Tag Archive | "magic"

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Orioles Magic and 666: The Number of The East

Posted on 27 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

It’s been six years and six days since we launched the “Free The Birds” campaign to speak out about the awfulness that the Baltimore Orioles had become under the stewardship of Peter G. Angelos. Coincidentally, today the Orioles “magic number” to clinch a playoff berth in the American League is 6.

It’s absolutely astonishing that we’re going to the Ravens’ fourth game of the season tonight and the Baltimore Orioles are playing meaningful baseball games every night. It’s almost awkward and overwhelming, the energy we’re all feeling for sports in our community.

So as 70,000 gather downtown and bring the purple love for the 2-1 Baltimore Ravens on national television, has all been forgiven and “fixed” according to the customers of the Baltimore Orioles?

If you’re counting the tens of thousands of empty seats this “Orioles Magic” show has played for over the last month you’ll see that the franchise and the 2012 Orioles still have a long way to go to undo the untold damage to the psyche of its own fan base. Even worse, there are many potential baseball fans who are unaware – or uninterested – in coming back to the ballpark and soaking in the love of Birdland, which right now is just about the happiest place on earth.

Fill in any reason you’d like: price, distance, inconvenience, HDTV, love of Jim Hunter, blah, blah, blah.

Bottom line: it ain’t a tough ticket.

I’ve never stopped going to Orioles games. I’ve been to eight games a year every year since 2003 when they proved to be awful business partners and 2006 when they took away my press pass (I’m the only person in history of Baltimore media to be “banned” from Orioles games). People give me free tickets and I use them.

I’ve flown to Sarasota twice to see them play in spring training. I’ve seen the Orioles play in New York three times a year every year for 8 years. I’ve seen them play in Boston, New York, Cleveland, Tampa, Philadelphia.

I’ve been going back to the ballpark this month and I’ve reached into my wallet to do it.

I purchased two tickets for the Cal Ripken Statue Thursday night extravaganza. I bought four tickets for this Monday’s DH for $4 each. I checked the credit card receipts. I spent $18.80. Because of the scarcity of the Ripken tickets, it cost us $47.80 for a pair of standing rooms that we turned into sitting rooms in the back row of Sec. 380.

My total investment in the Orioles so far in 2012? That’s right: $66.60.

If you follow me on Facebook or Twitter or @WNST on Twitter, you know that I’m at the ballpark because I’m sending up pictures, observations, analysis and some dark humor.

I turned down offers for free tickets the past two nights because I had other obligations for work.

I woke up early on Saturday morning and chased down a pair of tickets to every postseason game the Orioles could play this October. And then I realized that I’ll be in Kansas City for the Ravens’ game next weekend.

And I have to ask myself the same question many Baltimore sports fans are asking themselves – am I a bigger fan of the Orioles or the Ravens? And if I had to pick just one…???? Hmmm…

I’m asking Baltimore sports fans these questions all month here in our GREAT BALTIMORE MEDIA SURVEY. Take it for a chance to win a trip to Cleveland in November!

For me choosing between the Orioles and the Ravens is like picking between whether you love your

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Orange you glad we can celebrate Purple Friday with twice the color in Baltimore?

Posted on 07 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

I walked into BWI this morning and it was quite a mixed breed. I saw six Orioles hats and shirts and just three Ravens items. Alas, Baltimore is conflicted amidst an unprecedented occurrence – Orioles prosperity has made us all feel a little orange for the first time ever.

But that doesn’t mean on the eve of Monday’s season opener in Baltimore that we can’t find some “mixed marriages” of purple and orange. We here at WNST.net have ALWAYS been a mixed marriage of purple and orange from the very beginning:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re in our 14th year of wearing orange and purple at the same time everywhere we go.

We’ve NEVER stopped talking about the Orioles and the Ravens…every day. Win or lose.

So far, I can only name two other sports teams that bear the color scheme of orange and purple. Earlier today, Josh Charles tweeted that he thought they didn’t look so good together:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clearly, I have always had room in my heart for both.

So do these folks…

And, please don’t send me any “cease and desists” here, Mr. Angelos.

I didn’t create them. I’m just passing them along for your enjoyment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See more on next page:

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For one night, the “Magic” of Orioles baseball returned to Baltimore

Posted on 07 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

As much as we can credit any number of factors on the field – the Matt Wieters home run, the Adam Jones home run, the Mark Reynolds home run, the Chris Davis home run – what everyone in the ballpark at Oriole Park at Camden Yards will always remember about Sept. 6, 2012 was the energy of the crowd.

 

Last week I wrote about Adam Jones’ Twitter pleas for more support from Baltimore’s baseball fans amidst an embarrassing number of empty seats for a four-game series against the Chicago White Sox last week. Yesterday, I predicted the special nature of last night’s game simply because of the sheer volume of Orioles fans that would engage with the team inside he stadium.

 

As the Orioles Magic song says: “You make the magic happen…”

 

And last night the heroics on the field and the outcome better represented the weary and jubilant fan base more than anything that Peter Angelos has repeatedly done to extinguish the fire and passion of Baltimore Orioles fans around the world.

 

On a personal note, this is exactly why I led the “Free The Birds” walkout in 2006. It’s why I’ve been so vocal regarding the demise of the franchise and have illuminated the many reasons for the great emptiness in the city, stadium and in our hearts as Orioles fans.

 

Last night was what Baltimore Orioles baseball was about for two generations. It’s the finest example of what’s been missing since 1997 amidst a circus of mismanagement, mean-spirited and petty behavior and a flat-out awful product on the field that this city has endured.

 

The last chapter of the 2012 Baltimore Orioles is far from written and we’ll continue to chronicle it here at WNST.net and our many social media resources during the games – even the ones the Orioles won’t win during this stretch run.

 

The ballpark is sure to be electric again tonight and all week as the 2012 Baltimore Orioles have a chance to be, in the words of manager Buck Showalter, “pile divers.”

 

But Thursday night will live in the minds of fans for a long time. What a night to have a ticket for a Baltimore Orioles game and be a part of that kind of a local sporting event!

 

I’ve been doing sports media for almost 29 years and I’ll never forget the wide-ranging emotions of Thursday – from the death of Art Modell before sunrise to the emotions and love for him in Owings Mills in the early afternoon to the Cal Ripken statue ceremony to every pitch in a rollercoaster ride of a game vs. the New York Yankees.

 

It was the most exciting night of Baltimore baseball since 1979 at Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street when Doug DeCinces ignited a two-decade love affair with a huge home run to beat the Detroit Tigers.

 

You can argue for any of the Cal Ripken 2131 proceedings in 1995 or the Rick Sutcliffe Opener in 1992 or any of the playoff energy in 1996 and 1997. Obviously the 1989 Why Not? season – led by the Mike Devereaux foul-poul homer – and the 1983 World Series win will have memories to mark on our baseball journey.

 

But for a single game on a single night with the impact and the stakes being first place against the New York Yankees? And the statue dedication of Cal Ripken replete with every living legend in the history of the franchise being inside the jammed, overflowing ballpark?

 

I’ve been an Orioles fan since 1972.

 

I’ve never seen anything or been a part of anything baseball-oriented in Baltimore that was more special than Thursday night at Camden Yards.

 

The only thing that could top last night would be some playoff games next month and a parade down Pratt Street. As I wrote last week, anything is possible with this new-found Orioles Magic.

 

Onto Day 2 of a week of Baltimore sports magic.

 

Who says it’s Purple Friday?

 

Maybe, for one day at least, it’s Purple and Orange Friday?

 

And as a lifelong fan of the Orioles and the Ravens, that’s beautiful music to my ears.

 

 

 

 

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Time to “Buckle up” — there’s Orioles Magic in air for Baltimore tonight

Posted on 06 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

All of these wins and hours of scoreboard watching for fans of the Baltimore Orioles – and finally – tonight the city will fill Camden Yards with the “magic” that only a Cal Ripken event can exert for the Charm City.

Alas, no scriptwriter in Hollywood or even a “Major League” movie redux could’ve dreamed up the juiciness that this unexpected Baltimore Orioles pennant run has facilitated this weekend.

Last week, the stands were empty as the AL Central-leading Chicago White Sox came to town.

This weekend, with the New York Yankees on the ropes and the Orioles surging and trailing the Evil Empire by just one game in the AL East, Camden Yards will be buzzing with orange energy for the first time in eight years despite the “premium pricing” methods of Peter Angelos’ staff.

In the land of pleasant living, we call it “Orioles Magic.” Berthed in 1979 under Wild Bill Hagy with Eddie Murray, Jim Palmer, Rick Dempsey and Earl Weaver, brought to life by a World Series win in 1983 and resurrected duing the “Why Not?” campaign of 1989, the city’s enthusiasm and genuine love for the Baltimore Orioles has been dormant for the better part of 15 years at Camden Yards under the weight of last place and its own evil ownership regime.

But tonight none of that will matter because the Orioles can beat the Yankees and go back into first place in September.

Hard to believe it was 17 years ago tonight that Cal Ripken ran his victory lap amidst the confetti and “One Moment In Time.”

And make no mistake about it, a statue ceremony and a fancy giveaway item would’ve brought plenty of people to Camden Yards tonight no matter the record of the 2012 Orioles.

But what we’re going to witness – or in my case, be a part of – tonight should truly be “magical” for any longtime fan of the Baltimore Orioles.

Despite falling out of first place with last night’s loss in Toronto combined with a Yankees win in Tampa, tonight’s game once again has first place on the line and the 46,000 who are holders of these lucky tickets should be expected to bring full O-R-I-O-L-E-S voices tonight as Camden Yards should erupt with sound where previously it’s been a bunch of excuses and reasons for why the seats are empty.

I’m going to the game tonight. And, yes, I bought a ticket.

Other than “Free The Birds” events, it’s the first ticket I’ve purchased since 2004.

It’s worth going tonight to feel the civic energy and I’ll be bellied up to the centerfield bar soaking in the energy and enthusiasm that I wrote about in 2006 when WNST led the “Free The Birds” movement.

And in as much as some have twisted my words, I’ve never wanted anything more than what we currently have in Baltimore – a relevant baseball team that brings together the community for a common cause.

I’m not sure some fans are really prepared emotionally for what tonight will look and feel like inside Camden Yards.

Internally, many of the longtime employees certainly couldn’t have had any fire drills for this. And the players on the field – Nick Markakis, Adam Jones, the core guys who have only seen the stands full of Yankees or Red Sox fans over the years – should especially soak in the noise tonight because they’ve earned the right to Baltimore’s cheers with their solid play and the excitement they’ve filled our living rooms with this summer.

I think even Derek Jeter will be taken aback because he hasn’t seen anything like this since 1997. Usually, it’s 40,000 Yankees fans beating on the home team.

It won’t be that way tonight.

This is the Baltimore Orioles chance  – players, coaches, employees and ownership alike – to drastically move the needle on the fan

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Earl Weaver says he’s staying outta the way of 2012 Orioles Magic

Posted on 05 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

Earl Weaver was kind enough to spend a some time with me today discussing his managerial career and the inspiration that led him to become a Major League Baseball manager and Hall of Famer.

We had a long chat that will be included in my long-researched book on coaching and leadership. I’ve now sat with 23 of my 100 targets. Earl was on point today discussing his disdain for the hit-and-run, his respect for Paul Richards and why trading Doug DeCinces was a mistake.

When we concluded our chat about the old versions of Orioles Magic and how Cal Ripken became a shortstop, I asked The Earl of Baltimore about the current orange fever sweeping Baltimore via Buck Showalter’s 2012 squad.

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Wizards Surprise Howard-Less Magic

Posted on 10 April 2012 by WNST Staff

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Maybe now Cleveland will leave Art Modell alone?

Posted on 09 July 2010 by Nestor Aparicio

I’m not an expert about much but Cleveland is something I know a lot about. As much as I like to have some fun with our cousins to the Midwest – it’s been a healthy rivalry ever since Art Modell stepped foot into Parking Lot D in Nov. 1995 – today a little piece of me is angry for them.

It’s true – anger is to Cleveland what fake breasts and sunshine are to California. People in Cleveland are perennially angry. They hate the Browns. They hate Art Modell. They hate losing. They hate whoever is the quarterback of the Browns. They hate that they haven’t won a championship.

They hate me.

And this morning, for the first time since Modell brought us the Ravens, they have a right to be burning 23 jerseys and “M-F-ing” Lebron James into perpetuity.

Sure, “King James” had the freedom to play wherever he wanted to play. Sure, Miami has prettier girls (although I always had a good time in Cleveland, wink, wink) and more sunshine and Chris Bosh and Dewayne Wade and Pat Riley.

But Cleveland held something intrinsic and legitimate that Lebron James sold away in one sentence last night, something that can’t be bought with a check from South Florida (even if it’s just with the tax money saved and put back into his deep, Ocean Drive pockets).

It’s called authenticity.

Lebron had it the way Cal Ripken had it and Tony Gwynn had it. The way Derek Jeter, despite being an outsider, will always have it in New York and Kobe Bryant will have it in Los Angeles, just like Magic Johnson before him.

But even more so, Lebron James was “one of them.” He was an Akron kid who never left home and created a basketball craze in Cleveland that you’d have to see to believe. There’s a whole city of commerce and bars and jerseys and enthusiasm in a forever depressed and decaying community.

It gave people in Cleveland the most precious commodity that sports provides and one this is sorely lacking in Baltimore regarding baseball: hope.

In my private times with Art Modell, it’s the one thing he always talked about that was essential for any fan of a sport or a franchise. If you have hope, you have something that gets people interested.

I don’t need to tell you that Cleveland has been the armpit of America for years and hope is a wonderful thing for depressed communities.

This is where I should tell you that I really love Cleveland. I’ve gone there religiously for almost 20 years and despite having some of the worst sports fan in country (only contested by Philadelphia, in real terms) I pull for Cleveland to at least not be a doormat.

Cleveland and Baltimore are a lot alike. And it wouldn’t take you a few hours there chatting with the people to see it and feel it.

In my humble opinion, “Cleveland rocks!” (Just don’t tell anybody I said that…)

Cleveland was spurned last night. And they’re angry. And they’re burning jerseys. And they should. Hell, it’s what I’d be doing if I gave my soul to Lebron James and the Cavaliers over the last five years.

For the same reasons we collectively booed Mark Teixeira last Opening Day at Camden Yards, the people of Cleveland will forever hold a special place in their hearts for the anger and outrage of what Lebron James has chosen to do.

Like any other self-interested mega-star who is treated like a “King,” Lebron James eschewed any civic responsibility and chose to abandon his community.

Tsk, tsk…

Most of you know, I used to be a pretty huge NBA fan. The last 10 years I’ve chosen to ignore it and it’s been a fine decade for me. I think the players come off as a bunch of collective douche bags, the games are awful to watch and I have zero interest in the personalities or the standings.

But, this isn’t about Lebron James or basketball or the NBA. This is about doing the right thing. The thing that’s bigger than you. The thing that REALLY makes you “special.”

Lebron James chose selfish. And any 25-year old is allowed that privilege.

But Cal Ripken didn’t run off to the Dodgers. And Tony Gwynn didn’t run off to the Mets.

And they will forever reap the rewards of their “sacrifice.”

Lebron James, the man, will forever be remembered for an absurd evening of a July “Lebronathon” on ESPN where he took every negative stereotype consistent with “Rod Tidwell-ish” behavior and displayed it on worldwide TV and chose THE WRONG PLACE!

There was no Jerry Maguire, no happy landing for this imbecile. Wait’ll that first Christmas Day when the Miami Heat come to Cleveland to play a lunch time game. Just wait…

There will be a price to pay for the rest of eternity for Lebron James, even if he wins seven rings and surpasses Michael Jordan — and only time will tell how that script will be written.

But last night was memorable – for all of the wrong reasons. The NBA jumped the shark for a lot of people last night with that display.

I know I’ll always cheer against him. The Miami Heat are interesting to me because they’ll be my least favorite team in my least favorite sport.

The ultimate price for Lebron James will be that he can never go home again.

Somewhere in Northern Baltimore County Art Modell has felt the weight lifted from him.

Lebron James will be the guy they burn in effigy in Cleveland for the next 20 years.

Maybe Lebron should give Art a call for some advice.

Last night, Cleveland – the city that hates — was given a fresh, new gaping wound that will probably never be healed unless the next Lebron James is on some playground in Parma Heights right now.

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5 Ws and 1 H

Posted on 01 June 2009 by Luke Jones

Despite a disappointing end to the four-game series with Detroit, it was encouraging seeing an energized crowd at Camden Yards this weekend.

Matt Wieters may be off to a slow start at the plate, but that won’t dampen the enthusiasm for the 23-year-old catcher.  National pundits are calling him the most hyped prospect since Bo Jackson.

It was clear the organization was going to bring up the rookie to debut in front of the home crowd, but a west coast trip might be the best thing for him.  It allows Wieters to simply play baseball without the bright lights of Camden Yards or the primetime audience.  I look for him to start showing what he’s capable of doing at the big league level during the trip, but will many Orioles fans be watching late at night?

Here are the 5 Ws and 1 H for the week:

1.  Who will win the NBA Finals?  It’s not the highly anticipated Cavs-Lakers series, but the Orlando Magic continues to prove the doubters wrong.  Dwight Howard is a man possessed down low, and it’s doubtful the Lakers will have anyone to stop him—short of Andrew Bynum using six fouls and hoping Howard falls apart at the line.

The Lakers are the favorite, and Bryant is still the best player on the planet—sorry, LeBron—but don’t forget about Orlando’s outside shooting.  Hedo Turkoglu, Mickael Pietrus, and Rashard Lewis are all capable of hitting the three-ball to complement the inside presence of Howard.  The acquisition of Rafer Alston saved the Magic’s season.

This will be an intense series, but Kobe will finally get his ring without the assistance of Shaquille O’Neal.

Lakers in seven.

2.  What will be Ken Griffey, Jr.’s place in baseball history?  The 39-year-old future Hall of Famer is hitting just .208 in his return to the Seattle Mariners.

In this well-chronicled age of steroids, it’s easy to overlook Griffey’s brilliant career.  He had an amazing 438 home runs before turning 31.  If not for his body breaking down shortly after being traded to the Cincinnati Reds, the Kid would be the most prolific home run hitter in the history of the game.

While it’s impossible to declare any player from the past 20 years as indisputably “clean,” Griffey may represent something even better—a player with tremendous skills who, despite battling injuries for nearly a decade, managed to hit over 600 home runs.  While it may lack the pizzazz of Barry Bonds, Griffey’s story is far more heroic—if legitimate.

He is my generation’s Mickey Mantle, but is less fortunate.  Mantle chose to drink and not take care of himself while Griffey was often injured going all out in the field.

3.  Where will LeBron James be playing basketball in the fall of 2010?  David Stern may be crushed to lose his dream matchup of Kobe vs. LeBron, but Cleveland’s loss might increase the likelihood of James ending up with the New York Knicks.

Being the most valuable franchise in the league at $613 million (according to Forbes magazine), the Knicks—and the NBA—are desperately looking for a big star in the Big Apple.  James remaining in Cleveland would be a nice story for the hometown kid, but the bright lights of New York might just be too much for the superstar to ignore.

4.  When was the last time Orioles fans suggested that a starting pitcher with a 4.09 ERA go to the bullpen when he returns from the disabled list?

The fact that some are even suggesting the notion speaks volumes about the current state of the organization.  Brad Bergesen, Jason Berken, and David Hernandez are still unproven and need at least a dozen more starts before Andy MacPhail determines their future, but the early returns have been positive.

Koji Uehara has struggled to pitch effectively past the fifth inning, but it’s hard to imagine the organization moving him to the bullpen when he returns next week.

It’s nice to actually have some young options for the rotation though, isn’t it?

5.  Why would the Orioles even think about moving Wieters to first base?  The hype and expectations are magnified, because HE IS A CATCHER.

Wieters has the potential to be a consistent 30 HR-100 RBI catcher, numbers that would put him in the class of Johnny Bench and Mike Piazza.  If you move him to first base, he is still an above-average first baseman, but his numbers aren’t nearly as phenomenal.

His great value is created from the fact that he catches.  It’s a distinct possibility that he eventually moves to first base or becomes a full-time designated hitter, but doing it now would diminish his value exponentially.

To put it in perspective, Chris Hoiles’ 1993 season (.310, 29 HR, 82 RBI) is widely regarded as the best season by a catcher in team history, but those numbers don’t look nearly as impressive coming from a first baseman—even if it came with 75 to 100 more at bats.

Bottom line, Wieters would be a good first baseman (offensively), but he has the chance to be a Hall of Fame backstop—if you believe the hype, of course.

6.  How many of your friends can—or willingly—keep score at a baseball game?  It is quickly becoming a lost art, especially with technology allowing us to pull up a box score on our cell phone or computer with just a couple clicks.

I had the opportunity to teach a friend of mine how to keep score at last Thursday’s game.  She wanted to learn and, to my surprise, she stayed with it the entire game.  A very cool chick.

It brought back memories of my dad teaching me to keep score when I was seven—a skill I enjoy passing on to others.  I even taught her the legendary Phil Rizzuto’s symbol for missing a play—WW for “wasn’t watching.”  What other sport has the traditions and quirks of baseball?

Most detractors will tell you keeping score forces you to pay close attention to the game—something that hasn’t been very pleasant over the last 12 years if you’re an Orioles fan—but it’s a rite of passage for any serious baseball fan.

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Ridiculous story of the night

Posted on 12 May 2009 by Luke Jones

I had to share this one.  An Orlando Magic fan is demanding that Boston’s Glen Davis apologize for bumping into his 12-year-old son after hitting the game-winning shot on Sunday night.

I’ll let you be the judge of this one, but Davis shouldn’t be losing any sleep over this.  If the 289-lb big man didn’t even knock the kid off his feet, how hard could the bump have been?  If the father is truly concerned about what happened, perhaps he should reconsider buying tickets for his son to sit at courtside.  The league should ignore this ridiculous demand.

If I were the father, I’d be demanding an apology from Big Baby for stealing the momentum of the series back in the Celtics’ favor—not for barely making contact with my son.

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Orioles Win a Wild One

Posted on 14 April 2009 by Nicholas Miskelly

 Orioles Win a Wild One

 

If you love offense then you loved watching the Orioles game today.  Pitching was not at a premium as the Orioles out slug the Texas Rangers and hold on late as they take the first game of the series 10-9 to move to 5-2 on the year.

 

The Orioles only scored in three innings today but when they did score-boy did they score.  They started of fast as the jump out early putting 2 runs up in the first.  The offense showed resilience today as they quickly jumped back into the lead in the 4th inning by scoring 5 runs the inning after the Rangers grabbed the lead for the first and only time in the game.

 

The offense continued in the 5th as they scored their final 3 runs of the contest capped by Wigginton’s RBI single to left, his second RBI of the game.  Pie led off the inning with a deep bomb to left, his first of what will hopefully be many homeruns in an Orioles uniform.

 

Things got exciting in the 6th again as the Rangers continued to battle back.  After Uehara loaded the bases, Baez entered and got out of the inning after allowing all three of the inherited runners to score. 

 

Baez got slammed in the 7th by Jones as he hit a 2 run homer to make the score 10-9.  Walker and Johnson combined for a 1,2,3 eight which took us into the ninth when Sherrill entered and as usual with him came a lot of fireworks and some very good fortune. 

Earlier today I blogged about how the Orioles fundamentals were not where they needed to be especially as it pertains to base running.  Well today the Orioles won this game because of the Rangers, in particular Ian Kinsler’s, terrible base running.  Kinsler lead off in the 9th with a double to left.  Trouble loomed as Young followed with a blast to deep right field.  Nick Markakis saved the game with an outstanding running catch as he reached over his head snatching the ball as it was about to hit the wall.  This kept the winning runner from getting on base with what would have been at least a double.  But what really preserved the lead was the atrocious decision on the part of Kinsler not to tag.  In fact, as I watched Nick make the catch, I yelled “get it in!”  Then I realized there was no need to rush it in because for some reason Kinsler did not tag. What a break.   Just as I was explaining how lucky we just got, Hamilton hit a ball to medium deep center.  There’s the answer.  If Kinsler would have tagged as he should have, the game would have been tied and we would have been hoping for extra innings.  Instead, thanks to Markakis’ incredible catch and Kinsler’s equally incredible decision not to tag, the Orioles pulled out a magical victory in an offensively explosive game.

It is games like this in which plays seem to fall our way that has me thinking maybe, just maybe, the magic is back at the yard.  Well see how long the magic sticks around but come August I would love to be able to say ’09 Orioles:

 

Why Not!!!!!!

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