Tag Archive | "Michael Pineda"

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An Orioles performance only a mother could love

Posted on 10 May 2015 by Luke Jones

There was something ironic about the Orioles turning in a performance only a mother could love in a 6-2 loss to the New York Yankees on the holiday Sunday.

In their fifth loss in six games, the Orioles struck out a club-record 18 times as Michael Pineda turned in the first 16-strikeout performance without a walk in the majors since Johan Santana did it in 2007. To be clear, the Yankees starter deserves plenty of credit as he lowered his season ERA to 2.72, but Baltimore’s frustration was evident throughout the afternoon, perhaps captured best in the fifth inning when Manny Machado slammed his bat in frustration after striking out.

Despite Sunday’s dubious achievement, the strikeout hasn’t been a universal problem for the Orioles — they entered the day ranked 15th in the majors — but Chris Davis struck out twice more on Sunday to give him a league-leading 48 in 116 plate appearances. Davis has managed to produce an .805 on-base plus slugging percentage with a club-leading seven home runs, but his contact rate of 61.9 percent entering Sunday was even lower than last season’s 63.6 percent, which doesn’t bode well for future performance.

Hoping to build on back-to-back quality starts, Bud Norris reverted to the pitcher we saw throughout spring training and most of April when he allowed four earned runs before being chased in the fourth inning. It would be unfair to ignore his last two outings in which he posted a 3.95 ERA over 13 2/3 innings, but the leash is shrinking rapidly as we approach Memorial Day.

Of course, the question of who would replace Norris was complicated with Kevin Gausman being placed on the 15-day disabled list with right shoulder tendinitis on Friday. Injuries are a cruel reality of the game, but it’s impossible not to wonder what role irregular work might have played in the most talented pitcher in the organization developing a cranky shoulder. It was one of the biggest concerns mentioned as a reason why some wanted Gausman to be working on a regular schedule in the starting rotation at Triple-A Norfolk if not pitching every fifth day in Baltimore.

The day also brought the latest cringe-worthy outing from Rule 5 pitcher Jason Garcia, who walked four batters and allowed an earned run in 2 1/3 innings. His performance mattered little to the final score, but the 22-year-old has now walked 11 batters in 13 2/3 innings and once again was sitting in the low 90s with his fastball, a far cry from the electric stuff club officials raved about as enough reason to try to carry him on the 25-man roster.

There are simply too many pitchers — Mike Wright, Tyler Wilson, and Steve Johnson, just to name a few — performing well at Norfolk to justify continuing the Garcia experiment if he can’t even pitch in mop-up situations. And his diminished velocity makes you wonder if the long-term payoff of keeping him in the organization is even worth it.

The corner outfield spots continue to create cause for concern as right fielder Delmon Young threw to the wrong base to allow a run to score in the fourth inning and left fielder Alejandro De Aza got a bad read on Jacoby Ellsbury’s two-run double. Even with a proper break, De Aza likely wouldn’t have caught the deep liner, but Orioles pitching simply doesn’t strike out enough hitters to survive with the spottier-than-usual defense we’ve continued to see over the first five weeks of the 2015 campaign.

Even the 2013 Gold Glove winner Machado has struggled to find his usual consistency in the field with a club-leading seven errors this season.

On top of his shaky defense, De Aza struck out twice more to drop his average to .211 with a .632 OPS. He has the second-worst strikeout rate on the club behind Davis, but he hasn’t provided near the production to justify much playing time.

De Aza and Steve Pearce (.556 OPS) were counted on to be consistent contributors in 2015, but both have struggled to even stay in the lineup with such disappointing numbers. Their struggles have provided plenty of ammunition to criticize an offseason in which Nelson Cruz and Nick Markakis departed via free agency and only Travis Snider was added to the outfield.

The Orioles return home 13-16 and 5 1/2 games behind the first-place Yankees in the American League East. Panic and hopelessness are still premature, but it’s fair to be concerned with Baltimore having already suffered separate losing streaks of five and four games in the season’s first five weeks.

As manager Buck Showalter would say, blaming the underwhelming start solely on the losses of Cruz, Markakis, and lefty reliever Andrew Miller — who still has a 0.00 ERA in New York — would be a convenient excuse to overlook other problems. The Orioles have received poor pitching performances from Norris and No. 1 starter Chris Tillman and not nearly enough offense from the likes of De Aza and Pearce as well as former All-Star shorstop Everth Cabrera prior to the recent return of J.J. Hardy.

There’s no such thing as must-win games in mid-May, but the Orioles now play 17 of their next 20 games at Camden Yards. To quell concerns and keep pace as the geriatric Yankees continue to play strong baseball, the Orioles would serve themselves well to take advantage of the home cooking after a brutal stretch on the road.

They can start by putting an ugly Mother’s Day behind them as quickly as possible.

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Michael Pineda: The Disgrace

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Michael Pineda: The Disgrace

Posted on 24 April 2014 by Brandon Sacks

As the Orioles are dealing with one of the worst starting rotations in baseball, at least there is one thing that cannot cause us any worry.  Our pitchers are not cheaters – it would be hard to imagine a rotation cheating while still playing this poorly.  Our division foes up in the Big Apple, on the other hand, have a pretty serious issue at hand.  Starting pitcher Michael Pineda was thrown out of the team’s April 23 matchup against the Red Sox for having a foreign substance, most likely pine tar, on his neck.  This is his second such incident in as many weeks, both coming against Boston.  Red Sox skipper John Farrell asked to have Pineda checked during the second inning for foreign substances.  As many recall, Pineda looked to have pine tar all over his hands during the Yankees-Sox matchup on April 10.  After home plate umpire Gerry Davis felt the substance on Pineda’s neck, the pitcher was thrown out of the game.

One would think that Pineda would be a little more inconspicuous when it came to using something to grip the ball.  In fact, most pitchers are.  Most pitchers use some sort of foreign substance to help grip the ball.  The rosin bag out on the mound is generally used to help pitchers keep a stronger hold on the ball.  However, Pineda made the asinine mistake of “hiding” pine tar on the side of his neck while expecting that no one would notice. Consulting the MLB rulebook might show exactly what to expect here.

Per Rule 8.02(a)(4):

  • The pitcher shall not apply a foreign substance of any kind to the ball.
  • PENALTY:
    (a) The pitcher shall be ejected immediately from the game and shall be suspended automatically. In National Association Leagues, the automatic suspension shall be for 10 games.
    (b) If a play follows the violation called by the umpire, the manager of the offense may advise the plate umpire that he elects to accept the play. Such election shall be made immediately at the end of the play. However, if the batter reaches first base on a hit, an error, a base on balls, a hit batsman, or otherwise, and no other runner is put out before advancing at least one base, the play shall proceed without reference to the violation.
    (c) Even though the offense elects to take the play, the violation shall be recognized and the penalties in subsection (a) will still be in effect.
    (d) The umpire shall be sole judge on whether any portion of this rule has been violated.

The last time I checked, the pine tar could be classified as a foreign substance since it is not manufactured as a part of the baseball.  Gerry Davis, the umpire in the situation, determined that this rule was broken and tossed Pineda, as mentioned by the penalty section.  From this same point, a suspension for Pineda appears to be looming.  Precedent has shown that a suspension between 8-10 games as what can be expected, but people should not be surprised if his suspension is for a longer period of time since Pineda was seen to have another foreign substance on his hand during his last game against the Red Sox.  He has made a fool of himself for the second game in two weeks.  He just needs to accept the fact that he is not sneaky and should just be playing the game it is meant to be played.

While the Orioles are having their own troubles with pitching, at least they aren’t of this magnitude.  Remember Birdland, it could always be worse.

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