Tag Archive | "miguel cabrera"

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Miguel Cabrera beats out Chris Davis for AL Hank Aaron Award

Posted on 28 October 2013 by WNST Staff

Miguel Cabrera, Paul Goldschmidt win the 2013 Hank Aaron Award

Award recognizes most outstanding offensive performer in each league; Cabrera wins second consecutive American League Hank Aaron Award

 

Major League Baseball announced today that Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers and Paul Goldschmidt of the Arizona Diamondbacks have been selected as the winners of the 2013 Hank Aaron Award. This is Cabrera’s second consecutive season winning the Hank Aaron Award for the American League. Established in 1999 to honor the 25th Anniversary of Aaron breaking Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record, the Hank Aaron Award is officially sanctioned by Major League Baseball and recognizes the most outstanding offensive performer in each League.

Fans voted for the award on MLB.com, and for the fourth straight year, a special panel of Hall of Fame players led by Hank Aaron joined fans in voting for the award. The Hall of Fame panel led by Aaron includes some of the greatest offensive players of all-time – Roberto Alomar, Johnny Bench, Tony Gwynn, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray and Robin Yount. These Hall of Famers – who combined for 17,629 hits, 8,278 RBI and 1,723 home runs – were personally selected by Hank Aaron to lend their expertise to help select the best offensive performer in each League.

“I want to extend my congratulations to Miguel Cabrera and Paul Goldschmidt on being selected as the winners of the 2013 Hank Aaron Award, an award named after one of the greatest players in the history of baseball,” Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig said. “Miguel completed another stellar season this year, including winning his third batting title. Paul was an offensive force on the Diamondbacks and in the National League.”

“It is a privilege to have the award that recognizes the most outstanding offensive performer in each League named after me,” said Hank Aaron. “I want to congratulate Miguel and Paul on their outstanding seasons and extend my thanks to the Hall of Famers and fans who selected the winners.”

Cabrera followed up his Triple Crown-winning season of 2012 with his third consecutive American League batting title after hitting .348 in 2013. The eight-time All-Star, who was the starting third baseman for the A.L. at the Midsummer Classic, became the first Tigers player to lead the A.L. in hitting in three consecutive seasons since Hall of Famer Ty Cobb accomplished the feat (1917-19). The 30-year-old slugger matched his career best with 44 home runs (also 2012) and collected 137 RBI, marking his sixth straight season of 100-or-more RBI for Detroit and joining Harry Heilmann (1923-29) as the only players in franchise history to do so. The Venezuela native led the A.L. with a .442 on-base percentage, a .636 slugging percentage and a .397 average with runners in scoring position while tying for first with 37 go-ahead RBI. He also ranked among league leaders in homers (2nd), RBI (2nd), total bases (2nd, 353), runs scored (T-2nd, 103), hits (T-2nd, 193), walks (3rd, 90) and multi-hit games (9th, 52). The 2012 A.L. MVP has eclipsed the 100-RBI mark in each of his full Major League seasons and he has hit at least .320 in eight of his last 10 seasons.

Goldschmidt, who was selected to his first All-Star Game in 2013, hit .302 with 36 doubles, 36 home runs, 125 RBI, 99 walks and 103 runs scored in his second full season with the Diamondbacks. The 26-year-old led the National League in slugging percentage (.551), extra-base hits (75), RBI and total bases (332), and tied for first in homers. He also ranked third in walks, tied for third in runs scored, fourth with a .401 on-base percentage and tied for 10th in doubles. Among all Major Leaguers, the right-handed-hitting slugger tied for first in go-ahead RBI (37), go-ahead home runs (20), walk-off homers (3), and home runs after the eighth inning (7), while tying for most game-winning RBI (19) and RBI with runners in scoring position (84). The Texas State University product joined Hall of Famers Mel Ott (1929 and 1932) and Eddie Mathews as the only three N.L. players to post a .300 average, 35 home runs, 100 RBI, 100 runs scored and 99 walks during their 25-year-old season or earlier (ages as of June 30 of that season). In addition, Paul is the 19th player since 1977 to lead the N.L. or tie for the lead in home runs and RBI in a single season. Goldschmidt, who was drafted by the D-backs in the eighth round of the 2009 Draft, became the ninth player in the last 37 years to lead the N.L. or tie for the lead in homers and RBI while hitting at least .300, joining Matt Kemp (2011), Albert Pujols (2010), Ryan Howard (2006), Andres Galarraga (1996), Dante Bichette (1995), Barry Bonds (1993), Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt (1981) and George Foster (1977).

Past winners of the award include: Miguel Cabrera and Buster Posey (2012), Jose Bautista and Matt Kemp (2011), Bautista and Joey Votto (2010); Derek Jeter and Albert Pujols (2009); Aramis Ramirez and Kevin Youkilis (2008); Alex Rodriguez and Prince Fielder (2007); Jeter and Ryan Howard (2006); David Ortiz and Andruw Jones (2005); Manny Ramirez and Barry Bonds (2004); Rodriguez and Pujols (2003); Rodriguez and Bonds (2001-02); Carlos Delgado and Todd Helton.

Comments (0)

Your Monday Reality Check: “I hope his pants get caught and a bloodbath ensues!”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Your Monday Reality Check: “I hope his pants get caught and a bloodbath ensues!”

Posted on 08 July 2013 by Glenn Clark

Coming off what I’m sure you all will agree was a well-earned week of vacation, I thought quite a bit about writing a lengthy piece about Jim Johnson and the Orioles’ closer situation. Despite Johnson’s 1-2-3 ninth inning in Baltimore’s 2-1 win Sunday over the New York Yankees, the situation remains quite fluid and will be followed closely in the coming weeks.

Although I will point this out from an appearance I made Sunday morning on the SiriusXM Fantasy Sports channel…

That happened at 8am Sunday. Call me “Glennstradamus”?

But I’m NOT writing about that. No…because while I was sitting at Chase Field in Phoenix Friday night watching the Arizona Diamondbacks play the Colorado Rockies I had a thought cross my mind. The thought was furthered during that appearance I made on the SXM Fantasy Channel Sunday morning.

That thought has everything in the world to do with the movie Mallrats. Or at least kinda.

Stick with me.

If you listen to “The Reality Check” (and since I’ve seen the ratings-I KNOW you do), you’ve probably heard me discuss the fact that in a previous life, I was obsessed with director Kevin Smith and his films. I embarrassingly admitted just a few weeks ago to Allen McCallum that I went to see the movie “Jersey Girl” in theaters THRICE with different young ladies. I’m not even remotely proud.

If you’ve ever seen the movie “Mallrats” (and if not, go ahead and take the rest of the day off to view it. In fact, I’m broadcasting at Ryleigh’s in Federal Hill Monday afternoon courtesy of Pinnacle Vodka. Just bring your laptop and I’ll bring a copy of the flick you can watch before you head over to Oriole Park at Camden Yards.), you’ll probably remember Jason Lee’s character Brodie and his sincere respect for all things related to his local shopping mall. One particular issue he has is with a small child who sits down on the escalator, ignoring the dangers of getting caught.

A few escalator rides in, Brodie’s fears play out as the child gets caught and is hurt. If you don’t mind a tiny bit of foul language, here’s a clip…

The take away phrase in that clip would be “that kid is back on the escalator again!”

(Continued on Page 2…)

Comments (0)

Team Trout or Camp Cabrera?

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Team Trout or Camp Cabrera?

Posted on 01 October 2012 by Thyrl Nelson

It’s not often I get to say I’m right while also playing the role of devil’s advocate. Heck…who am I trying to kid? It’s not often I get to say I was right period, especially about something as subjective as AL MVP voting. I did however say a few weeks, maybe months, ago that this Year’s AL MVP vote would be an even bigger case of traditional stats vs. advanced metrics than the Cy Young candidacy of Felix Hernandez in 2010. To that end, and likely that end alone, I’m right.

The AL MVP race has boiled down to two vastly distinctive candidates and two incredibly different camps. In one corner there’s Miguel Cabrera, baseball’s most prolific hitter and potentially the winner of baseball’s first Triple Crown in 45 years. The old school “eye test” camp is touting his candidacy. In the other corner we have Mike Trout, baseball’s newest phenom and most complete player. Trout has rewritten the sabermetric standard and not surprisingly has the advanced stats guys singing his praises.

 

If there’s anything unfortunate about the historical pursuits of these two gentlemen and their two-man race for MVP it’s that it’s become a partisan debate. The Saber community and the Old Guard have long been at odds and much like Democrats and Republicans in a political debate, this year’s vote likely rides with which community you already subscribe to rather than which candidate you actually prefer.

 

Welcome to the “T” party; the Thyrl Party. I subscribe to neither camp wholeheartedly, but am suddenly becoming enamored with both, and the odds that they seem to be at currently.

 

For most of the summer I was on “Team Trout”. The kid emerged from the shadow of Bryce Harper to do things that we not only couldn’t have expected of him, Trout has done things that we couldn’t have expected from anyone. But suddenly, and maybe simply in the interest of being a contrarian, I find myself in “Camp Cabrera”. And as I’m not seeing many good arguments made on Cabrera’s behalf outside of the anomaly of a Triple Crown, I’ll try here to make one.

 

First, it seems the saber folks have pointed to a Triple Crown as nothing more than a statistical novelty and I don’t disagree. Even old school writers have seen through the statistical novelty seasons of the past. Baseball has seen multiple Triple Crown winners, 40/40 and even 50/50 club members and some have walked away with the hardware while others haven’t. The 56-game hitting streak did win Joe DiMaggio an MVP in a 1941 season that I’m convinced if we recast the ballot would go to Ted Williams in a landslide. So before going any further I’ll state for the record that my case for Cabrera has nothing to do with, and is in no way vested in his winning the Triple Crown. If Josh Hamilton were to hit 10 home runs over the season’s final series, my endorsement of Cabrera would not change.

 

Next, I will neither embrace nor reject the use of advanced metrics in deciding the award. I like most advanced metrics and the conclusions that they can help to lead us to. I’ll also acknowledge however that the MVP is a subjective award. That’s why it’s put to a vote. Sabermetrics aren’t and shouldn’t be the entirety of the MVP debate, or there’d be no debate at all. In fact the inclusion of “valuable” in the title instead of  “outstanding” for example, invites a further level of subjectivity. What is the definition of valuable? We could simply rename the award the “Warlord Award” and hand it to Trout. Heck, we could just call it the aWARd. While embracing the wave of new age data however, I’ll also suggest that I’m not convinced that the formulas are perfect, and that not all metrics are created equally.

 

Defensive metrics are a part of everyone’s WAR calculations, but seem to differ (sometimes greatly) depending on which saber community you subscribe to. There’s no question that Mike Trout is a batter defender than Miguel Cabrera, but by how much is largely debatable. It’s also somewhat debatable whether defensive metrics are being given the right amount of weight in the WAR calculation.

 

Comparing a center fielder to a third baseman should be seen as an apples-to-oranges type of proposition. Not only are the numbers of typical opportunities at those positions widely divergent, but so are the types of opportunities. Balls hit to a third baseman are basically his alone to get. He’ll either make a play on them or he won’t and the stats will reflect the runs above or below average that he’s allowing as a result of those efforts. By contrast, balls hit to a centerfielder aren’t always his alone to get. A particularly rangy centerfielder will have the opportunity to get to a number of balls that could be fielded by other players. Calling players off and increasing his own zone ratings as a result are impressive, but not necessarily run saving. In other words, some of the balls that Mike Trout gets to wouldn’t be caught by other centerfielders, but would still be caught on other teams by fielders at different positions. This seems to give a CF like Trout an inordinate advantage in padding his “runs saved” stats.

 

More importantly, if we’re going to penalize Cabrera for being a bad 3rd baseman, we also have to understand the circumstances that landed him there. Cabrera wasn’t a “plus defensive” first baseman either, but he was at least better playing first than he is at third, and also would have gotten the benefit of first base being a less important defensive position. Still, to penalize him for embracing third base for the good of the team and in order to facilitate the Tigers working Prince Fielder into the lineup seems at least moderately unfair. Instead of comparing these players run-for-run and since we’re only looking at two guys, let’s instead consider their specific circumstances.

Comments (1)