Tag Archive | "NFL"

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Ravens open their wallet in lucrative wide receiver market

Posted on 13 March 2018 by Luke Jones

Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome vowed to make changes to the wide receiver room in his final season in charge, resulting in a surprising opening to free agency.

After failing to land a top-tier talent such as Jarvis Landry or Allen Robinson, the Ravens have opened their wallet to spend significant money in one of the most lucrative markets for seemingly-ordinary wide receivers we’ve ever seen. Whether that’s a smart decision is open for debate.

The reported one-year, $5 million agreement with former Arizona Cardinals wide receiver John Brown at least involves a wideout who recorded a 1,000-yard season earlier in his career, but the four-year, $29 million deal with $14.5 million guaranteed reportedly struck with former Washington wide receiver Ryan Grant was immediately met with shock and even confusion Tuesday night. Grant did set career highs with 45 catches for 573 yards and four touchdowns in 2017, but the 27-year-old has made just 84 receptions for 985 yards and six touchdowns over his four NFL seasons combined.

Is that production worthy of one of the richest wide receiver contracts in team history? Of course, that’s not exactly an extensive list of deals as the Ravens have historically been very thrifty at the position, but this was an organization lacking salary cap space, making the Grant signing even more puzzling.

At such a price, are these two even as good as Mike Wallace and Jeremy Maclin, let alone better?

The 6-foot, 204-pound Grant was a favorite of Washington head coach Jay Gruden and is considered a good route-runner with the ability to play outside or in the slot, but he’s never had as much as a 100-yard game in his career. A 2014 fifth-round pick from Tulane, Grant graded 57th among qualified wide receivers by Pro Football Focus this past season and ranked 60th among outside receivers in Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 project, the latter of which labeling him an “ideal” No. 4 receiver.

The Ravens brass clearly sees substantial potential to award him that type of a deal, but scrutiny will understandably until Grant proves critics wrong.

Meanwhile, Brown provides some intriguing upside if he can stay healthy after he caught 65 passes for 1,003 yards and seven touchdowns in 2015. The speedy 5-foot-11, 179-pound receiver has averaged 14.5 yards per catch in his career, but he was diagnosed with the sickle-cell trait in 2016 and has been slowed by various injuries over the last two seasons.

In 2017, Brown played in only 10 games and caught 21 passes for 299 yards and three touchdowns. The former third-round pick from Pittsburg State has caught 173 passes for 2,515 yards and 17 touchdowns in his four-year career.

For Brown, a high ceiling is there, but there’s also a low floor because of health concerns.

With these expected signings at the start of free agency, the Ravens wide receiver room has certainly changed as Newsome promised. Whether it’s truly any better is the fair question.

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Ravens still paying for past mistakes at start of free agency

Posted on 13 March 2018 by Luke Jones

Owner Steve Bisciotti declared last month that the Ravens could “make a splash” to improve one of the NFL’s worst passing attacks, but it was always going to need to come at their price.

Free agency hasn’t yet officially begun, but dreams of a discounted rate for a high-impact wide receiver like Allen Robinson or Sammy Watkins are long gone as both agreed to deals for a combined $55 million in guarantees. Former Pro Bowl tight end Jimmy Graham is going to Green Bay. Even second- and third-tier free-agent receivers such as Paul Richardson and Albert Wilson are fetching deals with an average annual value of $8 million despite underwhelming production in their careers.

If the Ravens wanted to hand out a contract or two along those lines — many of them aren’t exactly looking wise — entering the week with less than $5 million in salary cap space left them in poor position. And as Sports Illustrated’s Albert Breer noted, the popular three-year structure being used in many deals this offseason makes it difficult for a cap-strapped team to spread out high guarantees and keep a free agent’s 2018 cap number affordable.

That isn’t an excuse, but it serves as a reminder that the Ravens continue to pay for past mistakes that have piled up since Super Bowl XLVII. And it’s why fixing their passing attack in one offseason isn’t going to be easy. Yes, these free-agent prices have looked outrageous, but Baltimore hasn’t shown the ability — or used the necessary resources — to draft and develop its own receivers over the years, either, meaning something has to give at some point.

To their credit, the Ravens have spent to the salary cap on an annual basis, but how they’ve used it is certainly open to criticism as too many back-loaded deals and veteran restructures have frequently left them in tight spots. It’s a vicious cycle that’s contributed to the current era of mediocrity, leaving one to wonder if some type of reset is needed sooner than later. Of course, try selling that strategy to John Harbaugh and his staff, who are likely coaching for their jobs after missing the playoffs for the fourth time in five years.

Joe Flacco’s biggest critics will point solely to his $24.75 million cap figure and label the remainder of his lucrative contract as holding the roster hostage. Of course, they’d be overlooking the fact that the Ravens felt compelled to give a box safety (Tony Jefferson) a $34 million contract last offseason when it was clear the offense was what needed more help, just a recent example of that side of the ball being neglected in favor of the defense. Two of the three modest veteran additions (running back Danny Woodhead and right tackle Austin Howard) made to the offense last year have already been jettisoned with the other (wide receiver Jeremy Maclin) possibly going next, illustrating the minimal impact they made.

Only four of Baltimore’s 17 combined picks in the first three rounds of the last five drafts have been used on offensive players with all four of their Day 1 and Day 2 selections last year spent on defense. Exactly one of those four offensive picks — left tackle Ronnie Stanley — has panned out with wide receiver Breshad Perriman and tight end Maxx Williams standing out as major disappointments at positions of great need. Making matters worse, several of those early picks on defense didn’t pan out, either, which compelled general manager Ozzie Newsome to pump even more resources into positions like safety.

The Ravens did re-sign offensive lineman James Hurst on Monday, but it’s difficult selling that move as a positive after the decision to cut Howard, who was solid at right tackle last season. Neither Hurst nor Alex Lewis is a proven starter at the position, creating another question mark on offense to go with the gaping holes at wide receiver and tight end. And should center Ryan Jensen receive the lucrative deal elsewhere that many are predicting, it would mark the third straight offseason in which the Ravens have lost an above-average offensive lineman in free agency.

When you haven’t spent major free-agent money or used meaningful draft capital on your offense, what exactly do you really expect from Flacco, who clearly has his own flaws?

Perhaps this offseason and this draft will be different. A number of marquee free agents have already come off the board, but potential value remains and some cap casualties are still to come with Green Bay’s Jordy Nelson being the latest cut loose on Tuesday. Maybe the organization will actually focus on the offense for this year’s draft and hit on multiple picks in a way similar to how New Orleans reversed its fortunes last year.

It’s only mid-March and much will happen between now and the start of the season, but the Ravens’ needs are too great and their resources too limited to simply trust that everything will be OK.

Too many mistakes in recent years leave them no longer enjoying the benefit of the doubt like they once did.

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Ravens part ways with right tackle Howard, running back Woodhead

Posted on 13 March 2018 by Luke Jones

The free agency signing period doesn’t officially begin until Wednesday, but the Ravens remained busy Tuesday clearing salary cap space by parting ways with two veterans on the offensive side of the ball.

Baltimore cut starting right tackle Austin Howard and running back Danny Woodhead, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport. Their departures save roughly $3.8 million in space when including the salaries of the two players replacing them in the “Rule of 51” calculation.

Howard’s future appeared up in the air at best after the Ravens re-signed offensive lineman James Hurst to a four-year, $17.5 million contract on Monday. Signed last August after being cut by Oakland, Howard, 30, appeared in all 16 games and ranked 36th among offensive tackles in Pro Football Focus’ grading system, but the organization declined to pick up his 2018 option and will save $3 million in cap space by doing so.

It remains unclear who will man the right tackle spot in 2018 with neither Hurst nor Alex Lewis — the logical in-house candidates — having proven themselves as a starting-caliber option there. The Ravens would have another hole at center if free agent Ryan Jensen fetches a lucrative contract on the open market as many are anticipating.

Those aren’t exactly encouraging developments for an offense already in need of more talent at wide receiver and tight end.

The Ravens signed the 33-year-old Woodhead to a three-year, $8.8 million contract at the start of free agency last March, but a serious hamstring injury in the season opener sidelined him for eight games and he finished with just 33 catches for 200 yards. The third-down back has now missed 35 games over the last four seasons, leaving his NFL future at a crossroads.

Howard and Woodhead joined defensive back Lardarius Webb as cap casualties a day after Webb saw his contract officially terminated, seemingly ending his nine-year run in Baltimore.

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Ravens re-sign offensive lineman Hurst, cut defensive back Webb

Posted on 12 March 2018 by Luke Jones

On the same day NFL teams could begin negotiating with other unrestricted free agents, the Ravens retained one of their own by re-signing offensive lineman James Hurst to a four-year contract.

The deal is worth $17.5 million with $8 million guaranteed, according to NFL Network. Hurst, 26, started 15 games at left guard last season as well as one at left tackle filling in for the injured Ronnie Stanley. The former undrafted free agent from North Carolina has struggled at both offensive tackle spots in the past, but he found a home inside while filling in for injured left guard Alex Lewis, who underwent season-ending shoulder surgery in training camp.

Many assumed the 6-foot-5, 317-pound Hurst would find a better contract elsewhere this offseason, but the Ravens clearly value his versatility and view him as a starting-caliber player with that type of a financial commitment. What that means for Lewis and the rest of the offensive line remains to be seen as starting center Ryan Jensen will hit the market this week as an unrestricted free agent.

“This is good news for our football team,” head coach John Harbaugh said in a statement released by the team. “James is a reliable, tough, and versatile player who has played a lot of football for us. He has started at both tackle and guard, and all he has been is productive and someone who has made us better.”

Pro Football Focus graded Hurst 55th among qualified guards last season while Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 rankings listed him 49th among guards. He has never missed a game in his four-year career and has started 32 regular-season games as well as two postseason contests.

Reserve defensive back Lardarius Webb announced his departure via his verified Twitter account Monday as Baltimore has cut the longtime Raven for the second straight year. The 2009 third-round pick eventually re-signed with the Ravens at a cheaper rate last year and would begin the season as the primary nickel corner, but his role diminished as the year progressed and he was replaced by second-year corner Maurice Canady in many sub packages.

Webb was scheduled to make $2.15 million in base salary in 2018, but his release will save the Ravens $1.75 million in cap space. The Nicholls State product appeared in 127 games in his nine-year run with the Ravens, collecting 15 interceptions, 467 tackles, 91 pass breakups, and 3 forced fumbles.

Baltimore entered Monday with just $4.878 million in salary cap space, according to the NFL Players Association. Teams must be in compliance with the salary cap by 4 p.m. Wednesday when the free-agent signing period officially begins.

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Franchise tag developments bode well for Ravens’ wide receiver search

Posted on 06 March 2018 by Luke Jones

The Ravens are one of several teams in the mix to acquire Miami wide receiver Jarvis Landry, but two other accomplished receivers are on track to hit free agency after not receiving the franchise tag on Tuesday.

Jacksonville’s Allen Robinson and Los Angeles Rams wideout Sammy Watkins were not tagged and will hit the open market next week unless their respective teams sign them to long-term contracts. The Watkins news wasn’t a big surprise, but many assumed Robinson would be tagged despite the former Penn State product coming back from an ACL injury suffered in the 2017 season opener.

If fully healthy, the 6-foot-3 Robinson could bring the most upside of any free-agent receiver after he caught 14 touchdowns and posted 1,400 receiving yards in 2015 while playing with maligned Jaguars quarterback Blake Bortles. His numbers slipped to six touchdowns and 883 receiving yards a year later, but the 24-year-old represents the kind of red-zone and jump-ball threat quarterback Joe Flacco has sorely lacked in years.

Watkins, the fourth overall pick of the 2014 draft, had over 2,000 receiving yards combined in his first two seasons with Buffalo, but a foot injury derailed his 2016 season and he was traded to the Rams last summer. In 15 games in 2017, he caught 39 passes for 593 yards and eight touchdowns.

Landry has easily been the most consistent of the trio, but Robinson and Watkins hitting the market could certainly impact the overall demand — and subsequent asking price from the Dolphins — in trade talks. Their presence would also figure to impact the cost of a variety of second- and third-tier free-agent options such as Marqise Lee, Paul Richardson, and Donte Moncrief.

Regardless of which receivers the Ravens ultimately target, more quality on the open market is good news for a roster in need of at least two meaningful additions at the position. With disappointing veteran Jeremy Maclin likely to be cut and leading wide receiver Mike Wallace scheduled to hit free agency, the Ravens will need to be aggressive to improve the league’s 29th-ranked passing attack from last season.

And though many are clamoring for Baltimore to address the position in next month’s draft, the need for both experience and upside makes it obvious that Newsome should be looking at the free-agent and trade markets before the final weekend in April.

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Ravens re-sign defensive end Urban to one-year deal

Posted on 06 March 2018 by Luke Jones

The Ravens have re-signed defensive end Brent Urban to a one-year contract.

The 2014 fourth-round pick was set to become an unrestricted free agent next week, but Baltimore will instead retain its only defensive starter from last season who had been scheduled to hit the open market. After missing 26 games due to injuries over his first three seasons, the 6-foot-7, 300-pound Urban had finally moved into a starting role in 2017 before suffering a season-ending Lisfranc foot injury in Week 3.

The Ravens struggled to replace Urban at the 5-technique defensive end spot, eventually deciding on Carl Davis midway through the season. However, with Davis undergoing offseason shoulder surgery and recent third-round picks Bronson Kaufusi and Chris Wormley not developing as rapidly as the organization had hoped, retaining Urban became a distinct possibility with general manager Ozzie Newsome mentioning it in Indianapolis last week.

“Beyond thankful to be given the opportunity to do what I love with the organization that gave me my start,” Urban posted on his Twitter account shortly after the deal was announced. “2018 is going to be so real.”

After also dealing with injuries at the University of Virginia that hurt his draft stock, Urban missed his entire rookie season after tearing his ACL early in training camp and then missed 10 games in 2015 with a torn biceps sustained that summer. The organization has always been high on his size and ability and were excited about his potential as an interior pass rusher last year before he went down in the blowout loss to Jacksonville.

In 25 career games with Baltimore, Urban has collected 25 tackles, three sacks, and three batted passes.

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2018 draft order finalized for Ravens

Posted on 06 March 2018 by Luke Jones

With the NFL having already announced compensatory picks, the order has been officially finalized for the 2018 draft beginning on April 26 in Arlington, Texas.

The Ravens will have a total of eight picks with their lone compensatory pick coming in the sixth round. After making four selections in the first 78 picks of the 2017 draft, general manager Ozzie Newsome has three of the top 83 next month.

There had been a question about whether the Ravens still held their seventh-round selection after acquiring offensive lineman Tony Bergstrom from Arizona last September, but he did not play enough for the conditional seventh-round pick to be surrendered to the Cardinals. The veteran appeared in four games and played just 32 offensive snaps before being cut in October and landing in Washington.

Below is a look at where the Ravens are scheduled to pick:

Round 1: 16th overall
Round 2: 52nd overall
Round 3: 83rd overall
Round 4: 118th overall
Round 5: 154th overall
Round 6: 190th overall
Round 6: 215th overall (compensatory)
Round 7: 238th overall

Just for fun, below is a look at past players selected by the Ravens at each of those spots (or as close as possible) over the years:

16th overall: CB Marlon Humphrey, 2016
Skinny: Humphrey’s selection was met with little enthusiasm last year, but the Alabama product looked the part of a future No. 1 cornerback as a rookie, intercepting two passes and playing in all 16 games.

52nd overall: DE Anthony Weaver, 2002
Skinny: The Notre Dame defensive lineman wasn’t a star, but he collected 14 1/2 sacks and started 54 games over his four seasons with Baltimore before playing three more years with Houston.

83rd overall: WR Devard Darling (82nd), 2004
Skinny: Darling is just one in a long list of failed picks at receiver as he made two receptions in his first three seasons before finally catching 18 passes and three touchdowns with the Ravens in 2007.

118th overall: LB Tyrus McCloud, 1997
Skinny: McCloud showed some early promise and made two starts in place of an injured Ray Lewis in 1998, but he was cut the following year and never played another game in the NFL.

154th overall: LB Ron Rogers, 1998
Skinny: The Georgia Tech product was cut near the end of his first preseason and doesn’t even have a Wikipedia entry, which says all you need to know as he never played in an NFL game.

190th overall: DT Cedric Woodard (191st), 2000
Skinny: Woodard never played a game for the Ravens, but the Texas defensive lineman had a decent NFL run, spending five seasons with Seattle and even started 28 games over that time.

215th overall: WR Justin Harper, 2008
Skinny: A 6-foot-3 wideout from Virginia Tech who stood out in training camps for making some acrobatic plays, Harper never carried that over to games and appeared in just two contests for Baltimore.

238th overall: WR Aaron Mellette, 2013
Skinny: The Ravens hoped they’d found a sleeper in the seventh round after Mellette caught over 300 passes and 44 touchdowns at FCS-level Elon, but he was cut a year later and never appeared in a game.

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Twelve Ravens thoughts from 2018 NFL combine

Posted on 04 March 2018 by Luke Jones

With the 2018 NFL scouting combine winding down, I’ve offered a dozen Ravens thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Ozzie Newsome didn’t drop any bombshells speaking at his final combine as general manager, but he was accountable and expressed much urgency to get back to the playoffs and finally get it right at wide receiver. The latter would be a fine demon to exorcise to complete his brilliant run.

2. Newsome’s job title and responsibilities after 2018 remain unclear, but Steve Bisciotti telling him he wants his golf game to improve should ease concerns about his “significant” position potentially clashing with the transfer of power to Eric DeCosta. It needs to be the latter’s show to run.

3. Jeremy Maclin remains on the roster for now, but Newsome only saying that no decision has been made on his future should be pretty telling. The general manager’s desire to “change that room” wouldn’t seem to bode well for free agent Mike Wallace’s chances of returning either.

4. On the other hand, Newsome’s praise for the play and leadership of Brandon Carr leads you to believe he’ll remain on the roster. Jimmy Smith is apparently progressing well with his Achilles tendon rehabilitation, but there’s no way to know yet if he’ll be ready for Week 1.

5. Some balked at Newsome saying Breshad Perriman would be part of spring workouts, but this shouldn’t be a surprise with the lack of bodies at receiver and the organization’s desire to salvage any bit of value from a first-round pick. This hardly guarantees he’ll be part of the 2018 team.

6. Only preliminary talks have been held with the agent of C.J. Mosley about a contract extension beyond 2018, but that’s not a major surprise as it wasn’t until late April of 2015 that Jimmy Smith signed his deal, the last time Baltimore extended a first-round pick.

7. Newsome predictably praised the emergence of Alex Collins, but adding a running back to be a dangerous factor as a receiver out of the backfield should still be a goal this offseason. I don’t believe Danny Woodhead, Buck Allen, or Kenneth Dixon is that guy.

8. Maryland wide receiver DJ Moore made a statement to be in the conversation as a first-round pick with his strong showing in Indianapolis. His workout numbers mesh very well with his production for the Terps despite never benefiting from consistent quarterback play.

9. Penn State’s Mike Gesicki is another prospect the Ravens should covet. He isn’t a blocker, but he checks the boxes you want in a pass-catching tight end and was very impressive at the combine. Gesicki also caught 14 touchdowns and had almost 1,500 receiving yards over the last two seasons.

10. Re-signing Brent Urban to a cheap contract with incentives is fine, but injuries have plagued him throughout his football career. It would be unwise to give him any real money or envision him as a “Plan A” guy.

11. Oklahoma offensive tackle Orlando Brown, the son of the late former Ravens lineman, was impressive during his press conference, but his disastrous workout numbers will be difficult to overcome. Talk of him being a first-round pick became a distant memory in a matter of hours.

12. Newsome has never basked in the spotlight — Friday was the first time he’d answered questions at a press conference since last April — but he deserves the farewell recognition he’ll receive from peers, fans, and media over the next calendar year. Where would the Ravens have been without him?

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Judge dismisses robbery case against Ravens cornerback Humphrey

Posted on 03 March 2018 by Luke Jones

A Tuscaloosa County district judge has dismissed the third-degree robbery case against Ravens cornerback Marlon Humphrey over a January incident involving a phone charger.

As first reported by the the Tuscaloosa News, Judge Joanne Jannik ruled there was no probable cause that Humphrey had robbed an Uber driver on Jan. 13. Mitchell Patton told University of Alabama Police that the Baltimore defensive back stole his phone charger and threatened him.

Humphrey, 21, was arrested and charged nearly two weeks after the incident occurred as Patton continued pursuing charges after the investigating officers had declined to do so. The 2017 first-round pick will be refunded the $2,500 bond paid after his arrest on Jan. 25.

The Ravens issued a statement on the day of his arrest making it clear they were firmly behind his side of the story.

“Marlon told us that it was a misunderstanding regarding a $15 telephone charger, which he thought was his,” the statement read. “Our understanding is that he has been interviewed by University of Alabama Police and is cooperating. We are monitoring the situation.”

Humphrey played in all 16 games as a rookie, making making five starts and finishing with two interceptions and 34 tackles. He is the son of former NFL running back Bobby Humphrey.

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Ravens receive only sixth-round compensatory pick in 2018 draft

Posted on 23 February 2018 by Luke Jones

The Ravens received only a sixth-round compensatory pick in the 2018 draft after many had anticipated a third-round selection for the free-agent departure of offensive tackle Rick Wagner last offseason.

This marks only the second time since 2010 that Baltimore will not have multiple compensatory picks in the draft. The maximum number of compensatory picks allotted to a team in a single year is four as Cincinnati, Dallas, Green Bay, and Oakland all reached the maximum for the 2018 draft.

Entering his final season as general manager, Newsome will have a total of eight selections — his regular choice in each round as well as the extra sixth-round pick at 215th overall — in this year’s draft. Last year was the first time teams were permitted to trade compensatory picks and Baltimore took advantage, sending its third-round selection and defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan to Philadelphia in exchange for the Eagles’ third-round pick used on defensive end Chris Wormley.

The Ravens lost Wagner, fullback Kyle Juszczyk, defensive end Lawrence Guy, wide receiver Kamar Aiken, and offensive lineman Vladimir Ducasse as unrestricted free agents and signed unrestricted free agents Tony Jefferson, Brandon Carr, and Danny Woodhead last offseason. That resulted in a net loss of two, but the small Ducasse deal did not qualify for the maximum of 32 compensatory picks awarded, leaving the Ravens with only one selection.

Wagner signed a five-year, $47.5 million contract with the Detroit Lions, which left him on the border of fetching either a third- or fourth-round pick for Baltimore. However, a three-game absence with an ankle injury likely dropped him to the fourth-round territory, the same tier as Jefferson’s four-year, $34 million contract to cancel out a potential fourth-round choice for the Ravens.

Determinations for compensatory picks are based on a formula considering the salary, playing time, and postseason honors earned by unrestricted free agents who left their teams the previous offseason.

Nick Korte of OverTheCap.com broke it down nicely here:

Since the compensatory pick program started in 1994, the Ravens have led the NFL in receiving 49 compensatory choices as the organization has frequently resisted signing unrestricted free agents over the years while losing many of their own. Green Bay is second with 42 compensatory picks over that same period of time.

Below is a history of the Ravens’ compensatory picks since 1996 with the round in which the player was selected noted in parentheses:

1996: none
1997: LB Cornell Brown (sixth), QB Wally Richardson (seventh), S Ralph Staten (seventh), DT Leland Taylor (seventh)
1998: TE Cam Qualey (seventh)
1999: G Edwin Mulitalo (fourth)
2000: none
2001: none
2002: WR Javin Hunter (sixth), RB Chester Taylor (sixth), S Chad Williams (sixth)
2003: FB Ovie Mughelli (fourth), OT Tony Pashos (fifth), C Mike Mabry (seventh), S Antwoine Sanders (seventh)
2004: WR Clarence Moore (sixth), WR Derek Abney (seventh), G Brian Rimpf (seventh)
2005: QB Derek Anderson (sixth)
2006: RB P.J. Daniels (fourth), TE Quinn Sypniewski (fifth), P Sam Koch (sixth), CB Derrick Martin (sixth)
2007: LB Antwan Barnes (fourth), FB Le’Ron McClain (fourth), QB Troy Smith (fifth), LB Prescott Burgess (sixth)
2008: OL Oniel Cousins (third), OL David Hale (fourth), S Haruki Nakamura (sixth), RB Allen Patrick (seventh)
2009: none
2010: none
2011: CB Chykie Brown (fifth), DE Pernell McPhee (fifth)
2012: S Christian Thompson (fourth), CB Asa Jackson (fifth)
2013: FB Kyle Juszczyk (fourth), OT Rick Wagner (fifth), OL Ryan Jensen (sixth), CB Marc Anthony (seventh)
2014: TE Crockett Gillmore (third), DE Brent Urban (fourth), RB Lorenzo Taliaferro (fourth), G John Urschel (fifth)
2015: CB Tray Walker (fourth), TE Nick Boyle (fifth), G Robert Myers (fifth)
2016:
DT Willie Henry (fourth), RB Kenneth Dixon (fourth), CB Maurice Canady (sixth)
2017: Traded third-round compensatory pick and DT Timmy Jernigan for Philadelphia’s third-round pick used to select DE Chris Wormley

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