Tag Archive | "Jimmy Smith"

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Revamped Ravens defense better live up to expectations

Posted on 29 April 2017 by Luke Jones

The Ravens stayed true to their board, but that doesn’t change reality after going defense with their first four picks of the 2017 draft.

This is an unbalanced roster with the heaviest lifting of the offseason now in the books. Yes, general manager Ozzie Newsome reminded us again Saturday that the Ravens aren’t done building this year’s team, but there are only so many viable free agents still out there to move the meter in any meaningful way. Right now, Baltimore has a below-average offense that’s going to be difficult to improve dramatically without some substantial improvement from players already on the roster.

The Ravens may still add Nick Mangold or bring back Anquan Boldin, but there’s a reason why they’re still out there. They’re not “Plan A” guys anymore.

Of the seven Ravens players selected in the first three rounds over the last two drafts, just one — left tackle Ronnie Stanley — was an offensive player. It’s difficult to improve on that side of the ball if you’re not spending free-agent dollars or investing early draft picks, which will make life more difficult for quarterback Joe Flacco and offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg as they will likely lean on unproven talent at wide receiver and on the offensive line.

Asked about the state of his offense after the first wave of free agency last month that included lucrative contracts for nose tackle Brandon Williams and safety Tony Jefferson and another deal for cornerback Brandon Carr, Newsome fairly pointed to the draft as the way to build the rest of the roster. But the Ravens came away with fourth-round guard prospect Nico Siragusa and fifth-round developmental right tackle Jermaine Eluemunor as their only picks for that side of the ball.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that the Ravens should have reached to draft offensive players purely out of need as they did appear to get good value with their picks, but the 2017 draft being so rich in defensive talent was a reason why the offense should have been a bigger focus in free agency. The outcome is an offense that’s lost a starting wide receiver, a starting right tackle, a starting center, and a Pro Bowl fullback and has netted only 32-year-old running back Danny Woodhead and two Day 3 offensive linemen.

Which side of the ball had its coordinator fired again last year?

Like it or not, the Ravens prioritized building a great defense above anything else this offseason. The unit collapsed down the stretch in 2016, but the primary cause of that was the absence of No. 1 cornerback Jimmy Smith as John Harbaugh’s team went 2-5 in games in which he missed meaningful time.

When Smith was on the field, the Ravens had a strong defense despite an underwhelming pass rush. And even with the resources used in both free agency and the draft to revamp the secondary and the pass rush, Smith’s availability remains arguably the biggest key for defensive success.

On paper, the Ravens defense does look better than the 2016 edition, but it will need to be great — possibly even special — to justify the use of so many resources and to make up for an offense with a ton of question marks. Taking that kind of a leap is no sure thing, especially in the modern NFL that is geared toward offense.

Will some combination of the pass-rushing group of Matt Judon, Za’Darius Smith, Tyus Bowser, and Tim Williams be ready to step up with Terrell Suggs set to turn 35 in October and Elvis Dumervil no longer on the roster? Is first-round rookie cornerback Marlon Humphrey going to be ready to play at a high level if Smith goes down again for some period of time? Can Kamalei Correa hold down the inside linebacker spot vacated by the retired Zach Orr? Will defensive coordinator Dean Pees use so many new pieces effectively and maximize their versatility?

The excitement for the defense is understandable with so much youth and potential at every level, but remember there isn’t a 25-year-old Ray Lewis leading this group before waxing nostalgic about replicating the 2000 Ravens. Even if we’re looking for a more contemporary comparison — it’s a different game than it was nearly two decades ago — the 2015 Denver Broncos had a generational talent in Von Miller and two 1,000-yard receivers on the other side of the ball.

A winning blueprint leaning so heavily on defense is very difficult to execute.

But it’s where the Ravens find themselves after free agency and the draft.

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Ravens open 2017 voluntary offseason workout program

Posted on 18 April 2017 by Luke Jones

(Photo courtesy of the Baltimore Ravens)

Ravens players officially began preparations for the 2017 season on Tuesday, reporting to Owings Mills for the start of the voluntary offseason workout program.

Of course, most players have been working out on their own for weeks, but this is the first time in which team activities were allowed to be conducted at the practice facility. The first phase of the nine-week program lasts two weeks and involves strength and conditioning work as well as physical rehabilitation. The coaching staff is not allowed to lead players in on-field workouts during this opening part of the offseason program.

This part of the offseason program is officially voluntary, but most players — especially younger ones — are expected to attend regularly.

The Ravens will provide media access on Wednesday with quarterback Joe Flacco, cornerback Jimmy Smith, safety Eric Weddle, and wide receiver Mike Wallace scheduled to talk, but photos and video released by the team on Tuesday showed a great number of players in attendance for the first day. That list included Flacco, Smith, Weddle, Wallace, Brandon Carr, Tony Jefferson, Danny Woodhead, C.J. Mosley, Matt Judon, Za’Darius Smith, Tavon Young, Michael Pierce, Carl Davis, Breshad Perriman, Alex Lewis, Ronnie Stanley, James Hurst, Albert McClellan, Kamalei Correa, Anthony Levine, Brent Urban, Sam Koch, Michael Campanaro, Crockett Gillmore, Benjamin Watson, Nick Boyle, and Ryan Jensen.

The second phase of the program lasts three weeks and consists of on-field workouts that may include individual player instruction and drills as well as team practice. However, no live contact is permitted, and the offense and defense may not work against each other.

The final phase of the program permits teams to conduct a total of 10 days of organized team practice activity (OTAs), which are voluntary. No live contact is allowed, but teams may conduct 7-on-7, 9-on-7, and 11-on-11 drills. Teams may also hold one mandatory minicamp for all veteran players during that final phase of the offseason program.

The Ravens will also hold a rookie minicamp beginning May 5, the weekend after the 2017 NFL draft.

Below is the Ravens’ 2017 offseason training program schedule:

First Day: April 18
OTA offseason workouts: May 23-25, May 30-June 1, June 5-6, June 8-9
Mandatory minicamp: June 13-15

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Carr’s reliability made him easy choice for Ravens

Posted on 21 March 2017 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — You can hardly blame the Ravens for being drawn to cornerback Brandon Carr.

After starting no fewer than four different players at cornerback in each of the last three seasons — including a whopping seven in 2014 — the Ravens needed more dependability at a position high in demand and limited in quality. The 30-year-old Carr may not have lived up to the high expectations that accompanied a $50 million contract with Dallas five years ago, but he’s been a reliable cornerback who’s started all 16 games in each of his nine NFL seasons.

Carr needs to show he can still play at a high level in 2017, but just being there means more than you might think for a team that’s started the likes of Rashaan Melvin and Shareece Wright in meaningful games over the last few years. Perhaps that’s why the Ravens signed Carr over former Dallas teammate Morris Claiborne, a talented former first-round pick who’s missed more than 40 percent of games in his career.

“There were different guys that had different histories,” said head coach John Harbaugh about the durability of others on the free-agent market. “You know you cannot do any better than Brandon has done. There’s a reason for that. Sure, luck comes into it and you do knock on wood and laugh about those kind of things.”

That durability is something the Ravens hope will continue with No. 1 cornerback Jimmy Smith missing 22 games over his six-year career and most of last December when their once-mighty defense fell apart. Some drop-off is inevitable whenever a team loses one of its best players, but performance can’t fall off a cliff in the way the Baltimore defense’s did at the end of last season without addressing the problem.

The Ravens feel confident about the trio of Smith, Carr, and 2016 fourth-round pick Tavon Young to go along with starting safeties Eric Weddle and Tony Jefferson, but Harbaugh said they will continue to look for more secondary depth with this year’s draft deep in cornerback talent.

How has Carr been able to stay on the field at a position involving so much lateral movement and speed?

“I do not even know how I do it myself with the injuries that I won’t even talk about,” said Carr, who cited his work with outside trainers and his focus on nutrition as factors that have kept him healthy. “I just keep playing through them. Sometimes it is just the luck of the draw, and sometimes it is just being stupid and playing through whatever is going on.

“Alongside of that, my preparation throughout the offseason taking care of my body [and] just keeping a balance in my life with family, friends, football, and my faith. I just try to stay on top of injuries.”

Holding the longest active streak for consecutive games (144) started by a cornerback, Carr isn’t guaranteed to continue being an iron man who’s never missed a game as he turns 31 in May. But the Ravens figured they would take their chances.

“I think the biggest indicator of future behavior and success is past behavior and success,” Harbaugh said. “He has proven that already.”

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Ravens narrowly avoided Atlanta’s fate four years ago

Posted on 06 February 2017 by Luke Jones

The Atlanta Falcons are predictably the butt of many jokes after surrendering the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history on Sunday night.

Coughing up a 25-point lead in the second half will do that to you, but Ravens fans should pause a moment or two before piling on Matt Ryan and company with too much enthusiasm. After all, Baltimore nearly suffered a similar fate in Super Bowl XLVII four years ago.

No one will forget the image of Joe Flacco raising the first Vince Lombardi Trophy or Ray Lewis celebrating the euphoric conclusion of his “last ride” in New Orleans, but the Ravens came dangerously close to squandering a 22-point lead in the second half. Such a notion felt impossible after Jacoby Jones’ 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown to begin the third quarter, but San Francisco finally found its offense while the Ravens offense couldn’t run and managed only two field goals in the second half.

It didn’t take long for a comfortable 28-6 lead to become a heart-stopping affair.

You can blame the Superdome blackout if you’d like, but a defense led by Lewis and Ed Reed at the end of their careers gave up three second-half touchdowns and a field goal, which is exactly what the Falcons did before the Patriots marched down the field for the winning touchdown in overtime.

Just imagine how differently we’d view Super Bowl XLVII had Jimmy Smith been flagged on fourth-and-goal from the 5 or the 49ers hadn’t forgotten over their final four plays inside the 10 that Frank Gore was gashing a Baltimore front playing without the injured Haloti Ngata. Of course, unlike the Falcons, the Ravens were able to make a few plays to protect their narrow lead in the end, and that’s all that matters.

Super Bowl LI reminded us that you should never count out the New England Patriots and that the margin between winning and losing can be so razor thin. It also might help to run the ball when you’re protecting a 28-20 lead and are comfortably in field-goal range with under five minutes remaining.

But before mocking Atlanta too much, remember that the Ravens nearly became the Falcons four years ago and breathe a quick sigh of relief that a storybook ending didn’t turn into a nightmare.

** Many Ravens fans predictably went to social media to use Sunday’s result as validation for Flacco being better than Ryan — a tired debate that needs to end — but I’d hardly pin that loss on the quarterback as much as I would on the offensive play-calling of Kyle Shanahan and a defense that couldn’t stop a nosebleed in the second half.

Regardless, Flacco and the Ravens have a lot of work to do to give fans something more current to brag about. Even with the fallout of a devastating Super Bowl defeat, Ryan and the Falcons have a lot more going for them right now.

** After watching his limitations as a pass rusher with just five total sacks in his four seasons in Baltimore, Courtney Upshaw collecting the first quarterback takedown of Super Bowl LI wasn’t what I expected to see.

The former Ravens linebacker added weight to play on the Falcons defensive line this year, and that sack was his only tackle of the postseason.

** Every organization and fan base would love to be the Patriots, but Ravens director of public relations Patrick Gleason offered some perspective hours before Sunday’s kickoff in Houston.

It’s understandable to be discouraged by the Ravens missing the playoffs in three of the last four years and improvements certainly need to be made from top to bottom, but this organization has built up a ton of equity over the last two decades and is still just four years removed from winning the ultimate prize. Relative to most teams around the NFL, the Ravens have spoiled their fans for a long time, which isn’t easy to do.

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How did Ravens defense stack up at each position in 2016?

Posted on 12 January 2017 by Luke Jones

We know the sum of their parts didn’t add up to a trip to the postseason for the Ravens, but where exactly did their defensive players stack up at each position across the NFL in 2016?

Whether it’s discussing the Pro Bowl or picking postseason awards, media and fans spend much time debating where players rank at each position, but few realistically have the time — or want to make the effort — to watch every player on every team extensively enough to develop an informed opinion.

How many times did you closely watch the offensive line of the Tennessee Titans this season?

What about the Los Angeles Rams linebackers or the San Diego Chargers cornerbacks?

That’s why I appreciate projects such as Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 and the grading efforts of Pro Football Focus. Of course, neither the NFL1000 nor PFF should be viewed as the gospel truth of evaluation and they have their limitations, but I respect the exhaustive effort to grade players across the league when so many of us watch only one team or one division on any kind of a consistent basis.

Earlier this week, we looked at the rankings for Baltimore’s offensive players.

Below is a look at where Ravens defensive players rank at their respective positions, according to those outlets:

DE Timmy Jernigan
NFL1000 ranking: 17th among 3-4 defensive ends
PFF ranking: 41st among interior defensive linemen
Skinny: The 2014 second-round pick appeared on his way to a breakout year, but he had only one sack after Week 7 and recorded one tackle over his last four games combined.

DE Lawrence Guy
NFL1000 ranking: 42nd among 3-4 defensive ends
PFF ranking: 36th among interior defensive linemen
Skinny: The 6-foot-4 lineman doesn’t offer much as a pass rusher, but he’s good against the run and was a solid contributor in his first full year as a starter.

DE Brent Urban
NFL1000 ranking: 40th among 3-4 defensive ends
PFF ranking: n/a
Skinny: The 2014 fourth-round pick saw only 150 defensive snaps this season, but his ratings suggest that more playing time should be in order in 2017.

DT Brandon Williams
NFL1000 ranking: 18th among defensive tackles
PFF ranking: 38th among interior defensive linemen
Skinny: The fourth-year nose tackle saw more double teams and wasn’t as dominant as he was in 2015, but he is still on track to receive a strong payday as a free agent.

DT Michael Pierce
NFL1000 ranking: 31st among defensive tackles
PFF ranking: 26th among interior defensive linemen
Skinny: The rookie free agent from Samford was one of the good stories of 2016 and will likely step into a starting role if Williams signs elsewhere this offseason.

OLB Terrell Suggs
NFL1000 ranking: 17th among 3-4 outside linebackers
PFF ranking: 40th among edge defenders
Skinny: The 34-year-old played with a torn biceps for much of the season and is nearing the end of his career, but he still plays the run at a high level and remained Baltimore’s best pass rusher.

OLB Za’Darius Smith
NFL1000 ranking: 36th among 3-4 outside linebackers
PFF ranking: 93rd among edge defenders
Skinny: Instead of building on an encouraging rookie campaign, Smith struggled mightily against the run and managed only one sack in a disappointing season.

OLB Elvis Dumervil
NFL1000 ranking: 41st among 3-4 outside linebackers
PFF ranking: n/a
Skinny: The five-time Pro Bowl pass rusher was limited to just three sacks in eight games after undergoing offseason Achilles surgery and could be a salary-cap casualty this offseason.

OLB Matt Judon
NFL1000 ranking: 42nd among 3-4 outside linebackers
PFF ranking: 83rd among edge defenders
Skinny: The Grand Valley State product flashed promise with four sacks in 308 defensive snaps, but the Ravens will be counting on him to show more consistency in 2017.

OLB Albert McClellan
NFL1000 ranking: 45th among 3-4 outside linebackers
PFF ranking: 99th among edge defenders
Skinny: McClellan sets the edge better than Smith or Judon, but the veteran is very limited as a pass rusher and in coverage and is better suited for his standout special-teams role of past years.

ILB C.J. Mosley
NFL1000 ranking: 11th
PFF ranking: 11th
Skinny: Selected to his second Pro Bowl in three years, Mosley bounced back from a shaky 2015 season and is rapidly establishing himself as one of the best inside linebackers in the NFL.

ILB Zachary Orr
NFL1000 ranking: 20th
PFF ranking: 82nd
Skinny: Orr had some tackling issues from time to time and isn’t an effective blitzer, but PFF’s ranking appears to be way too low for the man who led the Ravens in tackles this season.

CB Jimmy Smith
NFL1000 ranking: seventh
PFF ranking: 48th
Skinny: The Ravens experienced dramatic drop-off without their top corner, but he’s now missed 22 games in his career and the injury bug always seems to bite when he’s playing his best football.

CB Tavon Young
NFL1000 ranking: 72nd
PFF ranking: 30th
Skinny: The truth probably lies somewhere in between these rankings, but the rookie fourth-rounder was a pleasant surprise and looks to be no worse than a quality slot cornerback moving forward.

CB Jerraud Powers
NFL1000 ranking: 90th
PFF ranking: 70th
Skinny: Powers wilted down the stretch in coverage and against the run, which will likely prompt the Ravens to look elsewhere for depth in 2017.

CB Shareece Wright
NFL1000 ranking: 116th
PFF ranking: 80th
Skinny: After arguably being the best Ravens defensive player on the field in Week 1, Wright lost all confidence and became a frustrating liability as the season progressed.

S Eric Weddle
NFL1000 ranking: sixth among strong safeties
PFF ranking: first among all safeties
Skinny: After three years of cycling safeties in and out of the lineup, the Ravens finally found high-quality stability in the back end of the defense with Weddle’s arrival in 2016.

S Lardarius Webb
NFL1000 ranking: 10th among free safeties
PFF ranking: 16th among all safeties
Skinny: His switch from cornerback made him one of the highest-paid safeties in the league, but Webb grew into his new position after a slow start and played well in the second half of the season.

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Ravens’ season-ending dud only reconfirms issues for offseason

Posted on 01 January 2017 by Luke Jones

The Ravens played exactly like a team whose season had come to an end in Pittsburgh a week earlier.

Despite practically taking offense at the notion that their season-ending trip to Cincinnati was meaningless throughout the week, Baltimore’s performance against the Bengals was nothing short of offensive on Sunday, particularly in the first half of the 27-10 defeat. But it shouldn’t change anything once you move past the New Year’s Day sting and take consolation in a better draft pick a few months from now.

It was a meaningless game, remember?

We weren’t going to learn anything about the Ravens that we didn’t already know, even if you were surprised to see them sleepwalk against a Bengals team that had been out of the playoff race for weeks.

We’d already seen this offense make it look incredibly difficult to move the ball throughout the season with few exceptions. This group once again made it look like the Ravens were playing 11-on-15 football for much of the afternoon.

Joe Flacco threw more than 40 passes for the 11th time this season, and the ninth-year quarterback failed to eclipse the 300-yard mark for the seventh of those performances, illustrating how inefficient this pass-heavy attack has been all year.

This offense needs to be blown up and rebuilt with the top objective of getting Flacco playing at a higher level in a more balanced attack. Other than a couple decent performances late in the season, offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg showed little evidence of being able to do the job after replacing Marc Trestman in October. Sunday just reiterated that point when he called for a pass on first-and-goal at the Cincinnati 2 that resulted in a Flacco interception and later made the silly call to throw to offensive lineman Alex Lewis on a third-and-2 inside the Bengals’ 10.

The Ravens offense needs better coaching and more talent, especially with veteran wide receiver Steve Smith retiring.

More alarming than the season-long offensive ineptitude, however, has been the collapse of a defense that ranked first overall just a few weeks ago. The Ravens did nothing to bounce back from the ugliness of last week’s fourth quarter, allowing a Bengals offense without A.J. Green, Tyler Eifert, Jeremy Hill, and Giovani Bernard to score on each of its first four possessions.

That’s unacceptable.

After arguably doing the finest coaching job of his time in Baltimore through the first 12 games of the season, defensive coordinator Dean Pees is fairly under fire with the Ravens allowing 26 or more points in each of their final four games. The absence of No. 1 cornerback Jimmy Smith was significant, but that can’t excuse an undermanned Cincinnati offense moving against them with little resistance.

Was the defense tired down the stretch from carrying the offense for most of the season? What happened to a run defense that looked impenetrable just a few weeks ago?

The Ravens defense did an admirable job holding up without a consistent pass rush for much of the year, but that ability vanished down the stretch. Until Elvis Dumervil sacked Andy Dalton to conclude the third quarter on Sunday, Baltimore had gone almost 10 full quarters without a quarterback takedown.

Coaching changes or not, general manager Ozzie Newsome must address the pass rush with Terrell Suggs turning 35 next season and the 32-year-old Dumervil a possible salary-cap casualty. The secondary also needs more depth with injuries continuing to be a problem for Jimmy Smith.

Yes, it was alarming to see the Ravens go through the motions on Sunday, especially after head coach John Harbaugh was praised last season for the way his injury-depleted team continued to play hard down the stretch of a 5-11 campaign. But those players hadn’t experienced anything resembling the kind of gut-punch they took from the Steelers on Christmas.

The Ravens were ready to go home long before they took the field on Sunday, and what resulted wasn’t pretty. It was a bad look for both the coaching staff and the players — plain and simple.

But we’d already seen all there was to see from a team that wasn’t good enough in 2016.

How the Ravens performed in a meaningless game — good or bad — wasn’t going to change that.

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Former Navy star Reynolds promoted to Ravens’ 53-man roster

Posted on 30 December 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The feel-good story of the Ravens’ 2016 draft class has taken the next step in fulfilling his NFL dream.

Wide receiver and former Navy quarterback Keenan Reynolds was promoted to the 53-man roster on Friday morning after spending the entire year on the practice squad. The sixth-round pick was waived at the end of the preseason, but the Ravens thought highly enough of Reynolds’ character and potential to keep him in the organization.

“It’s a difficult thing making a transition like he’s doing,” head coach John Harbaugh said. “He works really hard at it every day. He’s learned a lot. Next year is going to be the year. We’ll see. He has to go to work the next three or four months, too, and get some real specific work as far as running routes and doing the things a slot receiver and an outside receiver have to do. He’s done a good job.”

It remains to be seen whether Reynolds will be active for Sunday’s season finale against Cincinnati after Harbaugh described his promotion as a reward from general manager Ozzie Newsome. Reynolds played sparingly in the preseason, making one catch for two yards and struggling to secure the football consistently as a return specialist.

Reynolds scored an NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision record 88 touchdowns while leading the triple-option attack for the Midshipmen.

“I was really happy. I called my parents to let them know,” Reynolds said. “It’s been a long season, and I’m just happy to be part of the squad on Sunday.”

To make room on the 53-man roster, cornerback Jimmy Smith (right ankle) was placed on season-ending injured reserve. Harbaugh said at the beginning of the week that Smith was likely to miss his third straight game with a high ankle sprain.

The Ravens officially ruled out inside linebacker Zach Orr (neck) and right tackle Rick Wagner (concussion). Scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent this offseason, Wagner may have played his final game with Baltimore last Sunday in Pittsburgh.

After practicing fully for the third straight week, rookie offensive lineman Alex Lewis (ankle) was once against listed as questionable on the final injury report, but he is likely to be active for the first time since Week 9 with Wagner sidelined. Lewis or veteran James Hurst will start at right tackle against the Bengals.

The Bengals officially ruled out left tackle Cedric Ogbuehi (shoulder) and wide receiver A.J. Green (hamstring) and declared linebacker Vontaze Burfict (concussion/knee) as doubtful to play. Running back Jeremy Hill (knee) is questionable to play against the Ravens.

The referee for Sunday’s game will be Pete Morelli.

According to Weather.com, the game-day forecast in Cincinnati calls for cloudy skies and temperatures in the mid-40s with a 70 percent chance of light rain and winds up to six miles per hour.

Below is the final full injury report:

BALTIMORE
OUT: LB Zach Orr (neck), OT Rick Wagner (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: G Alex Lewis (ankle)

CINCINNATI
OUT: WR A.J. Green (hamstring), OT Cedric Ogbuehi (shoulder)
DOUBTFUL: LB Vontaze Burfict (knee/concussion), TE Tyler Kroft (knee/ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: RB Jeremy Hill (knee)

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Three Ravens starters still sidelined ahead of season finale

Posted on 29 December 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Three Ravens starters remain sidelined with injuries ahead of Sunday’s season finale against the Cincinnati Bengals.

Right tackle Rick Wagner (concussion), inside linebacker Zach Orr (neck), and cornerback Jimmy Smith (ankle) all missed practice for the second straight day on Thursday. Head coach John Harbaugh said Monday that Smith is expected to miss his third straight game with a high ankle sprain.

It remains to be seen whether rookie Alex Lewis or veteran James Hurst would start at right tackle if Wagner cannot play while rookie Patrick Onwuasor could receive the start in place of Orr.

Center Jeremy Zuttah received a veteran day off on Thursday.

The Bengals continued to be without running back Jeremy Hill (knee), linebacker Vontaze Burfict (concussion/knee), and tight end Tyler Kroft (knee/ankle) for Thursday’s practice.

Below is Thursday’s full injury report:

BALTIMORE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Zach Orr (neck), CB Jimmy Smith (ankle), OT Rick Wagner (concussion), C Jeremy Zuttah (non-injury)
FULL PARTICIPATION: G Alex Lewis (ankle), G Marshal Yanda (non-injury)

CINCINNATI
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Vontaze Burfict (knee/concussion), WR A.J. Green (hamstring), RB Jeremy Hill (knee), TE Tyler Kroft (knee/ankle), CB Josh Shaw (knee)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: DE Will Clarke (ribs), CB Adam Jones (ankle), OT Cedric Ogbuehi (shoulder), LB Vincent Rey (hamstring), OT Andrew Whitworth (biceps), S Shawn Williams (ribs)

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Orr, Wagner among Ravens players absent from Wednesday’s practice

Posted on 28 December 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Taking the field for the final Wednesday practice of the season, the Ravens were without four starting players from their 53-man roster.

Linebacker Zach Orr (neck), right tackle Rick Wagner (concussion), cornerback Jimmy Smith (ankle), and left guard Marshal Yanda (non-injury) were not present during the portion of practice open to media. Orr has been dealing with a sore shoulder in recent weeks and played 52 of 58 defensive snaps in Sunday’s loss to Pittsburgh, but he was listed on Wednesday’s injury report as dealing with a neck ailment.

Smith is not expected to play in the season finale at Cincinnati after spraining his right ankle early in the Week 14 loss to New England. The Ravens are 2-4 in games in which Smith has missed substantial time this season.

“It is a high-ankle [sprain]. He probably will not be able to make it for this week,” head coach John Harbaugh said Monday. “We were hoping for the playoffs.”

Wagner suffered a concussion in the second half of the 31-27 loss to the Steelers while Yanda has regularly been given Wednesday practices off since injuring his left shoulder in October. Harbaugh confirmed that rookie Alex Lewis or third-year lineman James Hurst would start at right tackle if Wagner isn’t cleared in time for Sunday’s game.

Wide receiver Steve Smith was present for his final week of practice as he’s expected to retire from the NFL after 16 seasons.

Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis confirmed Wednesday that six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver A.J. Green will not play against the Ravens on Sunday. Linebacker Vontaze Burfict remains in the concussion protocol.

Below is Wednesday’s full injury report:

BALTIMORE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Zach Orr (neck), CB Jimmy Smith (ankle), OT Rick Wagner (concussion), G Marshal Yanda (non-injury)
FULL PARTICIPATION: G Alex Lewis (ankle)

CINCINNATI
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Vontaze Burfict (knee/concussion), WR A.J. Green (hamstring), RB Jeremy Hill (knee), TE Tyler Kroft (knee/ankle)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: DE Will Clarke (ribs), CB Adam Jones (ankle), LB Vincent Rey (hamstring), OT Andrew Whitworth (biceps)

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Harbaugh says Ravens will play all healthy players against Cincinnati

Posted on 26 December 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — John Harbaugh says it will be business as usual for the Ravens as they conclude their season at Cincinnati on Sunday afternoon.

Despite being eliminated from postseason contention with their 31-27 defeat at Pittsburgh on Sunday, the ninth-year head coach expressed no intention of resting veterans in favor of younger players against the Bengals. A win would give the Ravens only their second winning season since Super Bowl XLVII.

“We’re going [there] to win the game,” Harbaugh said. “We’ll play our guys, and everybody that is healthy will go play. That’s the plan. I wouldn’t look at it any other way.”

With the Ravens having nothing to play before beyond the possibility of finishing with a winning record, a sound argument could be made for resting established veterans, especially those who’ve played with long-term injuries such as guard Marshal Yanda and linebacker Terrell Suggs. There’s always the risk of a key player suffering a serious injury that could hinder his status for the start of next season, but the limitations of a 53-man roster make it difficult to treat Sunday’s game like a preseason affair.

Still, young players such as wide receivers Breshad Perriman, Michael Campanaro, and Chris Moore, offensive linemen Alex Lewis and John Urschel, defensive end Brent Urban, and outside linebacker Matt Judon would benefit from more live-game reps after serving in limited roles this season. And observers who are focused on the big picture would also point to such a strategy increasing the likelihood of a loss to improve the Ravens’ standing for the 2017 draft.

Harbaugh shared no such sentiment on Monday.

“You try to win. We talked about it in the locker room after the game,” Harbaugh said. “That’s what I pointed towards is the next game. We want to go win it. We do want to be 9-7. That is important. It’s important to have one more win than we potentially could have. I don’t care what the record is.”

Harbaugh did say that No. 1 cornerback Jimmy Smith is likely to miss his third straight game with a high ankle sprain suffered against New England on Dec. 12. The Ravens were hoping at the time of the injury that he might be able to return for the playoffs.

The Bengals officially placed tight end Tyler Eifert (back) and guard Clint Boling (shoulder) on season-ending injured reserve on Monday and do not intend to play wide receiver A.J. Green (hamstring) on Sunday despite his return to practice two weeks ago.

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