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Ravens do not select immediate starter – Draft Grade “C”

Posted on 28 April 2017 by Dennis Koulatsos

When it came time for the Ravens to make their selection in the 2017 NFL Draft, there were 2 Alabama players that were in the top 10 in most of the mock drafts.  In fact defensive tackle Jonathan Allen was a consensus top 5 pick, while talented but troubled middle linebacker Reuben Foster was a lock as a top 10 pick.

Foster had an incident at the combine with a medical staff member, and a couple of days before the draft a story broke out that his combine drug screen specimen had come back diluted.  This is why he was still there at 16, and didn’t come off of the board until the 49ers picked at 31.  He also had a history of injuries, but I thought for sure Foster would have been a Raven this morning.  He is the closest thing I’ve seen on tape to one Ray Lewis.  I know it’s a lofty comparison, and only time will tell who got the best of this deal.

Allen has some arthritic shoulder concerns, and he slid to Washington one pick after the Ravens took Marlon Humphrey, a talented cornerback from Alabama who should become an eventual starter.  And that’s what I have come concerns with, to say the least.

For a team that has to win now, I do not know why they wouldn’t draft a player that could potentially start right away.  As long as Jimmy Smith and Brandon Carr are healthy, Humphrey will not start, at least not this year.  Tavon Young played on the outside last year, particularly when Jimmy Smith was lost to injury, but at 5’9″ he’s more suited to play inside in the nickel and dime packages, and cover slot receivers. He is height challenged and that limits him from playing on an island.

The Ravens certainly needed depth at cornerback, and this is one of the deepest drafts at that position in the last decade.  There’s going to be great value there in rounds 2-4, and that’s where the Ravens should have found their eventual starter at cornerback.  In fact, the two corners from the University of Florida quickly come to mind.  Teez Tabor or Quincy Wilson would have been solid second round picks for the Ravens, and they may have even more upside than Humphrey.

Humphrey does check all of the boxes in terms of character, health, etc.  He even has an NFL pedigree as his father was former Dolphins running back Bobby Humphrey.  He has all of the necessary physical tools and may develop into a shutdown corner. However there are some concerns.  He doesn’t have long speed, doesn’t track the ball well in the air, and he may be better suited to play safety as he is at his best when things are right in front of him.

Now I get that the draft isn’t nowhere near over, and that the Ravens still have 6 picks left. But this is a team that finished 8-8 and lost a starter at WR (Steve Smith), RT (Rick Wagner), C (Jeremy Zuttah), ILB (Zach Orr), and Edge (Elvis Dumervil).  You’d think they would address one of these positions with their first pick.  The receivers came flying off of the board, and in my opinion it wouldn’t have made sense for the Ravens to have traded up for any of them, particularly with the glut of defensive talent that was sliding down to them.

This is a draft that is extremely short of starting quality receivers and offensive linemen, and although there wasn’t a run on 0-linemen, 3 receivers went in the top 9 picks.  This is also a draft that is deep in cornerbacks and edge rushers, and that is precisely why there was no need to take a player at either position at 16. Nothing but the old Economics 101 rule of supply and demand in process here.

Two tackles went in the first round, Garrett Bolles from Utah to the Broncos at 20, and Ryan Ramczyk to the Seahawks at 32.  Both could have started at right tackle for the Ravens on opening day.  Ozzie Newsome said they had fielded some calls to trade back, but they really liked Humphrey and kept the pick. I don’t know what the offers were, but if faced with picking Humphrey or trading back, I would have traded back and picked up one of these two tackles, or Forrest Lamp out of Western Kentucky.

Yesterday I heard former Ravens Director of Personnel and Browns General Manager Phil Savage say that a team should never draft a guard in the first round.  I couldn’t disagree more with that statement. Marshal Yanda blows that theory right out of the water.  Here is a potential Hall of Fame guard, who has played center as well as right tackle at a high level when called upon.  I guarantee you if we went back a decade and redrafted that class, Marshal Yanda would be selected a lot higher than the third round that he went in.  He would have been a top 5 choice for sure.

That is why the Ravens should have traded back for Lamp.  Lamp  is a left guard and would have been great right next to Ronnie Stanley.  I don’t think he drops to 47 today, and I do not think the Ravens will trade up for him – although they absolutely should.  As a left guard he could slide to left tackle in the event that Ronnie Stanley suffered an injury.  There is a dramatic difference with which side an offensive lineman plays on.  The footwork is different. It’s akin to being right handed and holding a fork with you right hand, then switching to the left to eat.

Lamp could play all 3 offensive line positions, and would be a day one starter at guard or center, and possibly even right tackle.  And he would have filled the need created by departed starter Rick Wagner.  Maybe he could have played left guard and Alex Lewis right tackle.  I don’t know. All I know is that if I was making the pick, I would have taken Foster, and if I had traded back, I would have taken Foster or an offensive lineman. Either way I would have selected a player that could start immediately.

The Ravens still own pick 47 in the second round, and picks 74 and 78 in the third round.  Hopefully they can select players that can start from day one – they’re out there.  As a die hard Ravens fan I always wish them the best, but when it comes to analyzing their moves I do take off my purple colored glasses, and I cease drinking the purple Kool-Aid.

I also want to address the notion that somehow Ozzie Newsome gets some “inside information” or “information that no one else does” from the Alabama coaching staff simply because he is a highly decorated alumni.  The Ravens have drafted exactly 7 players since the franchise’s inception in 1996.  They are DB Ralph Staten, TE Terry Jones, LB Jarrett Johnson, FB Le’Ron McClain, DT Terrence Cody, LB Courtney Upshaw, and LB CJ Mosley.

From that group McClain made 2 Pro Bowls and Mosley has made 1 so far. Off of the top of my head Staten was talented but had some serious off-field problems, Jones was a nice guy 3rd tight end type, JJ was a solid player, McClain flashed for a bit before going to KC, Cody was drafted in 2010 and he is out of football, Upshaw was a decent player but has never lived up to his draft position, and it looks like Mosley has a bright future.  I don’t see where Newsome’s Alabama picks have shined.

Furthermore, a couple of years ago Nick Saban publicly proclaimed that Landon Collins was “the best DB he had ever coached.”  He was counting safeties and corners in that group.  You’d think the Ravens would have been paying attention! Not only did Collins slide down the draft board, but the Giants traded up to get him with the very first pick of the second round.  After an uneven rookie season, Collins has developed into a Pro Bowl safety, who would have looked awfully good in a Ravens uniform. So much for Newsome’s perceived “inside information.”

I think Humphrey has a chance to be a solid NFL starter.  I understand that the team still needed a young corner due to Jimmy Smith’s recent inability to stay healthy.  In a draft full of quality corners, I thought they could have waited and selected one in a later round. They found Tavon Young in the fourth round last year, pick #104.  They could have drafted a quality corner at 47, 74 or 78.  That’s why I have a bit of heartburn today.  They absolutely passed on a day one starting caliber middle linebacker and offensive lineman.

 

 

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Ravens choose depth, upside over immediate need by picking Humphrey

Posted on 28 April 2017 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — For years, the Ravens didn’t invest much in the cornerback position.

Since taking Jimmy Smith in the first round of the 2011 draft, Baltimore hadn’t selected a corner before the fourth round in five consecutive drafts, instead going with late-round projects and cheap veteran band-aids to fill out the depth chart behind the injury-prone Smith and a declining Lardarius Webb. The strategy resulted in the secondary remaining an annual weakness as the likes of Chykie Brown, Asa Jackson, Kyle Arrington, Jerraud Powers, and Shareece Wright were asked to fill meaningful roles at one time or another.

That’s why I can’t be too critical of general manager Ozzie Newsome’s decision to take Alabama cornerback Marlon Humphrey with the 16th overall pick of the 2017 draft on Thursday night. At six feet and 197 pounds, Humphrey’s upside as an outside corner is obvious as he’s only 20 years old and played at a high level for the best program in the nation over the last two seasons. But talent evaluators acknowledge his raw technique and struggles defending the deep ball with a few even wondering if he’s better suited to play safety at the next level. That’s not exactly a dream endorsement for your newly-branded first-round cornerback.

In other words, it’s far from a sure thing that Humphrey will be a starter in 2017, especially with the free-agent acquisition of reliable veteran Brandon Carr last month. There would be no shame in that, of course, as plenty of talented cornerbacks didn’t start as rookies.

There’s no disputing that the secondary is loaded, but did the Ravens maximize their value when you consider their bigger needs and the other highly-rated prospects who remained on the board?

If we’re sticking with Newsome’s Alabama connection alone, defensive end Jonathan Allen and inside linebacker Reuben Foster would have been slam-dunk Week 1 starters and tight end O.J. Howard could have been a much-needed play-maker for quarterback Joe Flacco. Pass rushers such as Takkarist McKinley, Taco Charlton, Charles Harris, and T.J. Watt were also on the board.

Of course, the top three wide receivers were snatched up long before the Ravens were on the clock, but the offensive line also has major holes to be filled.

Would they have been better served grabbing a talent at one of these other positions and waiting to take a cornerback with this draft considered so deep at the position?

Newsome acknowledged Thursday night that the Ravens took calls from teams wanting to move up to the 16th spot, but the proposed returns weren’t appealing enough for him to make a deal. Humphrey was certainly a consensus first-round pick, but it may not have been out of the question to still land him later in the round while picking up an extra pick or two to use in a deep draft.

When the Ravens had better overall rosters five or six years ago, the addition of Humphrey would have been praised as a luxury pick with huge upside. But a team needing immediate help at multiple positions may not feel a great impact from him in his rookie season, putting even more pressure on Newsome to nail his three Day 2 picks.

Humphrey may prove to be a terrific cornerback, but the Ravens drafted for depth and upside instead of filling a more pressing need. It’s an interesting choice for a franchise at a crossroads after missing the playoffs in three of the last four years.

Time will tell whether it works out.

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Possibilities wide open for Ravens in 2017 draft

Posted on 26 April 2017 by Luke Jones

Despite months of mock drafts, workouts, visits, and rumors, anyone invested in the Ravens is still asking the same question with the 2017 NFL draft nearly upon us.

Who will they take with the 16th overall pick?

Frankly, I don’t think the Ravens even have a good idea this year.

There’s always volatility when 15 other players are to be picked before you’re officially on the clock, especially in a year when there are no slam-dunk quarterbacks at the top of the board. Even last year when the Ravens were picking sixth, how many correctly predicted that they would select left tackle Ronnie Stanley? Even fewer thought the then-San Diego Chargers would take edge rusher Joey Bosa with the No. 3 pick, illustrating how little truthful information most teams give away to outsiders.

Adding to that unpredictability is a deep talent pool lacking clear definition beyond the top few projected selections. Ask 15 different draft experts to rank the No. 6 through No. 25 prospects in order and you’ll likely find less common ground than in typical years. That’s not a bad thing with many considering this the deepest collection of talent in a number of years, but predicting who might be there in the middle of the first round feels even more like a guessing game than usual.

It’s no secret that the Ravens have a number of pressing needs, which is both a blessing and a curse. Needing immediate help on the offensive line and at wide receiver, edge rusher, and inside linebacker and still wanting to enhance its depth at cornerback, Baltimore should have no reason to reach for a prospect over the first few rounds. Of course, that lengthy list of needs also reflects an incomplete roster and a lack of success since Super Bowl XLVII, making it even more important that the Ravens build on their encouraging 2016 draft with another strong class.

Their list of reported visits and meetings reflects those aforementioned needs and offers possible clues, but I’m reluctant to put too much stock into those encounters. It was only last year that the Ravens drafted Boise State linebacker Kamalei Correa after spending a total of 15 minutes with him at the scouting combine and never contacting him again until he was selected in the second round two months later.

Trading back in the first round would hardly be the sexiest development on Thursday night, but it could be the best one in a year when the Ravens have only seven scheduled picks. The problem could be finding a partner wanting to move up as reports this week have indicated that a number of teams are looking to trade back to take better advantage of a deep talent pool. As is typically the case, movement will likely depend on the fascination with the top three or four quarterbacks.

Because I’ve been asked, my official guess prediction is that the Ravens select Western Michigan wide receiver Corey Davis with the 16th overall pick, which probably means 10 other prospects are now more likely to be taken there. His skill set as an intermediate receiver is exactly what Joe Flacco and the passing game need, and his familiarity with Flacco’s brother, Tom, from college also makes for a fun story.

It also didn’t go unnoticed at the pre-draft press conference earlier this month that Eric DeCosta barely made mention of Davis when discussing the top receivers, instead talking more about Mike Williams of Clemson and John Ross of Washington. With Davis then taking an official visit a couple weeks later, was that perceived lack of interest a bit of a smoke screen from the assistant general manager?

If the Ravens do stay put at No. 16, there should be at least a few really good prospects staring them in the face, regardless of how the first 15 picks play out.

If they’re convinced that Davis — or Williams — will be that true impact receiver that the offense needs, they shouldn’t waste time turning in their card, regardless of their rough draft history at the position.

If Derek Barnett or Takkarist McKinley feels like the successor to Terrell Suggs, then go for it.

If they see Temple’s Haason Reddick as a dynamic linebacker, draft him and then carve out a flexible role to best utilize his talents.

And with this draft class not having good offensive line depth, the Ravens shouldn’t dismiss taking Cam Robinson if he can immediately be a stud right tackle or Forrest Lamp if they’re convinced that he’s the next Marshal Yanda. Protecting Flacco and improving the running game are too important to this team’s success to pass up the right offensive line prospect in the right spot.

In other words, there can be more than one right answer for the Ravens at 16th overall.

General manager Ozzie Newsome and the Ravens just can’t afford to be wrong.

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Ravens to play three prime-time games as part of 2017 schedule

Posted on 20 April 2017 by Luke Jones

A 2017 schedule that includes the Ravens’ first ever trip to London will feature three prime-time games in the regular season.

After playing 11 of their last 12 Monday night contests on the road, the Ravens will finally welcome ESPN’s national telecast back to M&T Bank Stadium for a meeting with the Houston Texans on Nov. 27. This marks the first time since the 2012 opener that the Ravens have had a Monday home game, and it’s only the second one of the John Harbaugh era.

The Ravens will host Miami for a Thursday night game on Oct. 26 and will travel to Heinz Field to take on Pittsburgh for their only scheduled appearance on NBC’s Sunday Night Football on Dec. 10. Baltimore will also welcome Indianapolis to town in a nationally-televised Saturday afternoon contest on Dec. 23.

Beginning their 22nd campaign in Baltimore and 20th season at M&T Bank Stadium, the Ravens will open their season in Cincinnati on Sept. 10 and host Cleveland for the home opener on Sept. 17.

It was known months ago that the Ravens would play Jacksonville in London on Sept. 24, and the NFL has granted their wish not to have their bye immediately after that with the Steelers coming to Baltimore on Oct 1. The Ravens will then travel across the country to face Oakland on Oct. 8 to conclude arguably their most challenging stretch of the season.

Their bye will fall in Week 10.

The schedule concludes with two straight home games for the first time in franchise history, which should help Baltimore’s bid to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2014. The Ravens will host the Bengals in Week 17, marking the seventh time in eight years that these AFC North rivals have faced off in the regular-season finale.

The Ravens will play seven games against playoff teams from last season: Pittsburgh (twice), Houston, Miami, Oakland, Green Bay, and Detroit. They have six games against opponents who finished below .500 in 2016: Cincinnati (twice), Cleveland (twice), Jacksonville, and Chicago.

Baltimore’s 2017 opponents had a combined .461 winning percentage last season, which would give them the ninth-easiest schedule in the NFL entering the year. Of course, playing the 1-15 Browns twice skews that percentage a good bit.

For now, 10 of the Ravens’ 16 regular-season games are scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday starts, but many of those games are subject to flexible scheduling (see below).

2017 SCHEDULE

Sunday, Sept. 10 at Cincinnati — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: You mean the Ravens aren’t required by law to conclude every season at Paul Brown Stadium? This marks only the second time in the last seven years that they won’t be in Cincinnati for Week 17. 

Sunday, Sept. 17 vs. Cleveland Browns — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: The Browns have dramatically improved their offensive line, but that only matters so much until Hue Jackson finds the right quarterback to lead his football team. 

Sunday, Sept. 24 at Jacksonville Jaguars (London) — 9:30 a.m. (CBS)
Skinny: Playing the first game in franchise history outside the United States, the Ravens need to be ready to start fast with a breakfast kickoff time back home.

Sunday, Oct. 1 vs. Pittsburgh Steelers — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: The Steelers will once again be the favorite to win the AFC North, but they’ve lost four straight at M&T Bank Stadium with Charlie Batch being the last Pittsburgh quarterback to earn a win in Baltimore.

Sunday, Oct. 8 at Oakland Raiders — 4:05 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: Playing a road game against the young and talented Raiders appears daunting, but it will be interesting to see how Oakland fans respond to a team officially set to move to Las Vegas.

Sunday, Oct. 15 vs. Chicago Bears — 1:00 p.m. (FOX)
Skinny: Pernell McPhee received a huge contract when he left the Ravens, but Chicago pushed him too hard in 2015 and his well-documented knee issues limited him to just nine games last year.

Sunday, Oct. 22 at Minnesota Vikings — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: Brett Favre was the Vikings quarterback when the Ravens last visited Minnesota, but this one will be played at the extravagant U.S. Bank Stadium, which opened last season.

Thursday, Oct. 26 vs. Miami Dolphins — 8:25 p.m. (CBS/NFL Network)
Skinny: The Ravens demolished Miami by 32 points last December, but the Dolphins earned the last laugh by nabbing the final wild card in the AFC and are moving in the right direction.

Sunday, Nov. 5 at Tennessee Titans — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: It’s been a long time since the Titans were relevant, but young quarterback Marcus Mariota looked more and more like the real deal last year while nearly getting his team to the playoffs.

Sunday, Nov. 12 BYE

Sunday, Nov. 19 at Green Bay Packers — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: The Ravens have never won a game at Lambeau Field, and you have to wonder what the weather will be like come the second half of November.

Monday, Nov. 27 vs. Houston Texans — 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Skinny: Bill O’Brien’s team is still a good quarterback away from being a serious contender in the AFC, but his defense was very good even without All-Pro defensive end J.J. Watt last season.

Sunday, Dec. 3 vs. Detroit Lions — 1:00 p.m. (FOX)
Skinny: Former right tackle Rick Wagner and five-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle Haloti Ngata will return to Baltimore for their first regular-season game against the Ravens.

Sunday, Dec. 10 at Pittsburgh Steelers — 8:30 p.m. (NBC)
Skinny: These bitter rivals will square off in a nationally-televised contest for the 11th straight year and on Sunday Night Football for the sixth time in the last nine years.

Sunday, Dec. 17 at Cleveland Browns — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: Make fun of the hapless Browns all you’d like, but the Ravens haven’t won a game in Cleveland by more than one possession since 2012.

Saturday, Dec. 23 vs. Indianapolis Colts — 4:30 p.m. (NFL Network)
Skinny: Former Ravens defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano was the last man standing in the strained relationship with Ryan Grigson, but it’s tough imagining him surviving another non-playoff season.

Sunday, Dec. 31 vs. Cincinnati Bengals — 1:00 p.m. (CBS)
Skinny: The Ravens ended their five-game slide against Cincinnati last year, and the Bengals’ streak of five straight trips to the playoffs was also snapped, making you wonder if their window has closed.

Notes: In a move that was initiated three years ago, flexible scheduling can now be applied in Weeks 5 through 9. During that period, flexible scheduling can be used in no more than two weeks by moving a Sunday afternoon game into prime time and moving the Sunday night game to the afternoon.

Another recently-implemented wrinkle will be a select number of games being “cross-flexed,” moving between CBS and FOX to bring certain games to wider audiences.

Flexible scheduling will still be used in Weeks 10 through 17 as it has been in past years. In Weeks 10-16, the master schedule lists games tentatively set for Sunday Night Football on NBC. Only Sunday afternoon games are eligible to be moved to Sunday night, in which case the originally-scheduled Sunday night game would be moved to an afternoon time.

Flexible scheduling may not be applied to games airing on Thursday, Saturday, or Monday nights.

A scheduling change would be announced at least 12 days before the game. For Week 17, the Sunday night game is announced no later than six days prior to Jan. 1.

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Flacco unfazed by lack of offseason additions to Ravens offense so far

Posted on 19 April 2017 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — It’s no secret that the Ravens have invested heavily in revamping their defense this offseason while an offense that was below average in 2016 has been forced to wait.

With 32-year-old running back Danny Woodhead being the only free-agent addition and right tackle Rick Wagner, wide receivers Steve Smith and Kamar Aiken, fullback Kyle Juszczyk, and center Jeremy Zuttah no longer on the roster, you could understand if Joe Flacco felt anxious, especially when a theme from the Ravens brass’ season-ending press conference was a desire to see better play from the veteran quarterback. But Flacco expressed little concern when asked about the holes that remain on his side of the ball with the NFL draft only a week away.

“It’s the NFL. We have a lot of good guys around here that we are focused on getting better and going out and winning football games with,” Flacco said. “I never really expect too much to happen in the offseason, and whatever does happen, happens. I have been around long enough to know that guys change teams and you get new guys and that can happen all the way up to the time the season starts. You never know.”

Flacco expressing confidence in the players currently on the roster is hardly surprising — it’s the appropriate public stance to take — but two openings on the offensive line and the lack of an intermediate receiver don’t exactly inspire confidence for a team trying to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2014.

So, if the 32-year-old signal-caller isn’t concerned, has he at least approached general manager Ozzie Newsome with suggestions regarding a particular free agent or a positional need?

“If they ask my opinion, then I will give it to them,” said Flacco, who acknowledged hope that the Ravens would bring back former teammate Torrey Smith before he signed with Philadelphia last month. “But I don’t necessarily go up there and push one way or another. Obviously, there are certain things that I can feel strongly about.”

Asked about the possibility of the Ravens bringing back veteran wide receiver Anquan Boldin, Flacco chose his words carefully while acknowledging that he had a great on-field relationship with the 36-year-old and that he could still help any team.

Reiterating his confidence in his current teammates, Flacco even went as far as saying he doesn’t think that the Ravens need another wide receiver.

“I think we have a lot of young, talented guys that are ready to make a name for themselves and are going to work really hard this offseason to get that done,” Flacco said. “Whenever you have guys that are working really hard and you have that camaraderie out here and everyone is looking to get better, you are just developing relationships. I think that is all going to help when we get to the field.”

It would be tough to fathom the Ravens not adding another wideout between now and the start of the season, but the organization is clearly counting on 2015 first-round pick Breshad Perriman and 2016 fourth-round pick Chris Moore to take steps forward this season. Veteran receiver Mike Wallace went out of his way to express his belief that Moore will surprise observers this season despite catching only seven passes as a rookie.

As for the draft, Flacco hasn’t watched any tape of the top prospects, but he did receive some unique perspective on Western Michigan wide receiver Corey Davis, who was a teammate of Flacco’s brother Tom. Considered one of the top three receiver prospects in the draft along with Clemson’s Mike Williams and Washington’s John Ross, Davis visited with the Ravens earlier this week and would bring the intermediate skill set that they currently lack at the position.

The 6-foot-3, 212-pound receiver caught 97 passes for 1,500 yards and 19 touchdowns as a senior and finished his collegiate career with over 5,000 receiving yards and 52 touchdown receptions.

“My brother said, ‘Listen, this is all I know, but he was at another level,’” Flacco said. “He was a really good player. He thought he had really good hands. He thought he was really strong; he could run really well. That is all he knows, but he could definitely tell the difference between him and the guys he was seeing week to week.”

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Ravens open 2017 voluntary offseason workout program

Posted on 18 April 2017 by Luke Jones

(Photo courtesy of the Baltimore Ravens)

Ravens players officially began preparations for the 2017 season on Tuesday, reporting to Owings Mills for the start of the voluntary offseason workout program.

Of course, most players have been working out on their own for weeks, but this is the first time in which team activities were allowed to be conducted at the practice facility. The first phase of the nine-week program lasts two weeks and involves strength and conditioning work as well as physical rehabilitation. The coaching staff is not allowed to lead players in on-field workouts during this opening part of the offseason program.

This part of the offseason program is officially voluntary, but most players — especially younger ones — are expected to attend regularly.

The Ravens will provide media access on Wednesday with quarterback Joe Flacco, cornerback Jimmy Smith, safety Eric Weddle, and wide receiver Mike Wallace scheduled to talk, but photos and video released by the team on Tuesday showed a great number of players in attendance for the first day. That list included Flacco, Smith, Weddle, Wallace, Brandon Carr, Tony Jefferson, Danny Woodhead, C.J. Mosley, Matt Judon, Za’Darius Smith, Tavon Young, Michael Pierce, Carl Davis, Breshad Perriman, Alex Lewis, Ronnie Stanley, James Hurst, Albert McClellan, Kamalei Correa, Anthony Levine, Brent Urban, Sam Koch, Michael Campanaro, Crockett Gillmore, Benjamin Watson, Nick Boyle, and Ryan Jensen.

The second phase of the program lasts three weeks and consists of on-field workouts that may include individual player instruction and drills as well as team practice. However, no live contact is permitted, and the offense and defense may not work against each other.

The final phase of the program permits teams to conduct a total of 10 days of organized team practice activity (OTAs), which are voluntary. No live contact is allowed, but teams may conduct 7-on-7, 9-on-7, and 11-on-11 drills. Teams may also hold one mandatory minicamp for all veteran players during that final phase of the offseason program.

The Ravens will also hold a rookie minicamp beginning May 5, the weekend after the 2017 NFL draft.

Below is the Ravens’ 2017 offseason training program schedule:

First Day: April 18
OTA offseason workouts: May 23-25, May 30-June 1, June 5-6, June 8-9
Mandatory minicamp: June 13-15

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Hall of Famer Rod Carew saved by late Ravens tight end

Posted on 14 April 2017 by Luke Jones

On the same weekend when many celebrate Easter, this story of death spawning new life couldn’t be more powerful.

Four days after former Ravens tight end Konrad Reuland died from a brain aneurysm on Dec. 12, his heart and kidney went to Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, who was in desperate need of a transplant. Amazingly, the two had once met 18 years earlier when Reuland attended the same middle school as Carew’s children.

Even if you’re not a fan of the Ravens or baseball, take 15 minutes to read this story written by BaltimoreRavens.com.

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Former Ravens cornerback Powers announces retirement

Posted on 14 April 2017 by Luke Jones

With some teams having already begun their offseason workout programs, former Ravens cornerback Jerraud Powers has decided to walk away from the NFL.

The 29-year-old announced his retirement via his official Instagram account on Thursday night after an eight-year career that included stops in Indianapolis, Arizona, and Baltimore. Powers spent the 2016 season with the Ravens, collecting 33 tackles, two interceptions, five pass breakups, and one sack in 13 games.

“I think it’s time for me to walk away from the game,” Powers wrote. “The last eight years have been a joy and wonderful ride. Even though I can still compete and play at a high level, mentally, I’m ready for the next chapter of my life.”

Powers signed a one-year, $1.75 million contract prior to last season, but the 5-foot-10, 193-pound defensive back was not in the Ravens’ plans for 2017. With veteran Brandon Carr arriving from the Dallas Cowboys last month, second-year cornerback Tavon Young is expected to serve in the slot in the nickel package, which made Powers expendable.

A 2009 third-round from Auburn, Powers accumulated 13 interceptions in his career.

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Webb re-signing can offer more than depth to Ravens defense

Posted on 12 April 2017 by Luke Jones

The re-signing of veteran Lardarius Webb should be about more than just depth for the Ravens.

Yes, the 31-year-old is a good insurance policy behind starters Eric Weddle and Tony Jefferson, but his play in his first year as a safety in 2016 was more than respectable, ranking 15th among qualified safeties by Pro Football Focus and 10th among free safeties in Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 system. Relegating him to a strict backup role and special teams would seem to be a waste of his talents, especially for a versatile player who received a three-year deal for a reported maximum value of $10.5 million.

How then might defensive coordinator Dean Pees use Webb in the Baltimore defense?

Though the former starting cornerback can no longer play an outside spot in anything but an emergency situation, his coverage skills and tackling ability still make him a decent option for the inside nickel spot. The problem is that you wouldn’t want Webb playing in place of 2016 fourth-round pick Tavon Young, who was one of the great successes of last season. It remains to be seen whether the 5-foot-9 Young can thrive as an every-down corner lining up on the outside in the base defense — a major reason why the Ravens signed veteran Brandon Carr last month — but the second-year corner showed impressive ball skills and should be a mainstay in the nickel package at the very least.

Might a little more creativity be in the works with the secondary?

It’s no secret that the Ravens value Jefferson a great deal, evident by the four-year, $34 million contract they awarded him at the start of free agency. The former Arizona Cardinal’s greatest strengths are playing the run and clamping down on opposing tight ends, which are certainly useful skills but not reminiscent of a deep center-field safety like Ed Reed. Frankly, it’s a steep financial commitment to make if the Ravens are only going to use Jefferson in a standard safety role, making you think there’s more to it.

Baltimore is in need of a three-down linebacker to fill the void left by the retired Zach Orr. Perhaps 2016 second-round pick Kamalei Correa will be ready to assume that job, but it’s easier to find a capable two-down inside linebacker than it is to find the kind of talent who can consistently hold up in pass coverage. That’s where the arrival of Jefferson and the return of Webb could come into play.

Despite rarely ever using the dime package — which consists of six defensive backs and usually one linebacker — in Pees’ five-year tenure as the defensive coordinator, the Ravens practiced it extensively in the spring and summer of 2016 before it disappeared in the regular season. Reserve defensive back and special-teams standout Anthony Levine saw the most practice time at the dime spot last year, but he saw only 109 defensive snaps last season.

Jefferson would appear to be a good fit to serve in a hybrid linebacker-safety role next to C.J. Mosley in many passing situations. It’s obvious that the Ravens have made it a priority to improve their pass defense this offseason, but Jefferson also tackles like a linebacker, which would diminish the chances of the run defense being too vulnerable in a dime look. His strength is playing closer to the line of scrimmage, and the presence of Webb at safety next to Weddle in the sub package would allow Pees to be more aggressive with Jefferson in the box and to match him up with tight ends.

Such an alignment would not only better showcase the 25-year-old safety’s skills, but it would put less pressure on Orr’s replacement in 2017. The dime would make Webb’s re-signing more impactful than simply improving conventional depth in the secondary.

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Ravens unveil 2017 slate of preseason games

Posted on 10 April 2017 by Luke Jones

While fans wait for the 2017 regular-season schedule to be released later this month, the Ravens unveiled their preseason slate that begins with a home contest against Washington on Aug. 10.

The Ravens and the Redskins will meet for the 10th time in the all-time preseason series with Baltimore holding a 6-3 edge with its NFL neighbor. The teams last met at M&T Bank Stadium in the 2016 regular season with Washington coming away with a 16-10 victory.

The second week of the preseason involves a trip to Miami against the Dolphins for the first preseason meeting between these AFC teams. It’s worth noting that the Ravens will host the Dolphins in the regular season, which makes for a mildly interesting scheduling quirk. However, this isn’t the first time such a thing has happened as the Ravens played New Orleans in both the 2014 preseason and regular season.

John Harbaugh’s team will welcome Buffalo to town for the third preseason game, which has long been considered the dress rehearsal for the regular season and the best entertainment value of the four summer contests.

Ravens season-ticket holders frustrated over the cost and quality of preseason games over the years will again take some satisfaction in knowing that the preseason finale — which typically involves very few starters and is considered virtually unwatchable by some fans — will be played on the road for the ninth straight year. The Ravens travel to New Orleans to meet the Saints, marking the fourth straight year these teams have met in the preseason.

The Ravens are 51-32 in their preseason history and 24-12 in the preseason under Harbaugh.

Final dates and times will be announced at a later time.

2017 Ravens preseason schedule
Week 1: Thursday, Aug. 10 vs. Washington
Week 2: Friday or Saturday, Aug. 18 or 19 at Miami
Week 3: Friday or Saturday, Aug. 25 or 26 vs. Buffalo
Week 4: Thursday, Aug. 31 at New Orleans

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