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Navy G John Dowd Named Candidate for Lowe’s Senior CLASS Award

Posted on 24 August 2011 by WNST Staff

ANNAPOLIS, Md.—Navy senior offensive guard John Dowd was selected as a candidate for the 2011 Lowe’s Senior CLASS Award. To be eligible for the award, a student-athlete must be classified as an NCAA Division I FBS senior and have notable achievements in four areas of excellence – community, classroom, character and competition.

An acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School®, the Lowe’s Senior CLASS Award focuses on the total student-athlete and encourages students to use their platform in athletics to make a positive impact as leaders in their communities.   Navy quarterback Ricky Dobbs won the award last year.

Dowd, who started all 13 games last fall at right guard, was named a 2010 ESPN First-Team Academic All-American by the College Sports Information Director’s of America. He was the first Navy player since 1980 and just the fifth in program history to receive first-team recognition.  Dowd, who carries a 3.91 GPA in Mechanical Engineering, will have an opportunity this fall to be Navy’s first two-time First-Team Academic All-American in football in school history.

The 30 candidates will be narrowed to 10 finalists midway through the regular season and those 10 names will be placed on the official ballot. Ballots will be distributed through a nationwide voting system to media, coaches and fans who will select one finalist who best exemplifies excellence in the four Cs of community, classroom, character and competition.

Football Bowl Subdivision Candidates
Emmanuel Acho, Linebacker, Texas
Jeff Allen, Offensive Tackle, Illinois
Jake Bequette, Defensive End, Arkansas
Tony Bergstrom, Offensive Tackle, Utah
Michael Brewster, Center, Ohio State
Drew Butler, Punter, Georgia
Kirk Cousins, Quarterback, Michigan State
Jared Crick, Defensive Tackle, Nebraska
Austin Davis, Quarterback, Southern Mississippi
Jeff Demps, Running Back, Florida
John Dowd, Guard, Navy
Michael Egnew, Tight End, Missouri
Alan Gendreau, Placekicker, Middle Tennessee State
Kevin Goessling, Placekicker, Fresno State
Chandler Harnish, Quarterback, Northern Illinois
Aaron Henry, Free Safety, Wisconsin
Joe Holland, Linebacker, Purdue
Jared Karstetter, Wide Receiver, Washington State
Case Keenum, Quarterback, Houston
Chase Minnifield, Cornerback, Virginia
Dan Persa, Quarterback, Northwestern
Tauren Poole, Tailback, Tennessee
Nate Potter, Offensive Tackle, Boise State
Matt Reynolds, Offensive Tackle, BYU
Adrian Robinson, Defensive End, Temple
David Ruffer, Placekicker, Notre Dame
Will Snyderwine, Placekicker, Duke
Nate Stupar, Linebacker, Penn State
Bobby Wagner, Linebacker, Utah State
Dawson Zimmerman, Punter, Clemson

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Stevenson Tabs Gary Stewart as New Hoops Coach

Posted on 28 June 2011 by WNST Staff

OWINGS MILLS, Md. – A former Division I head coach with 230 career victories in 18 collegiate seasons, Gary Stewart has been named as the new head men’s basketball coach at Stevenson University, Director of Athletics Brett Adams announced on Tuesday. He replaces Adams who resigned in March after 17 seasons as the school’s first head coach to focus on his role as AD.

“Gary Stewart, at many different levels, is highly recognizable in the basketball community,” said Adams. “Beyond that, Gary Stewart played Division III basketball and was a very successful coach at the Division III level, including an NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearance. He has a reputation of bringing programs from worst to first.”

Stewart owns the unique distinction of having served as a head coach at each NCAA level. He brings 25 years as a highly-respected college coach to Stevenson, including 11 at Division I, six at Division II and eight at Division III. In 18 seasons as a college head coach, he has totaled four conference championships and six postseason appearances.

“Gary has some Division I experience, but I think his heart and soul is Division III,” commented Adams. “I am very excited about having him come on board. It was humbling to see so many top caliber candidates from over 200 qualified applicants that we had for this position. I think this will be a great triumph for Stevenson University and
Division III basketball.”

Most recently, Stewart was the head coach at the University of California, Davis from 2003-11 where he led the program’s four-year reclassification from Division II to Division I, culminating in the Aggies’ first year as an official member of the Big West Conference during the 2007-08 season.

“I am truly honored and extremely humbled to join Stevenson University as the new head men’s basketball coach,” said Stewart. “Stevenson University is growing at an unprecedented pace. I am enthusiastically looking forward to help build on the tremendous values, history and tradition of this extraordinary university.”

In eight seasons at UC Davis, Stewart mentored five Big West all-conference selections and three Freshman of the Year recipients. He posted his 200th career victory with an 85-74 win over Cal State Fullerton on Jan. 15, 2009 before becoming one of 14 charter appointment to the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Ethics Coalition in May 2009.

Stewart made an immediate impact on the Aggie program in 2003-04. Taking over a team that finished three games under .500 the previous season, he guided UC Davis to an 18-9 record and a 15-7 mark in the powerhouse California Collegiate Athletic Association in Division II. In its third year of Division I reclassification, he led the Aggies to a 64-58 upset over Stanford at The Pavilion on Dec. 4, 2005.

Under Stewart, UC Davis won more games than any other four-year transition program, averaging double-figure wins from 2003-04 through the final transition year in 2006-07. In the summer of 2006, he  was named to the National Association of Basketball Coaches Board of Directors, joining such coaches as Jim Boeheim (Syracuse), Tubby Smith (Minnesota), Bill Self (Kansas), Tom Izzo (Michigan State), Mike Brey (Notre Dame) and Bo Ryan (Wisconsin).

“There is an expectation of excellence set forth by the Stevenson administration and athletic department leadership,” added Stewart. “With a wonderful academic reputation, a passionate fan base and some of the nation’s best Division III athletic facilities, Stevenson has a great foundation in place to build a championship basketball program.”

Stewart is no stranger to Division III, earning four All-SCIAC selections at the University of La Verne and serving as team captain for three years from 1980-84 before returning as the Leopards’ head coach from 1987-95 where he guided his alma mater from last place to first place in a matter of three years. He ranks second in school history with 116 victories which includes a 20-8 record and NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearance following the 1992-93 season.

“I am committed to the mission of Division III athletics,” said Stewart. “Immersed in strong fundamentals with a team approach, I will run a goal oriented program predicated on the ‘always compete’ philosophy.  While vigorously pursuing athletic success, academic achievement will always be the guiding force of the basketball program. As I continue to formulate and implement a blueprint for the upcoming season, I will put into action the strategic plan for relentless recruiting of accomplished student-athletes needed to build and sustain a championship program.”

Stewart is the only coach in La Verne history to lead his team to a SCIAC title, a feat he accomplished three times, or a berth in the NCAA Division III Men’s Basketball Championship. In 2002, he was honored as a Distinguished Graduate during the university’s 75th Diamond Jubilee festivities while he was later inducted into the University of La Verne Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009.

Stewart received his bachelor’s of science degree in physical education from La Verne in 1984 and captured the SCIAC’s Ted Ducey Award, bestowed upon one senior who best exemplifies outstanding achievement in academics, athletics, leadership and sportsmanship. In addition, he was selected as the recipient of the Anthony P. Scafani Sportsman of the Year Award.

Stewart, who began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Long Beach State for two seasons from 1984-86, completed his master’s of arts degree in education at La Verne in 1995.

After eight seasons with the Leopards, Stewart spent two as the head coach at Division II Cal State East Bay from 1995-97. The program that had gone 22-79 in the four seasons prior to his arrival, but in just two years, Stewart led the Pioneers to a share of the NCAC title with UC Davis. For his efforts, he was named the 1997 NCAC Co-Coach of the Year and was selected by the Oakland Tribune as the Bay Area Men’s College Coach of the Year for all NCAA divisions.

Following UC Santa Barbara, Stewart spent one season as an assistant coach at UC Santa Barbara under Jerry Pimm during the 1997-98 season and was honored by Dunk Magazine as one of the top assistant coaches in the country.

Stewart was an assistant coach at Washington State from 1999-2002 and was an assistant coach to Michigan State’s Tom Izzo for the 2002 NABC All-Star Game. He assisted former Maryland head coach Gary Williams in 2003 and Hall of Famers Jim Boeheim (Syracuse) in 2004 and Jim Calhoun (Connecticut) in 2005. He also worked with Bruce Weber (Illinois) in
2006 and John Brady (LSU) in 2007.

Prior to UC Davis, Stewart served as the director of basketball services at UCLA under Steve Lavin during the 2002-03 season.

In addition to coaching, Stewart has 16 years of experience as a university lecturer and assistant professor while serving two years as an assistant and associate athletic director at Cal State East Bay. He is a member of the NABC and Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA).

Stewart’s service also includes the NABC Ethics Committee and Assistant Coaches Board of Directors and NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Regional Advisory Committee.

An active participant in community service, Stewart traveled to the Middle East as part of the United Service Organization’s (USO) “Operation Hoop Talk.” In 2009, after his first visit to Iraq and Kuwait, he was one of four coaches, including Georgetown’s John Thompson III, to serve as a court coach at the USA Basketball  U18 Team Trials in Washington, D.C., featuring former Connecticut star Kemba Walker.

Stewart’s other highlights include the United Way, ALS Foundation, Free Throws For Heroes program for 9/11 relief, which was adopted by the NABC, Special Olympics and raising relief funds for the American Red Cross in the wake of the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

Stewart has twice been honored with the UC Davis Community Service Award and, in 2008, the Diversity and Principles of Community Achievement Recognition Award. In four seasons in the Big West Conference under Stewart, the Aggie men’s basketball team received three consecutive Big West Conference Team Sportsmanship Awards in 2009, 2010, 2011.

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Terps beat Colgate in 95-40 laugher as sobering challenge awaits in Durham

Posted on 05 January 2011 by Luke Jones

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The game wasn’t over at tip-off, but it was pretty darn close.

After freshman Pat Moore’s opening bucket gave Colgate a 2-0 lead, Maryland’s 22-0 run led to a dominating 95-40 win at Comcast Center on Tuesday night. With the easy victory, the Terps closed out a month-long homestand with a three-game winning streak, albeit against less-than-stellar competition.

Forward Jordan Williams earned his eight straight double-double and 12th of the season, continuing his early-season dominance with 12 points and 11 rebounds. Senior Adrian Bowie led all scorers with 16 points, continuing his strong play since being shifted to the off-guard position late last month.

Earning his first career start at point guard, Terrell Stoglin added 12 points and four assists as coach Gary Williams continues to search for the right answer in the backcourt. Fellow freshman Pe’Shon Howard had started at the point the last two games following the loss to Boston College last month.

“I think [Stoglin] did a great job,” said Dino Gregory, one of five Terps scoring in double figures with 12 points. “He brought a lot of energy to the game. He brought a lot of defensive energy, a lot of offensive energy. For the first time — a freshman starting like that — I think he did a very good job.”

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A runaway win against the 1-12 Raiders — alley oops and all — won’t teach us much of anything about the unsettled backcourt with a sobering task awaiting Maryland on Sunday:

Cameron Indoor Stadium and No. 1 Duke.

If a road trip to take on the top-ranked team in the country isn’t intimidating enough, remember the Terps have lost by a combined 62 points in their last two trips to Durham, N.C.

And that was with Greivis Vasquez and Eric Hayes in the backcourt.

Yes, the unproven Terps will need to play a near-perfect basketball game on Sunday to have a chance against undefeated Duke, the only ACC team currently ranked in the top 25. Despite playing competitively with ranked teams such as Pittsburgh and Illinois, Maryland has been undone by poor free-throw shooting, occasional lapses in perimeter defense, and inconsistent play in the backcourt at critical times this season.

It’s a scary formula that could lead to the Terps being on the opposite end of what fans witnessed against overwhelmed Colgate.

Well, maybe not that bad, but you get the point.

However unlikely a win might be, the competitiveness in Maryland’s four losses —  by a combined 20 points — is exactly what Gary Williams is looking for against his biggest rival.

“In terms of how we want to play, I don’t think you can back off,” Williams said. “You’re going to have to bring your game, and if it’s good enough, fine. If it’s not, at least you went down playing the way you [want to] play, so I’ve always believed in that. And hopefully we’ll prove that on the floor.”

If Maryland is to have a chance against Duke — whose last loss came in College Park on March 3, 2010 — the freshmen tandem of Stoglin and Howard will need to play beyond their years in arguably the most hostile environment in college basketball. Both have shown flashes — Howard’s game-winning shot against Charleston and Stoglin’s showy passing and scoring — but have been just as frustrating to watch at other times, looking like the inexperienced players that they are.

A freshman point guard going into Cameron has won before, but it takes a special performance that might be too much to ask of Stoglin or Howard. Just four years ago, it was a freshman Vasquez who narrowly missed a triple-double with 13 points, 12 assists, and nine rebounds in an 85-77 upset on Feb. 28, 2007.

However, the three subsequent years produced no more Cameron victories for one of the greatest players in school history, proving just how difficult it is to beat Mike Krzyzewski and the Devils on their home floor.

“It’s going to be a war,” said senior Adrian Bowie, who will have his final opportunity for a win in Durham. “Cameron Indoor Stadium is not for the weak. It’s going to be a war, and everybody needs to be ready to play.”

A war, indeed. One this Maryland team will have a tough time surviving.

NOTES: The 55-point win was Maryland’s largest margin of victory this season as 11 of the 12 Terps who played managed to score in the game. … Williams’ eighth straight double-double moved him past Joe Smith’s streak of seven set in 1995. He is only four away from tying Len Elmore’s school record of 12 straight in the 1973-74 season. The sophomore also had three blocks. … Over the last eight games, Bowie has 35 assists and only 11 turnovers. … The Terps matched a season high with nine 3-pointers made. … Colgate made its first shot of the game before missing the next 15. … Maryland had six runs of at least 6-0 in the game. … Maryland’s bench scored 37 points, only four shy of the Raiders’ 40 total for the game.

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Maryland collapses late in 79-75 loss to Boston College

Posted on 12 December 2010 by Luke Jones

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The scowl on the face of Gary Williams said it all as the Maryland coach walked off the Comcast Center floor moments after the final buzzer.

In his mind, this was one that got away from the Terps.

The Terps and Boston College went toe-to-toe for 38 minutes in an ACC opener that had the intensity of a late-February battle. Leading 75-72 with 2:44 to play, Maryland would not score again, missing free throws and taking ill-advised shots in a 79-75 loss to the Eagles.

It was just the latest example of a close game in which the Terps couldn’t do enough to secure a victory against a quality opponent, dropping them to 7-4 and 0-1 in ACC play. The loss spoiled another sensational performance by sophomore Jordan Williams who scored 27 points and grabbed 13 rebounds, earning his ninth double-double of the season.

“We missed a couple free throws, took a couple bad shots, and were not patient on offense,” Jordan Williams said. “We went away from what we wanted to do on offense when they took a three-point lead, and we didn’t execute well.”

In the final 2:12 of the game, the Terps missed all three of their free-throw attempts, continuing a season-long issue at the charity stripe. The two missed by Cliff Tucker (an 80-percent shooter from the line) jump-started the Boston College comeback.

Freshman Terrell Stoglin, despite playing brilliantly at times and scoring 14 points, came unglued in his decision making. After missing the front end of a 1-and-1 with 1:03 left and the game tied 75-75, the point guard followed that up two possessions later by taking — and missing — a quick 3-pointer with 20 seconds left and the Terps trailing 78-75.

It was a move reminiscent of another point guard who never shied away from taking a big shot, even if it wasn’t the ideal look.

“Terrell tries to win just like when Greivis [Vasquez] was a freshman,” Gary Williams said. “Things happen, but he’s trying to win the game. You have to give him credit for that. As he plays, he’ll understand those situations a little better, but I like guys on my team that want to win, and Terrell’s one of those people.”

Stoglin’s performance was a microcosm of what has plagued Maryland all season in close games against tougher competition. As the freshman did Sunday night, the Terps have played brilliantly at times this season but have often shot themselves in the foot at critical moments.

For a team lacking a dynamic scorer like Vasquez, the margin for error is too small to give away points at the free-throw line and make mistakes in the execution of the half-court offense. On Sunday, Boston College’s execution down the stretch was precise while the Terps wilted.

The Eagles hit an impressive 13-of-29 3-point shots, often using four guards to give the Terps match-up problems on the perimeter. Biko Paris made six from beyond the arc and scored 22 points to lead Boston College to a win in its first ACC game under new coach Steve Donahue.

“This is the ACC and everyone can play,” said forward Dino Gregory, who matched a career high with 14 points and had three blocks. “We have to make adjustments on our defense. There is really no excuse for the mismatches.”

In contrast, the Terps went 3-for-17 from the 3-point line and made only 8 of 14 free throws, major flaws in a game that featured 11 ties and 16 lead changes.

Maryland will now have 10 days to stew over this one, as the players take final exams before hosting NJIT on Dec. 22. The Terps won’t resume their conference schedule, however, until Jan. 9 when they have the daunting task of traveling to Durham to take on No. 1 Duke.

After falling in non-conference games against Pitt, Illinois, and Temple, the Terps can add Boston College to a list of winnable games in which they’ve come up short. Maryland’s four losses have been by a combined 20 points, a small number but unforgiving nonetheless.

Of course, plenty of time remains between now and March, but failing to earn precious victories against quality opponents in November and December often catches up with a team looking to play in the NCAA tournament. Maryland only has one remaining non-conference game of any substance, a challenging trip to Philadephia to face Villanova on Jan. 15.

Luckily for the Terps, the ACC appears wide open once you look past the top-ranked Blue Devils. A strong conference record will be needed to boost an unimpressive slate of non-conference wins to this point.

If the Terps find themselves fighting for their tournament lives in early March, they’ll look back at their mid-December conference opener as another game that was there for the taking.

“You have to be able to handle this [loss], and we’ve got time now obviously before we play another conference game,” the Maryland coach said. “Every game we play between now and then will be very important to us to win.

“How we go after practice each day is going to be really big. That’s going to be very important for us to get better, because we don’t have to get a lot better. We have to get better, but we don’t have to get a lot better.”

The margin between victory and defeat has been minuscule for the Terps, but you’re only as good as your record says.

And with four losses already in the middle of December, it’s clear Maryland has plenty of work to do.

NOTES: After going undefeated in conference home games last season, the Terps dropped their ACC opener and are now 6-7 all-time against Boston College. Maryland had also won 27 straight games when leading at halftime. … The Terps entered the game second in the ACC in field-goal percentage defense (.372) and 3-point percentage defense (.288) but allowed the Eagles to shoot 48.3 percent from the field and 44.8 percent from beyond the arc. … Maryland had 10 offensive rebounds in the first half but just one after halftime. … The Terps’ nine turnovers matched a season low, which came against Pittsburgh on Nov. 18.

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Maryland again competitive, not good enough in 80-76 loss to Illinois

Posted on 19 November 2010 by Luke Jones

Gary Williams wanted to find out where his Terps really were with two games at Madison Square Garden against stiff competition this week.

The verdict for the Maryland coach was a competitive — and incomplete — team with room to grow as the season moves forward.

The Terps struggled to defend the perimeter and couldn’t do enough in the second half, falling to Illinois, 80-76, in the consolation game of the 2K Sports Classic benefiting Coaches vs. Cancer.

Maryland continually allowed open looks to Demetri McCamey (2o points), Tyler Griffey (three 3-pointers), and D.J. Richardson (three 3-pointers), as the Illini shot 47.6 percent (10 of 21) from beyond the arc, and the Terps only 5-for-18 on the other end.

Five Maryland players reached double-figure scoring, freshman Terrell Stoglin leading the way with 17 points, but forward Jordan Williams’ 15 second-half points weren’t enough as Maryland fell to 3-2 on the season.

The final 11:28 of the first half was a victory in and of itself after Williams was stricken with two fouls and banished to the bench as the Terps trailed 20-16. Using a patchwork frontcourt that included Berend Weijs, James Padgett, Hauk Palsson, and a foul-troubled Dino Gregory, Maryland managed to maintain the same deficit, entering the intermission trailing 40-36.

The two-game trip to Madison Square Garden was a perfect example of how crucial it is for Williams to stay clear of foul trouble this season. Aside from Tucker’s improved offensive output, the Terps not only lack the perimeter scoring to compete against sharp-shooting teams but also an offensive presence in the paint when the 6-foot-10 sophomore is not on the floor.

Not a good formula for success.

And yet it was a formula the Terps survived in the first half, keeping themselves in position to make a second-half run. Maryland briefly took a 47-46 lead following a 9-0 run, but the Illini responded with a 13-2 run to regain the lead and seize control for the rest of the night.

Despite Williams’ return in the second half, the Terps simply couldn’t generate enough offense despite the brief run midway through the second half, failing to knock down perimeter shots to compete with the sharp-shooting Illini.

It’s the exact type of game the Terps will struggle with this year. Maryland simply doesn’t have the shooters to compete against teams knocking down outside shots.

Maryland will undoubtedly be disappointed with an 0-2 performance in New York City, but neither loss should deter anyone from thinking this Maryland team can’t be pretty good by January or February.

Of course, last season’s Terps went to Hawaii and played two clunkers against Cincinnati and Wisconsin, looking far worse than they did against two top-25 programs in two nights. It offers perspective to how little we can really take from early-season tournaments and how they project a team’s aptitude.

Is the 0-2 showing disappointing? Of course.

But the reality is the Terps played two teams that were simply better than them in the middle of November. They lost, but competed at a high level.

And that bodes well for January and February with Gary Williams leading the way.

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