Tag Archive | "north carolina state"

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Maryland to honor Hill on 50th anniversary of ACC integration

Posted on 11 October 2012 by WNST Staff

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland department of athletics will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Darryl Hill becoming the first African-American player to play at the University of Maryland and in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Hill will be joined at a press availability with director of athletics Kevin Anderson and head coach Randy Edsall on Tuesday, Oct. 16 at noon at the Gossett Football Team House. In addition, Hill will be recognized during the Maryland-NC State game on Saturday, Oct. 20 at 3:30 p.m. at Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium.

Hill transferred to Maryland in 1962 and after sitting out one year he broke the color barrier in 1963, playing against NC State in College Park. Hill was also the first African-American to play at Gonzaga High School and the Naval Academy.

Hill emerged as Maryland’s top wide receiver in 1963, finishing with 43 receptions, only three short of the school record at the time. He played with the New York Jets for a short period before returning to school and earning a master’s degree from Southern Illinois. He has started businesses in China, Russia as well as the Pacific Energy Corporation. He also returned to Maryland for a period to serve as a Maryland’s director of major gifts.

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Dougherty, Amonte Hiller, Timchal headed to Lacrosse Hall of Fame

Posted on 23 May 2012 by WNST Staff

BALTIMORE, May 23, 2012 – The 2012 induction class for the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame has been approved by the US Lacrosse Board of Directors. This year’s eight-person class will be officially inducted in a ceremony Saturday, Oct. 20, at The Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, Md.

The 2012 induction class is comprised of Jen Adams, Roy Colsey, Brian Dougherty, Missy Foote, Kelly Amonte Hiller, Jesse Hubbard, Tim Nelson, and Cindy Timchal.

The National Lacrosse Hall of Fame, a program of US Lacrosse, was established in 1957 to honor men and women who by their deeds as players, coaches, officials and/or contributors, and by the example of their lives, personify the great contribution of lacrosse to our way of life. More than 350 lacrosse greats are honored in the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame, which is located with the Lacrosse Museum at US Lacrosse Headquarters in Baltimore.

Brief bios for this year’s inductees follow, with more detailed career bios listed further below:

Jen Adams
Adams will be inducted as a truly great player. She enjoyed a record-setting four-year playing career at the University of Maryland from 1998-2001, during which time she earned first-team All-America honors three times and won the Tewaaraton Award as a senior. Adams was named the national player of the year and the national attacker of the year by the IWLCA three times, winning each award in 1999, 2000 and 2001. She concluded her career as Maryland’s all-time leader in goals, assists, and points, and helped lead the Terrapins to four straight NCAA national championships from 1998-2001. A native of Australia, Adams also played for the Australian national team in 2001, 2005 and 2009 and earned All-World honors twice. She is currently serving in her fourth year as head women’s lacrosse coach at Loyola University Maryland.

Roy Colsey
Colsey will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a four-time All-American at Syracuse University from 1992-1995 following a standout prep career at Yorktown (N.Y.) High School. Colsey earned first-team All-America honors in each of his last three collegiate seasons after earning third-team honors as a freshman. He received the USILA’s McLaughlin Award in 1995 as the national midfielder of the year, and also was selected for the North-South All-Star Game as a senior. He led Syracuse to the NCAA national championship in 1993 and 1995. Colsey also played nine seasons (2000-2008) professionally in Major League Lacrosse and earned all-star honors four times. He was the MLL’s Championship MVP in 2006. Colsey also was a member of the 2006 U.S. Men’s National Team.

Brian Dougherty
Dougherty will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a two-time, first-team All-American at the University of Maryland (1993-1996), earning the award in his junior and senior seasons. Dougherty was a two-time recipient of the USILA’s Ensign C. Markland Kelly Jr. Award as the nation’s top goalkeeper (1995, 1996) and was named the Lt. Raymond Enners Award winner as the nation’s outstanding player in 1995. In addition, he was MVP of the 1995 NCAA Championship after leading Maryland to a second place finish. Dougherty played nine professional seasons in Major League Lacrosse and was an MLL All-Star six times and the MLL’s Goalie of the Year three times. He also won two World Championships as a member of the U.S. Men’s National Team in 1998 and 2010.

Missy Foote
Foote will be inducted as a truly great coach. She completed her 31st season as head coach at Middlebury (Vt.) College in 2012, and has a career winning percentage of nearly 80 percent. Foote has guided Middlebury to the NCAA Division III national championship five times (1997, 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2004) and has recorded four perfect seasons. Under her guidance, Middlebury has recorded seven conference championships and made 14 straight trips to the NCAA national semifinals from 1994-2007. She has been recognized as the IWLCA national coach of the year five times. Foote also served as an assistant coach with the U.S. Women’s Developmental Team from 2005-09, and a member of the NCAA Division III Women’s Lacrosse Committee from 2003-06.

Kelly Amonte Hiller
Amonte Hiller will be inducted as a truly great player. Amonte Hiller was a four-time All-American at the University of Maryland, earning first-team honors in 1994, 1995 and 1996 after receiving second team honors as a freshman in 1993. She helped to lead the Terrapins to the NCAA national championship in 1995 and 1996, and was named the national defensive player of the year in 1995 and the national offensive player of the year in 1996. She was chosen as the Atlantic Coast Conference’s (ACC) Female Athlete of the Year in 1996. Amonte Hiller is a three-time member of the U.S. Women’s National Team (1997, 2001, 2005), and was selected to the All-World Team in 2005. She is currently serving in her 11th season as head women’s lacrosse coach at Northwestern University.

Jesse Hubbard
Hubbard will be inducted as a truly great player. Hubbard was a three-time All-American at Princeton (N.J.) University, earning first-team honors in 1996 and 1998 and second-team honors in 1997. He helped lead the Tigers to three straight NCAA national championships (1996, 1997, 1998) and four consecutive Ivy League titles during his career. Hubbard also earned All-Ivy League recognition three times, and was named the league’s player of the year as a sophomore in 1996 when he established a new school record with 53 goals in a season. He finished his career as Princeton’s all-time leader in goals scored (163) and second in career points (211). He was a member of the 1998 U.S. National Team that won the world championship, and played professionally for three indoor seasons and eight outdoor seasons. He was a six-time all-star in Major League Lacrosse (2001-2006) and the MLL’s leading scorer three times (2001-2003).

Tim Nelson
Nelson will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a three-time first-team All-American (1983, 1984, 1985) at Syracuse (N.Y.) University after transferring from North Carolina State University following his freshman season. In addition, Nelson was awarded the USILA’s Lt. Col. Jack Turnbull Award as the national attackman of the year three times (1983, 1984 and 1985). Syracuse won the NCAA national championship in 1983 and finished as the national runner-up during Nelson’s junior and senior seasons in 1984 and 1985. Nelson also was selected for the USILA’s North-South All-Star Game in 1985, and recognized on the NCAA’s Silver Anniversary Team in 1995.

Cindy Timchal
Timchal will be inducted as a truly great coach. Timchal is the all-time winningest coach in NCAA women’s lacrosse history, with a 412-108 career record in 30 seasons as a head coach through 2012. She is the only women’s lacrosse coach to lead three different teams to the NCAA tournament, having done so previously with Northwestern University and the University of Maryland in addition to her current team, the U.S. Naval Academy. Timchal has won the NCAA national championship eight times (1992, 1995-2001) – all at Maryland – and made her 24th NCAA tournament appearance in 2012, the most all-time among coaches. She was named the IWLCA’s national coach of the year in 1999, was the ACC’s coach of the year four times (1999, 2000, 2001, and 2003) and recognized as the head coach on the NCAA’s 25th Anniversary Team in 2006.

A fuller listing of each inductees accomplishments follows below:

Jen Adams – Player 
• Four-year college player at University of Maryland (1998-2001)
• First-team All-American (1999, 2000 and 2001)
• Tewaaraton Award winner (2001)
• National Player of the Year (1999, 2000, and 2001)
• National Attacker of the Year (1999, 2000, and 2001)
• Atlantic Coast Conference Champion (1999, 2000, and 2001)
• NCAA National Champion (1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001)
• Named to NCAA 25th Anniversary Team
• Maryland career leader in goals, assists, and points
• Australia Women’s National Team (2001, 2005, and 2009)
• All-World Team (2005, 2009)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Potomac Chapter Hall of Fame (2007)

Roy Colsey – Player
• Three-year player at Yorktown (N.Y.) High School (1989-1991)
• Selected as all-county (1990 and 1991) and All-American (1990 and 1991)
• Won state championship (1989 and 1991)
• Four-time All-American at Syracuse Univ.: 1st Team (1993, 1994, 1995); 3rd Team (1992)
• Winner of USILA’s McLaughlin Award as Midfielder of the Year (1995)
• Two-time NCAA National Champion (1993 and 1995)
• Selected to North/South All-Star Game (1995)
• Played post-collegiate club lacrosse for New York AC (1997-2000)
• Played professional lacrosse for New York Saints (indoor, 2000-2001)
• Played professional lacrosse for Philadelphia Barrage (outdoor, 2001-2008)
• Selected as NLL All-Pro: First Team (2001); Second Team (2000)
• Selected as MLL All-Pro: First Team (2006) and four-time MLL All-Star
• Named MVP of MLL Championship Game (2006)
• Member of U.S. Men’s National Team (2006)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Hudson Valley Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2001)

Brian Dougherty – Player
• Four-year player at Episcopal (Pa.) Academy (1989-1992)
• Named all-state (1990, 1991, 1992) and All-American (1991, 1992)
• Won state championship (1991)
• Two-time All-American at the University of Maryland: First Team (1995 and 1996)
• Winner of USILA’s Ensign C. Markland Kelly Award as Goalie of the Year (1995, 1996)
• Named to All-ACC Team (1995 and 1996)
• Named Outstanding Player in NCAA Tournament (1995)
• Selected to USILA’s North/South All-Star Game (1996)
• Selected to ACC’s 50th Anniversary Team
• Played post-collegiate club for Chesapeake (1997-2000) and Team Toyota
• Played professional lacrosse for Rochester Rattlers (outdoor, 2001-2002)
• Played professional lacrosse for Long Island Lizards (outdoor, 2003-2004, 2009); MLL Champions (2003)
• Played professional lacrosse for Philadelphia Barrage (outdoor, 2005-2008)
• Selected as MLL All-Star six times (2001-2004, 2006, 2008)
• Named MLL Goalie of the Year three times (2003, 2006, 2007)
• Member of the U.S. Men’s National Team (1998 and 2010)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Philadelphia/Eastern Pa. Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2010)

Missy Foote – Coach
• Head Coach at Middlebury College (1979-1983, 1987 to present)
• Cumulative record of 376-101-1 (79%) through the end of the 2012 season.
• Five-time NCAA Division III National Champion (1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004)
• Five-time National Coach of the Year (1994, 1997, 2000, 2001, and 2002)
• Five-time conference Coach of the Year (2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005)
• Coached Middlebury to four perfect seasons (1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004)
• Led Middlebury to 14 straight trips to NCAA semifinals (1994-2007)
• Seven-time NESCAC Champions
• Assistant Coach for U.S. Women’s Developmental Team (2005-2009)
• Served on NCAA Division III Women’s Lacrosse Committee (2003-2006)
• Served on Tewaaraton Committee (2001-2005)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Vermont Chapter Hall of Fame (2002)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse New England Chapter Hall of Fame (2003)
• Inducted to Springfield College Hall of Fame (2004)
• Inducted to Ward Melville High School Hall of Fame (2002)

Kelly Amonte Hiller – Player
• Four-year player at Thayer (Mass.) Academy
• Three-time high school All-American (1990, 1991, and 1992)
• Four-year player at the University of Maryland (1993-1996)
• Four-time college All-American: First Team (1994, 1995, 1996); Second Team (1993)
• National defensive player of the year (1995)
• National offensive player of the year (1996)
• ACC Female Athlete of the Year (1996)
• Two-time NCAA National Champion (1995, 1996)
• Selected twice to All-NCAA Tournament Team (1994, 1995)
• Three-time member of the U.S. Women’s National Team (1997, 2001, and 2005)
• Named to All-World Team (2005)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse New England Chapter Hall of Fame (2006)
• Inducted to University of Maryland Hall of Fame (2009)

Jesse Hubbard – Player
• Four-year player at St. Alban’s (D.C.) School (1991-1994)
• Named All-Metro twice (1993 and 1994) and All-American once (1994)
• Selected as The Washington Post’s Player of the Year (1994)
• Three-time college All-American at Princeton: 1st Team (1996, 1998); 2nd Team (1997)
• Three-time NCAA National Champion (1996, 1997, and 1998)
• Named to All-NCAA Tournament Team three times (1996, 1997, and 1998)
• Named to All-Ivy League Team three times (1996, 1997, and 1998)
• Named Ivy League Player of the Year (1996)
• Won four Ivy League championships (1995, 1996, 1997, and 1998)
• Finished as Princeton’s all-time leader in career goals; goals in a season (1996)
• Played post-collegiate club for Capital Lacrosse Club (1999)
• Played indoor professional lacrosse for three seasons (1999-2002)
• Played outdoor professional lacrosse for eight seasons ( 2001-2008)
• Six-time MLL All-Star (2001-2006)
• Leading goal scorer in MLL three times (2001-2003)
• Member of the U.S. Men’s National Team (1998)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Potomac Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2008)

Tim Nelson – Player
• Four-year player at Yorktown (N.Y.) High School (1978-1981)
• Named All-County (1979, 1980, and 1981) and All-American (1980 and 1981)
• Won three section championships (1978, 1980, and 1981)
• Four-year college player at North Carolina State (1982) and Syracuse (1983-1985)
• Three-time first-team All-American: (1983, 1984, and 1985)
• Three-time winner of USILA’s Turnbull Award as Attackman of the Year (1983, 1984, 1985)
• Won NCAA National Championship (1983)
• Finished as NCAA Championship runner-up (1984 and 1985)
• Served as Syracuse team captain (1985)
• Selected to USILA’s North/South All-Star Game (1985)
• Named to NCAA’s Silver Anniversary Team (1995)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Hudson Valley Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame (1994)

Cindy Timchal – Coach
• Assistant Coach at University of Pennsylvania (1980)
• Head Coach at Northwestern University (1982-1990) – 76 wins, 40 losses
• Head Coach at University of Maryland (1991-2006) – 260 wins, 46 losses
• Head Coach of U.S Naval Academy club team (2007)
• Head Coach of U.S. Naval Academy varsity team (2008-2012) – 76 wins, 22 losses
• Cumulative varsity record through the end of the 2012 season: 412 wins, 108 losses (79%)
• Winner of eight NCAA National Championships (1992, 1995-2001)
• Named National Coach of the Year (1999)
• Named IWCLA South Region Coach of the Year (2000)
• Named ACC Coach of the Year (1999, 2000, 2001, 2003)
• Named to NCAA’s 25th Anniversary Team as Head Coach (2006)
• Head Coach of U.S. Developmental Team (1997-1998)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Philadelphia/Eastern Pa. Chapter Hall of Fame (2002)
• Inducted to US Lacrosse Potomac Chapter Hall of Fame (2006)
• Inducted to Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame – Delaware County Chapter (2009)

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Maryland to visit Northwestern in ACC/Big Ten Challenge

Posted on 14 May 2012 by WNST Staff

The 14th annual ACC/Big Ten Challenge Presented by DICK’S Sporting Goods on Nov. 27-28 will be highlighted by North Carolina at Indiana, Ohio State at Duke and North Carolina State at Michigan, six programs expected to be highly ranked entering the 2012-13 season. ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPNU will combine to televise all 12 games of the two-day event matching top college basketball programs playing for conference supremacy and the Commissioners Cup.

All 12 games will also be available via WatchESPN, which delivers live access to ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU and ESPN3 on PCs, smartphones and tablets to fans who receive ESPN’s linear networks as part of their video subscription from Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Bright House Networks or Verizon FiOS TV.

The 2012 Challenge involves nine teams ranked in an ESPN.com early preseason top 25, including five of the top nine: No. 1 Indiana, No. 5 Michigan, No. 6 NC State, No. 8 Ohio State and No. 9 Michigan State.

The ACC won the first 10 Challenges while the Big Ten captured the Commissioner Cup for the third consecutive event, including an eight to four win advantage over the ACC last year. In the event of a 6-6 tie, the Commissioner’s Cup will remain with the conference that won the previous year. 2012 Challenge highlights:

  • Off a Ratings High: ESPN’s telecast of Ohio State’s 85-63 victory over Duke last year was the highest-rated and most-viewed Challenge game ever, averaging a 2.6 rating and 2,618,000 households. The telecast propelled ESPN to its most-viewed Challenge, averaging 1,555,000 households, based on a 1.6 rating.
  • One more Shot at the Dozen: Duke, which has won 11 of its 13 Challenge games, will host Ohio State in its quest for an event-record 12th victory. Duke lost to Ohio State last year and to Wisconsin in 2009.
  • First Challenge Matchups: Four of the telecasts will feature first-time Challenge matchups: Virginia at No. 22 Wisconsin, Maryland at Northwestern, No. 9 Michigan State at Miami and Georgia Tech at Illinois.
    • In addition to first-time Challenge games, several of the teams are infrequent opponents: Michigan State and Miami have never met; Northwestern and Maryland played one other time, a Northwestern victory in 1958; Virginia and Wisconsin split its two games, Virginia in 1975 and Wisconsin in 1999; and Illinois has defeated Georgia Tech in six of its seven games, including the last one in 2001.
  • Tourney Teams: Eleven teams between the two conferences played in the 2012 NCAA Tournament: Duke, Florida State, North Carolina, NC State and Virginia from the ACC, and Indiana, Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State, Purdue and Wisconsin from the Big Ten.
  • Following a First with a Rematch: Boston College and Penn State and Nebraska and Wake Forest will follow first-time Challenge meetings with a second consecutive showdown in the event.
    • Boston College, which won its first five games, lost to Penn State last year, while Nebraska lost its Challenge debut to Wake Forest.
  • Threepeat: Five of the games will mark three-time Challenge matchups: North Carolina at Indiana (Indiana win in 2001 and North Carolina in 2004), NC State at Michigan (Michigan win in 2003 and NC State in 2006), Ohio State at Duke (Duke win in 2002 and Ohio State in 2011), Iowa at Virginia Tech (won by Virginia Tech in 2006 and 2009) and Purdue at Clemson (Purdue win in 2003 and Clemson in 2007).
  • Three and one more: Minnesota and Florida State will meet for the fourth time (Minnesota won in 2000 and Florida State in 2004 and 2007).

2012 ACC/Big Ten Challenge schedule (times and networks are to be determined):

Date Game
Tue, Nov 27 No. 13 North Carolina at No. 1 Indiana
  No. 6 NC State at No. 5 Michigan
  No. 25 Minnesota at Florida State
  Maryland at Northwestern
  Iowa at Virginia Tech
  Nebraska at Wake Forest
Wed, Nov 28 No. 8 Ohio State at No. 15 Duke
Virginia at No. 22 Wisconsin
No. 9 Michigan State at Miami
Purdue at Clemson
Georgia Tech at Illinois
Boston College at Penn State

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Former Maryland quarterback O’Brien chooses Wisconsin as next school

Posted on 28 March 2012 by WNST Staff

After flirting with several other schools such as Penn State and Ole Miss, former Maryland quarterback Danny O’Brien has decided to transfer to the University of Wisconsin, the school announced on Wednesday.

The 2010 ACC Rookie of the Year follows in the footsteps of Russell Wilson, who transferred from North Carolina State to Wisconsin and threw 33 touchdown passes and accumulated more than 3,000 passing yards for the Badgers last season. In a similar situation to O’Brien, Wilson was also a post-graduate transfer who did not have to sit out a season after enrolling in a graduate program not offered at his previous school.

O’Brien walks into an ideal situation to play immediately with the Badgers, who are dealing with injuries and a lack of depth at the quarterback position. He is scheduled to graduate in the spring, completing his undergraduate degree in only three seasons and leaving him with two years of eligibility to play Wisconsin.

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Gary Williams To Be Honored At Dick Vitale Gala

Posted on 22 March 2012 by WNST Staff

The Seventh Annual Dick Vitale Gala to Honor College Coaching Greats Lou Holtz, Jay Wright and Gary Williams

Net Proceeds from Gala to Benefit Pediatric Cancer Research through The V Foundation for Cancer Research

 

Cary, N.C.—The V Foundation for Cancer Research, one of the nation’s leading cancer research fundraising organizations, is excited to announce the Seventh Annual Dick Vitale Gala presented by Mountain Dew.  The Gala, held on Friday, May 18, 2012, at the Ritz-Carlton in Sarasota, Florida, is hosted by ESPN’s Hall of Fame Sportscaster Dick Vitale and will honor the former head men’s basketball coach for the University of Maryland Gary Williams, Hall of Fame college football coach Lou Holtz, and the head men’s basketball coach for Villanova University Jay Wright.  Net proceeds for the event will help fund pediatric cancer research.

“Celebrities from the sports world will focus on raising $1 million for pediatric cancer research,” said Vitale.  “This year’s gala will have a new twist as we will end the evening with music and dancing to the Motown sound of The Spinners.  Nothing excites me more than the preparation for my annual Dick Vitale Gala.  It is so gratifying to see everyone uniting and demonstrating a keen sense of pride and passion to help raise dollars for kids battling cancer.”

Since its inception in 2006, the event has raised over $6.5 million for pediatric cancer research.    This year, net proceeds from the Gala will benefit pediatric cancer research initiatives at All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and Shands Cancer Center in Gainesville through The V Foundation.  The V Foundation has awarded $6.16 million in research grants in the state of Florida.

“Dick has been a tremendous friend to The V Foundation over the years,” said Nick Valvano, CEO of The V Foundation. “I’d like to personally thank Dick and this year’s specials guests Lou Holtz, Gary Williams, and Jay Wright for their support of the Foundation. We are looking forward to another exciting gala this year.”

The Seventh Annual Dick Vitale Gala will begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and an after party featuring a live performance from musical group The Spinners.

Tickets and sponsorship opportunities for the event are now available.  For more information or to purchase tickets for the Dick Vitale Gala, please visit www.jimmyv.org/vitale or contact Mary Kenealy at 941-350-0580 or dickvitalegala@jimmyv.org.
About The V Foundation

The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, The Foundation has raised more than $120 million to fund cancer research grants nationwide. It awards 100 percent of all direct cash donations and net proceeds of events directly to cancer research and related programs. Administrative and fundraising expenses are paid by the Foundation’s endowment. The Foundation awards grants through a competitive awards process strictly supervised by a Scientific Advisory Board. For more information on The V Foundation or to make a donation, please visit www.jimmyv.org.

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Maryland’s Alyssa Thomas Named ACC Player of the Year

Posted on 01 March 2012 by WNST Staff

GREENSBORO, N.C. – Maryland women’s basketball sophomore Alyssa Thomas was named the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year, announced by ACC Commissioner John Swofford Thursday. The conference’s top individual honor is voted on by the league’s “Blue Ribbon Panel,” which consists of national and local media members, as well as school representatives.

Thomas, a native of Harrisburg, Pa., is just the second sophomore ever to be honored with the league’s top honor in its 29-year history. Duke’s Alana Beard won in 2002 as a sophomore. Beard and Thomas were both named ACC Rookie of the Year in their respective freshman seasons.

She is the fourth Terrapin to win the honor and the third in the last five years. Vicky Bullett won in 1989, Crystal Langhorne was honored in 2008 and Kristi Toliver won in 2009.

“First, I have to thank my teammates and our coaches. They push me every single day and we play hard for each other,” Thomas said. “This is such an honor because there’s so many great players in our league.”

Thomas, the ACC’s leading scorer, is averaging 17.0 points per game and 17.7 points per conference game. Her 8.5 rebounds per ACC game are fifth-best in the league. She was named ACC Player of the Week Monday and recorded a total of four weekly honors this season – more than any other player in the league.

“What a tremendous honor for Alyssa and we’re really appreciative that the voters recognized the incredible season she’s had for Maryland,” head coach Brenda Frese said. “We also know that there were other worthy candidates. I think Alyssa’s had more legendary-type moments in one season than most have in a lifetime. Her will to win is unsurpassed and I don’t think anyone plays harder for her team. She’s easy to coach and she responds to being challenged. Of course, this could not have happened without her tremendous teammates and the staff.”

“We feel like we’ve helped her improve, but really, what you see from Alyssa all started back home in Harrisburg, where she was raised by an incredible family and community. As a person and a player, she’s one of the people you want to wear your uniform and to represent your school. We’re incredibly proud and happy for her and our program.”

Thomas proved to be a game-changer for the Terrapins. In their third ACC contest of the season, Thomas scored 18 second half points, including the winning jumper with 17.0 seconds left, to help Maryland come back from a 20-point deficit to top Georgia Tech. Two days later, she made a reverse layup at the buzzer to force overtime at North Carolina. The Terps would go on to win 76-72.

In the Terrapins’ 63-61 win over No. 5 Duke on Feb. 19, Thomas pulled in 12 rebounds but made one of the best defensive plays of the season on the last play. With four seconds left in the game and the Terps with a two-point lead, Thomas helped get a stop in the paint to force the ball outside. As the Blue Devils swung it around the arc to Haley Peters on the opposite side of the court from Thomas, she sprinted to Peters and blocked the potential game-winning shot as the buzzer expired, sealing the win for the Terrapins. It would be Duke’s lone loss in ACC play.

A week later, she scored 22 of her 24 points in the second half to lead Maryland to a 65-50 win at North Carolina State in the regular season finale. In one 10-minute span in the second half, she rattled off 16 straight points for the Terrapins and finished with a career-high 17 blocks and four rebounds.

Thomas has scored in double figures in 25 of 28 games this season with eight double-doubles. The Terrapins won four straight to end the regular season. In that four-game span, Thomas averaged 17.0 points, 13.3 rebounds and four assists per game.

“What Alyssa has done this year against some stiff competition is nothing short of remarkable and has been so much fun to watch,” Maryland director of athletics Kevin Anderson said. “Alyssa represents all that we are here at Maryland with her incredible work ethic, love for her team and leadership on and off the court. Congratulations to her and her teammates, Coach Frese and the rest of the program for their part in this special award.”

Four members of the fifth-ranked Terrapins squad were named to the All-ACC Teams announced Monday. Thomas earned first team honors, while Tianna Hawkins made the second team. Lynetta Kizer and Laurin Mincy each earned honorable mention honors and Kizer was enamed the ACC’s Sixth Player of the Year. Brene Moseley was named to the ACC All-Freshman Team Tuesday and Alicia DeVaughn was named to the ACC All-Defensive Team Wednesday.

The Terrapins (25-4, 11-4 ACC) will open play in the 35th Annual ACC Women’s Basketball Tournament Friday evening at approximately 8 p.m. as the No. 3 seed. They will play either sixth-seeded Virginia or 11th-seeded Boston College, depending on Thursday’s result.

All eight games on Thursday and Friday will be broadcast on the league’s regional sports network (RSN), which includes Comcast SportsNet +, Fox Sports South, Fox Sports Florida and the New England Sports Network. Friday’s contest can be seen locally on Comcast SportsNet +. The entire tournament can also be seen on ESPN3 and Maryland’s games will also be shown online on the Terps’ Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MarylandWomensBasketballFans.

For more information, visit the official site of the 2012 ACC Women’s Basketball Tournament at www.theACC.com/SheCanPlay. Fans can also follow the upcoming Tournament games on Twitter at @ACCwbb.

Maryland is ranked No. 5 in the latest ESPN/USA Today Division I Top 25 Coaches’ poll and No. 6 in this week’s Associated Press rankings.

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Loyola Visits Rider Friday in MAAC Battle

Posted on 24 February 2012 by WNST Staff

Opponent Rider Broncs
Date Friday, February 24, 2012
Time 7:00 p.m.
Location Lawrenceville, N.J. | Alumni Gym
TV | Radio ESPN2
Series Record Rider leads, 22-16
Last Meeting Loyola 63, Rider 46 – February 3, 2012 at Loyola

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland plays its penultimate game of the 2011-2012 regular-season on Friday, February 24, 2012, when it takes on Rider University in Lawrenceville, N.J. Tip-off is slated for 7 o’clock.

On The Tube

The game will be televised live on ESPN2, the Greyhounds’ 11th televised game of the season. Doug Sherman will call the play-by-play, and former North Carolina State star Dereck Whittenburg will provide color analysis.

The game is Loyola’s first on ESPN2 since December 31, 2008, when it played Duke in Cameron Indoor Stadium.

Series History

Loyola and Rider will meet for the 39th time in series history when the teams take the floor on Friday with the Broncs holding a 22-16 lead in the previous 38 games.

The Greyhounds have won five of the last eight meetings between the teams.

The teams played just three weeks ago with Loyola coming out with a 63-46 win in front of a national television audience on ESPNU and sell-out crowd at Reitz Arena. Loyola held Rider to 13-percent shooting from the field in the first half and 12 points before the break.

Rider, which never led in the game, got back to within 13 points with less than 13 minutes to go in the game, but the Broncs would draw no closer.

Erik Etherly led all players with 15 points, and Robert Olson scored 14. Shane Walker had a game-high 12 rebounds for the Greyhounds.

20-Win Season

The Greyhounds’ victory over Boston University last Sunday was their 20th of the season, setting a school Division I record.

Loyola, which moved to NCAA Division I in 1981-1982, had won 19 games in 2007-2008 and 18 in 2006-2007.

More Than 60 Years

The last time the Loyola men’s basketball program won 20 games in a season, 1948-1949, the following things were going on in the world, 63 years ago:

Harry Truman began his first full term as President of the United States.

Arthur Miller’s Death Of A Salesman premiered on Broadway.

NATO was formed.

The Basketball Association of America and the National Basketball League merged to form the NBA.

The first jet-powered airliner, the de Havilland Comet, took flight.

Billy Joel, Joe Theismann, Bruce Springsteen & Meryl Streep were born.

Milestones And Firsts

Loyola has accomplished several milestones and firsts throughout the 2011-2012 season. Here is a sample of a few:

First 20-win season in Division I history.

Tied record with 12 MAAC wins (2006-2007 & 2007-2008).

Tied school Division I record with eight non-conference wins (1993-1994).

Longest winning streak in school Division I history (8, Nov. 14-Dec. 10). Also, second longest winning streak in D-I history (7, Jan. 19-Feb. 10).

First back-to-back sellouts of Reitz Arena since the venue opened in 1984 (Feb. 3 and 10).

Snapped Bucknell’s 18-game home court winning streak.

On Target

Robert Olson rebounded from a subpar shooting performance last Wednesday at Marist with one of his best shooting games as a Greyhound.

Olson scored just four points on 2-of-10 from the field against the Red Foxes, but he missed just one shot (6-of-7) to finish with 17 points against the Red Foxes.

The junior guard made 5-of-6 3-pointers, 4-of-4 in the second half, and also had three assists and four rebounds.

Second Half Shooting

Loyola started the game making just 3-of-11 shots in the first 12 minutes and was only 10-of-29 (.345) from the floor in the first half, but the Greyhounds picked up their percentage drastically in the second half.

Loyola made 15-of-21 shots after the break, going a season-best 71.4-percent from the field in the second half.

Back In Balance

During the Greyhounds’ two-game losing streak against Fairfield and Marist, several factors contributed to their demise, including lack of balanced scoring.

At Marist, Shane Walker (16) and Dylon Cormier (11) were the only Greyhounds in double-figures, and versus Fairfield, Erik Etherly and Robert Olson (both 17) were the only ones to top 10 points.

In the win over Boston U., four Greyhounds scored 11 or more: Olson (17), Cormier (14), Justin Drummond (12) and Etherly (11).

Loyola is 10-1 this season when four or more players score in double figures, having not lost since the season-opener on November 11 at Wake Forest when that occurs. The Greyhounds are 19-2 when three or more players top 10.

Transversely, the Greyhounds are just 1-5 when two or fewer players tally 10 or more with the only win coming on December 7 at George Washington.

Last Time Out

Robert Olson hit four of his five three points in the second half and helped Loyola pull away from Boston University for a 69-56 Bracketbuster victory on Sunday. Olson finished with 17 points, needing just seven shots to score that number.

Olson broke a 34-34 tie with his first three of the second half, sparking a 16-3 Loyola run that would put them in front by 13 with 11:28 to play. The Terriers would get it back to four with less than six minutes, but another Olson trey would push it to seven and start a 13-2 stretch for the Greyhounds.

Telling Stats

Loyola’s two most recent losses underscored the importance for the Greyhounds of capitalizing on a few areas of the box score.

Six of Loyola’s seven losses have come when scoring fewer transition points – and the seventh loss was in a game that the teams tied in the category – than its opponents.

The Greyhounds also dropped to 2-5 this year in the seven games they have shot fewer free throws than their opponents, compared to 15-2 when shooting more.

Loyola is also 4-7 when its opponents have a better field-goal percentage, compared to 15-0 when the Greyhounds shoot at a better clip.

Balance Abound

Loyola enters last week of its regular season as one of only two Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference teams (Rider) to boast four players with double-figure scoring averages, although the Broncs have six.

The Greyhounds are the only team with four players who have averages of 10.0 points per game or greater – Dylon Cormier (13.8), Erik Etherly (13.3), Robert Olson (11.8) and Justin Drummond (11.1).

Leading The Charge

Erik Etherly and Robert Olson have been the Greyhounds’ two most consistent scorers since the calendar flipped to 2012, averaging a combined 28.4 points per game since January 5, a span of 14 games in which they are 11-3.

Olson has scored three more points than Olson during those 14 games, 200-197 and averages 14.3 points to Etherly’s 14.1.

Combined, the duo is shooting 51.5-percent from the field (136-of-264). Olson is 43-of-79 (.544) from behind the 3-point line, as well.

Etherly also leads Loyola with a 7.4 rebounds per game mark during the last 13 games, while Olson is third on the team, averaging 4.0.

Tops In Conference Play, Too

Robert Olson and Erik Etherly have also paced the Greyhounds in their 16 MAAC games thus far as the top two scorers. Etherly again is slightly ahead of Olson, scoring-wise, tallying 216 (13.5 per game) points to Olson’s 212 (13.3).

Etherly has averaged 7.3 rebounds in 6 conference games, and Olson is third on the team with an average of 4.3.

Reitz Was Rockin’

The Greyhounds’ games in Reitz Arena against Rider and Iona were both been sellout crowds of 2,100. It marked the first time since Reitz opened in December 1984 that the gym has had back-to-back sellout crowds.

The crowd on February 3 against Rider was the building’s first sellout since November 14, 2008, against Mount St. Mary’s.

Still Crashing The Offensive Boards

The Greyhounds corrected one problem from the loss to Fairfield in which they had just 10 offensive rebounds in 36 opportunities. They pulled down 18 against Marist, their most since grabbing 22 on January 29 at Canisius. Shane Walker led the way with six, while Justin Drummond and Jordan Latham each had three.

Loyola leads the MAAC in offensive rebounding as a team, averaging 13.9, a full rebound more per game that second-place Canisius (12.9).

Despite the team ranking, no Greyhounds player is higher than seventh in the conference in offensive rebounds per game. Erik Etherly is seventh with 2.6, while Drummond is 13th with 2.1, and Walker is 15th with 2.0. No other team in the MAAC has more than two players in the top 15.

Offensive Onslaught

Loyola turned in season highs in points (87), field goals made (32) and field goals attempted (63) at home against Iona.

The Greyhounds’ 47 points in the first half were also the most they’ve scored in the first 20 minutes this season and were tied for the most in either half, matching the 47 scored on November 14 against Coppin State in the second half.

Eight Field Goals For Three

Three Greyhounds knocked down eight or more field goals versus the Gaels. Erik Etherly was 9-of-12 from the field, Justin Drummond 8-of-12, and Dylon Cormier 8-of-16.

It was the first time in the eight-year tenure of Jimmy Patsos as head coach that three or more players have made eight or more baskets in the same game.

Etherly, Cormier Top 20

For the second time this year, Erik Etherly and Dylon Cormier both topped the 20-point mark. The duo also accomplished the feat on November 17 at UMBC when Etherly scored a career-best 27, and Cormier finished with 20.

Against Iona, Etherly and Cormier’s combined 44 points were just over half of the Greyhounds’ 87.

Drummond Raises Efficiency

Justin Drummond had his best shooting night of the season versus Iona, making 8-of-12 shots (.667). Drummond, who shot .446 as a freshman last year, has seen his field-goal percentage dip to .387 this year.

His previous best outing of the season came on December 28 at Bucknell when he was 5-of-8 (.625) from the floor.

Defensive Presence

Jordan Latham did not play in the Greyhounds’ first meeting with Iona, an 11-point setback, but the sophomore forward made his presence known last Friday night.

He came off the bench and played 14 minutes and had four blocked shots. Three of his blocks were not just redirects, but true swats of the ball. Each of his blocked shots came against different Iona players and in different situations. Twice, Latham swatted shots by driving guards, and he twice denied post players.

The four blocks were a career-high for Latham.

R.J.’s Assists Equal Success

R.J. Williams recorded five assists in the win over Iona, the fourth time this year he’s dished out five or more. The Greyhounds are 7-0 this season in games that Williams has four or more helpers.

As a team, the Greyhounds are 4-0 this year when recorded 15 or more assists.

Six Under Sixty

For the first time in its NCAA Division I history (since 1981-1982), Loyola held six consecutive opponents to fewer than 60 points.

During the span, all Loyola victories, the Greyhounds have held Siena, Saint Peter’s (twice), Niagara, Canisius and Rider to an average of 53.2 points per game.

The Greyhounds previously had held three teams to sub-60 performances just once since joining Division I, and that came during 1981-1982, their first season at this level.

The last time a Loyola team held six-straight teams under 60, regardless of division, came in January-February 1977 when it held six teams in a row – Southampton, Saint Peter’s, Randolph-Macon, Mount St. Mary’s, Baltimore and Philadelphia Textile – to 59 or fewer. The Greyhounds, however, were just 3-3 in that stretch.

During The Six

Loyola’s success during the six games was reflected in several statistics. Opponents were shooting .387, .046 lower than the season average of .433. Also, Loyola held foes to .241 from 3-point range, more than 10 points lower than the season mark of .350.

Following the Greyhounds’ game at Iona on January 15, Loyola was ranked 265th in field-goal percentage defense (.449), 325th in 3-point defense (.389), and 163rd in scoring defense (66.2).

After the six games the Greyhounds to 193rd in field goal percentage defense (.443), 215th in 3-point defense (.350) and 71st in scoring defense (62.8).

Olson’s January, Continued

After a stretch of not scoring in double figures for the last three games of December and the first two in January, Robert Olson was the Greyhounds’ leading scorer during the first month of the new calendar year, averaging 14.1.

In Loyola’s last 14 games, a stretch in which the Greyhounds are 11-3, Olson has averaged a team-best 14.3 points per game, most on the team.

Overall this season, Olson is shooting 46.1-percent from 3-point range, and his 59 threes made this season are 11th in school single-season history. His 3-point field goal percentage currently stands third in school single-season history.

Olson has made 131 threes in his career, good for sixth-best all-time at Loyola, passing Gerald Brown (2006-2008) in the game against Fairfield.

Something Had To Give

Entering the first meeting with Rider, Loyola had held four consecutive opponents to 57 or fewer points, while the Broncs were averaging 87.5 points in their previous three games.

Loyola’s defense prevailed in the contest, holding Rider to 12 points in the first half and just 46 overall. It was the Broncs’ lowest scoring game since February 2008 when Fairfield held them to 40.

Almost 20 Years

Rider’s 46 points were the fewest Loyola has allowed since the Greyhounds defeated Niagara, 68-45, on February 21, 1992, a stretch of 521 games.

Loyola has now held opponents to 49 or fewer points eight times since joining NCAA Division I in 1981-1982. The Greyhounds did it twice each in 1981-1982, 1984-1985 and 1991-1992 and once in 1983-1984.

Tied For fifth In Road Wins

As of the beginning of the week, Loyola’s 10 road wins had them tied for fifth in all of NCAA Division I for victories away from its home court.

Cleveland State, Wagner, Iona and Murray State are all tied for first with 11.

Walker Moves Into Second

Shane Walker blocked two Fairfield shots in the first three minutes of the game, and he then swatted a Maurice Barrow layup with 13:58 on the clock, tying him for second all-time at Loyola in blocked shots.

With five blocks against Canisius, Walker now has 124 blocks in his career and is all alone in second place. Brian Carroll (1997-2001) holds the school record with 213.

Thievery

Loyola caused 20 Siena turnovers, and the Greyhounds were credited with 19 steals. R.J. Williams led the way with a career-high five, while Erik Etherly, Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each had three.

The 19 steals are the second-most in school history, one more than the Greyhounds posted in a November 29, 1997, game at Kent State. It is also the most Loyola has recorded against a Division I opponent. The school single-game record of 20 came on February 28, 1996, when the team closed the regular-season against St. Mary’s (Md.).

Running Away

Runs have been a big part of the Greyhounds’ success this year. Here is a look at some runs of note:

Opponent Run Start Finish
Coppin State 10-1, 4:26 31-32, 1:36 (1) 41-33, 17:11 (2)
at UMBC 16-4, 8:08 35-31, 19:16 (2) 51-34, 11:08 (2)
FGCU 22-5, 6:53 15-16, 8:08 (1) 37-21, 1:11 (1)
Marist 9-0, 1:50 47-48, 11:16 (2) 56-48, 9:26 (2)
Marist 15-3, 5:47 61-57, 6:03 (2) 76-60, :16 (2)
at Siena 13-0; 4:27 0-2, 19:28 (1) 13-2; 15:35 (1)
at The Mount 9-0, 1:55 24-26, 1:59 (1) 33-26, :04 (1)
Canisius 18-4, 10:14 57-53, 10:14 (2) 75-57, 2:11 (2)
at Fairfield 36-21, 16:42 30-45, 16:42 (2) 66-63, Final
Siena 22-2, 7:36 40-47, 10:35 (2) 62-49, 2:49 (2)
Saint Peter’s 20-5, 8:13 15-20, 8:55 (1) 35-25, :48 (1)
at Niagara 15-2, 5:42 44-46, 7:48 (2) 59-48, 1:58 (2)
at Canisius 24-2, 12:04 16-22, 8:02 (1) 40-24, 15:58 (2)
Rider 18-0, 8:06 6-5, 16:50 (1) 24-5, 8:55 (2)
Iona 36-17, 12:50 11-10, 13:40 (1) 47-28, 00:50 (1)
Boston U. 16-3, 4:37 34-34, 16:05 (2) 50-37, 11:28 (2)

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road. Patsos, who is in his eighth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 118 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

Two Of A Kind

Although unofficial, research shows that Jimmy Patsos is one of only two coaches in the last 20 years to take a team that won just one game the year prior to his arrival.

Brigham Young finished the 1996-1997 season with a 1-25 record. Steve Cleveland took over the following season and tallied 138 wins until his departure for Fresno State after the 2004-2005 season.

Men’s & Women’s Coaches With 100

Loyola University Maryland is one of just 26 mid-major schools that has men’s and women’s basketball coaches with 100 or more victories at their current school after Greyhound women’s coach Joe Logan got his 100th on December 18 in a win at George Washington.

Loyola is the only school in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to have accomplished the feat, and it is one of only five institutions at which the coaches have both won 100 or more games in 10 or fewer seasons.

Getting To The Line

As a team, Loyola went to the free-throw line 46 times at UMBC, making 31. The 46 attempts are the sixth-most all-time and most since the 2004-2005 squad attempted 53 on December 5, 2004, against Niagara.

Loyola’s 31 free throws made rank 11th on the school single-game chart and were the most since making 32 on January 14, 2009, versus NJIT.

Although his shot was not falling at UMBC, Dylon Cormier still found ways to be productive on the offensive end of the floor. The sophomore guard was just 2-of-9 from the field, but he went to the free-throw line 17 times, making 15, and finished with 20 points.

Cormier’s 15 free throws made are tied for sixth in Loyola single-game history, matching the total made by Mike Powell at Saint Peter’s on December 6, 1997, and Donovan Thomas against Marist on February 23, 2003. The 15 makes were the most by a Loyola player since Jamal Barney set the school record with 18 on January 14, 2009, against NJIT. His 17 attempts rank tied for sixth all-time.

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Three players – sophomore guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), sophomore forward Jordan Latham (City) and freshman guard R.J. Williams (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Shane Walker & Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Justin Drummond, Riverdale Baptist, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

What’s Next

The Greyhounds stay on the road for their final game of the 2011-2012 regular-season when they take on Manhattan College at 4 o’clock on Sunday at Draddy Gymnasium in Riverdale, N.Y.

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Loyola Hosts Saint Peter’s in Sunday Matinee

Posted on 22 January 2012 by WNST Staff

Opponent Saint Peter’s Peacocks
Date Sunday, January 22, 2012
Time 12:00 p.m.
Location Baltimore, Md. | Reitz Arena
TV  Hounds Unleashed
Series Record Saint Peter’s leads, 42-32
Last Meeting Saint Peter’s 70, Siena 60 – March 5, 2011 in MAAC QF

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland will round off a two-game homestand on Sunday, January 22, when it hosts Saint Peter’s College at 12 noon in Reitz Arena.

The game is the first of two over the next two weeks the teams will play. The Greyhounds travel to Jersey City, N.J., for a Super Bowl Sunday contest against the Peacocks on Sunday, February 5, at 2 p.m.

Series History

Sunday’s meeting will be the 75th all-time contest between Jesuit schools Saint Peter’s and Loyola. The series is Loyola’s second-most played series amongst the Greyhounds current opponents, trailing only Mount St. Mary’s.

Saint Peter’s holds a 42-32 advantage in the all-time series after the teams split during last year’s regular season, each winning on the other’s home floor. The Peacocks, however, won a meeting with the Greyhounds in the MAAC Quarterfinals, 70-60, in Bridgeport, Conn, en route to winning the MAAC Championship Game.

The fourth-seeded Peacocks shot 52.3-percent from the floor in a game that also featured 50 free-throw attempts. Justin Drummond scored a game-high 18 points off the bench in the game for Loyola, while Shane Walker and Erik Ethelry each had 13.

500 Club x2

Two Loyola players passed the 500 milestones in various statistical categories on Thursday night against Siena.

Dylon Cormier reached the 500-point mark in his 46th collegiate game, and Shane Walker became the 18th player to reach 500 rebounds in a Loyola uniform.

Through 18

Loyola’s 13-5 start through its first 18 games of the season ranks as the fourth-best start during in that many games in program history. It is the best 18-game start since the Greyhounds moved up to NCAA Division I for the 1981-1982 season, improving on the 11-7 mark that Jimmy Patsos’ 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 team, and Skip Prosser’s 1993-1994 squad puts together.

The start is the best since 1970-1971 when Nap Doherty’s Greyhounds had the same 14-4 mark and went on to finish 19-7 and win the Mason-Dixon Conference Championship.

The best start through 18 games came in 1940-1941 when the squad led by Emil ‘Lefty’ Reitz went 15-3 through 18. The 1940-1941 team finished 19-4.

Free Webstreaming

Fans who can’t make it to the game on Thursday have multiple options for catching the action from Reitz Arena. In addition to live stats and internet audio, all non-televised home contests, will be broadcast free of charge on Hounds Unleashed, the broadcast arm of LoyolaGreyhounds.com. The games will be available on computers and most smart phone devices.

Jesuit Basketball Spotlight

Loyola’s game against Saint Peter’s is the third of six games the Greyhounds will play this season as part of the Jesuit Basketball Spotlight.

As one of 28 Jesuit Catholic universities around the nation, Loyola is a proud participant in the Jesuit Basketball Spotlight again this season. The Greyhounds are 2-0 in Jesuit Basketball Spotlight games this season with wins over Canisius and Fairfield.

Good MAAC Start

With wins in six of its first eight Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference games this season, Loyola is off to its best start in league play since opening 7-1 in 2006-2007. That year, the Greyhounds lost their conference opener and then reeled off seven in a row.

Stretch Run

Loyola used its largest run of the season to rally from seven down and defeat Siena, 66-55. The Saints took a 47-40 advantage with 10:35 to play, but a Dylon Cormier three 25 ticks of the clock later, after a Justin Drummond offensive rebound, sparked a 22-2 run that saw the Greyhounds take a 62-49 lead with under three minutes remaining.

Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each scored eight points during the run, a stretch Loyola also turned up the defensive intensity. The Saints had seven turnovers in that nearly eight-minute run, and they were just 1-of-9 from the field as Loyola outscored them by 20.

Scoring Off Drummond’s Second Chances

Justin Drummond grabbed four offensive rebounds on Thursday, and the Greyhounds scored following each one. Drummond immediate put the ball back up and in after two of his rebounds for four of his nine points. He also kicked the ball out to R.J. Williams who found Dylon Cormier on the left side for a three after a long Drummond rebound with just over 10 minutes to left in the game.

Drummond also grabbed an offensive rebound after a missed free throw, and following a Loyola timeout, Robert Olson scored a driving layup with 54 seconds remaining. In all, the Greyhounds scored nine of their 17 second-chance points off Drummond rebounds.

Bench Press

Loyola played just three players – Julius Brooks, Justin Drummond and Anthony Winbush – off its bench on Thursday, but the Greyhounds outscored Siena’s subs, 17-0. Drummond scored nine, and Winbush matched his season-high with eight.

12 Plus 12 Equals Number 24

Erik Ethelry turned in a combined point-rebound performance worthy of his number 24 on Thursday night. He logged his seventh double-double of the year with 12 points and a game-high 12 rebounds versus the Saints.

Etherly, who also had three blocked shots and three steals, secured five of his rebounds on the offensive end.

Loyola is 6-1 this season when Etherly had a double-double performance, the only loss coming when Etherly had 14 points and 11 rebounds at then-No. 3 Kentucky.

In the Greyhounds’ last four games, dating back to the January 7 contest against Canisius, Etherly is averaging 12.8 points and 8.0 rebounds.

Olson’s Last Four

After a stretch of not scoring in double figures for five consecutive games, Robert Olson has led Loyola in the points column over the last four.

The junior guard scored what was then a season-high 19 at Mount St. Mary’s, but in Loyola’s next five games  – at St. Bonaventure, Kentucky and Bucknell and home versus Niagara and Manhattan – Olson scored nine points twice and eight points three times.

Since then, however, his low total is 15, coming in a win at Fairfield where he scored seven points in a 23-second stretch with under two minutes left that took Loyola from down seven to tied.

Olson is averaging 17.0 points and 4.0 rebounds per game during the recent stretch. He is shooting .610 from the field (25-of-41) and a more impressive .625 (15-of-24) from 3-point range.

He scored a career-high 21 points last Sunday at Iona, making 8-of-13 shots and 5-of-8 from behind the arc. On Thursday night versus Siena, Olson tallied eight points during Loyola’s 22-2 run and finished with 16.

Identical Numbers In Sweep Of Saints

Loyola did not shoot the ball particularly well in either of its wins this season against Siena. In fact the Greyhounds had identical nights from the field, going 23-of-61 (.377) in both games.

Moreover, they scored 66 in both outings against the Saints. In December, the Greyhounds made eight 3-pointers versus Siena, compared to five on Thursday. But, on Thursday, they sank 15 free throws as opposed to 12 in Albany.

Rebounding Rejuvenated

Loyola was outrebounded by 15, its worst showing of the season, last Sunday at Iona, but the Greyhounds bounced back against Siena. The Saints feature the nation’s leading rebounder, O.D. Anosike, and while he had 11 boards, it was more than a full rebound below his average.

Anoskie accounted for 11 of Siena’s 29 rebounds, while Loyola had 40. Erik Ethelry pulled down 12 to lead all players, and Shane Walker grabbed seven. Three other Loyola players had four each.

Last Time Out

Kyle Downey made two free throws with 10:35 to play, but 25 seconds later Dylon Cormier made a 3-pointer from the left side that sparked a 15-0 run, and Loyola extended that stretch to 22-2, in a 66-55 win over Siena Thursday night.

Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each scored eight of their 17 and 16 points, respectively during the 22-2 run, and Erik Etherly chipped in with 12 points and a game-high 12 rebounds.

All The Way Back

Loyola trailed by 15 points with 16:42 to play in the second half when two Keith Matthews free throws gave Fairfield a 45-30 lead last Friday night. The Greyhounds, however, outscored the Stags 36-18 from that point forward to win, 66-63.

The 15-point deficit overcome was the largest erased by a Loyola team since the Greyhounds came back from a 20-point Coppin State lead in the first half on December 10, 2008, to defeat the Eagles, 73-70.

Second In Road Wins

As of the beginning of the week, Loyola’s seven road wins have them tied for second in all of NCAA Division I for victories away from its home court.

Cleveland State leads the nation with eight, while the Greyhounds’ seven wins away from Reitz Arena are matched with fellow Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference side Iona, Lehigh, Middle Tennessee State, No. 15/14 Murray State, Oral Roberts and Wagner for the second place with seven.

The seven road wins also match Loyola’s total from all of last year when it was 7-8 away from home.

Olson Scores In Bunches

Robert Olson scored seven points in a 23-second stretch versus Fairfield, going on a 7-0 run by himself. Fairfield led 62-55 when Olson pulled up for an 18-foot jumper with 1:42 left in regulation. He then hit a shot with his foot on the 3-point line 15 ticks later to make it a 3-point Stags lead. The junior guard tied the game at 62-62 with 1:19 on the clock with a three from the right side.

Olson finished with 15 points, 13 coming in the second half. Earlier in the stanza, an Olson three at the 14:38 mark cut Fairfield’s largest lead of 15 to 12, and he then knocked one down with 10:04 on the clock.

It was the second game in a row Olson has scored seven-straight points in the second half. He went on a personal 7-0 run against Canisius to move Loyola’s lead back to 11 after the Golden Griffins cut it to four.

The second half has often been a big one for Olson. Last year, he scored nine points in 83 seconds to help defeat Morgan State, and against Iona in Baltimore, Olson made a three pointer with seven ticks of the clock left to tie and send the game to overtime. He then scored the game’s last four points to secure the victory.

Cormier’s Steals Help The Cause

Robert Olson’s 7-0 run would not have been possible if not for two Dylon Cormier steals in the backcourt. Cormier tied up Rakim Sanders on the inbound pass after Olson’s first bucket, creating a jump ball with the possession arrow in Loyola’s favor.

Cormier then stole the ball from Fairfield’s Derek Needham after Olson’s second jumper, and he fed a pass to Olson for the game-tying three.

Cormier was one off his career-high with four steals against the Stags. He set his career-best of five just one game prior, against Canisius.

With his nine steals in the Greyhounds’ last two games, Cormier has moved into the MAAC lead with 2.0 steals per game. Loyola tops the conference, averaging 8.6 a contest.

Cormier also tied his career-best with a team-high four assists against Fairfield.

Walker Moves Into Second

Shane Walker blocked two Fairfield shots in the first three minutes of the game, and he then swatted a Maurice Barrow layup with 13:58 on the clock, tying him for second all-time at Loyola in blocked shots.

Walker now has 117 blocks in his career, matching the total of George Sereikas from 1989-1993. Brian Carroll (1997-2001) holds the school record with 213.

Everyone On The Offensive Boards

Loyola leads the MAAC in offensive rebounding as a team, averaging 14.4, more than a full offensive board a game higher than second-place Canisius (13.2).

Despite the team ranking, no Greyhounds player is higher than sixth in the conference in offensive rebounds per game. Erik Etherly is sixth with 2.6, while Justin Drummond is 10th with 2.3, just ahead of teammate Dylon Cormier in 13th.

No other league team has more than two players in the top 15 of the statistical category.

3-Point Shooting Back On Track

In its first MAAC loss of the season, a 66-61 defeat on January 2 against Niagara, the Greyhounds shot just 4-of-20 from 3-point range, its worst effort from behind the arc since going 2-of-14 at UMBC on November 17.

Loyola improved by 21 percentage points against Manhattan, going 7-of-17, and it then turned in its third-best 3-point shooting outing of the season on Saturday versus Canisius. The Greyhounds made 9-of-17 (.529), behind only their 6-of-11 (.545) at George Washington and 8-of-15 (.533) versus Marist. The Greyhounds were then .500 from 3-point range (7-of-14) against Fairfield.

Robert Olson and Dylon Cormier did most of the damage against the Golden Griffins and Stags. Olson was 7-of-11, and Cormier made 5-of-10.

Etherly As A Distributor

Against Niagara and Manhattan, Erik Etherly tied or set career-highs in assists, and the 6-foot-7 forward leads the team in assists through 15 games this year.

On Thursday against Manhattan, Etherly had a career-best seven assists, eclipsing his previous mark of four, a number he has posted twice this year, including Monday against Niagara.

This year, Etherly has 36 assists, an average of 2.4 per game, tops on the team. He also leads the Greyhounds in rebounds with 7.5 a contest, and he is the only player in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to lead his team in both rebounds and assists.

Against the Jaspers, Etherly scored eight points and led all players with seven assists and six rebounds. He also had a block and a steal.

Keeping Them Close

For the third time this season, and the second time in three games, Loyola won a game in which neither team led by more than seven points. Manhattan’s largest advantage on Thursday was just four points, while the Greyhounds were never up by more than six.

At Bucknell on December 28, Loyola never led by more than five, and the Bison were only up three on occasions. In November, the Greyhounds defeated New Hampshire on the road in a contest separated by no more than seven.

This year, Loyola is 8-2 in games that are decided by 10 or fewer points.

Second Time With Twenty

Justin Drummond topped the 20-point plateau for the second time in four games when he led all players with 23 points on Monday night against Niagara. The 23 points were his second-most in a game during his career at Loyola, three behind the 26 he scored on December 18 at St. Bonaventure.

Drummond made 9-of-16 shots form the field and 4-of-5 from the line against the Purple Eagles.

Drummond also led all players Monday with nine rebounds and five offensive boards, and nine of his 23 points came as a direct result of his own offensive rebounds.

Road Warriors

The game at Bucknell closed a six-game road trip for the Greyhounds, a venture away from Baltimore on which Loyola finished 4-2 with its only losses coming at St. Bonaventure and No. 3 Kentucky.

The roadtrip is the longest in school Division I history (since 1981-1982), stretching longer than multiple five-game swings, the most recent coming from December 21, 2008-January 5, 2009. That trip took Loyola from Northern California (UC-Davis) to North Carolina (Duke and North Carolina State) and Western New York (Canisius and Niagara). The Greyhounds went 2-3 against those teams.

Honors Abound For Cormier

Loyola sophomore guard Dylon Cormier picked up a couple of awards for his recent play, earning Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Player of the Week and Jesuit Basketball Spotlight National Player of the Week honors on December 12, both for the first time in his career.

Cormier averaged 20.5 points and 7.0 rebounds in a pair of wins over George Washington University and Mount St. Mary’s University.

This season, Cormier leads Loyola in scoring (16.8), 3-point percentage (.424) and steals (1.8) and is third in rebounding (5.0).

Thievery

Loyola caused 20 Siena turnovers, and the Greyhounds were credited with 19 steals. R.J. Williams led the way with a career-high five, while Erik Etherly, Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each had three.

The 19 steals are the second-most in school history, one more than the Greyhounds posted in a November 29, 1997, game at Kent State. It is also the most Loyola has recorded against a Division I opponent. The school single-game record of 20 came on February 28, 1996, when the team closed the regular-season against St. Mary’s (Md.).

Running Away

Runs have been a big part of the Greyhounds’ success this year. Here is a look at some runs of note:

Opponent Run Start Finish
Coppin State 10-1, 4:26 31-32, 1:36 (1) 41-33, 17:11 (2)
at UMBC 16-4, 8:08 35-31, 19:16 (2) 51-34, 11:08 (2)
FGCU 22-5, 6:53 15-16, 8:08 (1) 37-21, 1:11 (1)
Marist 9-0, 1:50 47-48, 11:16 (2) 56-48, 9:26 (2)
Marist 15-3, 5:47 61-57, 6:03 (2) 76-60, :16 (2)
at Siena 13-0; 4:27 0-2, 19:28 (1) 13-2; 15:35 (1)
at The Mount 9-0, 1:55 24-26, 1:59 (1) 33-26, :04 (1)
Canisius 18-4, 10:14 57-53, 10:14 (2) 75-57, 2:11 (2)
at Fairfield 36-21, 16:42 30-45, 16:42 (2) 66-63, Final
Siena 22-2, 7:36 40-47, 10:35 (2) 62-49, 2:49 (2)

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road. Patsos, who is in his eighth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 111 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

Two Of A Kind

Although unofficial, research shows that Jimmy Patsos is one of only two coaches in the last 20 years to take over a team that won just one game the year prior to his arrival.

Brigham Young finished the 1996-1997 season with a 1-25 record. Steve Cleveland took over the following season and tallied 138 wins until his departure for Fresno State after the 2004-2005 season.

Men’s & Women’s Coaches With 100

Loyola University Maryland is one of just 26 mid-major schools that has men’s and women’s basketball coaches with 100 or more victories at their current school after Greyhound women’s coach Joe Logan got his 100th on December 18 in a win at George Washington.

Loyola is the only school in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to have accomplished the feat, and it is one of only five institutions at which the coaches have both won 100 or more games in 10 or fewer seasons.

Getting To The Line

As a team, Loyola went to the free-throw line 46 times at UMBC, making 31. The 46 attempts are the sixth-most all-time and most since the 2004-2005 squad attempted 53 on December 5, 2004, against Niagara.

Loyola’s 31 free throws made rank 11th on the school single-game chart and were the most since making 32 on January 14, 2009, versus NJIT.

Although his shot was not falling at UMBC, Dylon Cormier still found ways to be productive on the offensive end of the floor. The sophomore guard was just 2-of-9 from the field, but he went to the free-throw line 17 times, making 15, and finished with 20 points.

Cormier’s 15 free throws made are tied for sixth in Loyola single-game history, matching the total made by Mike Powell at Saint Peter’s on December 6, 1997, and Donovan Thomas against Marist on February 23, 2003. The 15 makes were the most by a Loyola player since Jamal Barney set the school record with 18 on January 14, 2009, against NJIT. His 17 attempts rank tied for sixth all-time.

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Three players – sophomore guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), sophomore forward Jordan Latham (City) and freshman guard R.J. Williams (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Shane Walker & Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Justin Drummond, Riverdale Baptist, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

What’s Next

The Greyhounds embark on a two-game road trip next weekend when they travel to Western New York. Loyola plays at Niagara on Friday, January 27, and Canisius on Sunday, January 29.

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Loyola Returns Home Thursday to Face Siena

Posted on 19 January 2012 by WNST Staff

Opponent Siena Saints
Date Thursday, January 19, 2012
Time 7:30 p.m.
Location Baltimore, Md. | Reitz Arena
TV
Hounds Unleashed
Series Record Siena leads, 36-17
Last Meeting Loyola 66, Siena 59 – Dec. 3, 2011 at Siena

Game Data

After a pair of road contests last week, Loyola University Maryland returns to Reitz Arena on Thursday, January 19, for a 7:30 p.m. game against Siena College.

Thursday’s game is the eighth Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference contest of the year for Loyola. Siena is the first MAAC team the Greyhounds will have played twice this season, while there are two squads in the league (Saint Peter’s and Rider) the Greyhounds have yet to face.

Series History

Thursday’s game will be the 54th all-time meeting between Loyola and Siena with the Saints holding a 36-17 advantage in the all-time series.

The Greyhounds and Saints played on December 3, 2011, at the Times-Union Center in Albany with Loyola coming out on top of a 66-59 decision. Loyola went up 13-2 early in the game and led 30-19 at halftime.

Dylon Cormier made 5-of-6 from 3-point range and finished with a game-high 22 points. Shane Walker added 10 points to go with nine rebounds and four assists. Evan Hymes scored 18 of his 21 points in the second half for Siena.

Loyola went up by as many as 13 early in the second half, but Siena cut it to six on four occasions. That was as close as the Greyhounds would allow it to get, however.

Last season, the teams split, each winning on the other’s home court.

Through 17

Loyola’s 12-5 start through its first 17 games of the season ranks as the fourth best start during in that many games in program history. It is the best 17-game start since the Greyhounds moved up to NCAA Division I for the 1981-1982 season, improving on the 11-6 mark that Jimmy Patsos’ 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 team puts together.

The start is the best since 1970-1971 when Nap Doherty’s Greyhounds had the same 12-4 mark and went on to finish 19-7 and win the Mason-Dixon Conference Championship.

The best start through 16 games came in 1940-1941 when the squad led by Emil ‘Lefty’ Reitz went 3-3 through 16. The 1940-1941 team finished 19-4.

Free Webstreaming

Fans who can’t make it to the game on Thursday have multiple options for catching the action from Reitz Arena. In addition to live stats and internet audio, all non-televised home contests, will be broadcast free of charge on Hounds Unleashed, the broadcast arm of LoyolaGreyhounds.com. The games will be available on computers and most smart phone devices.

Good MAAC Start

With wins in five of its first seven Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference games this season, Loyola is off to its best start in league play since opening 7-1 in 2006-2007. That year, the Greyhounds lost their conference opener and then reeled off seven in a row.

Staying Hot

Robert Olson kept up his strong shooting performances from the Fairfield game against Iona, matching his career-high with 21 points. He made 8-of-13 shots and was 5-of-8 from 3-point range.

Olson scored 15 points against the Stags, and his 18.0 point average in the two games last weekend nearly doubled the 9.4 he was averaging entering the week. He is now averaging 10.4 points per game, fourth on the team.

Olson’s five threes were a season-high and one off his career-best of six from last season at Manhattan. The eight field goals were also a career-high.

The junior guard has moved into fourth place in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference in 3-point field goal percentage (.437), and he is 12th in overall field-goal percentage (.479). He is the top true guard in the conference in that category.

Last Time Out

Loyola took a 36-31 lead at halftime and extended it to seven less than three minutes into the second half, but Mike Glover (16), Lamont Jones (15) and Scott Machado (8) combined for 39 of Iona’s 43 second-half points and the Gaels won the battle for first place in the MAAC, 74-63.

Iona outrebounded the Greyhounds 47-32, the largest margin Loyola has been outdone on the boards this season.

All The Way Back

Loyola trailed by 15 points with 16:42 to play in the second half when two Keith Matthews free throws gave Fairfield a 45-30 lead Friday night. The Greyhounds, however, outscored the Stags 36-18 from that point forward to win, 66-63.

The 15-point deficit overcome was the largest erased by a Loyola team since the Greyhounds came back from a 20-point Coppin State lead in the first half on December 10, 2008, to defeat the Eagles, 73-70.

Second In Road Wins

As of this week, Loyola’s seven road wins have them tied for second in all of NCAA Division I for victories away from its home court.

Cleveland State leads the nation with eight, while the Greyhounds’ seven wins away from Reitz Arena are matched with fellow Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference side Iona, Lehigh, Middle Tennessee State, No. 15/14 Murray State, Oral Roberts and Wagner for the second place with seven.

The seven road wins also match Loyola’s total from all of last year when it was 7-8 away from home.

Olson Scores In Bunches

Robert Olson scored seven points in a 23-second stretch Friday night, going on a 7-0 run by himself. Fairfield led 62-55 when Olson pulled up for an 18-foot jumper with 1:42 left in regulation. He then hit a shot with his foot on the 3-point line 15 ticks later to make it a 3-point Stags lead. The junior guard tied the game at 62-62 with 1:19 on the clock with a three from the right side.

Olson finished with 15 points, 13 coming in the second half. Earlier in the stanza, an Olson three at the 14:38 mark cut Fairfield’s largest lead of 15 to 12, and he then knocked one down with 10:04 on the clock.

It was the second game in a row Olson has scored seven-straight points in the second half. He went on a personal 7-0 run against Canisius to move Loyola’s lead back to 11 after the Golden Griffins cut it to four.

The second half has often been a big one for Olson. Last year, he scored nine points in 83 seconds to help defeat Morgan State, and against Iona in Baltimore, Olson made a three pointer with seven ticks of the clock left to tie and send the game to overtime. He then scored the game’s last four points to secure the victory.

Cormier’s Steals Help The Cause

Robert Olson’s 7-0 run would not have been possible if not for two Dylon Cormier steals in the backcourt. Cormier tied up Rakim Sanders on the inbound pass after Olson’s first bucket, creating a jump ball with the possession arrow in Loyola’s favor.

Cormier then stole the ball from Fairfield’s Derek Needham after Olson’s second jumper, and he fed a pass to Olson for the game-tying three.

Cormier was one off his career-high with four steals against the Stags. He set his career-best of five just one game prior, against Canisius.

With his nine steals in the Greyhounds’ last two games, Cormier has moved into the MAAC lead with 2.0 steals per game. Loyola tops the conference, averaging 8.6 a contest.

Cormier also tied his career-best with a team-high four assists against Fairfield.

Walker Moves Into Second

Shane Walker blocked two Fairfield shots in the first three minutes of the game, and he then swatted a Maurice Barrow layup with 13:58 on the clock, tying him for second all-time at Loyola in blocked shots.

Walker now has 117 blocks in his career, matching the total of George Sereikas from 1989-1993. Brian Carroll (1997-2001) holds the school record with 213.

Doubled Up

Erik Etherly recorded his sixth double-double of the season and 11th of his career on Friday night when he finished with game highs of 17 points and 10 rebounds.

The junior forward had not posted a double-double this calender with his last coming on December 22, 2011, at then-No. 3 Kentucky.

Etherly’s production has been key to Loyola’s success this season, as the Greyhounds are 8-0 when he played 32 or more minutes in games.

Defensively Speaking

Loyola used two significant stretches of time Friday night in which it held Fairfield without a field goal en route to its comeback.

Ryan Olander made a three with 18:12 to go in the second half for the Stags, giving them a 14-point lead, but they did not make a shot from the field for nearly eight minutes until Rakim Sanders’ jumper at 10:19.

Fairfield did make 5-of-7 free throws during that stretch of seven minutes, 53 seconds, but it was 0-of-6 from the field during that time. The Stags still led by 10 after Sanders’ jumper, but an Olson three and layups by Erik Etherly and Justin Drummond made it a three-point game in the next three possessions.

Later, Loyola held Fairfield to just one field goal in the last two minutes as it went from seven down to the three-point win.

Productive Minutes For Winbush

Anthony Winbush played just 14 minutes Friday night, but he scored five points and had five rebounds in that time. He also played solid defense for the Greyhounds on the perimeter and in the post.

Winbush had both defensive rebounds for Loyola on the Stags’ final two missed shots in the last 10 minutes.

Slowing Stag Options

Fairfield’s Rakim Sanders scored just over a point above his season average on Friday night, finishing with 17 after entering the game averaging 15.8 points per game.

Loyola, however, limited the production of Fairfield’s next three scorers, holding Derek Needham (11.2 points per game prior to contest), Ryan Olander (10.8) and Maurice Barrow (10.8) to four, three and six points, respectively on 6-of-22 shooting from the field.

Everyone On The Offensive Boards

Loyola leads the MAAC in offensive rebounding as a team, averaging 14.1, more than a full offensive board a game higher than second-place Canisius (12.9).

Despite the team ranking, no Greyhounds player is higher than eighth in the conference in offensive rebounds per game. Erik Etherly is tied for eighth with 2.5, while Justin Drummond is 12th with 2.2, just ahead of teammate Dylon Cormier in 13th.

No other league team has more than two players in the top 15 of the statistical category.

3-Point Shooting Back On Track

In its first MAAC loss of the season, a 66-61 defeat on January 2 against Niagara, the Greyhounds shot just 4-of-20 from 3-point range, its worst effort from behind the arc since going 2-of-14 at UMBC on November 17.

Loyola improved by 21 percentage points against Manhattan, going 7-of-17, and it then turned in its third-best 3-point shooting outing of the season on Saturday versus Canisius. The Greyhounds made 9-of-17 (.529), behind only their 6-of-11 (.545) at George Washington and 8-of-15 (.533) versus Marist. The Greyhounds were then .500 from 3-point range (7-of-14) against Fairfield.

Robert Olson and Dylon Cormier did most of the damage against the Golden Griffins and Stags. Olson was 7-of-11, and Cormier made 5-of-10.

Picking Up Where He Left Off

Last Thursday against Manhattan, Dylon Cormier was mired in a stretch of 115 minutes, 46 seconds without making a 3-pointer before he hit the game-winning trey with 3.1 seconds left to give the Greyhounds a 61-60 victory.

Prior to that shot, he had missed his last 10 3-point attempts: his last three at Bucknell, all five against Niagara and his first two versus Manhattan.

The game-winner sparked Cormier who went 3-of-5 from 3-point range and finished 8-of-13 from the field in the win over Canisius. He scored a game-high 23 points for his fifth 20-plus point effort of the season and sixth of his career. Cormier scored 16 of his points in the second half and was 6-of-10 from the field after the break.

Etherly As A Distributor

Against Niagara and Manhattan, Erik Etherly tied or set career-highs in assists, and the 6-foot-7 forward leads the team in assists through 15 games this year.

On Thursday against Manhattan, Etherly had a career-best seven assists, eclipsing his previous mark of four, a number he has posted twice this year, including Monday against Niagara.

This year, Etherly has 36 assists, an average of 2.4 per game, tops on the team. He also leads the Greyhounds in rebounds with 7.5 a contest, and he is the only player in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to lead his team in both rebounds and assists.

Against the Jaspers, Etherly scored eight points and led all players with seven assists and six rebounds. He also had a block and a steal.

Keeping Them Close

For the third time this season, and the second time in three games, Loyola won a game in which neither team led by more than seven points. Manhattan’s largest advantage on Thursday was just four points, while the Greyhounds were never up by more than six.

At Bucknell on December 28, Loyola never led by more than five, and the Bison were only up three on occasions. In November, the Greyhounds defeated New Hampshire on the road in a contest separated by no more than seven.

This year, Loyola is 8-2 in games that are decided by 10 or fewer points.

Second Time With Twenty

Justin Drummond topped the 20-point plateau for the second time in four games when he led all players with 23 points on Monday night against Niagara. The 23 points were his second-most in a game during his career at Loyola, three behind the 26 he scored on December 18 at St. Bonaventure.

Drummond made 9-of-16 shots form the field and 4-of-5 from the line against the Purple Eagles.

Drummond also led all players Monday with nine rebounds and five offensive boards, and nine of his 23 points came as a direct result of his own offensive rebounds.

Road Warriors

The game at Bucknell closed a six-game road trip for the Greyhounds, a venture away from Baltimore on which Loyola finished 4-2 with its only losses coming at St. Bonaventure and No. 3 Kentucky.

The roadtrip is the longest in school Division I history (since 1981-1982), stretching longer than multiple five-game swings, the most recent coming from December 21, 2008-January 5, 2009. That trip took Loyola from Northern California (UC-Davis) to North Carolina (Duke and North Carolina State) and Western New York (Canisius and Niagara). The Greyhounds went 2-3 against those teams.

A Little Bit Of Everything

Erik Etherly led Loyola in four statistical categories at Bucknell: points (18), rebounds (8), assists (4) and blocked shots (4). While it was atypical to lead the Greyhounds in all of the categories, Etherly has routinely topped the team in at least one category this season. He was named the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Co-Player of the Week on January 2.

He has led the team in rebounding eight times (including ties); scoring, 4; assists, 5; steals, 4; blocked shots, 5.

Currently, Etherly paces the team in rebounds (95 total, 7.9 per game) and assists (26, 2.2), and he is second in scoring (156, 13.0) and minutes played (370, 30.8).

He is the only player in the MAAC currently leading his team in rebounds and assists.

Etherly has scored in double-figures in 21 of the Greyhounds’ last 23 games, going back to January 2011. He has averaged 14.1 in those contests.

Streak Snapped

St. Bonaventure University defeated Loyola 76-66, snapping the Greyhounds’ eight-game winning streak. Loyola had reeled off the span of wins since falling in its season-opener at Wake Forest.

The winning streak was the longest in the school’s NCAA Division I history (since 1981-82), and it is the longest since the 1964-1965 team won eight in a row during January and February.

Honors Abound For Cormier

Loyola sophomore guard Dylon Cormier picked up a couple of awards for his recent play, earning Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Player of the Week and Jesuit Basketball Spotlight National Player of the Week honors on December 12, both for the first time in his career.

Cormier averaged 20.5 points and 7.0 rebounds in a pair of wins over George Washington University and Mount St. Mary’s University.

This season, Cormier leads Loyola in scoring (16.8), 3-point percentage (.424) and steals (1.8) and is third in rebounding (5.0).

Thievery

Loyola caused 20 Siena turnovers, and the Greyhounds were credited with 19 steals. R.J. Williams led the way with a career-high five, while Erik Etherly, Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each had three.

The 19 steals are the second-most in school history, one more than the Greyhounds posted in a November 29, 1997, game at Kent State. It is also the most Loyola has recorded against a Division I opponent. The school single-game record of 20 came on February 28, 1996, when the team closed the regular-season against St. Mary’s (Md.).

Running Away

Runs have been a big part of the Greyhounds’ success early this year. Here is a look at some runs of note:

Opponent Run Start Finish
Coppin State 10-1, 4:26 31-32, 1:36 (1) 41-33, 17:11 (2)
UMBC 16-4, 8:08 35-31, 19:16 (2) 51-34, 11:08 (2)
FGCU 22-5, 6:53 15-16, 8:08 (1) 37-21, 1:11 (1)
Marist 9-0, 1:50 47-48, 11:16 (2) 56-48, 9:26 (2)
Marist 15-3, 5:47 61-57, 6:03 (2) 76-60, :16 (2)
Siena 13-0; 4:27 0-2, 19:28 (1) 13-2; 15:35 (1)
Geo. Wash. 17-0; 3:58 18-19, 6:28 (1) 34-19, 2:30 (1)
The Mount 9-0, 1:55 24-26, 1:59 (1) 33-26, :04 (1)
Canisius 18-4, 10:14 75-57, 10:14 (2) 75-57, 2:11 (2)
Fairfield 36-21, 16:42 45-30, 16:42 (2) 66-63, Final

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road. Patsos, who is in his eighth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 110 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

Two Of A Kind

Although unofficial, research shows that Jimmy Patsos is one of only two coaches in the last 20 years to take over a team that won just one game the year prior to his arrival.

Brigham Young finished the 1996-1997 season with a 1-25 record. Steve Cleveland took over the following season and tallied 138 wins until his departure for Fresno State after the 2004-2005 season.

Men’s & Women’s Coaches With 100

Loyola University Maryland is one of just 26 mid-major schools that has men’s and women’s basketball coaches with 100 or more victories at their current school after Greyhound women’s coach Joe Logan got his 100th on December 18 in a win at George Washington.

Loyola is the only school in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to have accomplished the feat, and it is one of only five institutions at which the coaches have both won 100 or more games in 10 or fewer seasons.

Getting To The Line

As a team, Loyola went to the free-throw line 46 times at UMBC, making 31. The 46 attempts are the sixth-most all-time and most since the 2004-2005 squad attempted 53 on December 5, 2004, against Niagara.

Loyola’s 31 free throws made rank 11th on the school single-game chart and were the most since making 32 on January 14, 2009, versus NJIT.

Although his shot was not falling at UMBC, Dylon Cormier still found ways to be productive on the offensive end of the floor. The sophomore guard was just 2-of-9 from the field, but he went to the free-throw line 17 times, making 15, and finished with 20 points.

Cormier’s 15 free throws made are tied for sixth in Loyola single-game history, matching the total made by Mike Powell at Saint Peter’s on December 6, 1997, and Donovan Thomas against Marist on February 23, 2003. The 15 makes were the most by a Loyola player since Jamal Barney set the school record with 18 on January 14, 2009, against NJIT. His 17 attempts rank tied for sixth all-time.

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Three players – sophomore guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), sophomore forward Jordan Latham (City) and freshman guard R.J. Williams (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Shane Walker & Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Justin Drummond, Riverdale Baptist, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

What’s Next

Loyola hosts Saint Peter’s on Sunday, January 22, at 12 p.m. in Reitz Arena.

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Loyola Looks To Continue Hot MAAC Start Sunday at Iona

Posted on 15 January 2012 by WNST Staff

Opponent Iona Gaels
Date Sunday, January 15, 2012
Time 3:30 p.m.
Location New Rochelle, N.Y. | Hymes Center
TV/Radio Iona Webstreaming
Series Record Iona leads, 40-12
Last Meeting Loyola 88, Iona 85 (OT) – Jan. 30, 2011 at Loyola

Game Data

Loyola University Maryland wraps up a two-game road trip on Sunday, January 15, when it takes on Iona College at 3:30 p.m. in New Rochelle, N.Y. The game is the second part of a doubleheader, as Iona’s women take on Manhattan College at 1 p.m.

First place in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference will be on the line Sunday. Loyola and Iona are both 5-1 in the league and enter the game knotted in the top spot.

Series History

Loyola and Iona will meet for the 54th time in series history when the teams take the court on Sunday. The Gaels hold a 40-12 advantage in the series, although Loyola won the most recent meeting, an overtime thriller on January 30, 2011.

Robert Olson tied the game with a 3-pointer with seven ticks left in regulation, sending the game to overtime where he put the Greyhounds up for good, 86-84, with a layup with 41.6 seconds on the clock.

Six Loyola players scored in double figures in the game – Brian Rudolph (19), J’hared Hall (15), Justin Drummond (14), Dylon Cormier (12), Erik Etherly (12) and Olson (12). It was the first time that a Loyola team had six players score in double figures since December 6, 1991, when the Greyhounds matched the feat in a 98-84 overtime home victory against Mount St. Mary’s.

Good MAAC Start

With wins in five of its first six Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference games this season, Loyola is off to its best start in league play since opening 7-1 in 2006-2007. That year, the Greyhounds lost their conference opener and then reeled off seven in a row.

The 5-1 mark is tied for the best start to MAAC play through six games, matching that of the 2006-2007 team.

Through 16

Loyola’s 12-4 start through its first 16 games of the season ranks as the fourth best start during in that many games in program history. It is the best 16-game start since the Greyhounds moved up to NCAA Division I for the 1981-1982 season, improving on the 11-5 mark that Jimmy Patsos’ 2005-2006 team put together.

The start is the best since 1970-1971 when Nap Doherty’s Greyhounds had the same 12-4 mark and went on to finish 19-7 and win the Mason-Dixon Conference Championship.

The best start through 16 games came in 1940-1941 when the squad led by Emil ‘Lefty’ Reitz went 3-3 through 16. The 1940-1941 team finished 19-4.

All The Way Back

Loyola trailed by 15 points with 16:42 to play in the second half when two Keith Matthews free throws gave Fairfield a 45-30 lead Friday night. The Greyhounds, however, outscored the Stags 36-18 from that point forward to win, 66-63.

The 15-point deficit overcome was the largest erased by a Loyola team since the Greyhounds came back from a 20-point Coppin State lead in the first half on December 10, 2008, to defeat the Eagles, 73-70.

Second In Road Wins

As of Friday night’s games, Loyola’s seven road wins have them tied for second in all of NCAA Division I for victories away from its home court.

Cleveland State leads the nation with eight, while the Greyhounds’ seven wins away from Reitz Arena are matched with fellow Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference side Iona, No. 15/14 Murray State and Wagner for the national lead with seven.

The seven road wins also match Loyola’s total from all of last year when it was 7-8 away from home.

Olson Scores In Bunches

Robert Olson scored seven points in a 23-second stretch Friday night, going on a 7-0 run by himself. Fairfield led 62-55 when Olson pulled up for an 18-foot jumper with 1:42 left in regulation. He then hit a shot with his foot on the 3-point line 15 ticks later to make it a 3-point Stags lead. The junior guard tied the game at 62-62 with 1:19 on the clock with a three from the right side.

Olson finished with 15 points, 13 coming in the second half. Earlier in the stanza, an Olson three at the 14:38 mark cut Fairfield’s largest lead of 15 to 12, and he then knocked one down with 10:04 on the clock.

It was the second game in a row Olson has scored seven-straight points in the second half. He went on a personal 7-0 run against Canisius to move Loyola’s lead back to 11 after the Golden Griffins cut it to four.

The second half has often been a big one for Olson. Last year, he scored nine points in 83 seconds to help defeat Morgan State, and against Iona in Baltimore, Olson made a three pointer with seven ticks of the clock left to tie and send the game to overtime. He then scored the game’s last four points to secure the victory.

Loyola is undefeated in the five games this season that Olson has made three or more 3-pointers. He is now fourth in the MAAC in 3-point field goal percentage (.413).

Cormier’s Steals Help The Cause

Robert Olson’s 7-0 run would not have been possible if not for two Dylon Cormier steals in the backcourt. Cormier tied up Rakim Sanders on the inbound pass after Olson’s first bucket, creating a jump ball with the possession arrow in Loyola’s favor.

Cormier then stole the ball from Fairfield’s Derek Needham after Olson’s second jumper, and he fed a pass to Olson for the game-tying three.

Cormier was one off his career-high with four steals against the Stags. He set his career-best of five just one game prior, against Canisius.

With his nine steals in the Greyhounds’ last two games, Cormier has moved into the MAAC lead with 2.0 steals per game. Loyola tops the conference, averaging 8.6 a contest.

Cormier also tied his career-best with a team-high four assists against Fairfield.

Walker Moves Into Second

Shane Walker blocked two Fairfield shots in the first three minutes of the game, and he then swatted a Maurice Barrow layup with 13:58 on the clock, tying him for second all-time at Loyola in blocked shots.

Walker now has 117 blocks in his career, matching the total of George Sereikas from 1989-1993. Brian Carroll (1997-2001) holds the school record with 213.

Doubled Up

Erik Etherly recorded his sixth double-double of the season and 11th of his career on Friday night when he finished with game highs of 17 points and 10 rebounds.

The junior forward had not posted a double-double this calender with his last coming on December 22, 2011, at then-No. 3 Kentucky.

Etherly’s production has been key to Loyola’s success this season, as the Greyhounds are 8-0 when he played 32 or more minutes in games.

Defensively Speaking

Loyola used two significant stretches of time Friday night in which it held Fairfield without a field goal en route to its comeback.

Ryan Olander made a three with 18:12 to go in the second half for the Stags, giving them a 14-point lead, but they did not make a shot from the field for nearly eight minutes until Rakim Sanders’ jumper at 10:19.

Fairfield did make 5-of-7 free throws during that stretch of seven minutes, 53 seconds, but it was 0-of-6 from the field during that time. The Stags still led by 10 after Sanders’ jumper, but an Olson three and layups by Erik Etherly and Justin Drummond made it a three-point game in the next three possessions.

Later, Loyola held Fairfield to just one field goal in the last two minutes as it went from seven down to the three-point win.

Productive Minutes For Winbush

Anthony Winbush played just 14 minutes Friday night, but he scored five points and had five rebounds in that time. He also played solid defense for the Greyhounds on the perimeter and in the post.

Winbush had both defensive rebounds for Loyola on the Stags’ final two missed shots in the last 10 minutes.

Slowing Stag Options

Fairfield’s Rakim Sanders scored just over a point above his season average on Friday night, finishing with 17 after entering the game averaging 15.8 points per game.

Loyola, however, limited the production of Fairfield’s next three scorers, holding Derek Needham (11.2 points per game prior to contest), Ryan Olander (10.8) and Maurice Barrow (10.8) to four, three and six points, respectively on 6-of-22 shooting from the field.

Second-Half Rebounding

Fairfield led the rebounding battle, as well as the game at halftime, grabbing 19 first-half boards to Loyola’s 16. The Greyhounds reversed those numbers in the second, however, tallying 18 rebounds and holding the Stags to just 12.

Erik Etherly had seven of his boards after halftime to lead all players in the second half.

Last Time Out

Robert Olson scored seven of his 15 points during a 23-second stretch in the second half, erasing a 62-55 Fairfield advantage and tying the game with a three with 1:19 to play.

Dylon Cormier set up two of Olson’s buckets with steals in full-court press, and he recorded an assist on the three.

Desmond Wade made 1-of-2 from the free-throw line after the game-tying three, but then Cormier responded by making two of his own to give Loyola the lead for good in a 66-63 victory on the road. The Greyhounds made three defensive stops after Cormier’s shots to secure the game.

Everyone On The Offensive Boards

Loyola leads the MAAC in offensive rebounding as a team, averaging 14.4, more than a full offensive board a game higher than second-place Niagara (12.8).

Despite the team ranking, no Greyhounds player is higher than eighth in the conference in offensive rebounds per game. Erik Etherly is eighth with 2.6, while Dylon Cormier is 10th with 2.3, and Justin Drummond is 14th at 2.3.

No other league team has more than two players in the top 15 of the statistical category.

3-Point Shooting Back On Track

In its first MAAC loss of the season, a 66-61 defeat on January 2 against Niagara, the Greyhounds shot just 4-of-20 from 3-point range, its worst effort from behind the arc since going 2-of-14 at UMBC on November 17.

Loyola improved by 21 percentage points against Manhattan, going 7-of-17, and it then turned in its third-best 3-point shooting outing of the season on Saturday versus Canisius. The Greyhounds made 9-of-17 (.529), behind only their 6-of-11 (.545) at George Washington and 8-of-15 (.533) versus Marist. The Greyhounds were then .500 from 3-point range (7-of-14) against Fairfield.

Robert Olson and Dylon Cormier did most of the damage against the Golden Griffins and Stags. Olson was 7-of-11, and Cormier made 5-of-10.

Picking Up Where He Left Off

Last Thursday against Manhattan, Dylon Cormier was mired in a stretch of 115 minutes, 46 seconds without making a 3-pointer before he hit the game-winning trey with 3.1 seconds left to give the Greyhounds a 61-60 victory.

Prior to that shot, he had missed his last 10 3-point attempts: his last three at Bucknell, all five against Niagara and his first two versus Manhattan.

The game-winner sparked Cormier who went 3-of-5 from 3-point range and finished 8-of-13 from the field in the win over Canisius. He scored a game-high 23 points for his fifth 20-plus point effort of the season and sixth of his career. Cormier scored 16 of his points in the second half and was 6-of-10 from the field after the break.

Dominating On The Boards

All five Loyola players who saw 15 minutes or more of action against Canisius had four or more rebounds, and four had five or greater. The Greyhounds controlled a 42-24 advantage on the boards, and they allowed Canisius just six offensive rebounds while collecting 16 of their own.

Erik Etherly led the way with seven boards, while Dylon Cormier and Anthony Winbush each had six.

Loyola had 16 offensive rebounds in the game and scored 20 second-chance points.

Etherly As A Distributor

Against Niagara and Manhattan, Erik Etherly tied or set career-highs in assists, and the 6-foot-7 forward leads the team in assists through 15 games this year.

On Thursday against Manhattan, Etherly had a career-best seven assists, eclipsing his previous mark of four, a number he has posted twice this year, including Monday against Niagara.

This year, Etherly has 36 assists, an average of 2.4 per game, tops on the team. He also leads the Greyhounds in rebounds with 7.5 a contest, and he is the only player in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to lead his team in both rebounds and assists.

Against the Jaspers, Etherly scored eight points and led all players with seven assists and six rebounds. He also had a block and a steal.

Keeping Them Close

For the third time this season, and the second time in three games, Loyola won a game in which neither team led by more than seven points. Manhattan’s largest advantage on Thursday was just four points, while the Greyhounds were never up by more than six.

At Bucknell on December 28, Loyola never led by more than five, and the Bison were only up three on occasions. In November, the Greyhounds defeated New Hampshire on the road in a contest separated by no more than seven.

This year, Loyola is 8-2 in games that are decided by 10 or fewer points.

Second Time With Twenty

Justin Drummond topped the 20-point plateau for the second time in four games when he led all players with 23 points on Monday night against Niagara. The 23 points were his second-most in a game during his career at Loyola, three behind the 26 he scored on December 18 at St. Bonaventure.

Drummond made 9-of-16 shots form the field and 4-of-5 from the line against the Purple Eagles.

Drummond also led all players Monday with nine rebounds and five offensive boards, and nine of his 23 points came as a direct result of his own offensive rebounds.

Road Warriors

The game at Bucknell closed a six-game road trip for the Greyhounds, a venture away from Baltimore on which Loyola finished 4-2 with its only losses coming at St. Bonaventure and No. 3 Kentucky.

The roadtrip is the longest in school Division I history (since 1981-1982), stretching longer than multiple five-game swings, the most recent coming from December 21, 2008-January 5, 2009. That trip took Loyola from Northern California (UC-Davis) to North Carolina (Duke and North Carolina State) and Western New York (Canisius and Niagara). The Greyhounds went 2-3 against those teams.

A Little Bit Of Everything

Erik Etherly led Loyola in four statistical categories at Bucknell: points (18), rebounds (8), assists (4) and blocked shots (4). While it was atypical to lead the Greyhounds in all of the categories, Etherly has routinely topped the team in at least one category this season. He was named the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Co-Player of the Week on January 2.

He has led the team in rebounding eight times (including ties); scoring, 4; assists, 5; steals, 4; blocked shots, 5.

Currently, Etherly paces the team in rebounds (95 total, 7.9 per game) and assists (26, 2.2), and he is second in scoring (156, 13.0) and minutes played (370, 30.8).

He is the only player in the MAAC currently leading his team in rebounds and assists.

Etherly has scored in double-figures in 21 of the Greyhounds’ last 23 games, going back to January 2011. He has averaged 14.1 in those contests.

Streak Snapped

St. Bonaventure University defeated Loyola 76-66, snapping the Greyhounds’ eight-game winning streak. Loyola had reeled off the span of wins since falling in its season-opener at Wake Forest.

The winning streak was the longest in the school’s NCAA Division I history (since 1981-82), and it is the longest since the 1964-1965 team won eight in a row during January and February.

Honors Abound For Cormier

Loyola sophomore guard Dylon Cormier picked up a couple of awards for his recent play, earning Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Player of the Week and Jesuit Basketball Spotlight National Player of the Week honors on December 12, both for the first time in his career.

Cormier averaged 20.5 points and 7.0 rebounds in a pair of wins over George Washington University and Mount St. Mary’s University.

This season, Cormier leads Loyola in scoring (16.8), 3-point percentage (.424) and steals (1.8) and is third in rebounding (5.0).

Thievery

Loyola caused 20 Siena turnovers, and the Greyhounds were credited with 19 steals. R.J. Williams led the way with a career-high five, while Erik Etherly, Dylon Cormier and Robert Olson each had three.

The 19 steals are the second-most in school history, one more than the Greyhounds posted in a November 29, 1997, game at Kent State. It is also the most Loyola has recorded against a Division I opponent. The school single-game record of 20 came on February 28, 1996, when the team closed the regular-season against St. Mary’s (Md.).

Running Away

Runs have been a big part of the Greyhounds’ success early this year. Here is a look at some runs of note:

Opponent Run Start Finish
Coppin State 10-1, 4:26 31-32, 1:36 (1) 41-33, 17:11 (2)
UMBC 16-4, 8:08 35-31, 19:16 (2) 51-34, 11:08 (2)
FGCU 22-5, 6:53 15-16, 8:08 (1) 37-21, 1:11 (1)
Marist 9-0, 1:50 47-48, 11:16 (2) 56-48, 9:26 (2)
Marist 15-3, 5:47 61-57, 6:03 (2) 76-60, :16 (2)
Siena 13-0; 4:27 0-2, 19:28 (1) 13-2; 15:35 (1)
Geo. Wash. 17-0; 3:58 18-19, 6:28 (1) 34-19, 2:30 (1)
The Mount 9-0, 1:55 24-26, 1:59 (1) 33-26, :04 (1)
Canisius 18-4, 10:14 75-57, 10:14 (2) 75-57, 2:11 (2)
Fairfield 36-21, 16:42 45-30, 16:42 (2) 66-63, Final

Century Mark

Head Coach Jimmy Patsos became the third coach in Loyola history to win 100 games when the Greyhounds defeated UMBC, 73-63, on the road. Patsos, who is in his eighth season, took over a team that finished 1-27 during the 2002-2003 season. He won his 100th game in his 215th career game.

Last season, Patsos moved into third-place all time at Loyola in victories, trailing only Lefty Reitz (349 wins, 1937-44, 1945-61) and Nap Doherty (165, 1961-74).

Loyola All-Time Coaching Wins List
1. 349 Lefty Reitz 1937-1944, 1945-1961
2. 165 Nap Doherty 1961-1974
3. 110 Jimmy Patsos 2004-present
4. 85 Mark Amatucci 1982-1989
5. 72 Gary Dicovitsky 1976-1981

Two Of A Kind

Although unofficial, research shows that Jimmy Patsos is one of only two coaches in the last 20 years to take over a team that won just one game the year prior to his arrival.

Brigham Young finished the 1996-1997 season with a 1-25 record. Steve Cleveland took over the following season and tallied 138 wins until his departure for Fresno State after the 2004-2005 season.

Men’s & Women’s Coaches With 100

Loyola University Maryland is one of just 26 mid-major schools that has men’s and women’s basketball coaches with 100 or more victories at their current school after Greyhound women’s coach Joe Logan got his 100th on December 18 in a win at George Washington.

Loyola is the only school in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to have accomplished the feat, and it is one of only five institutions at which the coaches have both won 100 or more games in 10 or fewer seasons.

Getting To The Line

As a team, Loyola went to the free-throw line 46 times at UMBC, making 31. The 46 attempts are the sixth-most all-time and most since the 2004-2005 squad attempted 53 on December 5, 2004, against Niagara.

Loyola’s 31 free throws made rank 11th on the school single-game chart and were the most since making 32 on January 14, 2009, versus NJIT.

Although his shot was not falling at UMBC, Dylon Cormier still found ways to be productive on the offensive end of the floor. The sophomore guard was just 2-of-9 from the field, but he went to the free-throw line 17 times, making 15, and finished with 20 points.

Cormier’s 15 free throws made are tied for sixth in Loyola single-game history, matching the total made by Mike Powell at Saint Peter’s on December 6, 1997, and Donovan Thomas against Marist on February 23, 2003. The 15 makes were the most by a Loyola player since Jamal Barney set the school record with 18 on January 14, 2009, against NJIT. His 17 attempts rank tied for sixth all-time.

Baltimore Bred And More From Nearby

Since taking over as head coach in 2004, Jimmy Patsos has put an emphasis on recruiting locally, and it has never shown as much as on this year’s roster. Three players – sophomore guard Dylon Cormier (Cardinal Gibbons), sophomore forward Jordan Latham (City) and freshman guard R.J. Williams (St. Frances) are products of schools within the city limits.

Six more players played in high school within 50 miles of Loyola, as the crow flies (thanks daftlogic.com): Shane Walker & Tyler Hubbard, Montrose Christian, 32.6 miles; Robert Olson, Georgetown Prep, 33.9; Justin Drummond, Riverdale Baptist, 33.9; Anthony Winbush, T.C. Williams, 43.7; and Erik Etherly, Annandale, 47.9.

 

What’s Next

The Greyhounds return to Reitz Arena for a pair of MAAC games in the next week. Loyola hosts Siena on Thursday night at 6:30 p.m., and it then hosts Saint Peter’s on Sunday at 12 noon.


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