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MASN Money For Dummies (Part 3): Angelos was bleeding cash when Nats money came

Posted on 19 January 2016 by Nestor Aparicio

 

 

 

 

 

Those who complain don’t know the ins and outs of what’s going on. They have their own lives to lead, their own problems to deal with. And they are not going to become acquainted with what our economics are, and you can’t expect them to.”

Peter G. Angelos, May 2006

                                                                                 (as told to PressBox via Q&A)

 

 

THE SINCERE HOPE OF PETER G. Angelos is that you’re too dumb to figure this stuff out and too bored to read all of this vital information about where the money comes from. Especially now that Chris Davis has signed a long-term contract, which isn’t a blip on the radar of the finances of the franchise when you do the real math, many fans somehow believe that it was an incredible stretch to find the money to pay him.

Here’s the truth: knowing the facts about how much money the MASN tree is printing for Angelos and his family certainly doesn’t reflect well upon his legacy or commitment to winning. Especially when you consider that the team has been an abject failure on the field in 18 of the 22 seasons under this ownership group.

I love how Chris Davis said “we want to continue a tradition of winning here in Baltimore.” Spoken like a babe in arms. It’s kinda nice that he thinks that but that’s far from the truth. The Orioles haven’t “won” anything under the reign of Peter G. Angelos.

But Mr. Angelos has made a LOT of money – and after he lost a LOT of money.

But to understand the money – and where it came from and where it’s going – is to understand the Orioles’ offseason budgeting and what they’re trying to do on the field. From Chris Davis to Matt Wieters to Darren O’Day, it’s the money that funds the players.

As Buck Showalter said at the winter meetings on December 8th from Nashville on MLB Network TV: “We have plenty of money.”

Today, we’ll examine the history of Major League Baseball and the Baltimore Orioles ownership group and the birth of MASN and the Washington Nationals and how this nuclear war for the biggest pile of television money in local sports history began.

In the Fall of 2004, Peter G. Angelos, as usual, was preparing for war – this time with his partners over the concept of baseball in the nation’s capital. Realizing that commissioner Bud Selig and the owners of the 29 other MLB teams, who collectively had purchased the Montreal Expos, were hell bent on moving that franchise to Washington, D.C., John Angelos issued an internal memo cutting all expenses.

Of course, some saw this as a sign that he was about to sell the Orioles to local money manager Chip Mason.

“The mere issuance of a memorandum suggesting potential savings in a greater degree in efficiency of operations does not suggest that the enterprise being reviewed is for sale,” Angelos told The Baltimore Sun. “To suggest otherwise is absurd and clearly erroneous.”

The team had just invested $121.5 million into contracts for Miguel Tejada, Javy Lopez, Rafael Palmeiro and Sidney Ponson. “The millions recently spent on player acquisitions hardly suggest we’re on a cost-cutting crusade,” Angelos told the local newspaper. “On the contrary, we are moving forward aggressively to produce a very competitive and winning team for our fans both this year and in the years ahead.”

At this point, Angelos was very quietly hemorrhaging money by the tens of millions. In the early days, he bragged about the Orioles making money to The Baltimore Sun.

Seven years earlier, Angelos sat with me at The Barn in March 1997 on WLG-AM 1360 and went through a lengthy diatribe about how baseball could never work with two teams – one in Baltimore and one in Washington, D.C. (and at that point Northern Virginia seemed a far more likely destination). But he also told me that the Orioles lost $4 million the previous year – and that’s when they were selling 3.6 million tickets and winning.

Feel free to listen to that conversation here:

This Chapter 3 of my MASN Money For Dummies series will be brief because I’ve already written this part of the Angelos journey as Chapter 12 of The Peter Principles, a book I’ve been writing about the ownership of Peter G. Angelos.

I would cut and paste it here, but just click here and continue reading the history of how this MASN money gravy train began with the poor negotiation tactics of Bud Selig to deal with the likes of Peter Angelos. It’s now 12 years later and nothing is really solved except that the money is flowing in by the tens of millions every month via your cable television bill and MLB and the Nationals, along with owner Ted Lerner, haven’t figured out a way to extract their “fair share.”

In 1994, Angelos said about Selig during the MLB owners dispute with the Major League Baseball Players Association: “He is a very successful automobile dealer. What makes him think he has the abilities to do what he is trying to do here is beyond my comprehension!”

Angelos infuriated every partner in Major League Baseball in 1994. In 2002, he came back to save the day as a lead negotiator – and olive branch Democrat who curried favor with the Players’ Association – for Selig and his MLB partners. But at every turn he made it very clear that any notion of a team anywhere near Washington or Northern Virginia would never be acceptable under any condition.

Angelos lobbied many times and in many ways to keep baseball out of Washington, D.C. long before 2004.

“It isn’t that we would deny the people that live in those areas the recreational pursuit of baseball. We think baseball is a great game for everybody. But when we look at the experience of Boston, Philadelphia, Oakland, San Francisco – Boston and Philadelphia and St. Louis had two ballclubs. The history of baseball dictates that you can’t put two teams that close together. We are opposing that. We think Orioles baseball is plenty good enough for us as well as the people in the Washington suburbs and we thank them for that support and we want to retain that support.”

At the 2004 All Star Game in Houston, it appeared that Bud Selig was still unsure of the future of the Expos.

“I will not do anything to make Peter Angelos unhappy,” Selig told The New York Times.

It’s interesting to do the research and see the local media’s role in garnering the Washington Nationals for the nation’s capital. The Washington Post played as big of a role in the franchise and ballpark as it …

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Orioles, Nats and MASN Money for Dummies: A complete primer on how Peter Angelos has lied and pocketed your dough

Posted on 03 January 2016 by Nestor Aparicio

“What you can expect, though, that those that comment – putting aside the fellow you mentioned (Nestor Aparicio), who you know is not even worthy of getting into that (chuckles), it really makes no sense to respond to him – the responsible people, who know baseball and who are baseball fans – the writers like you (Stan Charles) – if they want to criticize, they better look at the economics. They owe it to the public to explain to whoever is interested that the problem is disparity in revenues. Now, I have heard some of them mention that this MASN development might really generate some real funds, which would permit the Orioles to spend more money. That’s a pretty strong acknowledgment that the key to all this, to get off the losing years and so on, is more money invested on the field. And obviously, with that becoming available, that’s exactly what we’re going to do. We’re going to do that because we are hometown and we are sensitive to what the public is thinking. I know a lot of Baltimore fans, and, just personally, I want them to feel like I am responding to their wishes.”

Peter G. Angelos, May 2006

(as told to PressBox via Q&A)

PETER G. ANGELOS DOESN’T WANT YOU to know about the billions of dollars he has collected, dispensed and quietly usurped from local sports fans from six states via your cable television bill. It’s time for someone who is “responsible” to do the math on where all of that money has gone over the last 10 years as the Orioles. and its spinoff cable TV partner the Mid Atlantic Sports Network (MASN), have become a virtual annuity for the owner here in Baltimore.

Clearly, given the dozen years that he’s fought with his Major League Baseball partners, Bud Selig, Rob Manfred and now Ted Lerner and the Washington Nationals over this incredible sum of “found” money, surely there must some large pot of gold somewhere? The Washington Post wrote that it was $298 million in dispute from 2011 to 2015 after the New York Supreme Court hearing in early November. But that’s just the tip of the financial iceberg – a small number compared to all of the money that’s been flushed through MASN since it was berthed as a olive branch to Angelos by then-commissioner Bud Selig for allowing baseball back into the nation’s capital in 2005.

Over the last decade, I’ve been portrayed as a liar or a heretic by Peter G. Angelos and his media partners. After 21 years with a Baltimore Orioles media credential, my access was taken away by the club in 2007.

However, my track record still stands as unblemished heading into 2016.

I always tell the truth and write the truth. (That’s why you’re here.)

As you’ll see, I’ve put in all of the work for you – a little “term paper” for you oldtimers who spent time with microfiche in a lonely library – so you can learn about this history and realities of how the Nationals came into existence and what it’s meant for Baltimore and Washington baseball and the fans.

This series of facts is presented with two educational goals:

  • Track everything that was said – and very openly in the “mainstream” media – a decade ago when Angelos began this power struggle for the future money of Washington, D.C. and what he considered his market
  • Document everything that has happened since he began this trail of lies in search of all of the money that was designed and originally earmarked to improve the Baltimore Orioles

Everything presented in this series will be linked to major media entities like Forbes, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, The New York Times, ESPN/Grantland, Sports Illustrated, USA Today and various reports with financial annotations. I’ve always been accountable in my work. Meanwhile, accountability is always completely absent from the mind and spirit of Angelos and his …

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The Peter Principles (Ch. 13): Mi$ter Angelo$ & $on$ Network change$ everything for two citie$

Posted on 18 December 2015 by Nestor Aparicio

This is Chapter 13 of the upcoming book, “The Peter Principles.” This lengthy excerpt is a prelude to a WNST report on ten years of MASN money and how Washington baseball has affected Baltimore baseball over the past decade. The first three chapters of the book are available here:

The Peter Principles (Ch. 1): So, just how did Angelos become ‘King’ of Baltimore baseball?

The Peter Principles (Ch. 2): The error of tyranny at Camden Yards

The Peter Principles (Ch. 3): How close did Angelos come to owning Baltimore’s NFL team?

The Peter Principles (Ch. 12): Selig vs. Angelos – trust, antitrust and billions of dollars

 

 

“The most important part of the deal is the equity in MASN over the long term. In a few years that equity stake in the network will be worth far more than any rights fee that a Comcast or a Fox SportsNet could pay (the Washington Nationals). So they will in time have a 33 percent stake in MASN without one penny of investment. We pay all production costs, overhead, the staffing and program fees. The new Nationals get all the benefits without the risk. My goal, and I am sure it is the same for the Washington owners, is to have two very successful franchises that work together on a number of projects while being friendly rivals on the field.”

Peter G. Angelos

The Examiner

April 7, 2006

 

 

AS PETER G. ANGELOS WATCHED THE Boston Red Sox win the 2004 World Series, he was still a state of shock that his Major League Baseball partners and commissioner Bud Selig had actually done the unthinkable – placing a rival National League team into Washington, D.C. to compete with the Orioles, forever dividing the marketplace.

Insiders said they’d never seen Angelos so angry, so agitated, so betrayed and hell bent on making them pay for this decision to double cross a partner. Selig had been contrite in their conversations and vowed to somehow find a way to keep Angelos whole on the deal and the burgeoning business of television networks had become the next generation way of getting money from the masses to fund baseball growth. In the 1980s, MLB discovered sponsorships and a higher-end clientele. In the 1990s, MLB discovered leveraging municipalities for new stadia, skyboxes, club seats and premium sponsorships. Now, in the new century, it was going to be television rights and revenues derived from cable purchasers who are bundled into larger all-but-invisible packages where the “regional sports network” would garner a few dollars per month, per subscriber.

This was a way to collect automatic, “unseen” money from virtually every home in their region. They would be getting tens of millions of dollars from folks who wouldn’t even know they were funding Major League Baseball. The Lords would be getting money from people who didn’t even know what baseball was ­– or where to find it on the multi-channel cable dial.

Angelos had already become wise to the reality of the changing media marketplace. He didn’t really understand but it ­– but knew it had tangible and growth value in the future.

It was no accident that the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox had more far revenue to spend on better baseball players, which exponentially aided their ability to win and keep the money machine well oiled with local interest and new-age marketing. The Yes Network was a product of a 1999 merger between the Yankees and New Jersey Nets for the express purpose of marketing a cable television channel in the New York region that would cut out the middleman – the sports cable television networks. The war in New York with Cablevision was legendary and it was big money. In 2001, the New England Sports Network (NESN), which enjoyed a near monopoly status in the region for television sports, went to the basic tier of cable, meaning far greater distribution and more money that would be used to fund the new and improved Boston Red Sox.

The same Red Sox that Angelos just watched win the World Series, who were led in part by Larry Lucchino – the former Orioles president and investor, who was the visionary for the modern franchise and building of Camden Yards, and the first employee whom Angelos unceremoniously partnered with and then ousted a month later in 1993 after his Orioles acquisition from Eli Jacobs in a New York auction.

Angelos knew all of his options, demands and “asks” in regard to what he’d be trying to retain and obtain if Selig and his MLB partners ever crossed the line and did the unthinkable – putting the Expos just 38 miles away in his backyard.

But, make no mistake about it, Angelos would’ve far preferred to have never seen the Washington Nationals born at any cost or any profit.

He abhorred the concept of D.C. baseball.

Washington baseball was truly his worst nightmare as the owner of the Baltimore Orioles. He was absolutely convinced there was no financial way to make him “whole” – and worse, he truly believed that it would drastically affect not only his team, but that the Washington team would fare no better in a market that Angelos and most everyone else remembered as a two-time baseball loser in the 1960s and early 1970s. But a lot had changed since the Senators left for Arlington, Texas in 1971 to become the Rangers.

The Northern Virginia suburbs had grown exponentially over the nearly four decades and the biggest enclave of per capita earnings in the United States fell throughout what Angelos felt was hard-earned Orioles country. Angelos valued the Washington, D.C. community for the same reasons Selig and the other MLB owners did – they smelled the size, money and disposable income. Angelos claimed that 30% of his audience came from those homes and wallets. The Orioles and Major League Baseball were a television brand that his baseball brand had cultivated over 30 years and he and his partners paid top dollar for in 1993.

Angelos felt absolutely deceived, absolutely blindsided by their lack of concern …

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Did you hear what those fools said on the radio over at 105.7 The Fan?

Posted on 27 September 2015 by Nestor Aparicio

 

 

“All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.”

– Keith Richards

 

 

SO, I SUPPOSE YOU’VE HEARD the big news that WNST “doesn’t take phone calls anymore.” In the midst of this ugly 0-3 start for the Baltimore Ravens, this is a perfect time for an illustration of the difference between “them” and “us” in the world of local sports radio and media information in 2015.

Who do you go to for news, information and analysis? And who do you trust? And where do you ever truly learn anything about the team or sports or strategy?

I’m guessing if you’re an intelligent, thinking Baltimore sports fan, the format at 105.7 The Fan this week will be like nails on a chalkboard. Wall to wall bitching, 24 hours a day and all fueled by the people who know the least about the team. You know, kinda like what you see at the bottom of the toilet on your Twitter feed.

I hear and read and see a lot of garbage about WNST and 105.7 The Fan ­­–­ contrasts, comparisons, scuttlebutt and nonsense that isn’t really unique in any publicly competitive environment – and it’s far past the time that I finally said something about my upstart “competitor” down the FM dial.

I get paid to be honest and tell you what I think and this is a topic that I’m actually a supreme expert on – sports radio and local media. And let’s be honest: everything they’ve ever done over at the corporate CBS Radio monster was a rip off and a cheap imitation of WNST from the beginning.

So this missive is actually long overdue. It’s time for a report card.

At 105.7 The Fan, they spend their whole public lives judging the work of athletes so as the Bruno Tonioli of this dance, this is a one-time expression of what I think of their “art” and ethics and journalism.

So, here it is:

I’ve had a year now of being back on the radio 24 hours a day, doing the best and most intelligent sports conversations in the marketplace. I’m entering my 25th year of doing sports radio better than anyone in Baltimore has ever done it. And, yes, we’ll be throwing a party in December.

Swimming behind the murky scenes in the media world of sharks and snakes, I’ve dealt with the low blows and insults of WJZ TV corporate poohbah Jay Newman, dealt with the emergence of a New York-driven corporate entity led by radio poohbah Bob Philips attacking my brand over the past decade with various lies and a heinous and baseless lawsuit from one of his pathetic former employees that was designed to get publicity for a lazy media member looking for a cheap headline. All of this “Walmart-style” business as usual from out-of-town corporate monoliths while adjusting to a changing marketplace in the volatile space of modern media during the worst recession in our history.

I also watched my wife battle for her life last year and survive to inspire me to save more lives. I wrote about the changes in my life then – and now. I’m a very happy guy. My life is fantastic and my future is as bright as it’s ever been.

Honestly, having 105.7 around simply shows off how good our work is at WNST.net.

A few of my former hosts, whom I literally plucked from the street and put on the radio to give them their biggest opportunity in life, are over there or elsewhere – where they belong – as I outlined last month.

I’m still very happy about that.

And I’m still here at little WNST, where I’ve been since 1998 as the last local, independent voice in a wilderness of corporate media greed, corruption and stench.

And I’m still quite relevant. Every word I say gets measured, critiqued and heard – except by Arbitron and the local advertising agencies. You’re reading my words right now. So will everyone at CBS Radio.

And, you can certainly be the judge any time day or night from anywhere in the world on your mobile device.

Try my brand and try theirs.

I think the quality of the content speaks for itself.

I rest well every night knowing that we do Baltimore sports media better than anyone in the marketplace – now or ever.

And it shouldn’t shock you that the folks over at CBS Radio don’t like me one iota.

But I’ve been watching their increasingly weak act.

And the primary difference is that they base their content around listener outrage, low information conversation and “uncensored” radio. That, and lazy hosts.

This is a week when I’d love to point out the vast differences between a local guy from Dundalk who

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It’s time for a WNST “report card” & we need your help!

Posted on 19 September 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

As the owner and C.E.O. of WNST.net since 1998, I believe the most important trust in running Baltimore’s longest-running sports information company is listening to the needs of the marketplace.

It’s the fans of the Orioles, Ravens, Terps, Caps and other issues of Baltimore sports concern that put us in business and keep us growing and healthy in 2012.

As has been our custom over the past two decades, I’m always available to receive emails at nasty@wnst.net concerning any issue at WNST.net. (Or as Peter Angelos famously lied to me in 1997: “I’m a very available individual…”)

Today, I’m asking you to give me a report card on how we’re doing here at WNST. We’d sincerely appreciate an honest appraisal of the way you use Baltimore sports media in 2012 and the way you view WNST.net, our competitors and, hopefully, some helpful suggestions on ways we could improve what we’re doing.

As an incentive, we’ll take one lucky winner and a friend to exotic Cleveland, Ohio for a weekend of football and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in November on our WNST Purple Football Roadtrip, courtesy of Jiffy Lube.

 

 

 

And we’ll never sell or share your information. So, take a few minutes if you can and perhaps you’ll be our big winner!

TAKE THE 2012 GREAT BALTIMORE SPORTS MEDIA REPORT CARD HERE

Do we suck? Are we awesome? What are we missing? How can we better service you? What do our competitors do that you like? What do you love about WNST? What do you dislike about WNST?

Every two years we do a major survey to gauge how we’re doing. But the media world changes and evolves at a frightening speed in 2012 with mobile devices, tablets and the instant distribution of thoughts, news, observations and information.

Many, many things have changed in the Baltimore sports media scene since I began working at The News American in January 1984. As a kid who saw that hot metal type line up on newsprint and then watched and learned at The Sun from 1986-1992 to doing sports radio locally and nationally, I’ve picked up many hints and plenty of help along the way to create a company that is boldly local, proudly independent and enduringly honest.

I’ve dedicated my entire life to Baltimore sports and to the journalism, information and analysis that goes with it. This is the only thing I’ve ever done with my life and I want WNST.net to be the best and biggest media company in the marketplace.

We want to be the media organization that serves you the best. Unlike our “small” AM radio signal, you can now take WNST.net everywhere in the world you go…

We’re always looking for a deeper level of engagement with the fans we already have via Baltimore sports. And more so than any other voice on the internet bringing you Baltimore sports reaction and analysis, we are striving for perfection and your attention at WNST.net.

In the old days, you had to go to your radio to get your WNST fix. Now, via mobile devices, we’re in your pocket everywhere you go, every hour of the day.

We’re hoping to connect with you in a more meaningful way and to better serve Baltimore sports fans as mobile grows and your tastes evolve. Over 21 years of doing radio and now almost 15 years of WNST as an entity, we’d like to strengthen our relationship with Ravens, Orioles, Terps, Caps, lacrosse and local high school programs.

Unlike morning shows with guys from New York and Boston and “experts” from the Washington suburbs and parts of upper Michigan and St. Louis, the crew at WNST.net is always local and has lived the history of Baltimore sports.

Now we’re asking you: has WNST.net done a good job of this?

Judging from every measurement we can find on the internet – Twitter, Facebook, Google Analytics, reaction to our posts and opinions, we’re doing a damned fine job.

But we can always be better.

This is where you come in…

In our market, quite frankly, it’s been about authenticity and credibility.

WNST builds our audience through quality programming, content and distribution. And then we build relevance for local marketers and businesses who keep us in business because of your support of their sponsorship of our programming and information.

When you support a WNST sponsor you directly affect our ability to improve and keep bringing you the best Baltimore’s best sports coverage divinely possible.

So, as Bruce Springsteen might say, bring on your Wrecking Ball and give us some feedback. We’re thick-skinned. Any constructive criticism or feedback is always welcome at WNST.net.

Once again, here’s a link to our report card and survey

 

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Three-way decision: Radov, Kryglik & Dickinson share 2012 Baltimore Sports Media Superstar crown

Posted on 27 July 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

After three months of exhaustive research, work and auditions, we had a very difficult decision in anointing the 2012 Baltimore Sports Media Superstar crown on Thursday night at Hooters in Towson.

After a lengthy debate and a myriad of input and criteria — from facts, knowledge, video & audio tryouts, live audiences, trivia challenges and panel conversations — we arrived at three winners who will split the $1,000 prize for the 2012 title.

Congratulations to Daniel Radov, Jeff Kryglik and Brett Dickinson for sharing the title this year. All will be given opportunities to participate at WNST.net & AM 1570 this fall as we ramp up our football and weekend coverage, led by the re-emergence of Fox Sports Radio at WNST.

Many of the remaining 13 finalists will also be given chances to contribute at WNST.net as well.

Here’s the speech I gave last night regarding the process and the presentation of the winners:

 

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The State of Baltimore Sports Media (circa Summer 2012)

Posted on 16 July 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

In its entirety, this is a 90-minute speech that I delivered to an upper-level sports marketing class at Loyola College in Spring 2012.

I’ve spent 21 years learning about this stuff. I’m glad you found my blog to hear and watch my thoughts on where Baltimore sports media is heading over the next decade.

If you make it through this series, I’d love to hear your feedback at nasty@wnst.net

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Baker’s dozen: 13 invited to Baltimore Sports Media Superstar finals on July 26 at Hooters

Posted on 16 July 2012 by WNST Staff

Here are the finalists for our Baltimore Sports Media Superstar competition, brought to you by Hooters for Thursday, July 26th:

Daniel Radov

Brett Dickinson

John Sears

Jeff Kryglik

Simon Habtemariam

Josh Levine

Adam McCallister

Mark Brown

Robert Testoni

Chris Cichon

Jeff Gilley

Andrew Tomlinson

Scott Zolotorow

All remaining contestants will continuing blogging, writing and tweeting about Baltimore sports over the next 10 days before our championship event at Hooters in Towson next Thursday.

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Our 18 Baltimore Sports Media Superstar finalists await Monday cuts

Posted on 13 July 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

Can our WNST Baltimore Sports Media Superstars pass the test? You can be the judge now with all of the action from Monday’s packed live show at Hooters in Towson right here at WNST.net:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Updates and helpful hints for next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar

Posted on 17 June 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

While in the process of putting together as many details and helpful hints as possible for our next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar, I’ve been going through some old blogs and media information that I’ve dispersed over the years here at WNST.net.

All of the details of our Baltimore Sports Media Superstar search and competition are now a click away if you want to be a contestant: http://wnst.net/wordpress/wnst/the-2012-baltimore-sports-media-superstar-search-is-underway-at-wnst-net/

This recent blog is very thorough and should answer all of your questions and most of your concerns. I sincerely hope you join the competition and begin your first blog today! This weekend has been active with participation and questions and entries to nasty@wnst.net.

Please do not send docx files as attachments. I’d appreciate all resumes in a pdf or .doc format for sharing purposes.

Also, our hashtag for the competition will be #WNSTBSMS and all Twitter activity should include this easy 8-digit shortcode for WNST Baltimore Sports Media Superstar.

If you want some extended reading, helpful hints and some of the WNST philosophy (and reality) please see my “State of Baltimore Sports Media” series from January 2010 here:

Part 1: Where Do You Get Your Info and Whom Do You Trust In Baltimore Media?

Part 2: How Does WNST Measure Up To Other Baltimore Media?

Part 3: Content and Distribution: Sharing Is Caring

Part 4: Power of Partnership: Flogging The Flag

Part 5: What Is The Future Of Sports Media In Baltimore?

And my three-part update in May 2011:

Part 1: What WNST Stands For In Local Media

Part 2: Journalism is dead…but not at WNST

Part 3: People Ask Me All The Time, “How Big Is Your Stick?”

These blogs are almost a “handbook” and should make the position and our needs at WNST.net even more clear. But, granted, it’s going to take you a few hours to read it and years to digest it but the more you know and understand about the local sports media industry the greater your chances of success.

I wish someone would’ve given me a handbook back in 1992 😉

As a bonus, here’s Part 3 of my Loyola lecture on women, video and mobile streaming in 2012…

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