Tag Archive | "Kevin Anderson"

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Maryland AD Anderson says he’s “not pursuing” Texas job

Posted on 02 November 2013 by WNST Staff

From a statement released by Terrapins Athletic Director Kevin Anderson via the school’s website (Anderson had previously been linked to the job-even reported to be interviewing for the job by the Dallas Morning News)…

“Hello Terps,

I write this post as reports have surfaced in the media recently speculating my connection to the athletic director opening at the University of Texas. I must confess I am humbled to be mentioned in connection with such a position, but more importantly, I feel it speaks volumes to the outstanding progress we have made at the University of Maryland and to the new heights our athletic department is destined for in the future.

Let me be clear, I am not pursuing any other professional opportunities at other institutions. I am steadfast in my commitment to the University of Maryland.

We open up the men’s basketball season on Friday, November 8 against No. 18 Connecticut at the Barclays Center and then the following afternoon host Syracuse in football with the opportunity to become bowl eligible with a victory. I look forward to seeing you at Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium on November 9. Kickoff is at 3:30 p.m.

Here’s to many more exciting years at Maryland!

Go Terps!”

 

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Maryland football, men’s basketball post all-time high graduation rates

Posted on 24 October 2013 by WNST Staff

Maryland Posts All-Time High GSR Score

Men’s basketball and football also set program-best marks

COLLEGE PARK, Md.  The University of Maryland posted an all-time high institutional Graduation Success Rate (GSR) of 86 percent in figures released today by the National Collegiate Athletics Association. It marks the fourth time in the nine-year history of the metric that Maryland has been above 80 percent and the fourth straight year the campus set a school record. Maryland’s previous-best GSR of 83 percent came in 2012.

Maryland’s four-year Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) for student-athletes was 74 percent (higher than 68% posted last year), nine percent higher than the overall NCAA Division I average of 65 percent.

The Graduation Success Rate is a four-year measure of freshmen and transfer student-athletes who entered the University of Maryland between the fall of 2003 and the spring of 2007. It does not penalize the institution for those student-athletes who transfer from Maryland in good academic standing, as the FGR does. In addition, the GSR includes student-athletes who transfer into the institution and receive athletics aid, unlike the FGR.

Maryland’s men’s basketball and football programs showed firm improvement once again, posting program-best GSR marks of 82 and 73 percent, respectively, since the metric began in 2005.  Men’s basketball boasted an impressive 32 percent jump from its 50 percent GSR mark in 2012.  Football’s score exhibited significant progress from a 65 percent mark in 2012.

Overall, Maryland’s GSR rate of 86 percent is five percent better than the NCAA average of 81 percent.

“The progress we continue to show with both GSR and FGR rates is indicative of the dedication to our vision of providing student-athletes with an excellent experience academically and athletically,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “As we strive to be the best intercollegiate athletics department in the nation, it is vital we continue to cultivate an environment where academics are of boundless importance.”

“Our student-athletes continue to work hard in the classroom and it shows,” said Chris Uchacz, associate A.D. for academic services and career development. “Supporting our student-athletes is a total departmental team effort as our number one priority is to serve our WHY while graduating student-athletes.”

In this most recent data, 16 teams at Maryland earned GSRs at or above 80 percent. Women’s cross country and track, field hockey, and gymnastics had perfect 100 percent GSR scores. Women’s cross country and track (100 percent), field hockey (100), women’s golf (90) gymnastics (100),  women’s soccer (94), softball (94), and volleyball (91) all matched or improved their GSR score from the previous year.  In addition, women’s basketball 92 GSR score was seven percent higher than the NCAA average.

Overall, the men’s golf team achieved a 100 percent GSR, marking the highest-scoring men’s team at Maryland. In addition to men’s basketball, football and golf, other men’s programs to secure improved GSR scores include wrestling (86) and soccer (83).

The GSR and FGR are separate from the NCAA’s Academic Performance Rates, which will be released in spring 2014.

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Maryland hoops assistant Hill takes leave of absence

Posted on 22 October 2013 by WNST Staff

Dalonte Hill To Take Leave Of Absence

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – University of Maryland men’s basketball assistant coach Dalonte Hill is taking a leave of absence from the program effective immediately.

Hill spent the past two seasons as an assistant coach with the Terps.

“I appreciate the support and encouragement I’ve received from Coach Turgeon and the athletic department,” said Hill. “But at this time it is in my best interest to take a leave of absence from the Maryland basketball program and focus my attention on some personal matters that need to be dealt with immediately.”

“We will support him through this process,” said Maryland men’s basketball head coach Mark Turgeon. “We want him to focus on his personal life. Basketball is secondary at this point. His primary focus needs to be on his health and well-being.”

“I accept Dalonte’s decision to take a leave of absence,” said Maryland director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “We’ve encouraged him to take the time he needs to address these personal issues.”

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Maryland lacrosse receives strong APR score

Posted on 11 June 2013 by WNST Staff

Thirteen teams post multiyear scores at or above 970

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Thirteen intercollegiate teams at the University of Maryland posted multiyear Academic Progress Rates (APR) at or above 970 based on data released Tuesday by the NCAA.

 

Those programs in the report were led by the women’s golf team, which earned a perfect multiyear score of 1,000 and was recognized by the NCAA as among the top 10 percent of programs nationally.

 

In addition to women’s golf, teams scoring above 970 on the multiyear (4-year) rate were: field hockey (997), volleyball (990), men’s lacrosse (989), women’s soccer (985), women’s lacrosse (981), gymnastics (978), women’s outdoor track (975), women’s indoor track (974), women’s cross country (973), men’s golf (973), men’s outdoor track (972) and men’s soccer (972).

 

All sport programs reported in the 2011-12 data set earned multiyear scores of 930 or higher. As a result, no penalties were assessed by the NCAA.

 

Football continued to make strides since 2009-10 when the multiyear score was 922. Since then, football has reported multiyear scores of 931 and 937 in the latest data. Under Randy Edsall, the football team has had an increase of 15 APRpoints in two years. Men’s and women’s basketball had multiyear scores of 948 and 950, respectively.

 

“Academic performance is a core value of our athletics department and our student-athletes continue to represent this university with distinction,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “Our entire department is dedicated to ensuring our student-athletes achieve their goal of graduating with a Maryland degree. We’re committed to helping our student-athletes build a foundation for a successful life after intercollegiate athletics.”

 

The newly released multiyear APR scores are comprised of data submitted for 2008-09, 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. The APR index was developed by the NCAA to provide a “real time” snapshot on a semester-by-semester basis in order to measure the eligibility and retention of student-athletes in all Division I institutions. The APR is part of a larger package of initiatives, the NCAA Academic Performance Program, which was mandated by the NCAA Board of Directors to improve the academic performance of athletic teams.

 

In calculating the APR, all student-athletes receiving athletics financial aid are considered “counters” and each semester receive one point for retention/graduation and one point for meeting NCAA and University of Maryland eligibility standards to compete. The maximum number of APR points a student-athlete can earn in an academic year is four (2 in the fall semester and 2 in the spring semester). A team’s APR is the total number of eligibility/retention points earned divided by the maximum number of points possible. This APR number is then multiplied by 1,000. (For example, a team which receives 94 percent of all possible points would have a team APR of 940.)

 

The database of APR data for all NCAA Division I teams is available at this link.

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Maryland’s Turgeon, Anderson to visit Spirit of Baltimore

Posted on 10 May 2013 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - A four-stop list of visits with Terrapin fans was revealed Friday as the Maryland athletics department released the schedule for the 2013 Coaches Caravan.

Maryland coaches, athletic department staff and student athletes will visit with fans from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at each of four stops on the Caravan, which will be hosted either at a restaurant or on a boat cruise. Each event will feature a short program with insight into Maryland Athletics followed by an opportunity for attendees to mingle with the coaches and student athletes, take photos and get autographs.

There are 100 spaces available at each location, and tickets are only $25 per person and $15 for children ages 15 and under. If capacity is reached, names and phone numbers will be put on a waiting list, but there will be no guarantees on securing a spot.

Appetizers and giveaways will be provided by the Terrapin Club at each event. If you have any questions, feel free to contact the Terrapin Club at 301-314-7020.

Coaches Caravan 2013

Ocean City
May 20, 2013
6:30pm-8:30pm
Galaxy 66 Bar and Grille
6601 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD

- Parking available at the site
- Special Guests: football coach Randy Edsall, wrestling coach Kerry McCoy, and deputy director of athletics Nate Pine.

Annapolis
May 23, 2013
6:30pm-8:30pm
Catherine Marie Yacht (Annapolis City Dock)
1 Dock Street, Annapolis, MD

- Boat will stay docked until 7:00pm
- Parking is available near dock at meters and any other spaces downtown
- Special Guests: football coach Randy Edsall, field hockey coach Missy Meharg, soccer coach Sasho Cirovski and director of athletics Kevin Anderson.

Baltimore
May 29, 2013
6:30pm-8:30pm
Spirit of Baltimore Yacht
561 Light Street Baltimore, MD

- Boat will stay docked until 7:00pm
- Parking is available at Harbor Place Indoor garage at the Royal Sonesta hotel.  The address is 30 East Lee Street and is right across street from Spirit. Get voucher on board for $6.00.
- Special Guests: men’s basketball coach Mark Turgeon, women’s basketball coach Brenda Frese, soccer coach Sasho Cirovski, wrestling coach Kerry McCoy and director of athletics Kevin Anderson.

Washington, DC
June 4, 2013
6:30pm-8:30pm
Virginia’s Jewel Yacht
1300 Maine Avenue SW Washington, DC

- Boat will stay docked until 7:00pm
- Parking is available at the dock for $15 or there is other parking including: street parking, parking garage down the street or at Phillips down the street
- Special Guests: men’s basketball coach Mark Turgeon, women’s basketball coach Brenda Frese, soccer coach Sasho Cirovski and director of athletics Kevin Anderson.

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Terps Blye, Francis earn ACC postgraduate scholarship honors

Posted on 21 February 2013 by WNST Staff

ACC Postgrad Scholarships Awarded to Three Terps
Blye, Francis and Schwarzmann named Weaver-James-Corrigan Award recipients

GREENSBORO, N.C. – The Atlantic Coast Conference has selected Owen Blye (Men’s Lacrosse), A.J. Francis (Football) and Katie Schwarzmann (Women’s Lacrosse) from the University of Maryland for the Weaver-James-Corrigan Postgraduate Scholarship Award for 2013.

ACC Commissioner John D. Swofford announced on Thursday the 36 student-athletes who have been honored with the award.

The Weaver-James-Corrigan scholarships are awarded to three student-athletes at each league institution. The awards are based on academic record, athletic versatility, interest in university and community life, and the athlete’s commitment to ideals and values in their professional lives. Recipients will receive $5,000 to contribute to their graduate education.

“This is a tremendous and very well-deserved honor for Katie, Owen and A.J.,” Kevin Anderson, University of Maryland director of athletics said. “These student-athletes are terrific leaders in the classroom and on the field and represent the very best at the University of Maryland.”

“The ACC Postgraduate Scholarship is an extremely prestigious award with a long history and we are very excited that Katie, AJ, and Owen were recently named as recipients,” said Associate Director of Athletics Chris Uchacz. “All three will be pursuing Master’s level work next year and are outstanding examples of the types of leaders the university is producing that will have an impact on the local, state and global communities. Congratulations to each of them!”

The award is named in honor of the late Jim Weaver and Bob James, as well as Gene Corrigan. All three are former ACC commissioners.

The recipients of this year’s award will be honored on April 17, 2013 at the Koury Convention Center in Greensboro, N.C.

- Terps -

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President Loh says Big Ten move in “strategic interest” for Maryland

Posted on 19 November 2012 by WNST Staff

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND TO JOIN THE BIG TEN CONFERENCE

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The Big Ten Council of Presidents/Chancellors (COP/C) announced unanimous approval today for the University of Maryland to join the Big Ten Conference effective July 1, 2014, with competition to begin in all sports for the 2014-15 academic year. The University of Maryland also looks forward to joining the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), a consortium of world-class research institutions dedicated to advancing their academic missions.

“Today is a watershed moment for the University of Maryland,” said university president Wallace D. Loh.  “Membership in the Big TenConference is in the strategic interest of the University of Maryland.  It will not only ensure the financial vitality of Maryland Athletics for decades to come, but the extensive opportunities in the CIC for collaborations with our peer AAU and flagship universities in education, research, and innovation will boost the University of Maryland’s ascendancy in academic excellence.”

“The Big Ten Presidents and Chancellors are pleased to welcome the University of Maryland to the Big Ten Conference,” said COP/C Chair and University of Iowa President Sally Mason.  “The University of Maryland is one of the premier public research universities in the country and represents a natural alignment with our other member institutions.  Their top-ranked academic and athletic programs will be a tremendous addition to our conference.”

“Today is a historic day for both the University of Maryland and for Maryland Athletics,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “The Big Ten is an outstanding conference comprised of flagship research universities. Our new peers share our pursuit of both athletic and academic excellence.  We are thrilled to join the Big Ten and look forward to beginning this next chapter in Maryland Athletics starting in 2014.”

In order for an institution to be admitted to the Big Ten Conference, it must submit a written application, which must then be approved by at least 70 percent of the Big Ten COP/C.  The University of Maryland formally submitted an application to join the Big Ten Conference Monday morning. The Big Ten COP/C then met via conference call and unanimously approved UMD’s application.

“The Big Ten Conference is excited to welcome the University of Maryland beginning with the 2014-15 academic year,” said Big Ten Commissioner James E. Delany. “Maryland is a tradition-rich institution with a history of academic and athletic excellence. They’re a great fit and we look forward to a great future.”

About the University of Maryland:  The University of Maryland is the state’s flagship university and one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities. Ranked No. 19 among public universities by U.S. News & World Report, it has 30 academic programs in the U.S News Top 10. UMD is one of only six universities in the world with top 25 programs in Computer Science, Engineering, Economics and Business, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Physics and Social Sciences, according to the Academic Ranking of Worldwide Universities.

About the Big Ten Conference: The Big Ten Conference is an association of world-class universities whose member institutions share a common mission of research, graduate, professional and undergraduate teaching and public service. Founded in 1896, the Big Ten has sustained a comprehensive set of shared practices and policies that enforce the priority of academics in student-athletes’ lives and emphasize the values of integrity, fairness and competitiveness. The broad-based athletic programs of the 12 Big Ten institutions sponsor 298 teams competing for championships in 25 official conference sports, 12 for men and 13 for women. Big Ten universities provide in excess of $136 million in athletic scholarship aid to nearly 10,000 men and women student-athletes, the most of any conference. For more information, visit www.bigten.org.

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I’m not as hellbent against potential Big Ten move as some of you

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I’m not as hellbent against potential Big Ten move as some of you

Posted on 17 November 2012 by Glenn Clark

Drew Forrester is right.

(You better make sure you pocket that one away for the future there, Forrester.)

He wrote Saturday morning here at WNST.net that if the University of Maryland were to jump ship from the ACC to the Big Ten (or B1G if you will), the move would be made entirely based on money.

He’s right about that. Of course, as it always is with Drew-he’s not right about everything.

Drew also said such a move would “stink…plain and simple.”

I’m not buying that whatsoever. I know he isn’t either.

Maryland to the Big Ten rumors have been reheated in recent days, and it appears as though this time there’s the actual bite that has been missing during previous rounds of rumors. In fact, a detailed ESPN.com report said Saturday school President Wallace Loh and Athletic Director Kevin Anderson were directly involved in negotiations.

The single biggest reason why a move like this WOULDN’T happen would be the $50 million exit fee the ACC is charging for a member institution to leave, but there’s monetary incentive for the B1G to be willing to help there.

Should the B1G be able to lure Maryland (and Rutgers as reports have indicated the league would also like to add), they would immediately open up three top 30 markets for likely pickup of the Big Ten Network (New York, Washington and Baltimore). Adding these three markets would prove quite lucrative for a league who created the first ever 24-7 sports television network.

That fact has been deemed understandable by most fans, but what some have struggled to understand is why Maryland would want to give up money-making basketball games against the likes of Duke and North Carolina.

Perhaps Saturday’s football game should teach you a lesson.

To understand why the move would make sense for Maryland, you must first be willing to accept a simple fact. No matter how important basketball is to your program, football is the money maker at (damn near) every major Division 1 university.

Let that sink in.

Maryland needs football revenue. It’s why they’re rotating through many different Under Armour uniforms right now. They’re hoping that with actual healthy players in the near future, they might be able to win games under Randy Edsall. If they do, that will go a long way to helping the program make money. In the meantime, their most lucrative opponents at Byrd Stadium include the likes of Virginia Tech and Florida State.

And thanks to this picture posted by InsideMDSports.com Saturday, here’s what we’ve learned about the lucrative nature of a game against Florida State…

There is no guarantee that a late season game against an Ohio State or Penn State or Michigan or Wisconsin would be significantly better attended than Saturday’s game given the dreadful state of the Maryland program after losing FOUR quarterbacks. But if THIS is as good as the ACC has to offer in football, what really is there to lose by making the jump?

There absolutely WOULD be something lost in basketball with a move to the B1G. Games against Duke and North Carolina have been perhaps the most significant athletic events the school has hosted in the last decade. That said, the conference has been a watered down mess outside the two power programs, and replacing Duke and Carolina with games against Michigan State and Indiana annually (or biannually) doesn’t sound like a terrible consolation prize. Games against Ohio State Wisconsin could serve as replacements for what would have been gained from the pending additions of Pitt and Syracuse to the ACC.

But Maryland’s reason for interest in jumping ship to the Big Ten is still much more tied to football, and namely the Big Ten Network.

The thought process is quite simple. Every Big Ten football game played every year is on television.

I want you to think about that.

Every single game is on television…not ESPN3.com.

That value cannot be dismissed in making a determination for the University of Maryland. Even the early season games against the likes of James Madison or Florida International would actually air on TV in (presumably) almost every home in the area and in other Big Ten markets, which would now include the crucial recruiting areas of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Every single game would also be available for viewing parties of alumni groups in bars and restaurants in those same markets.

Does that make sense?

On top of that, every program aired 24 hours a day, seven days a week on BTN serves as very affordable advertising for the athletic department and university as a whole.

If Maryland makes the move to the B1G, it will ABSOLUTELY be all about money.

It will NOT however “stink”.

Everyone knows (including Drew) that the only thing that actually matters in college athletics is money.

That’s “plain and simple.”

-G

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A Terps move to Big Ten would stink, plain and simple

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A Terps move to Big Ten would stink, plain and simple

Posted on 17 November 2012 by Drew Forrester

Is Maryland really going to jump from the ACC to the Big Ten?

Apparently, yes.

While it’s still not a done deal, a college athletics source told me early this morning “They’re just going over the fine print now…”, which would lead you to believe it’s on the verge of being announced.

At stake, of course, is money.  That’s the only reason Maryland would be doing this sort of thing.  It can’t be about any other reason.  It’s most certainly not being done to help increase the interest in the Terps basketball program, which would take a major hit if they leave the ACC for the Big Ten.  Maryland vs. Northwestern every year sure gets me excited, how about you?   It’s fair to note that Big Ten football is far superior to ACC football, but what good does that do Randy Edsall and Company when they’re already a bottom-feeder in the ACC?  Does the Big Ten really need another sacrificial lamb for Ohio State and Michigan and Penn State?

Some folks will point to Saturday’s woeful attendance of 32,000 in College Park to see Florida State hammer Maryland and use that as a measuring stick for how much of a draw even a good program like the Seminoles are…but the reality is the attendance in College Park is dwindling because the team isn’t any good.  They can move to the Big Ten tomorrow, but if the Terps are 2-7 in football this time next year, they’ll draw 32,000 for the home game against Michigan State, too.

This is about money.  Nothing more, nothing less.  Maryland would get a chip or two from the Big Ten TV pie, for starters, and you would think a handful of football home games a year against the powers of the Big Ten would draw more paying customers than, say, annual visits from Georgia Tech, Wake Forest and North Carolina.

Maryland athletics, needless to say, is much more than just football and basketball from a competitive standpoint.  But from the money viewpoint, those two sports are propping up all the others.  While the soccer and lacrosse programs have both become national powers over the last few years, they’re still not paying for themselves.  Golf, tennis, field hockey and all of the other non-revenue sports in College Park don’t generate enough cash to pay for the gas they use in the luxury coach to get them to Charlottesville, Virginia for an event.  At Maryland, it’s basketball and football, with soccer and women’s basketball generating some money and men’s lacrosse chipping in as well.  And that’s it.

So, on the basis of needing to make some financial sense out of sports at College Park, this move to the Big Ten is probably going to lend a helping hand to a department that has been scuffling for several years now.

And even though the Big Ten move might cure Maryland’s athletic economic woes, the switch won’t do anything cosmetically for Kevin Anderson and Company.  They’re simply taking the money.  Nothing more.  The move doesn’t add any immediate interest to Maryland sports.  The only reason Maryland hops to the Big Ten is because of the money they’ll make for doing so.

In general, the move stinks.  No more Duke basketball games.  No more Roy Williams.  Rivalry games with Virginia are gone.

Maryland is an Atlantic/Eastern seaboard school with a long history of trips to Tobacco Road and memorable encounters with the Blue Devils and Tar Heels and Wolfpack and Deamon Deacons.

Maryland is not supposed to play Iowa or Michigan State or Minnesota.

But it looks like they’re going to be doing just that if this story comes to fruition, which many are now saying it will sometime in the next few weeks.

I don’t like it all, but I’m not surprised by it, either.

College sports is all about money.

If you have a lot of it, you’re the one doing most of the winning.

If you don’t have a lot of it, you’re trying to figure out how to get more of it so you can start winning again.

Maryland’s chasing the money.

That’s better than losing, I guess.

 

 

 

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NCAA approves appeal making Wells eligible

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NCAA approves appeal making Wells eligible

Posted on 07 November 2012 by WNST Staff

NCAA DECLARES WELLS ELIGIBLE FOR COMPETITION

 

The University of Maryland athletics department on Wednesday morning announced the NCAA has approved the appeal on the waiver allowing Dez Wells to be immediately eligible for competition.

The appeal decision was provided by the NCAA Division I Legislative Council Subcommittee for Legislative Relief, which is comprised of athletics administrators from around the country, and overturned the staff decision denying the waiver.

“We’re very happy for Dez as the NCAA legislative relief process provided him with complete and fair due process,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “Our staff was personally invested in the NCAA waiver and appeal process because it was in the best interest of our student-athlete. We’re pleased that Dez will be able to move forward and experience all the opportunities that come with being a student-athlete at the University of Maryland.”

“We’re excited for Dez because at the end of the day, the NCAA made the right decision,” said basketball head coach Mark Turgeon. “Our staff did an incredible job in putting this NCAA waiver appeal together on Dez’s behalf. Dez has been a welcomed addition, a great teammate, and has made a seamless transition in getting acclimated to our campus. This has been a long process for him and his family, and we’re grateful he can put it behind him and focus on being a student-athlete at the University of Maryland.”

 

- Terps -

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