Tag Archive | "Michael Phelps"

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Twelve Ravens thoughts on preseason win over Carolina

Posted on 12 August 2016 by Luke Jones

With the Ravens kicking off the preseason with a 22-19 win over Carolina, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Terrance West and Buck Allen combined for three touchdowns, but I was most impressed with the quickness of Kenneth Dixon, who ran for a game-high 44 yards on nine carries. He has the potential to be a home-run hitter as a change-of-pace back, which is something the Ravens need.

2. With Jerraud Powers and Kyle Arrington both struggling, I’d like to see Tavon Young and Terrence Brooks get more opportunities at the nickel. Young played sparingly, but he has shown good ball skills in practices. Brooks’ size is an intriguing option there, especially since Baltimore’s starting safeties are undersized.

3. First-round rookie Ronnie Stanley performed well in his first start, and Harbaugh made a point to praise the young left tackle’s strong desire to play despite suffering a recent injury. I wonder if that was a coincidence after ex-Raven Eugene Monroe started just 17 games over the last two years.

4. The Kaelin Clay muffed punt and John Harbaugh’s post-game comments lead you to believe the 2016 punt returner may not be on the current roster. The Ravens were right to cut Jacoby Jones two offseasons ago, but they’ve surely had their problems replacing him.

5. After a fast start to camp, Kamalei Correa had a relatively quiet night, failing to record a statistic in 21 defensive snaps. He appeared to play exclusively as an edge defender, making you wonder if Zach Orr has a bigger lead in the inside linebacker competition than we thought.

6. Entering his sixth year, linebacker Chris Carter was facing second- and third-team offensive linemen, but he showed impressive quickness off the edge and also made plays at inside linebacker. Versatility and his special-teams ability will help in his bid to win a job.

7. Speaking of edge defenders, Victor Ochi has flashed potential on more than one occasion during camp, but the rookie free agent only saw the field for seven snaps. That makes you wonder if the Ravens are trying to hide him in an effort to sneak him onto the practice squad.

8. Starting in place of Marshal Yanda, Vlad Ducasse may have been the Ravens’ most impressive offensive lineman, making terrific blocks on Dixon’s 19-yard run and Allen’s 19-yard touchdown catch. He’s not a sure bet to make the roster, but he has made 22 starts in six NFL seasons.

9. The Ravens only suited up five receivers, making it concerning that Keenan Reynolds wasn’t targeted once despite playing 29 offensive snaps. Everyone is rooting for the former Navy standout, but he remains a work in progress with a long way to go as both a punt returner and receiver.

10. Built similarly to Brandon Williams, rookie nose tackle Michael Pierce showed impressive push inside to collect three tackles and split a sack with Carter. Making the 53-man roster might appear to be a tall order, but the Samford product has definitely turned some heads.

11. After calling plays from the upstairs booth the last few seasons, defensive coordinator Dean Pees was on the sideline during Thursday’s game. It will be interesting to hear his rationale for the change and whether it will carry over to the regular season.

12. The fans’ reaction to Michael Phelps winning his 22nd Olympic gold medal on Thursday night was hardly surprising, but the enthusiasm shown by players watching the replay of the race on the video board was a memorable moment late in a pedestrian preseason game.

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Michael Phelps arrested for DUI in Baltimore

Posted on 30 September 2014 by WNST Staff

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Here’s a little “prep” you can enjoy for this week’s #WNSTSweet16

Posted on 01 June 2014 by Glenn Clark

We’re quickly approaching the midway point of 2014-which means we’re preparing to celebrate our 16 and a half(th?) birthday here at WNST. Yes, we’re also expecting a card from you for this one.

We’ve been marking our 16th year of being Baltimore’s sports media leader by going over some of the more significant “water cooler” topics of the WNST era. Each week we attempt to “define” the topic with a list we’re calling the #WNSTSweet16 here at WNST.net.

The concept doesn’t exactly take an Ivy Leaguer to figure out. In fact, we’ve noticed that even some of the folks who listen to the “other” station in town have managed to be able to participate. Remarkable.

If you’ve missed any of the first 21 Sweet 16 lists we’ve put together this year, here’s a look back. (The #WNSTSweet16 is brought to you by Jerry’s Automotive!)

Week 21: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 greatest local lacrosse players of all time
Week 20: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 most unsung Orioles
Week 19: Gary Quill-Sweet 16 all-time Maryland horse racing moments
Week 18: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 most important picks in Ravens draft history
Week 17: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 worst draft picks in Baltimore Ravens history
Week 16: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest players in Washington Capitals history
Week 15: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 games we’ve been treated to
Week 14: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 Masters moments of the last 30 years
Week 13: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 greatest pro wrestling moments in Baltimore history
Week 12: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports goofballs/personalities
Week 11: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 local sports saints-athletes who gave back
Week 10: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 events a Baltimore sports fan must attend
Week 9: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 greatest Baltimore college basketball players
Week 8: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 Orioles who didn’t live up to the hype
Week 7: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 most underappreciated Maryland basketball players
Week 6: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local sports “Heartbreakers”
Week 5: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local Olympic sport athletes
Week 4: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local athletes who deserved to win a championship but didn’t
Week 3: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 local sports people who “had a dream”
Week 2: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports playoff moments
Week 1: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 “debuts” in local sports history

“The Nasty One” himself is back at the helm of the #WNSTSweet16 in Week 22 and taking on another very difficult list.

I had the pleasure of speaking at Aberdeen High School last week to a group of kids that included a great number of seniors. We discussed opportunity, preparation and reaching goals after graduating from high school. For so many of them, the chat was particularly important because they were less than a week away from joining the “real world”.

It is graduation season throughout the region, which made us think about some of the great athletes who have graduated from Charm City area high schools. This stream of consciousness should probably tell you that this week’s topic is the “Sweet 16 greatest local high school athletes”.

We have certainly been blessed in this area to have had the first opportunity to see quite a number of incredible athletes here in this area. We probably could have made a list using Dunbar basketball players alone, as the likes of Reggie Williams, Reggie Lewis, Sam Cassell, Skip Wise, Muggsy Bogues, Kurk Lee, David Wingate and Keith Booth are all really good options to make this list.

Just considering basketball alone you can lump names in like Carmelo Anthony, Rudy Gay, Will Barton, Juan Dixon, Gary Neal, Marvin Webster, Kim English, Aquille Carr and more.

We haven’t even considered football players (Tommy Polley, Tavon Austin, Antonio Freeman, Keion Carpenter, Jeff Grantz), baseball players (Mark Teixeira, Gavin Floyd, some fellas named Cal Ripken and…ummm…Babe Ruth?), lacrosse players (Kyle Harrison, Steele Stanwick, Ryan Boyle, Joe Cowan, etc.) or some of the amazing female athletes (Pam Shriver, Angel McCoughtry, etc.) who did their prep work in the area.

I do not envy…in any way…the responsibility Nestor has in putting this list together. We haven’t even talked about the soccer players, wrestlers, runners, swimmers and others who are certainly also deserving of consideration. This list is going to be REALLY tough.

Nestor wants your suggestions. You can leave them here in the comments on this blog post or email him (nasty@wnst.net). We will be discussing the list throughout the day Monday on AM1570 WNST.net. We’d love to have you Tweet with us or discuss the topic via Facebook by using the hashtag #WNSTSweet16.

On Tuesday morning, Nes will unveil the “official” list here at WNST.net and then discuss it with Drew and Luke on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction” at 8am. He will then re-visit the list at 4pm Tuesday on “The Happy Hours”.

Shack Stanwick might be just the latest tremendous athlete we had the opportunity to see locally over the last school year. As it wraps up, let’s recognize the greatest we’ve ever seen. Make your voice heard!

-G

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Phelps’ comeback to continue next week in Charlotte

Posted on 07 May 2014 by WNST Staff

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — (AP) Next up for Michael Phelps’ comeback: Two events that produced Olympic gold.

Phelps has entered the 100-meter butterfly and the 200 freestyle at the Charlotte Grand Prix meet in North Carolina next week, his coach, Bob Bowman, told The Associated Press on Monday night.

With both events on May 16, Bowman can stick to the plan of building up Phelps’ endurance while staying away, at least for now, from the grueling, multi-day programs that were once the norm for Phelps. There will be morning preliminaries and evening finals, though the coach said he’s not yet certain Phelps will actually compete in both races.

Phelps returned to competitive swimming at a meet in Arizona less than two weeks ago, his first since retiring after the 2012 London Games as the most decorated athlete in Olympic history.

He is the three-time defending Olympic champion in the 100 fly, so it’s obvious that race would be part of any plans to compete at the Rio Games. He won the 200 free at the 2008 Beijing Games — during his record eight-gold performance — but dropped the event in London.

Phelps also competed in two events at the Mesa Grand Prix, finishing second to longtime rival Ryan Lochte in the 100 fly and matching the fourth-fastest time in the world this year. The other event, the 50 freestyle, wasn’t nearly as serious. That race has never been part of Phelps’ program at a major meet, and he even used his preliminary heat to work on his butterfly stroke. Not surprisingly, he finished 42nd overall against swimmers who were using the much faster freestyle.

Still, it was a good starting point for what the Phelps’ camp is describing as a low-key comeback.

“We were encouraged by his performances in Mesa and look forward to trying a 200 in Charlotte,” Bowman said in a text message.

Phelps has also put his name in for the final Grand Prix meet of the season in Santa Clara, California, next month, though he is taking the comeback one step at a time and not committing to any long-term goals.

Still, it’s clear he wouldn’t be putting in the work if the 2016 Olympics were not his primary focus. Phelps has already competed in four Summer Games, winning 18 golds and 22 medals overall.

The Grand Prix schedule provides tuneups for the U.S. national championships in August, where spots will be earned for the Pan Pacific Championships later that month and next year’s world championships in Kazan, Russia — an important steppingstone for the Olympics.

After the Charlotte meet, Phelps will head to Colorado for high-altitude training beginning May 27.

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Phelps says he’ll never swim 400IM again

Posted on 25 April 2014 by WNST Staff

By BETH HARRIS Associated Press

MESA, Ariz. — Michael Phelps’ comeback meet was cut short Friday when he failed to advance to the 50-meter freestyle final.

The 18-time Olympic gold medalist used the morning preliminaries at the Arena Grand Prix to fine-tune his butterfly stroke instead of doing freestyle like everyone else. He finished seventh in a time of 24.06 seconds, missing out on the eight-man evening final.

Phelps didn’t even make any of the three consolation finals because he was 42nd overall; only the top 32 qualify for those, so his first competition since retiring after the 2012 London Olympics ended early.

“I don’t think there will be enough scratches,” coach Bob Bowman joked about the possibility of Phelps getting into any of the finals.

Phelps ended up in the sprint because none of the day’s other events — 400 individual medley, 200 freestyle and 200 backstroke — are ones that he plans to compete in during this comeback. He dominated the 400 IM during the height of career, but he vows he won’t swim the grueling event anymore.

“I’m putting that out there: I am never swimming the 400 IM again,” he said.

Bowman jabbed him, saying, “Kind of like, ‘I will never swim again.’”

At that, the longtime friends laughed.

Phelps had insisted he was done with swimming after London and frequently pointed out he had no intention of swimming past the age of 30. He turns 29 next month, and would be 31 by the time of the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Phelps tread lightly when pressed about his intentions toward a possible fifth Olympics. He was 15 at his first games in Sydney in 2000, when he was the youngest member of the entire U.S. team. He didn’t medal, but went on to haul in 22 medals over his next four games, including a record eight gold in 2008.

He repeatedly emphasized he’s having fun this time around and feels more relaxed than ever.

“I felt like a kid and that was the coolest part about it,” he said. “It’s a good starting point, being able to get some races back under my belt.”

Phelps’ goal Friday was to take just three breaths in the one-lap race; easy enough for a sprinter but not for a swimmer who specialized in distances ranging from 200 to 400 meters during his career.

“It’s weird for me not to breathe,” he said. “I’m used to breathing every single stroke.”

He gulped air every second or third stroke, and halfway through he took two consecutive breaths.

“As soon as I did that, I was like, ‘Man, I wonder if I can hold my breath the whole way,” he said. “I was like, ‘No, I don’t think so, so I snuck one more at 15.”

Afterward, Bowman told him, “You don’t really know how to swim a 50.”

Phelps replied, “I guess that’s a good thing.”

He finished second to Ryan Lochte in the 100 butterfly on Thursday, tying the fourth-fastest time in the world this year.

Next up for Phelps is high-altitude training in Colorado next month. He’s entered in Grand Prix meets in North Carolina and California, although his presence hasn’t been confirmed yet.

 

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Expect the national media, including Sports illustrated, to follow Michael Phelps' every move after coming out of retirement. (Courtesy of Michael Phelps' Facebook page)

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Michael Phelps’ return makes swimming relevant again

Posted on 25 April 2014 by johngallo

Sports needed this.

Swimming needed this.

And of course, Baltimore needed this.

Michael Phelps is back, which means swimming is back and even more importantly, it means one of the most underappreciated sports rivalries is back: Phelps vs. Ryan Lochte.

You can’t have a sport without a rivalry, which makes fans gravitate to the competition, whether it’s on land or water.

The Ravens have the Steelers, and the Orioles have the Red Sox. But those are teams and Phelps is a 28-year-old man, well, more like a demigod considering what he does in the pool isn’t human.

Expect the national media, including Sports illustrated, to follow Michael Phelps' every move after coming out of retirement. (Courtesy of Michael Phelps' Facebook page)

How many great athlete vs. athlete rivalries are there right now? LeBron James vs. Kevin Durant? Nope. Talk to me when Durant beats James in the Finals. Baseball? Who?

What about boxing? The Baby Boomer generation grew up with Muhammad Ali, who never stopped throwing jabs – verbally or physically – at opponents. Now, we have Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao talking about fighting each other instead of actually, well, you know, getting in the ring and proving who’s the man.

I miss the days when Magic Johnson and Larry Bird went at each other. I long for the time when Michael Jordan had to learn to fail against the Pistons before conquering them. And how about the Knicks and Heat? I still crack a smile when I see footage of Knicks Coach Jeff Van Gundy clinching to Alonzo Mourning’s leg like a toddler during the 1998 playoffs.

Every decade can be defined by its rivalries. The 70s had the Steelers and Cowboys and even NASCAR was in the mix, with Bobby Allison and Cale Yarborough trading punches next to the track at the 1979 Daytona 500. Awesome.

The 80s had had Martina Navratilova against Chris Evert and the Edmonton Oilers against everyone else. The 90s had Pate Sampras and Andre Agassi.

Sports forces us pick sides. You can’t like the Terps and Duke, just as you can’t cheer for the Yankees and Red Sox. You either cheer for Tiger Woods or the rest of the field, with the same applying to NASCAR drivers.

That’s why swimming needs Phelps back in the pool. Lochte, a native New Yorker, simply isn’t polarizing enough, or good enough, to carry swimming the way Mark Spitz did decades ago. How many professional swimming races did you watch after Phelps called it quits? That’s what I thought.

But Phelps says he’s coming back and immediately, swimming’s relevant again.

How else can you explain that all sessions of the three-day Arena Grand Prix at the Skyline Aquatic Center in Arizona were sold out. A pair of $40 all-session tickets was being sold for more than six times that on the Internet. Phelps should get a cut.

All of the sudden, swimming was in a news cycle dominated by the NHL and NBA playoffs and the release of the NFL schedule. On SportsCenter, Phelps received more coverage than the Orioles.

And for good reason. The only way Phelps, an avid Ravens and Orioles fan, could be any more “Baltimore” is if you covered him in Old Bay. When Phelps is at the starting block, our city is there with him. By having Phelps, we could go to anywhere and say our guy is better than your guy. Phelps isn’t one of those athletes who lives here during the season and spends the offseason in Miami.

Phelps lives in Canton.

Even Lochte, an 11-time Olympic medalist, acknowledges swimming is much better with Phelps in the pool than on the golf course.

“With what he’s done for the sport of swimming and him leaving kind of broke my heart a little because I love getting on those blocks and racing him,” Lochte told reporters after his winning time of 51.93 seconds was two-tenths of a second faster than Phelps (52.13) in the 100-meter butterly on Thursday night in Arizona. “Now that he’s back, I’ve got a big ol’ smile on my face.”

And so does everyone else. We get another chapter in the Phelps-Lochte saga, with the two biggest bullies on the block, lining up at that the starting block, wanting nothing more than to touch the wall before the other guy.

Phelps, a Rodgers Forge native, has won a world record 22 Olympic medals, including 18 gold medals that probably are worth more than Dundalk.

The guy’s super human. Who else can go from retiring after the 2012 London Games and, with minimal training, jump and beat Lochte – and everyone else – by swimming the fastest qualifying time in the 100-meter butterfly in 52.84 seconds?

“Him and I can’t stand losing to one another,” Phelps told reporters. “We both want to beat each other as many times as we can. That’s the competitiveness we both have. When we do get in the water, we’re going to do everything we can to get our hand on the wall before [the other] in every single race. And it’s the same for him. We’ll fight to the end, in any stroke, in any event we swim.”

Consider: Phelps is a three-time Olympic champion and current world record-holder in the 100-meter butterfly and his time on Thursday night tied for the fourth fastest in the world this year.

“It’s one meet; it’s one race,” Phelps told reporters after the final. “It’s a long way whether I decide to continue or not. This was awesome. I’m really excited about how things went. I do know what I need to do if I want to continue and swim faster.”

How much faster would his time have been he wasn’t overweight or hadn’t spent the past 18 months on the golf course, where he claimed to have struck 20,000 balls in the past six months?

“I’m doing this for me,” Phelps said at a press conference before the competition. “I’m doing this because I enjoy being in the pool and I enjoy the sport of swimming. I am looking forward to wherever this road takes me.”

Michael, we all know where this road is leading: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the 2016 Olympics.

Follow me on Twitter @JonGallo1

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#WNSTSweet16 Greatest Local Olympic Sport Athletes

Posted on 04 February 2014 by Luke Jones

As we shift our attention from Super Bowl XLVIII and another football season to Sochi, Russia and the start of the 2014 Winter Olympics, it’s time to take a look at our latest #WNSTSweet16 list that recognizes the greatest local Olympic sport athletes to represent the area.

Some names may have garnered little more than 15 minutes of fame with their athletic glory while a few have become heroes who will never be forgotten in the local community as well as in the entire country. Athletes who were either born in the state of Maryland or resided here for a significant period of time during their triumphs were considered for the list.

As WNST.net’s Glenn Clark previously pointed out, winning a medal and even participating in the Olympics weren’t requirements, but the list of Marylanders to triumph in either the Winter or Summer Games is extensive, meaning Olympic triumph carried heavier influence in paring down the candidates. Other guidelines that were considered were career longevity as well as a preference to recognize individual success before team competitions.

Here’s the list of the WNST Sweet 16 Greatest Local Olympic Sport Athletes:

16. Pam Shriver, tennis

The McDonogh grad may never have won a Grand Slam singles title, but her remarkable doubles career included 21 championships in Grand Slam tournaments and an Olympic gold medal playing with Zinna Garrison in Seoul, South Korea in 1988. The pair topped Jana Novotná and Helena Suková in the doubles final to take the gold.

Because this list doesn’t require Olympic triumph or participation, the argument could be made to move Shriver much higher on the list, but tennis wasn’t reintroduced as an Olympic medal sport until 1988 — after a 64-year hiatus– when her best years were winding down. Shriver did not appear in another edition of the Summer Games, but her triumph in Seoul coupled with even her late-career success made her a worthy inclusion. 

pam

Continue to next page for No. 15

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Before we get to Socchi, our #WNSTSweet16 recognizes local Olympic sport athletes

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Glenn Clark

If you’ve missed the first month of the #WNSTSweet16, you’ve missed a lot.

We’re celebrating our 16th year as Baltimore’s sports media leader here at WNST. To mark the occasion, we’re taking a look at some of the bigger “water cooler” topics that have been discussed during the course of the WNST era. We’re already four lists into the year, here’s a look back on them.

Week 1: Glenn Clark-Sweet 16 “debuts” in local sports history
Week 2: Luke Jones-Sweet 16 local sports playoff moments
Week 3: Nestor Aparicio-Sweet 16 local sports people who “had a dream”
Week 4: Drew Forrester-Sweet 16 local athletes who deserved to win a championship but didn’t

Which brings us to our fifth week.

The 2014 Winter Olympics are set to get underway this weekend in Socchi, Russia. There aren’t a whole lot of local connections to this year’s Olympiad, but that hasn’t always been the case. The state of Maryland has been well represented over the years.

For this week’s #WNSTSweet16, Luke Jones looks over the Greatest Local Olympic Sport Athletes.

You might have caught something in there. Yes, that’s right. Olympic SPORT athletes. The athletes included on this list are not required to have won anything at a particular Olympics or to have even competed in one. They just have to have competed in a sport that is known as an “Olympic sport”.

This is where things get interesting for Luke, isn’t it?

Look, we all know who is going to be at the top of the list-so it does take a good bit of the drama out of this-but not all of it. Plenty of other athletes have represented the state of Maryland in the Olympics besides Michael Phelps. Most recently, basketball stars like Carmelo Anthony and Angel McCoughtry have brought gold back to Charm City. Kimmie Meissner not only competed in an Olympics but won a World Championship in an Olympic sport (figure skating).

But if you’re like me, we’re not far into the list and we’re already struggling to name more. Tommy Hannan won a gold medal out of Mt. St. Joe. Dominique Dawes is from Maryland and has won four Olympic medals.

Who else?

Remember, they don’t have to have won anything in the Olympics or EVEN PARTICIPATED in them. They just have to have competed in an “Olympic Sport” (Note: baseball is no longer an Olympic sport.)

This is easily the toughest list anyone from our crew has had to tackle yet.

So Luke needs your help. Leave your ideas here in the comments or email him via luke@wnst.net. We will be discussing the list throughout the day Monday on AM1570 WNST.net. We’d love to have you Tweet with us or discuss the topic via Facebook by using the hashtag #WNSTSweet16.

On Tuesday morning, Luke will unveil his list here at WNST.net and will discuss it with Drew Forrester on “The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction” at 8am. He will check back in at 4pm Tuesday with me on “The Reality Check Driven by Jerry’s Toyota Scion” to discuss the list further.

Who are we missing? Who do we need to know about? You need to tell us now!

-G

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Ravens shut out, but Baltimore’s Phelps, Long claim ESPY Awards

Posted on 18 July 2013 by WNST Staff

The biggest stars from the worlds of sports and entertainment gathered in downtown Los Angeles at the Nokia Theatre L.A. LIVE on Wednesday night to celebrate the best sports stories of the year at The 2013 ESPYS Presented by Capital One, hosted by Jon Hamm.

The Miami Heat were the winners of the night as they were honored as the year’s Best Team for the second consecutive year. LeBron James won for Best Championship Performance, Best NBA Player and Best Male Athlete. This marks the second consecutive year that LeBron James won all three of those awards.

Best Game went to Game 6 of the NBA Finals between the Miami Heat and the San Antonio Spurs, where Ray Allen forced overtime with a game tying 3-pointer with 5.2 seconds left in regulation. The Heat would outlast the Spurs in overtime on their way to the NBA Championship.

The year that included a number of young standout athletes culminated with Colin Kaepernick taking home the ESPY for Best Breakthrough Athlete. Best NHL Player went toSidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins who scored 15 goals and tallied 41 assists during the season.

It came as no surprise that Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers won for Best MLB Player. Michael Phelps collected the award for Best Record-Breaking Performance for setting the all-time record for most Olympic medals with 22. (He also won this award in 2009.)

The Arthur Ashe Courage Award, which recognizes individuals whose contributions transcend sports, was awarded to Robin Roberts. She became known to many across the country as one of the first female sports anchors on ESPN in the 1990s and today she greets viewers as the beloved co-anchor of the country’s leading morning show Good Morning America. Roberts blazed a trail for women in broadcasting, but it is her personal story that has served as an inspiration to countless people as she has overcome (faced?)  life-threatening illness twice. The award, which LeBron James presented to Roberts, honored the strength and courage that Roberts has displayed throughout her career and during her fight against cancer and MDS, a rare blood disorder.

Another special moment in the show was the presentation of the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance, in honor of the late Jim Valvano and The V Foundation for Cancer Research.Ben Affleck presented the award to the father-and-son team of Dick and Rick Hoyt, who have participated in over 1,000 endurance events including 31 Boston Marathons. Rick Hoyt, 51, was born with cerebral palsy and is unable to use his hands and legs. His father, 73, pushes him in a custom-made running chair during events including 5K and 10K races, marathons and triathlons.

Other 2013 ESPY winners included Serena Williams (Best Female Athlete and Best Female Tennis Player), Rick Pitino (Best Coach/Manager) and Candace Parker (Best WNBA Player).Floyd Mayweather (Best Fighter) Missy Franklin won Best Female Olympian for winning four Gold Medals at the 2012 London Olympic Games. Usain Bolt won Best International Athlete and Thierry Henry won the ESPY for best MLS Player.

With three wins this year, LeBron James has collected a total of nineESPY Awards over the course of his career.  This marks Serena Williams’ eighth ESPY Award.  Floyd Mayweatherwon Best Fighter for the second consecutive year and fifth time in his career.

This year’s guest presenters included Michelle Obama (First Lady), Ben Affleck (Two time Academy Award Winner), Kevin Bacon (R.I.P.D.), Malin Ackerman (The Trophy Wife), Paula Patton (2 Guns), Tate Donovan (Hostages), Bill Hader (Turbo), Kerri Walsh Jennings, Tony Gonzalez, Adrian Peterson, LeBron James, Jason Sudeikis (We Are The Millers), Lake Bell(Million Dollar Arm), Michael Phelps, Ray Lewis, Gabby Douglas, Colin Kaepernick, Alex Morgan, Victor Cruz, Steve Nash, Selena Gomez (Stars Dance), Katherine Webb, Chrissy Teigen (TV Host), Sean “Diddy” Combs (Grammy Award Winner).

Below is a complete list of 2013 winners.

SPECIAL AWARDS

ARTHUR ASHE COURAGE AWARD: Robin Roberts

JIMMY V AWARD FOR PERSEVERANCE: Dick and Rick Hoyt

 

BEST IN SPORT

BEST FEMALE ATHLETE: Serena Williams

BEST MALE ATHLETE: LeBron James

BEST FEMALE OLYMPIAN: Missy Franklin

BEST MALE OLYMPIAN: Michael Phelps

BEST MOMENT: Jack Hoffman TD at Nebraska spring game

BEST TEAM: Miami Heat

BEST COMEBACK: Adrian Peterson

BEST COACH/MANAGER: Rick Pitino

BEST GAME: Miami Heat vs. San Antonio Spurs, Game 6 NBA Finals

BEST CHAMPIONSHIP PERFORMANCE: LeBron James, NBA Finals

BEST PLAY:

BEST UPSET: 15-Seed Florida Gulf Coast over 2-Seed Georgetown

BEST BREAKTHROUGH ATHLETE: Colin Kaepernick

BEST RECORD-BREAKING PERFORMANCE: Michael Phelps 22 Olympic medals

BEST MALE COLLEGE ATHLETE: Johnny Manziel

BEST FEMALE COLLEGE ATHLETE: Brittney Griner

BEST MALE ATHLETE WITH A DISABILITY: Jeremy Campbell

BEST FEMALE ATHLETE WITH A DISABILITY: Jessica Long

 

INDIVIDUAL SPORTS

BEST MLB PLAYER: Miguel Cabrera

BEST NBA PLAYER: LeBron James

BEST WNBA PLAYER: Candace Parker

BEST NFL PLAYER: Adrian Peterson

BEST NHL PLAYER: Sidney Crosby

BEST MLS PLAYER: Thierry Henry

BEST MALE ACTION SPORT ATHLETE: Nyjah Huston

BEST FEMALE ACTION SPORT ATHLETE: Stephanie Gilmore

BEST BOWLER: Pete Weber

BEST DRIVER: Ryan Hunter-Reay

BEST FIGHTER: Floyd Mayweather

BEST MALE GOLFER: Tiger Woods

BEST FEMALE GOLFER: Stacey Lewis

BEST INTERNATIONAL ATHLETE: Usain Bolt

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Phelps gets long odds, Ovechkin short odds to take home ESPYs

Posted on 15 July 2013 by WNST Staff

Courtesy of Bovada, (www.Bovada.lv, Twitter: @BovadaLV).

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best Male Athlete 

LeBron James                           1/2

Adrian Peterson                        5/2

Miguel Cabrera                          4/1

Michael Phelps                          15/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best Female Athlete          

Serena Williams                         5/4

Brittney Griner                           8/5

Gabby Douglas                         5/2

Missy Franklin                           9/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best Fighter          

Floyd Mayweather Jr.                2/3

Jon “Bones” Jones                    5/4

Anderson Silva                          4/1

Canelo Alvarez                          25/1

Danny Garcia                            33/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best NBA Player   

LeBron James                           1/3

Tony Parker                              7/2

Kevin Durant                             15/4

Kobe Bryant                              12/1

Carmelo Anthony                       20/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best NFL Player   

Adrian Peterson                        4/7

Peyton Manning                        5/2

JJ Watt                                     5/1

Calvin Johnson                         13/2

Aaron Rodgers                          10/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best MLB Player   

Miguel Cabrera                         1/2

Mike Trout                                 2/1

Buster Posey                            9/1

David Price                               9/1

R.A. Dickey                              9/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best NHL Player   

Sidney Crosby                          1/5

Alexander Ovechkin                   2/1

John Tavares                            12/1

Martin St. Louis                         33/1

Henrik Lundqvist                       33/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best International Athlete   

Usain Bolt                                2/3

Novak Djokovic                        9/4

Lionel Messi                              3/1

Cristiano Ronaldo                      9/1

Juan Manuel Marquez                20/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best Male College Athlete  

Johnny Manziel                         1/5

Trey Burke                                3/1

Kyle Dake                                 15/1

Drew LeBlanc                            15/1

 

2013 ESPY Awards – Best Driver

Tony Kanaan                             1/2

Brad Keselowski                       3/1

Sebastian Vettel                        4/1

Ryan Hunter-Reay                      10/1

 

 

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Outright Winner         

Tiger Woods                 8/1                                                                                

Justin Rose                   16/1

Phil Mickelson               18/1

Adam Scott                  20/1

Graeme McDowell         22/1

Lee Westwood              25/1

Rory McIlroy                 25/1

Ernie Els                       28/1

Luke Donald                 28/1

Sergio Garcia                28/1

Jason Day                    33/1

Charl Schwartzel            33/1

Henrik Stenson              33/1

Dustin Johnson             40/1

Brandt Snedeker           40/1

Matt Kuchar                  40/1

Rickie Fowler                40/1

Ian Poulter                    50/1

Martin Kaymer               50/1

Louis Oosthuizen           50/1

Nicolas Colsaerts          50/1

Padraig Harrington        66/1

Branden Grace              66/1

Hunter Mahan                66/1

Thomas Bjorn                66/1

Matteo Manassero         66/1

Webb Simpson             66/1

Jason Dufner                66/1

Bubba Watson              66/1

Francesco Molinari        80/1

Zach Johnson               80/1

Richard Sterne              80/1

Jim Furyk                      80/1

Keegan Bradley             80/1

Thorbjorn Olesen           80/1

Paul Lawrie                   80/1

Bill Haas                       100/1

Martin Laird                   100/1

Shane Lowry                 100/1

Nick Watney                  100/1

Angel Cabrera               100/1

Billy Horschel                100/1

Alexander Noren            100/1

Jamie Donaldson          100/1

Peter Hanson                100/1

Chris Wood                   125/1

George Coetzee            125/1

Bernd Wiesberger          125/1

Mikko Ilonen                 125/1

Brooks Koepka             125/1

Bo Van Pelt                  125/1

Fredrik Jacobson          125/1

K.J. Choi                      125/1

Jordan Spieth               150/1

Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano      150/1

Geoff Ogilvy                 150/1

Miguel Angel Jimenez    150/1

Marcel Siem                  150/1

Stewart Cink                  150/1

David Lynn                   150/1

Ryan Moore                  150/1

Stephen Gallacher         150/1

Jonas Blixt                    150/1

Robert Karlsson            150/1

Tim Clark                      150/1

Harris English                150/1

Carl Pettersson             150/1

Ben Curtis                     150/1

John Senden                 200/1

Marc Leishman              200/1

Rafael Cabrera -Bello     200/1

Richie Ramsay              200/1

Brian Davis                   200/1

Boo Weekley                200/1

Kevin Streelman            200/1

Graham Delaet              200/1

Camilo Villegas             200/1

Hideki Matsuyama         200/1

Thongchai Jaidee          200/1

Jimmy Walker               200/1

Russell Henley              200/1

Marc Warren                  200/1

Thomas Aiken               200/1

John Huh                      200/1

Danny Willett                 250/1

Kyle Stanley                  250/1

Scott Piercy                  250/1

Alvaro Quiros                250/1

Brett Rumford               250/1

Fred Couples                250/1

Robert Garrigus             250/1

Darren Clarke                250/1

Scott Jamieson             250/1

Bud Cauley                   250/1

Lucas Glover                 300/1

Michael Thompson        300/1

Gregory Bourdy            300/1

Justin Leonard              300/1

Luke Guthrie                  300/1

Kiradech Aphibarnrat     300/1

Vijay Singh                   300/1

D-A Points                    300/1

Yong-Eun Yang             300/1

Ken Duke                      300/1

Josh Teater                   300/1

Gareth Maybin               300/1

Johnson Wagner           300/1

Brendan Jones              300/1

Kyung-Tae Kim              350/1

Marcus Fraser               400/1

Tom Lehman                 400/1

Tom Watson                 500/1

Niclas Fasth                  500/1

Ashun Wu                     500/1

Eduardo De La Riva      500/1

Garrick Porteous           500/1

Hyung-Sung Kim           500/1

Mark Calcavecchia        500/1

Oliver Fisher                  500/1

Satoshi Kodaira            500/1

Shingo Katayama          500/1

Shiv Kapur                    500/1

Steven Tiley                  500/1

Thaworn Wiratchant       500/1

Toru Taniguchi               500/1

Daisuke Maruyama        500/1

Scott Brown                  500/1

David Duval                  500/1

Elliot Saltman                500/1

Estanislao Goya            500/1

Hiroyuki Fujita               500/1

Mark Brown                   500/1

Peter Senior                  500/1

Richard Mcevoy            500/1

Oscar Floren                 500/1

Rhys Pugh                    500/1

George Murray              750/1

Justin Harding               750/1

Todd Hamilton              750/1

Darryn Llloyd                750/1

Kenichi Kuboya             750/1

Mark O’Meara                750/1

Ben Stow                      1000/1

Gareth Wright                1000/1

Grant Forrest                 1000/1

Jimmy Mullen                1000/1

John Wade                   1000/1

Makato Inoue                1000/1

Matthew Fitzpatrick        1000/1

Stephen Dartnall            1000/1

Steven Fox                   1000/1

Steven Jeffress             1000/1

Tyrell Hatton                  1000/1

Sandy Lyle                    1000/1

Nick Faldo                    1000/1

 

Miscellaneous Props

The Open Championship 2013 – Will There Be a Play-Off?       

Yes                  5/2

No                    2/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Where Will The Winner Come From? 

USA                                         7/5

Great Britain & Ireland                3/1

Rest of the World                      3/1

Continental Europe                    4/1

 

Tiger Woods Props

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 5?         

Yes                  7/4

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 10?        

Yes                  4/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 20?        

Yes                  2/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Shoot A Hole in One?        

Yes                  80/1

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Tournament H2H Matches – T Woods v J Rose           

Tiger Woods                 5/9

Justin Rose                   7/5

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Tournament H2H Matches – T Woods v P Mickelson  

Tiger Woods                 1/2

Phil Mickelson               3/2

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Tournament H2H Matches – T Woods v R McIlroy      

Tiger Woods                 2/5

Rory McIlroy                 9/5

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Tournament H2H Matches – T Woods v S Garcia        

Tiger Woods                 2/5

Sergio Garcia                9/5

 

 

The Open Championship 2013 – 1st Round Leader

Tiger Woods                 12/1

Justin Rose                   22/1

Phil Mickelson               22/1

Adam Scott                  25/1

Graeme McDowell         28/1

Lee Westwood              33/1

Rory McIlroy                 33/1

Ernie Els                       33/1

Luke Donald                 33/1

Sergio Garcia                33/1

Jason Day                    40/1

Charl Schwartzel            40/1

Dustin Johnson             40/1

Brandt Snedeker           40/1

Henrik Stenson              40/1

Matt Kuchar                  50/1

Rickie Fowler                50/1

Ian Poulter                    50/1

Martin Kaymer               50/1

Louis Oosthuizen           50/1

Nicolas Colsaerts          50/1

Branden Grace              50/1

Padraig Harrington        66/1

Hunter Mahan                66/1

Thomas Bjorn                66/1

Matteo Manassero         66/1

Webb Simpson             66/1

Jason Dufner                66/1

Zach Johnson               75/1

Bill Haas                       75/1

Thorbjorn Olesen           75/1

Bubba Watson              80/1

Francesco Molinari        80/1

Richard Sterne              80/1

Jim Furyk                      80/1

Keegan Bradley             80/1

Martin Laird                   80/1

Shane Lowry                 80/1

Paul Lawrie                   80/1

Billy Horschel                80/1

Jamie Donaldson          80/1

Peter Hanson                90/1

Jordan Spieth               100/1

Nick Watney                  100/1

Angel Cabrera               100/1

Alexander Noren            100/1

Chris Wood                   100/1

George Coetzee            100/1

Bernd Wiesberger          100/1

Mikko Ilonen                 100/1

Brooks Koepka             100/1

Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano      100/1

Bo Van Pelt                  100/1

Fredrik Jacobson          100/1

Marcel Siem                  100/1

Geoff Ogilvy                 125/1

Miguel Angel Jimenez    125/1

K.J. Choi                      125/1

Stewart Cink                  125/1

David Lynn                   125/1

Ryan Moore                  125/1

Stephen Gallacher         125/1

Jonas Blixt                    125/1

Robert Karlsson            125/1

Tim Clark                      125/1

Harris English                125/1

John Senden                 125/1

Rafael Cabrera -Bello     125/1

Carl Pettersson             125/1

Richie Ramsay              125/1

Brian Davis                   125/1

Boo Weekley                125/1

Graham Delaet              125/1

Hideki Matsuyama         125/1

Alvaro Quiros                125/1

Marc Leishman              150/1

Kevin Streelman            150/1

Camilo Villegas             150/1

Thongchai Jaidee          150/1

Ben Curtis                     150/1

Jimmy Walker               150/1

Russell Henley              150/1

Danny Willett                 150/1

Marc Warren                  150/1

Kyle Stanley                  150/1

Scott Piercy                  150/1

Thomas Aiken               150/1

Brett Rumford               150/1

Fred Couples                150/1

Lucas Glover                 150/1

John Huh                      150/1

Gregory Bourdy            150/1

Robert Garrigus             150/1

Scott Jamieson             150/1

Michael Thompson        200/1

Justin Leonard              200/1

Luke Guthrie                  200/1

Darren Clarke                200/1

Kiradech Aphibarnrat     200/1

Vijay Singh                   200/1

D-A Points                    200/1

Yong-Eun Yang             200/1

Ken Duke                      200/1

Bud Cauley                   200/1

Josh Teater                   200/1

Gareth Maybin               200/1

Tom Watson                 200/1

Marcus Fraser               200/1

Johnson Wagner           200/1

Brendan Jones              200/1

Garrick Porteous           200/1

Oliver Fisher                  200/1

Tom Lehman                 200/1

Niclas Fasth                  250/1

Ashun Wu                     250/1

Eduardo De La Riva      250/1

Hyung-Sung Kim           250/1

Kyung-Tae Kim              250/1

Mark Calcavecchia        250/1

Satoshi Kodaira            250/1

Shingo Katayama          250/1

Shiv Kapur                    250/1

Steven Tiley                  250/1

Thaworn Wiratchant       250/1

Toru Taniguchi               250/1

Daisuke Maruyama        250/1

Scott Brown                  250/1

Hiroyuki Fujita               250/1

Justin Harding               250/1

Peter Senior                  250/1

David Duval                  300/1

Estanislao Goya            300/1

George Murray              300/1

Mark Brown                   300/1

Richard Mcevoy            300/1

Todd Hamilton              300/1

Ben Stow                      300/1

Darryn Llloyd                300/1

Gareth Wright                300/1

Grant Forrest                 300/1

Jimmy Mullen                300/1

John Wade                   300/1

Kenichi Kuboya             300/1

Makato Inoue                300/1

Mark O’Meara                300/1

Matthew Fitzpatrick        300/1

Oscar Floren                 300/1

Rhys Pugh                    300/1

Stephen Dartnall            300/1

Steven Fox                   300/1

Steven Jeffress             300/1

Tyrell Hatton                  300/1

Sandy Lyle                    300/1

Nick Faldo                    300/1

 

Top 5/10/20 Finishes

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 5?         

Yes                  7/4

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 10?        

Yes                  4/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Tiger Woods Finish in The Top 20?        

Yes                  2/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Phil Mickelson Finish in The Top 5?      

Yes                  7/2

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Phil Mickelson Finish in The Top 10?    

Yes                  8/5

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Phil Mickelson Finish in The Top 20?    

Yes                  5/7

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Justin Rose Finish in The Top 5?           

Yes                  7/2

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Justin Rose Finish in The Top 10?         

Yes                  8/5

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Adam Scott Finish in The Top 5?           

Yes                  4/1

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Adam Scott Finish in The Top 10?         

Yes                  9/5

 

The Open Championship 2013 – Will Graeme McDowell Finish in The Top 5? 

Yes                  9/2

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