Tag Archive | "Naismith Basketball Hall Of Fame"

Gary Williams takes place in Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame

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Gary Williams takes place in Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame

Posted on 09 August 2014 by WNST Staff

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – Former University of Maryland men’s basketball head coach Gary Williams was officially enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Friday night in Springfield, Mass.

“This is the biggest honor you can get as a coach,” Williams said during his induction speech. “I am truly honored to be a member of the [Naismith Memorial Basketball] Hall of Fame.”

Presented by Billy Cunningham, Williams acknowledged many of his former players and his longtime assistant coaches at Maryland: Dave Dickerson, Billy Hahn and Jimmy Patsos.

“Our fans at Maryland always stayed behind us,” Williams said. “I can’t thank our fans, alumni and students enough for all their support over the years. I thought I had a lifetime job at Ohio State, but Maryland called and gave me an education, a chance to play and an opportunity to coach.”

Also selected for induction into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame , Williams is the first coach in history to be selected to both institutions in the same year.

Joining Williams in the Class of 2014 is Immaculata University’s AIAW National Championship teams of the early 1970s, Alonzo Mourning, Nolan Richardson, Mitch Richmond, Bob Leonard, Nat Clifton, Sarunas Marciulionis, Guy Rodgers and David Stern.

To be elected, finalists required 18 of 24 votes from the Honors Committee for election into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.  The addition of the direct elect committees were incorporated into the election process to maintain a strong focus on keeping history on the forefront of the voting procedures and to preserve a balance between two eras of basketball.

Upon returning to the College Park campus in 1989, Gary Williams (Maryland ‘68) led his alma mater’s basketball program from a period of troubled times to an era of national prominence during his 22 seasons at the helm from 1993-2011.

With 14 NCAA Tournament berths in his final 18 seasons, Williams and his staff garnered seven Sweet Sixteen appearances, a pair of consecutive Final Four showings, and the 2002 National Championship – the first of its kind in Maryland basketball history.

After leading the Terrapins to the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title in 2010, Williams was voted the league’s Coach of the Year by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association. It was his second such award, as he was also honored in 2002.

With an all-time record of 461-252 (.646) as Maryland’s head coach, Williams stands as the Terrapins all-time winningest head basketball coach. He passed Charles “Lefty” Driesell, who amassed 348 victories in 18 seasons from 1969 to 1986.

The rise of the Maryland program ran parallel with Williams’ ascent among the most notable in the collegiate coaching fraternity. Williams was one of only five coaches to boast a string of 11 consecutive trips to the NCAA Tournament from 1994-2004. He produced at least 20 wins in a school-record eight straight seasons from 1996-97 to 2003-04.

Williams was heralded as the national and Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year during the Terps’ 2002 championship run.

In 2001, Williams became just the sixth coach since 1980 to direct his alma mater to the Final Four. A year later, he became the first coach since 1974 to guide his alma mater to a national title.

A former Terrapin point guard and 1968 graduate, Williams was a starter under coach Bud Millikan during the 1965, 1966 and 1967 seasons. He was the team captain as a senior and still lists one of his most memorable basketball moments as his experience as a spectator at the 1966 national championship game conducted at Maryland’s legendary Cole Field House, between Texas Western and Kentucky.

Williams was hired by Maryland on June 13, 1989, inheriting a team that had won only nine games the year before and finished in last place in the ACC. Displaying his coaching abilities immediately, he helped the Terps to 19 wins while advancing to the second round of the National Invitation Tournament – and making him the first coach in school history to lead a team into the postseason in his first year.

Williams began his coaching career as a graduate student at Maryland under freshman coach Tom Davis. The 1969 freshman team finished with a 12-4 record as Williams bonded with Davis in a relationship that would serve him well as his coaching career progressed.

After earning a degree in business, he continued his coaching career as an assistant at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J. After one year, he took over as the head coach and guided his first team to a perfect 27-0 record and the state title. Williams has called that season “the ultimate — there wasn’t another game to win.” Upon winning the NCAA West Region championship in 2001, he fondly recalled his championship at Camden as the “only other time I’ve ever got to cut down a net.”

Williams spent one more year at Woodrow Wilson before accepting an invitation from Davis in 1972 to become an assistant at Lafayette College. While an assistant at Lafayette, Williams also served as the head soccer coach. In 1978, Williams accompanied Davis to Boston College. After one year there, Williams became the head coach at American University.

Williams immediately began making his mark at American. His 1981 squad set the still-standing school record for victories with a 24-6 mark, won the East Coast Conference championship, and played in the NIT. Williams was named the district coach of the year.

American returned to postseason play the next season as the Williams-led Eagles went 21-9 and played in the NIT for the second consecutive year. Only once prior to Williams’ arrival had AU attended a postseason tournament, and the Eagles have not returned since. Williams’ four-year record at AU was 72-42.

In 1983, Williams succeeded Davis at Boston College. He was once again an instant success, posting a 25-7 record and leading the Eagles to the regular-season championship of the Big East in his first season. Making his first appearance in the NCAA Tournament, Williams directed the Eagles to the Sweet 16. He finished third in the balloting for national coach of the year, and was honored again as the Eastern Coach of the Year by his peers. He went on to duplicate that NCAA Tournament success again in 1985, leading B.C. back to the Sweet Sixteen.

In 1987, Williams accepted the head coaching job at Ohio State, becoming the 10th basketball coach in that school’s illustrious history. He succeeded Eldon Miller and once again enjoyed success. In three years, the Buckeyes made three postseason appearances. His first squad defeated then-No. 1 and unbeaten Iowa (coached by Tom Davis) in the regular season, in what would be the first of many giant-killings.

During Williams’ three-year term at Ohio State, the Buckeyes defeated a second-ranked Purdue team, perennial power Kansas and highly regarded Big Ten powers Michigan and Illinois. Each of Williams’ three Ohio State teams advanced to postseason play, and he laid the groundwork for the highly successful teams that followed when he left Columbus for College Park.

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Turgeon grateful to see Williams get Hall of Fame recognition

Posted on 08 August 2014 by WNST Staff

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – Maryland Athletics hosted a luncheon Friday afternoon at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame to celebrate Gary Williams’ enshrinement.

Family and friends joined Williams hours prior to the ceremony for a luncheon, which was hosted by Maryland broadcast icon Johnny Holliday.

Director of athletics Kevin Anderson, current men’s basketball coach Mark Turgeon, former Terps standout Walt Williams, assistant coaches Billy Hahn and Dave Dickerson, and Williams’ daughter, Kristen Scott, were also in attendance and shared fond memories of the newest member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

“He’s a Hall of Fame Terp,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “The Maryland family appreciates his commitment, dedication, and love for Maryland basketball and the University.”

Williams, who was also selected for induction into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame, will be the first coach in history to be selected to both storied institutions in the same year.

“The true test of being a great coach is the relationships you develop with your student-athletes,” said head coachMark Turgeon. “It’s great to see him getting the recognition he deserves. This is an outstanding day for the University of Maryland.”

The enshrinement ceremony is scheduled to begin in the Springfield Symphony Hall at 6:30 p.m. and the event will be broadcasted live on NBA TV.

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Williams set to be enshrined in Basketball Hall of Fame Friday

Posted on 07 August 2014 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Former University of Maryland men’s basketball head coach Gary Williams will officially be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Friday, Aug. 8, in Springfield, Mass. The enshrinement ceremony is scheduled to begin in the Springfield Symphony Hall at 6:30 p.m. and the event will be broadcasted live on NBA TV.

Also selected for induction into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame , Williams will be the first coach in history to be selected to both institutions in the same year.

Joining Williams in the Class of 2014 is Immaculata University’s AIAW National Championship teams of the early 1970s, Alonzo Mourning, Nolan Richardson, Mitch Richmond, Bob Leonard, Nat Clifton, Sarunas Marciulionis, Guy Rodgers and David Stern.

To be elected, finalists required 18 of 24 votes from the Honors Committee for election into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.  The addition of the direct elect committees were incorporated into the election process to maintain a strong focus on keeping history on the forefront of the voting procedures and to preserve a balance between two eras of basketball.

Upon returning to the College Park campus in 1989, Gary Williams (Maryland ‘68) led his alma mater’s basketball program from a period of troubled times to an era of national prominence during his 22 seasons at the helm from 1993-2011.

With 14 NCAA Tournament berths in his final 18 seasons, Williams and his staff garnered seven Sweet Sixteen appearances, a pair of consecutive Final Four showings, and the 2002 National Championship – the first of its kind in Maryland basketball history.

After leading the Terrapins to the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title in 2010, Williams was voted the league’s Coach of the Year by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association. It was his second such award, as he was also honored in 2002.

With an all-time record of 461-252 (.646) as Maryland’s head coach, Williams stands as the Terrapins all-time winningest head basketball coach. He passed Charles “Lefty” Driesell, who amassed 348 victories in 18 seasons from 1969 to 1986.

The rise of the Maryland program ran parallel with Williams’ ascent among the most notable in the collegiate coaching fraternity. Williams was one of only five coaches to boast a string of 11 consecutive trips to the NCAA Tournament from 1994-2004. He produced at least 20 wins in a school-record eight straight seasons from 1996-97 to 2003-04.

Williams was heralded as the national and Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year during the Terps’ 2002 championship run.

In 2001, Williams became just the sixth coach since 1980 to direct his alma mater to the Final Four. A year later, he became the first coach since 1974 to guide his alma mater to a national title.

A former Terrapin point guard and 1968 graduate, Williams was a starter under coach Bud Millikan during the 1965, 1966 and 1967 seasons. He was the team captain as a senior and still lists one of his most memorable basketball moments as his experience as a spectator at the 1966 national championship game conducted at Maryland’s legendary Cole Field House, between Texas Western and Kentucky.

Williams was hired by Maryland on June 13, 1989, inheriting a team that had won only nine games the year before and finished in last place in the ACC. Displaying his coaching abilities immediately, he helped the Terps to 19 wins while advancing to the second round of the National Invitation Tournament – and making him the first coach in school history to lead a team into the postseason in his first year.

Williams began his coaching career as a graduate student at Maryland under freshman coach Tom Davis. The 1969 freshman team finished with a 12-4 record as Williams bonded with Davis in a relationship that would serve him well as his coaching career progressed.

After earning a degree in business, he continued his coaching career as an assistant at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J. After one year, he took over as the head coach and guided his first team to a perfect 27-0 record and the state title. Williams has called that season “the ultimate — there wasn’t another game to win.” Upon winning the NCAA West Region championship in 2001, he fondly recalled his championship at Camden as the “only other time I’ve ever got to cut down a net.”

Williams spent one more year at Woodrow Wilson before accepting an invitation from Davis in 1972 to become an assistant at Lafayette College. While an assistant at Lafayette, Williams also served as the head soccer coach. In 1978, Williams accompanied Davis to Boston College. After one year there, Williams became the head coach at American University.

Williams immediately began making his mark at American. His 1981 squad set the still-standing school record for victories with a 24-6 mark, won the East Coast Conference championship, and played in the NIT. Williams was named the district coach of the year.

American returned to postseason play the next season as the Williams-led Eagles went 21-9 and played in the NIT for the second consecutive year. Only once prior to Williams’ arrival had AU attended a postseason tournament, and the Eagles have not returned since. Williams’ four-year record at AU was 72-42.

In 1983, Williams succeeded Davis at Boston College. He was once again an instant success, posting a 25-7 record and leading the Eagles to the regular-season championship of the Big East in his first season. Making his first appearance in the NCAA Tournament, Williams directed the Eagles to the Sweet 16. He finished third in the balloting for national coach of the year, and was honored again as the Eastern Coach of the Year by his peers. He went on to duplicate that NCAA Tournament success again in 1985, leading B.C. back to the Sweet Sixteen.

In 1987, Williams accepted the head coaching job at Ohio State, becoming the 10th basketball coach in that school’s illustrious history. He succeeded Eldon Miller and once again enjoyed success. In three years, the Buckeyes made three postseason appearances. His first squad defeated then-No. 1 and unbeaten Iowa (coached by Tom Davis) in the regular season, in what would be the first of many giant-killings.

During Williams’ three-year term at Ohio State, the Buckeyes defeated a second-ranked Purdue team, perennial power Kansas and highly regarded Big Ten powers Michigan and Illinois. Each of Williams’ three Ohio State teams advanced to postseason play, and he laid the groundwork for the highly successful teams that followed when he left Columbus for College Park.

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

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Top 10 Baseball Distractions

Posted on 05 August 2014 by Glenn Clark

Honorable Mention: WNBA-New York Liberty @ Washington Mystics (Tuesday 7pm from Verizon Center live on Comcast SportsNet/NBA TV), Washington Mystics @ Indiana Fever (Friday 7pm from Indianapolis live on WNBA Live Access), Washington Mystics @ Connecticut Sun (Sunday 4pm from Uncasville, CT live on WNBA Live Access); MLL: Charlotte Hounds @ Chesapeake Bayhawks (Saturday 7pm from Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium live on YouTube); Charm City Roller Girls (Saturday 6:30pm Laurel Ice Gardens)

10. Jim Gaffigan (Saturday 8pm Wolf Trap); Jim Breuer (Friday & Saturday Magooby’s Joke House); Doug Benson (Thursday DC Improv); Baltimore Summer Restaurant Week (Tuesday-Sunday throughout Charm City); Otakon (Friday-Sunday Baltimore Convention Center); Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and “Into The Storm” out in theaters (Friday); Divergent” and “Oculus” available (Tuesday)

Jim Breuer will be appearing on “The Reality Check” Tuesday. We will be discussing this. AT LENGTH.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzIJNG5__8s

Also, don’t go see any other movie until you see Guardians of the Galaxy. I’M NOT KIDDING. I WILL FIND YOU.

9. JD McPherson (Thursday 7pm Canton Waterfront Park); John Legend (Tuesday 8pm Pier Six Pavilion), Slightly Stoopid/Stephen Marley/G. Love & Special Sauce (Thursday 6:30pm Pier Six Pavilion), Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration feat. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra & Warren Haynes (Friday 8pm Pier Six Pavilion), Heart (Saturday 8pm Pier Six Pavilion), Panic! At The Disco/Walk The Moon (Sunday 7:30pm Pier Six Pavilion); David Gray (Thursday 6:30pm Merriweather Post Pavilion); Gavin DeGraw/Matt Nathanson (Sunday 7pm Wolf Trap); Gregg Allman (Tuesday & Wednesday 8pm Rams Head on Stage); Sublime with Rome (Thursday 8pm Fillmore Silver Spring); Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds (Friday 7:30pm Howard Theatre), Project Pat (Saturday 11:30pm Howard Theatre); Presidents of the United States of America (Friday 8pm 9:30 Club); Kenny G (Sunday 7:30pm Birchmere); Jerry Douglas (Tuesday 7:30pm The Hamilton), Carbon Leaf (Saturday 8:30pm The Hamilton); Moonrise Festival feat. Kaskade/DJ Snake/Wacka Flacka Flame (Saturday & Sunday Pimlico Race Course); Godsmack “1000HP” and Shooter Jennings “Don’t Wait Up For George” available (Tuesday)

Go see JD McPherson. You won’t regret it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyMsYMSXO6o

John Legend is married to Chrissy Teigen and it’s the second most impressive thing about him.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyPCD13-LPo

I enjoy the Walk The Moon a bit, friends.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPedH9B8AAE

Can someone buy me a bourbon and a David Gray ticket?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOI4F3fGbzk

(Continued on Page 2…)

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Hall of Famer Cunningham to present Gary Williams for induction

Posted on 04 August 2014 by WNST Staff

SPRINGFIELD, MA – The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced today the list of Hall of Famers who will present for the 2014 Enshrinement Ceremony, presented by Nike, on Friday, August 8th at Springfield Symphony Hall.

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Class of 2014 were asked to select a previous inductee to accompany and present them to their peers. The choice is solely the decision of the incoming Hall of Famer. More than 50 Hall of Famers are expected to be in attendance for this year’s ceremony, including all presenters.
The Class of 2014 inductees includes seven-time NBA All-Star Alonzo Mourning, 1994 NCAA National Champion coach Nolan Richardson, six-time NBA All-Star Mitch Richmond, 2002 NCAA National Champion coach Gary Williams, the three-time AIAW National Championship winning Immaculata University team, the winningest coach in ABA history, Bob Leonard, early African American pioneer of the game Nat Clifton, international superstar Sarunas Marciulionis, four-time NBA All-Star Guy Rodgers and former NBA Commissioner of 30 years David Stern.
2014 Inductees and Presenters
Nolan Richardson, presented by Hall of Fame coach John Thompson (’99) & player Nate Archibald (‘91)
Mitch Richmond, presented by Hall of Fame players Chris Mullin (‘11) & Ralph Sampson (‘12)
Bob Leonard, presented by Hall of Fame players Mel Daniels (‘12) & Larry Bird (‘98)
Immaculata University, presented by Hall of Fame coach Cathy Rush (‘08)
Guy Rodgers, presented by Hall of Fame player Earl Monroe (‘90)
Nat Clifton, presented by Hall of Fame player Meadowlark Lemon (‘03)
Sarunas Marciulionis, presented by Hall of Fame player Chris Mullin (‘11)
Alonzo Mourning, presented by Hall of Fame coaches Pat Riley (‘08) & John Thompson (‘99)
David Stern, presented by Hall of Fame players Larry Bird (‘98), Earvin “Magic” Johnson (‘02), Bob Lanier (‘92) and NBA contributor Russ Granik (‘13)
Gary Williams, presented by Hall of Fame player Billy Cunningham (‘86)

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Maryland AD Anderson on Williams HOF election: “(His) contributions…are unmatched”

Posted on 07 April 2014 by WNST Staff

Williams Elected for Enshrinement in Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Former University of Maryland head coach Gary Williams has been elected for enshrinement in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as announced today. The Class of 2014 will be enshrined during festivities in Springfield, Mass. on Friday, August 8.

“On behalf of the University of Maryland athletics department, we want to congratulate Gary on being selected for induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame,” said Maryland director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “Over the past five decades, Gary’s contributions to the University of Maryland as an alum, player and coach are unmatched. Gary has earned this honor through his unwavering commitment and dedication to the game of basketball. He had the uncanny ability to bring the best out of his players. Gary is an outstanding coach and great friend, whose drive, passion and knowledge of the game have led him to the pinnacle of his profession.”

Selected for induction into National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame last month, Williams will be the first coach in history to be selected to both institutions in the same year. Joining Williams in the Class of 2014 is Immaculata University’s AIAW National Championship teams of the early 1970s, Alonzo Mourning, Nolan Richardson, Mitch Richmond, Bob Leonard, Nat Clifton, Sarunas Marciulionis, Guy Rodgers and David Stern.

To be elected, finalists required 18 of 24 votes from the Honors Committee for election into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.  The addition of the direct elect committees were incorporated into the election process to maintain a strong focus on keeping history on the forefront of the voting procedures and to preserve a balance between two eras of basketball.

“Gary Williams is an icon not only here at the University of Maryland, but for all of college basketball,” said Wallace D. Loh, President.  “I congratulate Coach Williams on this much-deserved honor and I celebrate this moment with Terp alumni and fans all over the world.”

Upon returning to the College Park campus in 1989, Gary Williams (Maryland ‘68) led his alma mater’s basketball program from a period of troubled times to an era of national prominence during his 22 seasons at the helm from 1993-2011.

With 14 NCAA Tournament berths in his final 18 seasons, Williams and his staff garnered seven Sweet Sixteen appearances, a pair of consecutive Final Four showings, and the 2002 National Championship – the first of its kind in Maryland basketball history.

“I want to congratulate Gary on this prestigious honor,” said current Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon. “Gary is as respected as they come in the coaching profession. He won at every level, did things the right way and will be recognized as one of the all-time greats in our profession. His record and championship pedigree speak for themselves.”

After leading the Terrapins to the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title in 2010, Williams was voted the league’s Coach of the Year by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association. It was his second such award, as he was also honored in 2002.

With an all-time record of 461-252 (.646) as Maryland’s head coach, Williams stands as the Terrapins all-time winningest head basketball coach. He passed Charles “Lefty” Driesell, who amassed 348 victories in 18 seasons from 1969 to 1986.

The rise of the Maryland program ran parallel with Williams’ ascent among the most notable in the collegiate coaching fraternity. Williams was one of only five coaches to boast a string of 11 consecutive trips to the NCAA Tournament from 1994-2004. He produced at least 20 wins in a school-record eight straight seasons from 1996-97 to 2003-04.

Williams was heralded as the national and Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year during the Terps’ 2002 championship run.

In 2001, Williams became just the sixth coach since 1980 to direct his alma mater to the Final Four. A year later, he became the first coach since 1974 to guide his alma mater to a national title.

A former Terrapin point guard and 1968 graduate, Williams was a starter under coach Bud Millikan during the 1965, 1966 and 1967 seasons. He was the team captain as a senior and still lists one of his most memorable basketball moments as his experience as a spectator at the 1966 national championship game conducted at Maryland’s legendary Cole Field House, between Texas Western and Kentucky.

Williams was hired by Maryland on June 13, 1989, inheriting a team that had won only nine games the year before and finished in last place in the ACC. Displaying his coaching abilities immediately, he helped the Terps to 19 wins while advancing to the second round of the National Invitation Tournament – and making him the first coach in school history to lead a team into the postseason in his first year.

Williams began his coaching career as a graduate student at Maryland under freshman coach Tom Davis. The 1969 freshman team finished with a 12-4 record as Williams bonded with Davis in a relationship that would serve him well as his coaching career progressed.

After earning a degree in business, he continued his coaching career as an assistant at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J. After one year, he took over as the head coach and guided his first team to a perfect 27-0 record and the state title. Williams has called that season “the ultimate — there wasn’t another game to win.” Upon winning the NCAA West Region championship in 2001, he fondly recalled his championship at Camden as the “only other time I’ve ever got to cut down a net.”

Williams spent one more year at Woodrow Wilson before accepting an invitation from Davis in 1972 to become an assistant at Lafayette College. While an assistant at Lafayette, Williams also served as the head soccer coach. In 1978, Williams accompanied Davis to Boston College. After one year there, Williams became the head coach at American University.

Williams immediately began making his mark at American. His 1981 squad set the still-standing school record for victories with a 24-6 mark, won the East Coast Conference championship, and played in the NIT. Williams was named the district coach of the year.

American returned to postseason play the next season as the Williams-led Eagles went 21-9 and played in the NIT for the second consecutive year. Only once prior to Williams’ arrival had AU attended a postseason tournament, and the Eagles have not returned since. Williams’ four-year record at AU was 72-42.

In 1983, Williams succeeded Davis at Boston College. He was once again an instant success, posting a 25-7 record and leading the Eagles to the regular-season championship of the Big East in his first season. Making his first appearance in the NCAA Tournament, Williams directed the Eagles to the Sweet 16. He finished third in the balloting for national coach of the year, and was honored again as the Eastern Coach of the Year by his peers. He went on to duplicate that NCAA Tournament success again in 1985, leading B.C. back to the Sweet Sixteen.

In 1987, Williams accepted the head coaching job at Ohio State, becoming the 10th basketball coach in that school’s illustrious history. He succeeded Eldon Miller and once again enjoyed success. In three years, the Buckeyes made three postseason appearances. His first squad defeated then-No. 1 and unbeaten Iowa (coached by Tom Davis) in the regular season, in what would be the first of many giant-killings.

During Williams’ three-year term at Ohio State, the Buckeyes defeated a second-ranked Purdue team, perennial power Kansas and highly regarded Big Ten powers Michigan and Illinois. Each of Williams’ three Ohio State teams advanced to postseason play, and he laid the groundwork for the highly successful teams that followed when he left Columbus for College Park.

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Former Terps coach Williams elected to Naismith Hall of Fame

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Former Terps coach Williams elected to Naismith Hall of Fame

Posted on 05 April 2014 by WNST Staff

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Gary Williams among ten finalists for Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame

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Gary Williams among ten finalists for Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame

Posted on 14 February 2014 by WNST Staff

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Announces Ten Finalists for 2014 Election

Friday, February 14, 2014

First-Time Finalists include seven-time NBA All-Star Alonzo Mourning and ’94 NABC Coach of the Year Nolan Richardson

NEW ORLEANS, LA and SPRINGFIELD, MA – The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced today, at NBA All-Star Weekend, eight elite players, coaches and one team as finalists from the North American and Women’s committees to be considered for election in 2014.  Hall of Fame finalist recognition is a career highlight for many in the sport of basketball.  This year’s list includes six first-time finalists: three-time NBA All-Star Kevin Johnson, seven-time NBA All-Star Alonzo Mourning and 1994 Naismith, NABC Coach of the Year Nolan Richardson, four-time National Coach of the Year Eddie Sutton, NCAA National Championship coach Gary Williams and Immaculata University’s AIAW National Championship teams of the early 1970s.  Previous finalists included again this year for consideration are five-time NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway, four-time NBA All-Star Spencer Haywood, six-time AAU National Champion Coach Harley Redin and six-time NBA All-Star Mitch Richmond. The Class of 2014 will be unveiled at the NCAA Final Four in April.

“We are proud to present a distinguished group of finalists for the Class of 2014 who have made huge strides in the game of basketball,” said Jerry Colangelo, Chairman of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.  “Each finalist has made a difference to the game in their own way.  It’s not going to be easy for the Honors Committee to select the final class members.”

Also announced today are five Direct Elects who are the initial members of the Class of 2014.  They include Bob Leonard voted in from the American Basketball Association (ABA) Committee, Nat Clifton from the Early African American Pioneers Committee, Sarunas Marciulionis from the International Committee, Guy Rodgers from the Veterans Committee and David Stern from the Contributor Direct Election Committee.

The complete list of eight finalists from the North American Screening Committee include: players Tim Hardaway, Spencer Haywood, Kevin Johnson, Alonzo Mourning, Mitch Richmond and coaches Nolan Richardson, Eddie Sutton and Gary Williams. From the Women’s Screening Committee: Harley Redin and Immaculata University.

The Class of 2014 will be announced on Monday, April 7 at a press conference in North Texas prior to the NCAA Men’s Championship game.  A finalist needs 18 of 24 votes from the Honors Committee for election into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.  The Class of 2014 will be enshrined during festivities in Springfield, Mass. in August.

Women’s Committee Finalists:

HARLEY REDIN [Coach] – Redin, compiled an overall women’s record of 431-66 (.867) capturing six AAU National Championships (1956, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1970, 1971). Leading Wayland Baptist to two undefeated women’s season (1956, 2957), 17 top five finishes and went 110-2 during his first four seasons at Wayland Baptist. He coached the Women’s US National Team in 1959, the 1971 Pan-American Games, and the 1963 World Tournament in Peru. Redin is also a member of the US Olympic Committee and the AAU Rules Committee. He was the recipient of the Jostens-Berenson Service Award by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association for his lifetime of service to women’s basketball (1992) and the recipient of the Naismith Award for Outstanding Contribution to the game of women’s basketball (2000). Redin was named #42 in Sports Illustrated 50 Greatest Sports Figure from Texas.

IMMACULATA UNIVERSITY [Team] – Coached by Hall of Famer Cathy Rush, Immaculata University won three straight AIAW National Championships (1972-74), compiling an overall record of 60-2 in three seasons. They were the first women’s college team to play in a nationally televised game, play at Madison Square Garden and to play in Australia. The roster included some of the nation’s best women’s basketball players including: Theresa Shank, who was a three-time All American recording 1,167 points and 952 rebounds in her career, Marianne Crawford, who was a two-time Kodak All- America also recording 747 points and 544 assists and Mary Scharff, who was a Kodak All-American recording 1,235 points and 583 rebounds in her career. All three ladies were inducted into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame.

North American Committee Finalists:

TIM HARDAWAY [Player] – A 2000 Olympic Gold Medalist, Hardaway played 13 NBA seasons scoring a total of 15,373 points while averaging more than 20 points per game for four consecutive seasons.  He is the 1990 recipient of the Jack McMahon Award for most inspirational player and a 1993 All-NBA Third Team member.  He currently ranks thirteenth in NBA history with 7,095 career assists and 1,542 career three-point field goals.  The Chicago, Ill. native was a member of the men’s basketball at the University of Texas at El Paso (1985-1989) and played in the NBA from 1989-2003.  He is known for making his signature move – the “UTEP Two-step” – famous in 1989, the same year he was named WAC Player of the Year.

SPENCER HAYWOOD [Player] – Haywood joined the ABA in 1969 and then went on to play for 12 years in the NBA (1970-1983), where he scored 14,592 points, had 7,038 rebounds and won a National Championship with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1980.  He is a four-time NBA All-Star (1972-1975) and two-time All-NBA First Team member (1973, 1974).  Haywood was the leading scorer on the 1968 gold medal United States Olympic team.  During his time with the ABA’s Denver Nuggets, he was named ABA Rookie of the Year and ABA All Star Game MVP.  He holds ABA single season records for most minutes played (3,808), most field goals made (986), most rebounds (1,637) and highest rebounding average (19.5).  At the University of Detroit, he received a unanimous First Team All-America selection in 1969.

KEVIN JOHNSON [Player] – Johnson is the first player to have his jersey retired at the University of California.  After playing for Cal from 1983-1987 he played for 12 years in the NBA and holds the NBA Finals single-game record for most minutes played with 62.  Johnson is the first player in NBA history to average at least 20 points, 10 assists, a .500 field goal percentage and two steals per game for an entire season.  In 1989, he earned the NBA Most Improved Player award.  The three-time NBA All-Star (1990, 1991, 1994) is also an All-NBA Second Team member (1989, 1990, 1991, 1994) and an All-NBA Third Team member (1992).  Now the mayor of his hometown of Sacramento, CA, Johnson was a major advocate of keeping the Sacramento Kings NBA team in the city when it was at high risk of moving.

ALONZO MOURNING [Player] – Mourning was a seven-time NBA All-Star (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002) and a member of the Miami Heat NBA Championship team in 2006.  He is a two-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year (1999, 2000) and a two-time NBA All-Defensive First Team member (1999, 2000).  He led the NBA in blocked shots (1998-99, 1999-2000) and blocks per game (1998-99, 1999-2000) and earned an NBA All Rookie Team recognition in 1993.  The Chesapeake, Virginia native attended Georgetown University (1988-1992) and played in the NBA from 1993 until 2008 and the all-time leader in blocks for the Miami Heat with 1,625.

NOLAN RICHARDSON [Coach] – The 1994 Naismith and NABC Coach of the Year, Richardson led the University of Arkansas to the 1994 National Championship and to three Final Four appearances (1990, 1994, 1995).  Richardson is an enshrinee in the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame and the Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.  He was the 1998 SEC Coach of the Year and led Tulsa to an NIT championship in 1981 and Western Texas to a NJCCA national championship in 1980.  Richardson compiled a collegiate coaching record of 509-207 (.711).

MITCH RICHMOND [Player] – A six-time NBA All-Star, Richmond is a 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist, 1988 Olympic Bronze Medalist and won the 2002 NBA Championship with the Los Angeles Lakers.  At the beginning of his NBA career he became a part of the Golden State Warriors’ famous “RUN TMC” attack.  Richmond is the 1995 NBA All-Star Game MVP, the 1989 NBA Rookie of the Year and a two-time All-NBA Third Team member (1996, 1998).  He scored 20,497 points and averaged more than 21 points per game for ten consecuive seasons in the NBA.  At Kansas State University, he averaged 20.7 points and 6.0 rebounds per game and was UPI, The Sporting News and USBWA Second Team All-America in 1988.

EDDIE SUTTON [Coach] – The four-time National Coach of the Year (1977, 1978, 1986, 1995) and eight-time Conference Coach of the Year (1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1986, 1993, 1998, 2004) is the first coach in NCAA history to lead four different schools in the NCAA Tournament.  Sutton currently ranks eighth among Division I coaches in all-time victories and has recorded only one losing season in 37 years of coaching (1989).  He coached Oklahoma State University from 1991-2006 and ties the conference record for wins by a first-year coach with 24.  He guided his teams to three Final Fours, six Elite Eights and 12 Sweet Sixteens.

GARY WILLIAMS [Coach] – As head coach of the University of Maryland from 1990-2011, Williams led the team to 11 consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances (1994-2004), a National Championship in 2002, an ACC Tournament championship in 2004 and was enshrined into the University of Maryland Sports Hall of Fame and University of Maryland Alumni Hall of Fame. Williams was named Coach of the Year from Basketball America, Playboy, CBSsportsline.com, District and the ACC.  He compiled an overall coaching record of 668-380 (.637) and led his teams to seven 25-win seasons and 22 appearances in postseason play.

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