up on Sunday, when we go out and practice it’s a brand new week.”

On Kevin Dorsey and his status as a mentor to the younger receivers:

“Well I’ve seen the unselfishness, and I know our receivers would love to see the ball a little bit more. With a young quarterback I think they realize and understand it’s more about what our quarterback can execute. I think each week you’ll see us continue to be able to add or improve on what we take in based on how fast Perry [Hills] continues to develop. I’ve been really pleased with Kevin [Dorsey] and Kerry Boykins as senior receivers who’ve sacrificed for the sake of getting wins and helping the development of a young quarterback and offense. Those guys have been just tremendous from a leadership standpoint.”

On if the selflessness is something he pressed upon them or they brought on their own:

“I think communication is the key, and those guys understood when C.J. [Brown] went down, there were maybe going to be some things that would take some time with a young quarterback like Perry. It’s not anything that we had to go and talk about, but I think they understood being around the game as fifth year seniors what it takes.”

On what Brandon Ross brings to the table:

“I think because of his skill set he’s a homerun threat. I’ve been pleased with the running backs in general, minus the turnovers obviously. It gives you another weapon in your arsenal, and gives you a guy that has the ability to make some things happen. Maybe at the second level he can make a guy miss, and take it the distance. He has those types of abilities.”

On Albert Reid’s role:

“That’s the thing we talk about, roles are something that change daily based on performance and situations. Going into last week, the competition at that position has been pretty good. I like that; it’s something I wish we had at every position. Depth wise, we just don’t have it at the offensive line position, even somewhat at the receiver position. The depth isn’t there to have that type of competition, but those roles will be determined by how they practice during the week. We thought Wes practiced well last week, Albert [Reid] didn’t do anything wrong per se, but his role will be determined by how we finish up this week. This is the second day of our two really tough practices, Tuesday and Wednesday, we’ll see what his role will be when we get closer to game time.”

On percent of his job is spent recruiting vs. coaching:

“It’s 50-50, you’re doing both. I’m a big believer that to be a complete coach you have to be a guy that can go out and get the groceries and come home and cook dinner. That’s just been my philosophy, I never wanted to be pegged just as a recruiter or pegged as a guy that just knows X’s and O’s. To the young coaches that I’ve often time spoke with about the business, I think you develop leverage with the ability to do both really well. Right now I have some work to do as a coach.”

On Notre Dame joining the ACC:

“I just heard that maybe an hour ago… Any time you can bring in a product like Notre Dame to our conference it helps. For right now, all my energy and thoughts are on getting ready for UConn and trying to put an offensive plan together.”

On the feelings as a recruiter when someone signs with you:

“Well you move on to the next recruit. You don’t have a lot of time to celebrate small victories, whether it’s recruiting or a game on Saturday. It’s unfortunate, we just talked about it a little as an offensive staff. There’s very little time to enjoy the process because as soon as you get a Stefon Diggs come in, then you’re on to the next guy whether it be for next year or next week. So it’s a short-lived excitement, but I think in the end it’s what you do as a coach.”

 

Defensive Coordinator Brian Stewart

On the return of defensive backs Isaac Goins and Matt Robinson:

“It’s pretty exciting. It was unfortunate that Matt [Robinson] got hurt so early in training camp, but the experience he brings and the leadership he brings back there is pretty good. He’s tried to be a leader but it’s hard when you’re not on the field. Now with him getting the chance to be on the field and help out the young guys has been awesome. Isaac [Goins] had a great spring for us. We’re excited just to get him on the field to do some things with him.”

On if he thinks the secondary has been an issue:

“Obviously we’re a work in progress. I’d like to play better on the back end, you don’t like to give up touchdown passes or pass interferences. I think they’re getting better. As a group we play a lot of young guys, as we start to stabilize guys on the field the better we’ll get.”

On Sean Davis coming in and playing in his first year:

“I think he’s holding up ok. I think you guys had a chance to talk to him earlier in the week, and you see he’s a very personable kid. He’s going to do the best he can, and it’s just hard because things are a little different and faster than when you’re in high school. It’s a learning process for him, and I think it was a good process. I’d rather him get a chance to learn in a backup role rather than a starter role, but nonetheless it was a good learning process.”

On if he has seen Sean Davis grow rapidly over the past month:

“I think he did a great job. When you’re young as a whole, there’s not a lot of football experience you can go back on especially with the speed of the game at the college level. Those young guys just have to keep seeing it. The more playing time they get, the more motions they see, and the more things that happen to them the better they get.”

On what the offense can expect to see from Don Brown and how familiar he is with Brown:

“You know what, we have some guys like Keith Dudzinski who was on the staff with [Don Brown] for quite a while. He’s talked about his thought process and what he thinks Don does and likes to do. I pretty much focus on our guys and how I’m going to attack [Connecticut]. It should be fun, it sounds like there’s going to be two pretty aggressive, pressure defenses going on. It should be fun.”

On if there’s any frustration that the media is calling this game the “Randy Bowl”:

“This is the first time I’ve heard it called the “Randy Bowl”. The great thing about Coach Edsall is that we do everything the same. We practice the same, do meetings the same, recruit the same, so I haven’t noticed anything different. I just know that we have another football game against the University of Connecticut and we’re going to do everything we can to win that game.”

On why this unit has been able to come together and rank so highly in defensive statistics:

“I’m not a big numbers guy. I’m more about looking at what we need to do to win. I just think the basic foundation of our defense is if we can stop them running the ball, focus on third down, get them off the field, and not let them score, then we have an opportunity to win every game. Those are the things I focus and drive into our guys. I just really want to play our defense and get better at our defense. Winning each down one game at a time, down by down, that’s the main focus. That’s exactly what I want the players to think.”

On how Alex Twine has held up this season:

“I think Twine has played and done everything we’ve asked him to do with that position. A lot of times the coaches don’t get credit. I have to credit Lyndon Johnson, Keith Dudzinski, as well as Greg Gattuso with just coaching their guys and making sure they know the intricacies of each position.  They make sure when a guy is called to play, he can play and I can call a total menu of plays. When Twine got thrown in, he knew everything, not to mention he had the opportunity in the spring to be the starter. That helped tremendously. I think Twine, Sean Davis, and all those guys benefit from the way the coaches have taught and making sure everyone knows our scheme defensively.”

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