Tag Archive | "Johns Hopkins"


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A #JennStrong2 update: Cancer complicates things…

Posted on 08 November 2015 by Nestor Aparicio


“All of my life I’ve been a type 1 diabetic. I’ve always taken life day by day.”

– Bret Michaels


ON THE 34TH DAY OF HER SECOND battle with cancer, Jenn slept and vomited and slept some more and vomited some more. Needless to say, it’s been a rough fifth week here at The Hotel for my beautiful wife in this #Jennstrong2 journey to a new, cancer-free life.

When she was first diagnosed with leukemia in March 2014, our initial fear was that somehow her Type 1 Diabetes would factor into her prognosis and her ability to survive all that was about to happen to her 112-pound body during the first intense cancer treatment and chemotherapy. Until this week, it was always an issue ­– and a well-maintained one – but never a major factor outside of basic monitoring.

I have written extensively about her journey over the past five weeks. Because of the complex nature of her leukemia treatment and the daily roller coaster of things that could – and have – gone awry, I’ve been updating her situation weekly via my blog here. Trust me, you wouldn’t want a daily or hourly report from here. It’s simply too volatile at times. It’s cancer. Stuff happens, the doctors manage it and you hold on tight and wait for improvement.

You can read backwards here to be fully in the loop about her path to recovery.

I also wrote extensively about the first 18 months of her miracle first cure during my 30-30 #GiveASpit tour this summer when we traveled to create awareness for leukemia and the bone marrow registry that saved her life. Here are Part 1 and Part 2.

Today, however, she is slowly coming out of four days of hell because of some scary things that happened to her blood chemistry during the middle of the week. On Thursday evening, Jenn had a brief and early-detected episode with a complication of her diabetes. It was the first time anything significantly bad has occurred because of a medical condition she has managed since 1991.

I needed to Google it on Friday afternoon to understand it because I’d never heard about it before, despite almost 13 years of living with a diabetic.

It’s called Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and, according to Diabetes.org, “this is a serious condition that can lead to diabetic coma (passing out for a long time) or even death.”

When your cells don’t get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are chemicals that the body creates when it breaks down fat to use for energy. The body does this when it doesn’t have enough insulin to use glucose, the body’s normal source of energy. When ketones build up in the blood, they make it more acidic. This is a warning sign that your diabetes is out of control or that you are getting sick.

Because they’re literally checking her blood composition and counts several times a day, this was caught very early and was nipped in the bud. But it was still a massive blow to her progress this week.

On Thursday, it began with diarrhea and then full nausea and vomiting in the overnight and much of the day Friday, which led her to sleeping and waking only to vomit more, literally around the clock, for 72 hours. Of course, she was wired to heart monitors and the largest number of bags of fluids, medicines, insulin, antibiotics and drips that I’ve ever seen attached to her tree to neutralize the effects of DKA.

They’re also keeping an eye on her appendicitis, which has appeared to calm for now after a week of antibiotics.

She is now pretty washed out, frail and fatigued. And it was the second time during this second journey that she experienced several days of “delirious” …

Comments Off on A #JennStrong2 update: Cancer complicates things…


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

#JennStrong 2 update: Every day is a bloody Halloween at The Leukemia Hotel

Posted on 30 October 2015 by Nestor Aparicio


“The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That’s real glory.”

-Vince Lombardi



On the fourth day of her stay at The Hotel, on this second leukemia journey of pain and reward, my wife Jenn was seated as her nurse unhooked her first bag of B Positive blood. Somehow, a pair of lonely droplets sat under her tree on the floor – beaded up, shining ruby red, like eyes staring at me.

Jenn said to me, “Hey, can you grab a napkin and clean that up?”

And as I looked down and saw it, I just couldn’t do it.

My stomach turned, my eyes glazed over and I needed a moment to close my eyes and collect myself. Nurses and doctors and medics and diabetics – a club my wife has been a member of since 1991 – all see and deal with the scarlet fluid of life all day, every day.

I must admit it was the first time that I saw Jenn administer a shot into her abdomen in February 2003 that I really fell in love with her because of the empathy I felt and the toughness she exuded in dealing with pain and self-inflicted needles and blood and courage. Honestly, I’d never met a girl with that kind of innate grit.

This weekend she’s dealing with the effects of an appendicitis that was diagnosed late Wednesday night after an evening of stomach pain. We learned earlier in the week that her donor’s schedule was delayed with the blood she’ll need to survive this leukemia diagnosis and her bone marrow transplant from June 2014.

So instead of Thursday Night Football with the Patriots and a potentially life-saving lymphocyte infusion from her 22-year old German donor, she instead waits for a variety of antibiotics to settle down her appendix, which they do not want to remove because she currently has no immune system to fight bacteria or to heal wounds.

Surgery is the last thing in the world she needs right now. The doctors believe that it will be avoided and she’s trending in a positive direction.

Cancer isn’t fair and it does kinda what it wants. Or, more fairly, it’s the chemotherapy and poisons, which are designed to kill the cancer, that create other sticky situations throughout various organs in the body.

The medical team expects signs of neutrophils sometime over the next two weeks. This would indicate her white blood cells are coming and her body is bouncing back. The appendix situation remains “moment to moment” and she’s constantly being monitored to make sure this doesn’t get more complicated. Heart monitors, blood pressure checks, lots of labs and scans are all involved at all hours of the day.

Sleep doesn’t come easy at The Hotel.

Meanwhile, during the Halloween weekend of revelry and costumes and candy, we’ve only got blood – and not the fake kind – here at The Hotel. And like vampires they’re taking plenty of blood out of her.

Earlier in the week, she started feeling better from a burned-out gastrointestinal tract from the chemo. After eight days with mucositis and incredible pain, she was finally getting back to eating oatmeal and soft foods like mashed potatoes and soups. Now, she’s being fed once again by a nutrition solution every night because they can’t afford to find out what real food might do to her stomach if her appendix gets uppity. She’s slowly getting back to clear fluids and being able to drink water again.

We’ve had throat sores and nose bleeds, fevers and incredible bruising (she has very few platelets) – plus tears and fears and plenty of pain and discomfort this week.

And plenty of B Positive blood being drawn, given and used.

A bloody Halloween, indeed…

I see lots of macho muscles from idiot sports fans on the internet and every day out in the real world someone is playing the role of “tough guy” – but ask yourself how you’d feel about pricking your fingers a dozen times a day and giving yourself shots twice day, EVERY day just to survive the day and live through the night?

As a diabetic, Jenn has been doing that every single day of her life since 1991.

We didn’t need Halloween or cancer for every day to be a bloody day at my condo. Alcohol swabs, needles, pins, gauze and droplets of blood on clothes are a …

Comments Off on #JennStrong 2 update: Every day is a bloody Halloween at The Leukemia Hotel


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A #JennStrong2 update: a second chance at life next Thursday

Posted on 22 October 2015 by Nestor Aparicio


“Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift, that’s why they call it the present.”

Mike Ditka



FOR A WHILE, IT SEEMED like the sickness would never end.

The first nausea came in a brief wave last Tuesday right after her second day of the second round of chemotherapy. She was on her way to the bathroom and got one whiff of my dinner and the vomiting began and it didn’t stop for seven days. Last Thursday morning, she sent me a text that read: “I’m struggling.”

I arrived 30 minutes later and when I left after midnight on Friday, she was still living with a bucket at her feet and more waves of stomach-churning illness channeling through her into the fourth straight night.

On Saturday, with her sister by her side, she didn’t know what day it was and was quite combative and insistent about many rambling thoughts. Jenn was convinced that I wasn’t even with her on Thursday or Friday. After the Ravens loss on Sunday night, I slept on the cot in her room because she was so disoriented that I didn’t want her waking up alone in a panic without being able to calm her.

She wasn’t on her mobile phone or iPad for eight days because she really couldn’t type. She was far too loopy and weak to even paw at the keys as her frustration mounted. All throughout the weekend nights, she said dozens of nonsensical phrases, rambling words and was wildly talking in her sleep and twitching a bit with her hands – almost trying to motion by pointing like she does when she talks.

At one point on Sunday morning, she sat up in bed and looked at me, insisting with full clarity that I send her sister a text reply to tell her that she “got the message.”

Meanwhile, her sister was sitting two feet away from us, and staring at her. She was asleep again moments later. It was like something out of “The Shining” – a giant fever dream.

Her sister Jessica was planning to come to Baltimore to spell me, so I could go to San Francisco for the Ravens game. I never really came close to leaving her. She was just so, so sick.

(And that was before she watched the Ravens play in Santa Clara.)

By Sunday afternoon, the lesions caused by the chemo had settled into her esophagus and throughout her GI tract, and the pain was so severe that on Monday night the bags of morphine started coming. On Tuesday morning, they began feeding her through a tube because she needs the liquid nutrition to keep her strength for the rest of this literally bloody battle. Plus, with the sores on her tongue, in her mouth and down her throat, there is no way she can swallow anything beyond a little water. They have a dentist-style suction tube next to her bed to extract the mucus from her throat.

On Tuesday night, she started to rebound with some energy. I’m pretty sure the pain meds act as a stimulant. Her hair stylist came to shave her head bald once again because her beautiful, curly hair was ripping out of her scalp in clumps over the weekend.

On Wednesday morning, she announced that she wanted a Boston cream donut. Of course, there’s no way she could eat it. But, she did make me bring her some shepherd’s pie later that night and she made it through a few mouthfuls of mashed potatoes and gravy.

She said the mashed potatoes were “like glue in her throat.” Today she is moving on to Ensure milkshakes. This is why…


There is no romance in leukemia treatment.

Week 2 at “The Hotel” has been a living hell for my wife.

It has been a display of courage and bravery that leaves me speechless. It takes my breath away.

Welcome to #JennStrong2.

Yes, cancer still sucks. Anyone who’s been subjected to it as a patient or a care provider understands where Jenn is in the process of her long journey to recovery and health. It’s been incredibly hard to watch and …

Comments (1)


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Surreal journey of cancer has returned with new prognosis for #JennStrong2

Posted on 13 October 2015 by Nestor Aparicio


“To me there are three things everyone should do every day. Number one is laugh. Number two is think — spend some time time in thought. Number three, you should have your emotions move you to tears. If you laugh, think and cry, that’s a heck of a day.”

– Jim Valvano



WE CALL IT THE HOTEL, but make no mistake it’s very much a hospital.

Cold. Sterile. Corporate. Every day it’s where Obamacare and big business and big pharma and the best and worst of our society meet under the banner of “healthcare.” It is its own education in the ways of the world and life in America in 2015.

Full of sick people. Full of people fighting for their lives and the good people inside the walls in various shades of blue and green scrubs and white jackets who are trying to keep them alive.

Bad food. Bad cable TV. Awful towels. Great nurses. Amazing doctors. A friendly support staff. Parking with little cards that spit out of a machine and act as an ATM. It costs $6 a throw (even after you purchase the little green books…it was $5 last year, so it’s only a 20% bump) and I park twice a day. You do the math.

Even down to the gaudy, shimmery marble lobby, it’s a lot like five-star hotel – Jenn maintains that you do get 24-hour room service, a butler and several maids to wipe down your room twice a day. Anything you want and a button to push to get it. The bed even adjusts.

I call it the factory of extreme hope and sadness.

I see the best and worst things in the world here every day.

My wife will be living here again for the next month and beyond. We’ll be here virtually every day for the next six months even after she comes home.

Rest assured, she’ll be fighting for her life every day.

This leukemia thing is hard. It’s heavy lifting. The cancer diagnosis the first time was brutal. The long journey back to safety and health came to a tab of well over a million dollars the first time and lord only knows where the end of this nightmare lies.

But you can’t even begin to think about the drugs, the hospital stays, the bills, the expense, the insurance issues (and we luckily have excellent insurance because her job at Verizon and the people there have been amazing) or the risk. The sheer volume of people, hours and science involved in saving her life a second time boggles my mind as it did the first.

There are 137 different types of blood cancer in the world. And, as smart of a guy as I think I am sometimes, I’ll never understand much about this because it honestly makes me queasy as hell.

There’s lots of sitting around and waiting and time for thinking. Lots of tubes and bags connected to Jenn. Lots of very sick people with masks everywhere you go. Lots of really freaked out family members in the lobby, often sobbing and in a state of shock the way I was the first few days last year.

And then there are those victims’ extended friends and families on the outside wondering about prognosis and medicines and cancers and answers. All of them Googling buzzwords, worrying, talking on social media and inquiring as respectfully as possible.

The question you want to ask and the only real question is: “Will she be OK?”

We will always believe that she will survive. As Tug McGraw said, “Ya gotta believe…”

And every day – all day, really – caring folks are asking me the same question:

“How is she feeling?”

That answer is pretty simple: “Probably not well as you want her to be feeling.”

She has cancer. They’re dumping various poisons and toxins (aka chemotherapy) into her bloodstream. The nurses wear rubber suits as they administer it into her bloodstream. She’s always an hour away from feeling like garbage even when she’s feeling semi-OK.

Mouth sores, bleeding, breathing issues, heartburn, nausea, diarrhea, headaches and extreme fever – there’s seemingly a pill or a bag full of medicine with fancy names for all of ‘em – and we’ll see it all just like the last time.

And those are just the physical pains. The emotional toll and time and the possibilities can all sap you of your desire to live and fight.

We won’t let that happen.


Call us eternal optimists but we kinda refused to believe that this could happen the second time. But, our doctors did tell us last year that because she didn’t experience any graft vs. host disease (GVHD), she was statistically far more susceptible to a relapse.

So, do you want the awful rash and all of the risk and pain that comes with it or not?

Because she didn’t experience GVHD last summer, this relapse occurred and she’s got cancer in her body again. It was simply dormant over the last 15 months.

Last night, I met the couple in the next room. They look to be 40. They have three kids: 10, 8 and 6. They live in Virginia. She relapsed three days ago after five years of being clean. The husband is ashen. He’s an hour from his family, sleeping in a cot next to his wife after battling this thing when all three of their kids were toddlers. Now, they’re here again in an in a similar state of utter disbelief.

Behind every door, there’s a story here at “The Hotel.”

So many folks don’t understand what’s happening with Jenn and given the complexity, we certainly can relate. We’ve been battling this thing since March 20, 2014 and I’m still learning nuances every day.

It took her doctor 45 minutes to explain our current situation earlier this week and I’m going to try to explain as well as I can here:

Her leukemia, an extremely rare form known as acute bilineal leukemia (ABL), is back. It is the same cancer she had 18 months ago. Because the chemotherapy got her to remission (which means “no current signs of cancer”) last April, they’re using the same protocol and believe that it will work to get her clean again.

Our first goal is to get her to remission.

Instead of being prepped for a second bone marrow transplant, her doctors are using a different method to cure her this time. We are going back to her original donor in Germany – the same guy who wrote THIS LETTER in the hours after her saved her life last June. We will not ask him for bone marrow this time but instead for blood, a much simpler request and procedure.

The real need is for lymphocytes, which are white blood cells that she needs to enact this graft vs. host disease (GVHD) that would cure her.

Essentially, they need to get her very sick in order to get her better.

We are playing with fire here. You need GVHD in order to fully overcome the leukemia and have your body adjust to a new immune system. But GVHD can also be life threatening.

When it comes, she will experience a total body rash that will apparently burn like the gates of hell.

“It will be a complete rash from head to toe,” her doctor told us. “It’s not subtle.”

We felt blessed that she didn’t experience this awfulness the first time but it inevitably means that she’s back here with leukemia again and the goal of the doctors is to get her

Comments (1)


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My wife’s leukemia has returned, our #JennStrong2 cancer battle has begun

Posted on 02 October 2015 by Nestor Aparicio

Apparently, one miracle wasn’t enough for the most beautiful girl in the world. Now, my amazing wife Jennifer will try to repeat with back-to-back miracle seasons and beating cancer again with a second bone marrow transplant.

“I don’t know how to tell you this but your leukemia has returned,” is what her doctor told her while she was standing at a lunch buffet in a supermarket in Hunt Valley at 1:30 on Tuesday afternoon.

I was in the middle of a WNST radio conversation with baseball writer Bob Nightengale when she sent me a frantic text.

Clearly, we were both floored – completely shocked and devastated by the news.


That is not what we were expecting to hear on Tuesday when Jenn went to Johns Hopkins for what we thought was some routine blood work in the morning.

Yes, she had been battling some low energy over the past few weeks. She didn’t feel quite herself in Denver two weeks ago when we traveled to Mile High to see the Ravens and Broncos. She came home with a cold, some sniffles and a sore throat. She got an antibiotic and was feeling better every day – almost normal and 100% earlier this week.

Life had been so normal for us for so long ­– her initial bone marrow transplant was June 26, 2014 – that we never feared or envisioned this relapse and second battle, which we expect to be just as demanding and gruesome as the first battle.

Now that we have discovered that her leukemia has returned, we realize there have been some clues.

She had a massive cramp in her foot last Friday night at the Maritime Magic event at Living Classrooms Foundation. She started noticing a few small bruises on her body over the weekend. She’s been a Type 1 diabetic since 1991 and noticed some weird ranges in her blood sugar over the past week.

And on the final day of Blood Cancer Awareness Month, we became again aware of the silent ticking time bomb of leukemia. The cancerous cells exploded in her body again on Tuesday and, once again, will put our lives on hold for the next year.

Jenn had given blood 13 days earlier, when she first started feeling sick, and her blood was cancer free. Now, she has blasts in her blood and her platelets and key numbers are beginning to dive as the cancer begins to ravage her immune system.

She will move back into the hospital on Sunday night and her chemotherapy regiment will begin on Monday morning. We expect a lengthy hospital stay and a long battle. She spent 56 days in the hospital on the first journey – including 42 days on the first stay in March and April of last year. We were in the hospital literally every day for 180 days.

Honestly, this time, we’re just hoping to have her home by the end of the World Series or sometime around Halloween. And we’ve put our full faith in the doctors at Johns Hopkins who miraculously saved her life the first time.

My son has been on his honeymoon this week at Disney World, the Ravens played in Pittsburgh on Thursday night and we were headed for a five-day beach getaway and now, nothing else seems to matter anymore.

I wrote a massive blog about my search for happiness last month.

But, as Don Henley, sang: “In a New York minute, everything can change.”

Indeed, the wolf is always at the door.

Life is very fragile and our time on earth is very limited.

We’ve had 72 hours to digest this diagnosis and the second battle begins now.

It’s #JennStrong2.

And once again, my wife told me on Tuesday night: “I’m not going to f**king die. I will fight!”

So, off to the 5th floor we go for an extended stay and a full focus on her getting to remission and whatever it takes after that.

Her doctors are working on various protocols and developing an evolving strategy to save her life.

We know this journey well. We’ve become close friends with survivors. We’ve also lost some friends along the way. We’ve already run into folks at the hospital who were battling with her in 2014 and are still fighting for their lives every day.

And we’ve also seen many miracles.

Last Saturday night, we went to have our annual pre-game beverage with Marvin Lewis here in Baltimore before the Ravens game. We ran into this young lady with some Cincinnati roots, who is a five-year bone marrow transplant survivor.


Inspiration is all around.

Survivors abound. That’s what There Goes My Hero is all about!

But this #JennStrong2 fight will not be any

Comments Off on My wife’s leukemia has returned, our #JennStrong2 cancer battle has begun

Tags: , , ,

Princeton rallies late to top Hopkins LAX in overtime

Posted on 28 February 2015 by WNST Staff


BALTIMORE, MD – The 18th-ranked Princeton men’s lacrosse team jumped out to a 7-0 lead, then fought back from a two-goal deficit in the final seven minutes before knocking off 12th-ranked Johns Hopkins, 16-15, on a Gavin McBride extra-man goal with 1:07 remaining in overtime at Homewood Field Saturday. The win improves the Tigers’ record to 3-0 on the year, while the Blue Jays slip to 2-3 with the loss.

The 31 combined goals are the most in a Johns Hopkins-Princeton game since 1994 and this is the first time in the 85-game series history that both teams have scored 15 or more goals.

Hopkins bailed itself out of the early seven-goal deficit and finally took its first lead of the game on a Ryan Brown goal with 9:16 remaining. When freshman Joel Tinney spun inside a defender and scored on a nifty dodge from the side, the Blue Jays had a 14-12 lead and had outscored Princeton 14-5 since digging themselves the early seven-goal hole.

But, in a game of runs and as quickly as the Blue Jays had turned a 12-10 deficit into the 14-12 lead with a four-goal spree that took less than five minutes, the Tigers struck twice to knot things at 14. An unassisted goal by Zach Currier just 65 seconds after Tinney’s strike made it 14-13 and McBride split a pair of defenders and got in tight to knot the game with just over five minutes remaining.

Still, the Blue Jays grgoalie abbed a 15-14 lead when Tinney completed his first career hat trick with a 12-yard bouncer that eluded Princeton Eric Sanschagrin with 2:13 remaining.

That set the stage for the late-game heroics that forced overtime and the extra-session game-winner from McBride.

Princeton had the final possession of regulation and called timeout with 32 seconds remaining. Two shots that missed the cage were followed by a quick feed to the crease from Mike MacDonald that Ryan Ambler shoveled home with seven seconds left in regulation.

A violation on the opening faceoff of overtime gave Princeton possession and the Blue Jays drew a pair of flags, including a two-minute non-releasable penalty for an illegal body check.

Hopkins got a big save from Eric Schneider on a Kip Orban shot while still playing two men short and the Blue Jays nearly cleared the ball before turning it over under pressure. A successful clear by the Tigers kept the pressure on with Hopkins still trying to kill the final 30 seconds of the longer penalty and Princeton finally capitalized with 67 seconds remaining in the first overtime when Riley Thompson slipped a pass across the crease to McBride, who flipped the game-winner into the open net on the backside.

A late-game rally didn’t seem like it would be necessary 10 minutes into the game as the Tigers had their 7-0 lead by then as MacDonald had a hat trick and Orban had a pair before Hopkins finally broke through. In all, Princeton scored on seven of eight first-quarter shots.

A Brown goal for Johns Hopkins finally halted the Tigers’ run with 3:46 to play in the first quarter; Brown’s goal ignited a six-goal run for the Blue Jays that took less than nine minutes and included five consecutive extra-man goals.

Holden Cattoni closed the first quarter with an extra-man strike and then added another less than a minute into the second quarter before Blue Jay freshman Patrick Fraser put on an impressive shooting display with three straight extra-man goals in a span of just 80 seconds. His third goal capped the six-goal run and made it 7-6.

In a game full of runs, it was the Tigers’ turn to answer as McBride, Ambler and Orban all scored in the final five minutes of the first half with only another goal by Cattoni answering for the Blue Jays during that time to account for a 10-7 Tiger lead at the half.

The seven-goal deficit was a memory less than seven minutes into the second half as Tinney scored the first of his three second-half goals, Wells Stanwick got his hands free and scored on a dodge from behind and Brown blew home a 12-yarder.

Ambler and Orban gave Princeton a 12-10 lead as they bridged the third and fourth quarters with consecutive Tiger goals. Hopkins answered with the four-goal run that gave them the 14-12 lead. That run was ultimately answered and capped by McBride’s game-winner that sealed the seventh straight win in the series by the visiting team.

Princeton got all 16 of its goals and 11 of its 13 assists on the day from its starting attack and first midfield unit. Orban punched up six points on four goals and two assists, while Ambler, MacDonald and McBride added three goals and two assists each.

Five different players had exactly four points for Johns Hopkins as Fraser’s career-best four goals led the way, while Tinney and Brown added three goals and one assist. Stanwick and Crawley both punched up one goal and three assists to round out JHU’s four-point performers. Cattoni was just behind with his three-goal effort.

Johns Hopkins will return to action next Saturday, March 7 when Navy visits Homewood Field. Princeton will play at Maryland the same day.

#18 Princeton (3-0) 7-3-1-4-1/16

#12 Johns Hopkins (2-3) 2-5-3-5-0/15

Goals: P: Orban-4, MacDonald-3, Ambler-3, McBride-3, Currier-2, Hardej. J: Fraser-4, Brown-3, Cattoni-3, Tinney-3, W. Stanwick, Crawley. Assists: P: Currier-3, Ambler-2, MacDonald-2, McBride-2, Orban-2, Thompson-2. J: Crawley-3, W. Stanwick-3, S. Stanwick-2, Brown, Tinney. Saves: P: Sanschagrin-12. J: Schneider-4. Shots: P-34. J-37. EMO: P: 4-for-5. J: 7-for-10. Attendance: 1,217.


Comments Off on Princeton rallies late to top Hopkins LAX in overtime

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

”How’s our girl doing?” – A #JennStrong update for August

Posted on 03 August 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

We’re coming up on Day 150 for Jennifer Aparicio and her #JennStrong leukemia journey and every day I get more questions about her prognosis, future and general health. We’re blessed to have so many folks who care so much about my wife.

On June 26th, she underwent a bone marrow transplant from an anonymous donor. We believe the donor is from Europe.

The last six weeks have been exceedingly difficult for Jenn as she completely restores her immune system, strength, DNA and overall health. It has been an honor to be her caregiver and constant companion through this gruesome yet inspiring adventure to save her life.

The side effects are literally too numerous to recount. Pain, aching, fatigue, bones growing, blood flowing, infections and more than 30 pills per day for all sorts of complications and issues related to her safety. We have spent 134 of the last 143 days in or at the hospital. So far, she’s spent 51 nights as an in-patient.

Everywhere I’ve gone the past few weeks, people ask the same question: “How is our girl doing?”

The answer: better than we could have possibly expected but still far from our eventual destination.

Her weight dipped from 118 pounds to less than 100 at several points but over the past five days she has regained her appetite as she’s been weaned off several of the drugs after Day 30 post-transplant.

The next major event will come the week of Aug. 25th when she undergoes a bone marrow biopsy that will determine whether her body has the new cells or her old, cancerous pathology.

We were told, overall, that there’s a 70% chance that she’ll have the new, safe blood. Her odds are even greater because her match was a  “perfect match” – a 10-out-10 with the same B-Positive blood type in her donor’s genetic markers.

With the Baltimore Ravens season coming, we expect that she’ll be able to attend some of the games pending her condition and the weather. Because of her skin, blood and the various antibiotics she needs for her safety, she will not be able to be in direct sunlight for the next 12 months. (So, no Ocean City or beach for us until late 2015. We’re discussing places with cloudy awful weather for vacation destinations but we already go to Cleveland once a year.) That said, there’s a dome in New Orleans and we’re hoping she can make that trip in November with so many WNST fans already signed up on our roadtrip.

Your thoughts, spirit, prayers and kind wishes have been received and are all appreciated. We intend to continue to pay it forward as we swab more donors for the bone marrow registry and spread the word and assist victims of this insidious disease that has caused our lives to come to a complete halt while we battle this cancer along with an amazing team of doctors, nurses and a supportive staff of experts at Johns Hopkins.

Please stay #JennStrong with us as we feel we’re about to enter the red zone and go for the end zone of safety for her in the coming weeks and months. She’s getting better and inches closer to a full recovery every day.

We’ll keep you posted and hope that we get a chance to personally say hello sometime in the fall, perhaps at one of our live radio shows with new wide receiver Steve Smith. We’re be swabbing for There Goes My Hero at every event.

Keep the faith and stay #BmorePositive that she’ll be cured.

Much love…from Nes and #JennStrong

P.S. Her journey is in the video below…


Comments (3)

Tags: , , , , , ,

Hopkins lacrosse officially joins Big Ten, announces 2015 conference schedule

Posted on 01 July 2014 by WNST Staff

BALTIMORE, MD – On June 3, 2013, Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels stepped to the podium in the Cordish Lacrosse Center and announced that he had accepted an offer from the Big Ten and commissioner Jim Delany for the Blue Jay men’s lacrosse program to join the league as a sport affiliate member. The effective date of that membership? July 1, 2014.

While the first official Big Ten men’s lacrosse game is still nearly nine months away, Johns Hopkins men’s lacrosse coach Dave Pietramala, his staff and players are eagerly looking forward to the Blue Jays’ first season of competition as a member of the league. The Big Ten, which earlier today officially added Maryland and Rutgers as full members of the league, recently announced plans for the first two men’s lacrosse conference tournaments as it prepares to add both men’s and women’s lacrosse to its list of sponsored sports.

Below is some pertinent information for fans as the Blue Jays officially begin their membership in the Big Ten. While much of this information has previously been available, some is being announced for the first time.

Has Johns Hopkins ever competed in a conference in men’s lacrosse?
No. Johns Hopkins’ acceptance into the Big Ten as a sport affiliate member starting with the 2015 season will mark the first conference affiliation for the Blue Jay men’s lacrosse program. Johns Hopkins played its first men’s lacrosse game in 1883 and competed as an independent from then through the 2014 season.

Which teams will compete in the Big Ten in men’s lacrosse?
The six-team league will include Johns Hopkins, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio State, Penn State and Rutgers.

How will the Big Ten determine its champion?
The Big Ten recently announced that it will host a four-team tournament at the end of the regular season. The top four teams in the final regular season standings will qualify for the tournament and play for the championship.

And to the Victors?
The champion of the Big Ten Tournament will receive an automatic bid to the NCAA Division I Men’s Lacrosse Championships.

Where Will the Big Ten Men’s Lacrosse Tournament be Held?
The Big Ten announced the location for the 2015 and 2016 league tournaments. The 2015 Big Ten Tournament will be held at the University of Maryland, while the 2016 Big Ten Tournament will be held at Johns Hopkins University.

Is there a history between Johns Hopkins and the other Big Ten men’s lacrosse programs?
Yes, Johns Hopkins has played each of the other five Big Ten lacrosse-playing schools. Below is a quick look at the series history between Johns Hopkins and its Big Ten opponents:

Maryland – Nothing like the Big Ten bringing the greatest rivalry in college lacrosse to the table. The Blue Jays and Terrapins have met 111 times with Johns Hopkins holding a 70-40-1 advantage.

Michigan – The Blue Jays and Wolverines have met twice with JHU winning both. Michigan added men’s lacrosse as a varsity sport in 2012.

Ohio State – Johns Hopkins and Ohio State have met five times with JHU winning all five. The Buckeyes visited Homewood Field in 2014 and the teams played a triple overtime thriller that the Blue Jays won 10-9.

Penn State – The Blue Jays and Nittany Lions have played five times with Johns Hopkins winning all five. The teams last met in 1946.

Rutgers – The Johns Hopkins-Rutgers series dates back to 1920. The teams have met 34 times with Johns Hopkins winning 30 of the 34. Johns Hopkins and Rutgers last played in 1998.

Is the Big Ten schedule set for the 2015 season?
Yes. While exact dates and times are not set, the weekend that each game will be played has been established. Below is a look at Johns Hopkins’ Big Ten lacrosse schedule for 2015:

March 27-29: Rutgers
April 3-5: @ Ohio State
April 10-12: Penn State
April 17-19: Michigan
April 24-26: @ Maryland
April 30 – May 2: Big Ten Tournament at Maryland

What about the rest of the schedule?
While not set in stone, here is a quick look at the tentative non-conference schedule for Johns Hopkins in 2015. Like the games above, the weekends of each game are listed, but exact dates and times have not been established.

Feb. 6-8: UMBC
Feb. 10-11: @ Towson
Feb. 13-15: @ Villanova
Feb. 20-22: @ North Carolina
Feb. 27 – Mar. 1: Princeton
Mar. 6-8: Navy
Mar. 13-15: @ Syracuse
Mar. 20-22: Virginia

Will Johns Hopkins men’s lacrosse games be televised by the Big Ten Network?
Through its negotiated contract with the Big Ten, Johns Hopkins will maintain its television agreement with ESPN. Thus, all Johns Hopkins home games will air on the ESPN Network (ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU or WatchESPN (web)). Big Ten games played away from Homewood Field may air on the Big Ten Network, although those plans have not been finalized at this time.

What happens with television when the Big Ten Tournament is at Homewood Field in 2016?
The Big Ten retains the television rights to the Big Ten Tournament. The Big Ten Tournament is not covered in Johns Hopkins’ agreement with ESPN.


Comments Off on Hopkins lacrosse officially joins Big Ten, announces 2015 conference schedule

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Former Hopkins, UMBC, Maryland stars make US lacrosse roster for Worlds

Posted on 30 June 2014 by WNST Staff

BALTIMORE — At the conclusion of a tryout process that included 98 players and spanned 11 months, US Lacrosse has named the U.S. Men’s National Team final 23-man roster for the FIL World Championship, presented by Trusted Choice, July 10-19 in Commerce City, Colo.

The team was selected from a 31-player roster that attended training camp last week in Connecticut and Massachusetts, and competed in Thursday’s MLL All-Star Game at Harvard Stadium in Cambridge, Mass.

Four players return from the gold medal-winning 2010 FIL World Championship squad that defeated Canada 12-10 in Manchester, England, to earn the United States’ ninth world title. Returners include attackmen Ned Crotty and Brendan Mundorf (All-World) as well as midfielders Paul Rabil (MVP and All-World) and Max Seibald (All-World).

Team USA will next head to the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., for a final training camp July 6-9 before beginning its world title defense in Denver on July 10.

“These men were selected from a group of 52 that participated in Orlando and 31 that participated this past week, so we feel this is a very solid team that will represent our country well in Denver,” said Team USA head coach Richie Meade. “Several of the men who have been part of this process distinguished themselves, but weren’t chosen for this team. We’re very humbled to represent our country and endeavor to do so to the best of our collective ability.”

The 23-man roster by position with professional teams, collegiate alma maters, and previous U.S. team experience noted:

Ned Crotty, New York Lizards, Duke*
Marcus Holman, Ohio Machine, North Carolina
Kevin Leveille, Rochester Rattlers, Massachusetts
Brendan Mundorf, Chesapeake Bayhawks, UMBC*
Rob Pannell, New York Lizards, Cornell
Garrett Thul, Florida Launch/Philadelphia Wings, Army

Matt Abbott, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Syracuse
Kevin Buchanan, Boston Cannons, Ohio State
Dan Burns, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Maryland
Kyle Harrison, Ohio Machine, Johns Hopkins^
David Lawson, Rochester Rattlers, Duke
Paul Rabil, Boston Cannons, Johns Hopkins*
Max Seibald, New York Lizards/Philadelphia Wings, Cornell*

Mitch Belisle, Boston Cannons, Cornell
Jesse Bernhardt, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Maryland
Tucker Durkin, Florida Launch, Johns Hopkins
Michael Evans, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Johns Hopkins
Kyle Hartzell, New York Lizards, Salisbury
Lee Zink, Denver Outlaws, Maryland

Drew Adams, New York Lizards, Penn State
Jesse Schwartzman, Denver Outlaws, Johns Hopkins

Chris Eck, Boston Cannons, Colgate
Greg Gurenlian, New York Lizards, Penn State

* 2010 U.S. men’s national team member
^ 2006 U.S. men’s national team member

Two alternates were selected to travel with the team to Colorado Springs and Denver, and will be added to the active roster only in the instance of injury. Per FIL policy, no changes to the active roster may be made after Wednesday, July 9.

John Galloway, Rochester Rattlers, Syracuse
Steele Stanwick, Ohio Machine, Virginia

For more information on the U.S. men’s national team, visit uslacrosse.org/usmen. Follow the team on Facebook at fb.com/uslacrosse, on Twitter and Instagram at @uslacrosse and use #USAMLAX.

The World Champion U.S. Men’s National Teams train and play using best-in-class products provided by Nike (apparel and footwear), STX (equipment) and Cascade (helmets). Nationwide and Marriott International are official sponsors of Team USA.

Comments Off on Former Hopkins, UMBC, Maryland stars make US lacrosse roster for Worlds

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Loyola/Johns Hopkins to resume lacrosse series in 2016

Posted on 17 June 2014 by WNST Staff

Loyola-Johns Hopkins Men’s Lacrosse Series To Resume in 2016

BALTIMORE – The head men’s lacrosse coaches Loyola University Maryland and Johns Hopkins University, Charley Toomey and Dave Pietramala, announced that the two schools will not play a regular-season game during 2015, but the series will resume in 2016.

With both programs joining new conferences over the past year – Loyola began play in the Patriot League in 2014, and Johns Hopkins will be a member of the Big Ten starting next year – the traditional late-season date on which the teams have played was not an option.

The teams will play a scrimmage at Johns Hopkins on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015, and will then meet in the 2016 season in a game to be played at Loyola’s Ridley Athletic Complex.

“We are disappointed that we will not be playing during the regular-season in 2015, but we are certainly looking forward to picking back up in 2016,” said Loyola Head Coach Charley Toomey. “Playing this game on a Saturday was something that was very important to both programs, and I am pleased that we have been able to do that going forward. Our scrimmage against Johns Hopkins in 2015 is going to be a great way for our team to prepare for tough early-season games against Virginia and Penn State.”

Comments Off on Loyola/Johns Hopkins to resume lacrosse series in 2016