Tag Archive | "MSA"

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Ravens receive environmental recognition for stadium

Posted on 19 November 2013 by WNST Staff

RAVENS AND MARYLAND STADIUM AUTHORITY RECOGNIZED

The Baltimore Ravens, in partnership with the Maryland Stadium Authority (MSA), have earned a LEED-certified “Gold” designation for M&T Bank Stadium from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). (LEED is Leadership inEnergy and Environmental Design. LEED strives to deliver energy- and water-efficient, healthy, environmentally-friendly, cost-saving buildings, homes and communities.)

M&T Bank Stadium becomes the first existing outdoor professional sports facility in the United States – including all NFL and Major League Baseball stadiums – to receive USGBC’s Gold rating. A LEED certification is recognized across the globe as the premier mark of achievement in green building.

“I’m pleased to celebrate the LEED-certified Gold designation with our World Champions,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “Working together, we’re meeting some of the most ambitious energy reduction goals in the nation, fostering innovation and job creation that will lead to a better, more sustainable future for our children.”

“In conjunction with and support from the Maryland Stadium Authority, the Ravens wanted to step forward as a leader in the stadium industry by pushing the envelope with efficiency and sustainability,” Ravens president Dick Cass said. “Our staff, headed by Roy Sommerhof [Ravens vice president of stadium operations], used creative strategies that produced significant energy and maintenance efficiencies and cost savings.

“One of the highlights of this effort was the cooperation we received from the MSA staff, its workers, our partners and our vendors while implementing these green and sustainability programs,” Cass added.

Some of the major sustainability projects at M&T Bank Stadium highlighted by LEED include:

  • ·       43% water reduction with the installation of over 400 waterless urinals
  • ·       27% above the national average in energy efficiency
  • ·       Offset 123,070 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions
  • ·       Electricity at the stadium has been reduced from 15,952,984 kilowatt hours in 2005 to 10,881,579 in 2012, a savings of 5,071,405 kilowatt hours. (That savings can heat about 440 homes for a year.)
  • ·       71% of regularly occupied spaces have access to outdoor views

“One of the benefits of these efforts and this recognition is that the Ravens and the MSA set a standard for existing stadiums, allowing us to help educate the public about the importance of retrofitting existing structures to help the environment,” Sommerhof explained.

Maryland Stadium Authority chairman John Morton III noted: “Achieving LEED status does more than showcase our commitment to the environment. This standard of excellence enhances the value of our stadium. For many sports and entertainment entities, sustainability is a key factor in selecting venues. This designation improves our chances to attract these events.”

“We congratulate the Maryland Stadium Authority and the Baltimore Ravens on the significant accomplishment of becoming the first LEED Gold certified football stadium in the country,” said Rick Fedrizzi, president/CEO and founding chair of USGBC. “Under Governor O’Malley’s leadership, the state of Maryland has and continues to be a leader in sustainable building, with this certification being an impressive example. The Maryland Stadium Authority and Ravens are pushing forward an important mission toward healthier, energy-saving stadiums that we hope to see replicated throughout the world.”

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell offered his thoughts on the Ravens’ involvement: “The Ravens attempt to set a standard in everything they do, both on and off the field. Working hard to stay green and sustainable at M&T Bank Stadium is another example of the Ravens doing the right thing in their community at a consistently high level.”

Among the efforts at M&T Bank Stadium that helped earn the Gold recognition from LEED are:

1.        The stadium recycles 31% of its regular waste and is working to increase this percentage.

2.        The stadium saves over 3 million gallons of water per year with waterless urinals and water-efficient restroom fixtures throughout the building.

3.        All purchases for M&T Bank Stadium follow the Sustainable Purchasing Policy to include recycled, renewable and Energy Star-labeled products for the building.

4.        The stadium implements a “Green Cleaning” program that improves air quality and reduces waste with green cleaning products and materials.

5.        Both the Ravens and Maryland Stadium Authority encourage the use of public and alternative transportation to stadium events. 10% of Ravens fans use the MTA Light Rail service to travel to and from games. Another 2% use buses through the “Ravens Ride” program.

6.        38% of M&T Bank Stadium staff use alternative transportation to work, contributing to the stadium’s carbon footprint reduction of 123,070 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year.

7.        The stadium’s efficient irrigation system and adaptive vegetation reduces 30% of its potable water for outside irrigation.

8.        Environmentally friendly operations and maintenance programs are used in all pest, landscape and hardscape management programs for the stadium.

Along with the LEED designation, the USGBC presents a plaque saluting this honor. The plaque will be placed prominently at M&T Bank Stadium.

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On Halloween weekend, perhaps it’s fitting to have a schedule-gate horror sequel

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On Halloween weekend, perhaps it’s fitting to have a schedule-gate horror sequel

Posted on 02 November 2013 by Glenn Clark

The Ravens’ Super Bowl XLVII will obviously go down as the biggest sports story of 2013 here in Baltimore. But for those of us who live in Charm City-we truly know the story that has actually been the most discussed.

The Ravens opened on the road in 2013-getting absolutely crushed by the Denver Broncos in the process-due to the fact that the Baltimore Orioles were previously scheduled to play the Chicago White Sox on September 5-a date that was traditionally held for the defending Super Bowl champs to open at home.

The debate that occurred between when the Ravens won the Super Bowl and when they played the Thursday night opener in the Mile High City was one of the historically contentious debates our city has ever seen. Instead of debating what was best for the city, the debate became more about allegiances. The common question was about whether you supported the Ravens or the Orioles-the National Football League or Major League Baseball-and who you thought the bad guys were in the process.

What was so rarely discussed was what was best for Baltimore and what needed to happen to ensure such issues wouldn’t occur moving forward. As I mentioned in a column this March, this issue wasn’t as uncommon as some wanted to paint it. I reported then that the 2012 Baltimore Marathon was dangerously close to being cancelled because the O’s could have ended up hosting Games 1 and 2 of the ALCS had they won the AL East. (They would have still needed to win the ALDS to host the first two games of the Championship Series, but the race would have been cancelled prior to that because of the possibility.)

As I reported in March, the Birds had the power to force such a cancellation because in their lease agreement for the Camden Yards complex with the Maryland Stadium Authority-they have been granted not only the first right to dates available, but they have essentially been granted ALL rights to dates available. They have the exclusive power to decide they want a date for a game (or an event), preventing the Baltimore Ravens or another entity from using the complex.

I told you then this situation wasn’t going anywhere. I told you then this was an issue that needed to be addressed in a bigger picture scope than just adjusting a football game. I wasn’t kidding.

The situation already looms as a factor twice in 2014. The Orioles are scheduled to be home against the Cleveland Indians over Memorial Day weekend-the same weekend the Ravens are scheduled to host the NCAA Lacrosse Final Four at M&T Bank Stadium. Then on Labor Day weekend the Birds are scheduled to be home against the Minnesota Twins-the same weekend Ohio State is scheduled to face Navy at the home of the Ravens. The scheduling complexities of that weekend have already lead to the cancellation of the Grand Prix of Baltimore for at least the next two years if not longer. No solutions have been determined for those events-instead the parties involved appear to simply be hoping those events will work out.

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Schedule-gate 2013: We’re not all going to get everything we want

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Schedule-gate 2013: We’re not all going to get everything we want

Posted on 20 March 2013 by Glenn Clark

“You play games on holidays all the time, including Rosh Hashanah. Just move the game to Wednesday.”  

I’ve talked myself into and out of writing about this about ten times in the last couple of days.

For some reason, a simple issue related to scheduling has turned into a referendum related to singular support of one of Baltimore’s two major professional sports teams. Once again, we’ve drawn a line in the sand and said “either you’re with the Orioles or you’re with the Ravens. No other way around it.”

It reminds me of how most people view social, economical and political issues in this country. You HAVE to support the beliefs of one side of the political spectrum or the other. There’s no room for discourse. Personally, I side sometimes with liberals (I am fully supportive of marriage equality) and other times with conservatives (Rand Paul had every right to know whether or not the President would be willing to kill American citizens on American soil).

Unfortunately, if I were to side with one political party or the other, I would find myself ostracized for not simply toeing the party line. This week has somehow because a week of talking points and finger pointing without any willingness to completely discuss all aspects of the issue and accept there may be a little bit more to be accomplished than playing a blame game.

We know the situation. Because the Ravens won the Super Bowl, the NFL intended to extend to them the recent tradition of opening the following season at home. Unfortunately for the Ravens, the Orioles are scheduled to host the Chicago White Sox at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, making the game an impossibility because the Ravens share the downtown Camden Yards Sports Complex.

Somehow instead of working proactively to try to solve the problem, the two sides have instead reached excruciating levels to make sure the appropriate level of blame was placed in one direction or another.

The bad news for those who have supported the Ravens in this battle is that the people who point this out the holiday hypocrisy are absolutely right to do so. The NFL has claimed the Jewish holiday as the reason they don’t want to move the season opener back to Wednesday, as they did a year ago to not go head to head against President Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention.

Some fans have gone to an extremely ignorant level to make this point. I have stated that personally-I, Glenn Clark, would provide that no league play ANY games on any particular holiday. That’s a one man grandstand and as a caller reminded me this week, “that ship has already sailed.” The league plays on holidays.

New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft made it apparent at the league’s meetings in Phoenix he expected his team to be the opponent in the opener in Charm City. It has lead some to believe that this is simply the league kowtowing to Kraft because he’s Jewish. I’m not really going to even bother responding because the real answer isn’t particularly relevant.

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