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Caps Breakdown Day News, Nuggets, and Analysis

Posted on 13 June 2018 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals held breakdown day on Wednesday afternoon and it was obviously the best one ever, given that this year’s session followed the franchise’s first ever Stanley Cup victory. The players were clearly tired from two grueling months of hockey and then the post triumph celebrations, but were extremely happy.

Here are some of the major takeaways from the day at Kettler IcePlex:

Alexander Ovechkin, now clean cut thanks to his Gillette sponsorship, is a very happy man, and rightly so. The victory has clearly brought back the old Ovi that we saw when he was younger before some of the angry and hating national and even local media constantly crushed him forcing him to withdraw some of the best sides of his personality from public view. On Wednesday, the Gr8 answered questions for 30 minutes going above and beyond the call of duty. Ovi started by stating “I still can’t believe we won, I still can’t believe we did it. Right now we are realizing how special this win was.” He also added that “We lost some key guys last year, but all of the new guys played unbelievable.” Ovi noted that this was the best team he ever played on and whenever someone got hurt, felt bad, or were suspended, people stepped up. “It was a special group.” He also praised former General Manager George McPhee for “drafting half of the group” and ended with a very classy “Thanks George for what you did here.”

Nicklas Backstrom suffered two fractures in his right index finger in game five against Pittsburgh. He said he will not need surgery. Clearly Nicky was still hurting when he came back in the lineup after missing four games and to perform the way he did with that injury – shutting down the other team’s top center in each of the Tampa and Vegas series – is the stuff of legends. Backy will have his Cup celebration in his hometown in Sweden.

Brooks Orpik injured his hand in game two of the Columbus series and also had the tip of his right pinky finger detached when Erik Haula violently slashed him at the end of game two in the Stanley Cup final. Despite the injuries, Orpik played some of his best hockey in this postseason. When asked about the improvement in his skating this past season, Brooks noted that he is always tweaking his off season training regimen to seek improvement, but he also pointed out this was the first season in a few years where he did not have any ailments that impacted his wheels. Orpik told me he’d find out on Friday if he needed surgery on his hand.

Coach Barry Trotz had initial new contract discussions with General Manager Brian MacLellan on Wednesday morning. The Stanley Cup winning coach says he wants to be back because he likes this group while also stating that the area and setup has been good for his family situation. When asked if the rest of the entire coaching staff would be back next year, he said that is unknown, at this time.

John “Big Game” Carlson has not had any contract talks with the Caps yet, but said he loves this team and would love to be back, but there are a lot of factors involved. He will be having his Stanley Cup celebration in the DC area (his wife is from the DMV). The Capitals have an advantage in negotiations since they can sign number 74 for eight years, while others can only offer seven campaigns. There is no doubt that “Big Game” is the number one offseason unrestricted free agent priority for MacLellan and the Caps. The salary cap number for 2018-19 will be out from the league on Monday, June 18th and the higher it goes, the better it is for Washington ($82M would be really nice). Backstrom, when asked about Carlson stated, “John Carlson just keeps getting better and better. It’s impressive. Hopefully he stays here.” I’ll say this now, just like I did about T.J. Oshie last year, Pay the Man! He’s a legitimate number one defenseman and easily in the top ten in the NHL, in my opinion. You don’t let stud blue liners like “Big Game” Carlson leave. Losing him would be close to the magnitude of the Scott Stevens departure back in 1990.

Defensemen Michal Kempny and Dmitry Orlov gave a lot of credit to assistant coach Todd Rierden for helping them improve their respective games. Kempny noted that he had little confidence when he came over in February in a trade from Chicago and that Rierden immediately helped him regain it. The Czech defensemen stated that he had some bad games in the postseason, but that Rierden was always there to give him some keys to turning things around in the next contest. Kempny, who was very vocal about coming back because the Caps have “a great group of players, coaches, and trainers,” is an unrestricted free agent and given that he played as the number four defensemen in the postseason, he’s high up on the contract pecking order for MacLellan and the Caps. He only has 103 games of NHL experience, so that could help keep his price lower (he made $900, 000 in 2017-18 and will get a decent raise). Orlov, who had his hand badly injured in the World Championships in the spring of 2014 and missed the entire first season of the Trotz era (2014-15), said he was unsure he’d ever be able to play again at a high level. Rierden has certainly helped Dima out, but I also give Orlov a ton of credit for constantly working and striving to be better. It’s amazing how far he’s come since the 2016 playoffs where he struggled against the Flyers and Penguins. He’s a quality blue liner that breaks the puck out of his own zone incredibly well.

Oshie said he hasn’t won much since he was younger, so this Stanley Cup victory has been very exciting. Courtesy of the great Tarik El-Bashir, T.J. said he was healthiest at the start of the Stanley Cup Final. He won’t require any procedures this offseason. The Osh Babe, who is one of the most positive people you’ll ever meet, told Tarik that “I didn’t even need Advil” as the SCF started.

Tom “Future Captain” Wilson noted that he played up and down the lineup this season, but said when he played 10 games straight with Ovechkin and Kuznetsov, instead of just one or two, his game really took off. Willy talked at length about how close this team was (is), but credited former Cap Justin Williams for encouraging the team to have fun and said it helped loosen the team up and bond them. Top line Tommy says he’s loved his five years here, stated he’s always done whatever he can to help the team, but also said there will be an element of business this summer for him (he’s a restricted free agent). Like Orlov and Evgeny Kuznetsov and some others on this squad, it’s amazing how much they have improved in the four years this coaching staff has been in place. The players clearly get the majority of the credit, but you can’t discount the way the coaches have enabled these players to blossom.

On the netminding front, courtesy of Isabelle Khurshudyan of The Washington Post, MacLellan said Philipp Grubauer wants to be a number one goaltender, but he’d like to keep both Grubi and Braden Holtby, be he’s going to explore a trade for Grubauer so he can do his thing. There is no doubt that the Capitals don’t win the Metropolitan Division without the stellar play of number 31 this past season. You need two good goalies in this day and age in the NHL to make it to the postseason. If Grubauer, who is a restricted free agent departs via trade, there could be a big dropoff to third string, Phoenix Copley. 2015 1st round pick Ilya Samsonov will be coming over to North America to play this fall, but he’ll need time in Hershey to become acclimated to the smaller rink. Bottom line, the best scenario for the Caps is to keep Grubauer, but potential salary cap room and a good trade return will likely be too hard to pass up. Goaltending coach Scott Murray and his staff, to include Olie Kolzig, will need to really get the other goalies in the system ready quickly should the German keeper move on.

Jay Beagle, when asked why the Caps won this year, pointed out that the Capitals “built their game all year and peaked at the right time. In past years we peaked in December and Janaury and then tried to hold onto it.” When questioned about Ovechkin not letting go of the Cup very much since they won, he stated that Ovi is invited to his Cup celebration, but he doubted the Gr8 would come to the Beagle farm. On Trotz, number 83 said “He’s always been a great coach since he’s been here, has brought in great people around him, and I feel like we have been the most prepared team in the league.” The unrestricted free agent, who has now won championships at the ECHL, AHL, and NHL level, hasn’t had any contract discussions yet and stated “obviously, I have to wait until the big guys get settled first” before receiving an offer. The hard working total team guy stated he could wait until after July 1st and that he’d leave things up to MacLellan. When I asked him if he’d leave if some team came along and threw money at him, said he’d have to see what was best for his family. The fourth line center who is great on faceoffs and the PK made $1.75M in each of the last three seasons.

As I wrote in my Cup winning blog, players such as Brett Connolly, Jakub Vrana, and Andre Burakovsky really upped their compete level, especially on the physical side of the house, and were important factors in the Caps playoff run. Burakovsky told El-Bashir that after three hand injuries over the past couple of years that he plans to have a conversation with CCM this summer about getting more substantial gloves. He told Tarik that two of the injuries could’ve been avoided with more protection. Washington will need each of these three guys to continue to progress, as they’ve done so far under Lane Lambert’s tutelage, if they are going to have a chance to repeat. Connolly, who for two years has confidently told me that the Caps have a very good team, summed up why this Championship ultimately happened for this squad.

“It was amazing, such a good group, such a committed group, such a highly skilled group. We really just came together at the right time, especially after that Pittsburgh series where we first really said we could win this. It’s such a big moment for all of us, we’re all just so happy that we could ultimately get this done for all of our fans, for our families, it was such a special moment.”

That quote from Connolly really summed up this team, who will forever be legends around this area, in a nutshell.

Notes: Matt Niskanen, when asked about all of the celebrations, said “It was great to see Brooks Orpik let his hair down.” So many players mentioned how business like number 44 is and that they don’t often get to see that side of one of the biggest leaders on the Caps…Alex Chiasson, who scored a huge goal to open the scoring in the game six triumph that closed out the Penguins, was hoping to come back to the Caps next season, especially given his close friendship that he has developed with Ovechkin, which apparently started from playing cards on the plane together…Beagle is leaving town on Thursday and noted it would be good to get back to reality…I’ll post a full transcript of my exclusive one on one session with Connolly out at WNST.NET on Thursday night…Backstrom, when asked about the team possibly breaking up, “It sucks, but when you look back on this 10, 15 years from now, we’ll always have this special group.”

Photo credit to Jacquelyn Martin of the Associated Press.

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Caps End 44-Year Drought With Stanley Cup Win

Posted on 08 June 2018 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals have won the Stanley Cup!!!

Pardon my French, but 44 years of futility is freaking over!

There will be no more doubting Conn Smythe Trophy Award winner Alexander Ovechkin or Nicklas Backstrom or Braden Holtby or General Manager Brian MacLellan or Coach Barry Trotz or Brooks Orpik and on and on down the list of Washington Capitals players, coaches, and managers. This is truly an incredible group of people who bonded together and showed that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. They have made a long suffering fan base very proud and the Baltimore-Washington area will NEVER EVER forget this cast of champions!

As for the Stanley Cup clinching game itself, WOW!

The Caps jumped out to 1-0 and 2-1 leads, saw Vegas tie the game on a tally that sure looked like goalie interference and then surge ahead very late in period two with a power play goal. The Golden Knights had a 3-2 advantage after 40 minutes in a very hotly contested physical affair and had their eyes on sending things back to Capital One Arena down just three games to two.

Previous Washington teams might’ve folded, at that point, and started contemplating that game six in DC on Sunday night, but not the 2018 Washington Capitals. This club came out with a passion in period three and fought tooth and nail to get the equalizer, which came from an incredible individual effort by Devante Smith-Pelly to notch his 7th goal of the postseason after Orpik made an outstanding keep in at the offensive blue line to set the tally up. That marker came with 10:08 remaining and the Caps kept the hammer down.

With 7:37 to go, Luca Sbisa turned the puck over to Andre Burakovsky behind his own net and Burkie fed Brett Connolly alone in the slot. Conno fired on net and the puck squeezed through Marc-Andre Fleury’s pads and Lars Eller, who applied the fore check pressure to set up the turnover after a smart dump in by Michal Kempny, grabbed the disc and deposited it into the cage for what would be the first ever Stanley Cup clinching goal for the Capitals and his seventh of the post season, as well.

Imagine that, sevens were wild in the third period, in Vegas??!!

Washington had 13 of the first 18 shots on goal in period three to storm the castle and take a 4-3 lead.

From there, the Capitals went into their 1-1-3 defensive posture and really didn’t give Vegas any quality chances, despite six Golden Knights shots on goal. Any attempts that made it through were gobbled up by Holtby (28 saves), who kept this a one goal game early in period three by gloving a top shelf wrister from David Perron in the slot. It was a big stop and nearly as important as “The Save” in game two, because if the Caps go down two pucks there, then a game six would very likely have occurred.

Backstrom (1 assist) had a chance to end the series with an empty net tally with under a minute to go, but somehow missed the cage invoking memories of Esa Tikkanen not scoring in game two of the 1998 Stanley Cup Final. But Nicky’s teammates wouldn’t allow the miss to bite the team in the rear and the Caps killed off the remainder of the clock and celebrated wildly when it was over, led by their very emotional captain.

This team won the Cup because it learned to play defense better than any other Capitals squad in the Ovechkin era. Washington listened to the coaching staff and walled off the front of their net regularly in the post season. They received outstanding goaltending from the Holtbeast, who along with Evgeny Kuznetsov (32 playoff points), could’ve won the Conn Smythe Trophy, based on their on ice production.

But the Gr8 (power play goal, his NHL leading 15th tally of the 2018 playoffs) definitely deserved the MVP trophy for his incredible leadership. Who can forget the Ovechkin line, “We’re going to Columbus to win two games and bring this series tied back to DC” in the first round? Time after time he scored the big goal (first goal in game 7 in Tampa) or made a great back check and pass to win a series (Pittsburgh, game 6) or blocked a shot and dove to clear a puck at an important juncture (SCF game two). Ovi led by example on and off of the ice. He made it clear before game five that the team shouldn’t be talking about celebrations or any of the stuff that comes with winning because they hadn’t won anything yet. Simply put, all playoffs long, Alex talked the talk and then backed it up by walking the walk.

Seeing his emotions as he was given the Cup from Commissioner Gary Bettman was incredible, then watching him skate around with Lord Stanley and pass it to Backstrom is a memory that Capitals fans will remember forever. Two players who former General Manager George McPhee drafted and built the franchise around finally made it to the promised land after 11 years of failures.

As Ovi and Nicky will tell you, this wasn’t about them, though, this was about a team that picked each other up through injuries, suspensions, mistakes, adversity, and questionable officiating along the way. You can go up and down the lineup and point to contributions each player made.

  • Kuznetsov dominated with his skating and became a superstar this spring. He took his game to a whole new level and backed up the big contract he received last summer.
  • T. J. Oshie did just about everything you could ask for from scoring big goals (see game six vs. Tampa), winning the vast majority of board battles, and playing great defense to close out games. The Caps don’t win the Cup without the Osh Babe. There’s a reason I blogged and tweeted “Pay the Man” throughout 2016-17.
  • Tom Wilson evolved into a complete player this campaign and “Top Line Willy” was just a wrecking ball and force all post season. He’s built for the playoffs.
  • John Carlson, Matt Niskanen, Dmity Orlov, and trade deadline bargain Kempny played a lot of minutes on the blue line in four grueling series. “Big Game” Carlson showed how a number one defensemen should perform in the playoffs and I’ll say this again about him, “Pay the Man!” Niskanen was so solid and took the heat for he and Orlov’s rough game five in Tampa. That’s leadership, right there, and it took the pressure off of Dmitry, allowing Dima to get back on track quickly in game six.
  • Orpik was a team leading +17 in the post season and “Batya” had the key game winning goal in game two that turned the Stanley Cup Final around. For all of the grief the Corsi crew gives him, he thrived in the post season on defense, the PK, and he even chipped in offensively with five points.
  • Eller stepped up, especially when Backstrom broke his hand. He played second and third line center doing whatever was asked of him. The Capitals also don’t win the Cup without “Tiger.”
  • Jay Beagle was a beast on faceoffs all post season and a dominant force in all three zones. Nobody works harder than “Beags.”
  • Connolly (6 goals, 3 assists in the playoffs) was a totally different player from the guy who was scratched in the 2017 postseason by using his speed, great shot, and more importantly, his body to win puck and board battles.
  • Jakub Vrana and Andre Burakovsky used their skill and speed to score or set up huge goals. Vrana had the critical game winner in game five against the Pens and Andre notched two huge breakaway tallies in game seven to defeat the Bolts. Those two guys learned to win board battles by adding a physical element to their game and that was critical to the team’s success. They became excellent playoff style hockey players, something this squad badly needed after the off season losses of forwards Justin Williams and Marcus Johansson to the top six.
  • Chandler Stephenson (7 playoff points) played up and down the lineup and used his superior speed to set up goals and make opposing defensemen lose confidence. He was also a key cog on the penalty kill.
  • Smith-Pelly notched big goal after big goal, with his game going to an incredible level in the Cup Final after a rough game one.
  • Christian Djoos took advantage of the downtime down the regular season stretch he endured due to Jakub Jerabek’s strong play to jump back in against Columbus in game three and become part of a quality third pair duo with Orpik.
  • Even forwards such as Alex Chiasson (goal in game six against Pittsburgh), Nathan Walker (assist in game six against Pittsburgh), and Travis Boyd contributed when the injury bug and suspension to Wilson hit against the Pens.

Yes, this was a special crew of players because of how they united and after two very shaky games against Columbus, bought in to what the outstanding coaching staff was selling to go on a remarkable run. Washington was 16-6 beginning with game three of the first round. The switch to Holtbeast was a game or two late for me, but perhaps it was meant to be so that the rest of the club could finally understand the way they needed to play to have the ultimate success?

Yes, it’s true, Alexander Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals are really Stanley Cup Champions!!

When is the parade??!!

Addendum

The ride was absolutely amazing and for me, this championship is extra special. As a nine year old boy in 1974, my father was in the sports journalism business at WLMD in Laurel and dragged me time and time again to Capital Centre to watch a terrible expansion team play a sport that quickly got my attention. It wasn’t until I was a senior in high school in 1983 that the Capitals finally made the playoffs thanks to David Poile, Rod Langway, Scott Stevens, and Bryan Murray. That’s when hockey became my favorite sport. From there I covered the team for the PG Post-Sentinel for a few years, meeting current WNST owner Nestor Aparacio in the process. That press box stint led to a Capitals team statistician position with Dr. Mike Herr and several other great people for 11 years. From 1986 to 1997 I traveled to games in Philly and everywhere in the playoffs with the team enjoying really great times while learning so much about hockey from great players such as Langway and Dale Hunter, and hockey personnel Jack Button, although I learned even more from his son, Tod. But there were so many heartbreaks along the way and several times it was to the Penguins, who won five Stanley Cups, defeating the Caps each time. In 2007, Nestor reached out to me and told me he was starting a WNST website and he wanted me to blog on it, doing whatever I wanted since I was someone he trusted and had inside access given my time with the Caps. Naturally I’ve turned that into this Caps blog and regular radio show sessions with Nestor. We’ve chronicled the highs and even more heartbreak since 2008 during the Ovechkin era. I was able to be on the ice in Hershey when Carlson, Beagle, and Holtby won the Calder Cup in 2010 (thanks John Walton!). But in 2014, I had seen enough of a bad culture and the lack of a cohesive team that led to me calling for the firing of Coach Adam Oates and GM McPhee, and the hiring of Trotz. Three years of crushing playoff defeats followed in the Trotz and GM Brian MacLellan era, but on July 3, 2017, I penned a “Caps are still a contender blog” despite the fact that many had written the GM, coach, and players off. Thankfully the GM, the coaches, and the guys on the ice delivered in a way that many hockey fans around this area will appreciate for the rest of their lives. I know I will, but most of all, I really appreciate my father, Ed, who will turn 80 on July 7th, for introducing me to the Capitals and the sport of hockey. Exchanging texts with him after the Capitals won the Cup was a very special moment for me and many of the people who reached out to me afterwards are great people that I’ve met along the way watching, working, covering, and just being around this great sport. I’ve made so many lifelong and life changing friends and people through hockey. I’d need numerous blogs to list all of them, you know who you are! I owe all of it to my father, so thanks Dad! I know you predicted back in 1974 that the Caps would sell out every game some day and they’d win a Stanley Cup. You are now correct on both counts!

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Ovi Game 3 SCF

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Caps Take Series Lead With First Home Stanley Cup Final Triumph

Posted on 03 June 2018 by Ed Frankovic

Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov, and Devante Smith-Pelly scored for Washington and Braden Holtby stopped 21 of 22 shots to lead the Capitals to a 3-1 victory in front of 18,506 raucous fans at Capital One Arena on Saturday night. The triumph was the Caps first ever win on home ice in the Stanley Cup Final and they now lead the best of seven series, two games to one. Game four is Monday night in DC.

This was the event of the year in town and the pregame featured a concert from Sting and Shaggy outside the arena and then Wheel of Fortune’s Pat Sajak, a long time Capitals season ticket holder, announced the pregame lineups where every Vegas player, except for former Capital Nate Schmidt, was booed.

The Capitals did a lot of things correct and still have things to clean up, so here are eight thoughts and analysis on this win that moves the team closer to their ultimate goal.

Do The Bird – Kuznetsov was injured on a hit by Brayden McNabb in period one of the second game and since that time, the Capitals have been a different team. Washington amped up their play without Kuzy in a 3-2 victory and on Saturday night, the tougher than you think Russian with high end skill returned to the lineup. Number 92 was flying in this affair in an attempt to prove that he will not be intimidated by physical play and his shot from the slot eventually set up Ovechkin’s net crashing tally that put Washington on the board just 1:10 into period two. At 12:50 of the middle frame, he put a serious dagger into Vegas’ hopes in this contest. T.J. Oshie did a great job of blocking a shot by Shea Theodore and he gathered in the disc and fed it to Jay Beagle in the neutral zone. Beags took off up ice with Kuzy on a two on one and Jay alertly gave the puck to the wizard to his right very quickly. Evgeny skated in and with the Golden Knights Colin Miller shading Beagle in an attempt to cut off the pass, Kuznetsov sailed in closer on Marc-Andre Fleury and put a superstar shot past the goalie over the right pad, under the blocker and off of the inside of the far post for a huge tally. The $7.8 million dollar man showed up big time on the game’s largest stage to lead the Capitals to a monumental win. He logged 18:52 of ice time, had six shot attempts, including four on net, and won five of seven draws. Kuznetsov was named the game’s number one star and deservedly so.

Come on now

Whawk! Hallelujah! Whoa

Whawk! Hallelujah! Whoa

Follow the Leader – Ovechkin had another beastly game and he nearly scored in the first two minutes when Kuznetsov fed him on a two on one, but Fleury somehow got his glove on his attempt. Ovi would not be denied on this night and his goal, on a rebound of John Carlson’s shot, was reminiscent of his 600th career goal against Winnipeg this year. This one came on a backhander with bodies strewn all over the ice in a goal mouth scramble. It was pure grit and determination by the Gr8 and his linemates, with Tom Wilson having a wrecking ball of a shift. The goal put the somewhat anxious crowd at ease and allowed Washington to play the style they wanted while Vegas had to start chasing the game. Alex had 10 shot attempts in this outing and five were on net in 17:28 of action. He also had two hits and two blocked shots. The blocked shots are something the Capitals have done a very good job of in this series and when the other players see Ovi “all in” and doing the little things like that, it energizes the team and motivates them to put themselves on the line, as well.

Defense Wins Championships – Washington, after their own zone struggles in the first game of this series, have become much better at team defense and walling off the front of their net. In game three they blocked 26 shots and the Holtbeast noted afterwards that the communication between the shot blocker and himself have been good to make sure the right lanes are taken away and he can see the shots. Vegas’ only goal was on a giveaway by Holtby in period three, but the Golden Knights did have some quality chances to score. In period two, Cody Eakin, Jonathan Marchessault, and Alex Tuch all had grade “A” opportunities, but either missed the net or Holtby made the save. Afterwards, Vegas Coach Gerard Gallant agreed that his team had the potential to score more goals, but noted that they were not able to get the second or third attempts to penetrate the Washington net. This is a credit to the Capitals team defense. Coach Barry Trotz noted that the Caps turned the page quickly on game one and seem to be finding their better levels again, but he didn’t like the chances the Golden Knights received in period two. The Capitals were certainly stingier in period three, especially after the Tomas Nosek goal just 3:29 into the final stanza. Coach Trotz also said that they can certainly get even better in limiting Vegas’ offense going forward.

“We probably gave them a little bit more zone time than we would have liked, but certainly the high danger areas we did pretty good with,” stated big game player, Carlson, afterwards.

Breaking the Fore Check – Vegas is a fast skating, straight line team that comes at you in your own end with speed and size. Washington has adapted to that style as this series as gone on, but it’s imperative that the first pass is a good one, because when it’s not, the Golden Knights swarm and use that fore check to generate goals. That’s where Holtby’s ability to play the puck makes a big difference. Despite that one miscue, the Holtbeast has been very good at stopping the dump ins and getting the puck to one of his defensemen where they can make a solid read and get the disc going the other way quickly. As for the Capitals blue liners, they have continued to improve from game one with their decision making. We saw fewer giveaways in game three and more quality passes that are leading to opportunities at the other end. The Caps must continue that trend if they are going to take game four.

Let’s Get Physical – This series has continued to be very physical as it’s progressed and the Caps outhit Vegas, 38-31, and this was not because the Golden Knights dominated possession. Washington is doing a good job of hitting the Vegas blue line in their own end and there have been lots of Capitals hits on Vegas forwards along the walls and on the backboards in Washington’s end. Wilson, Smith-Pelly, Beagle, and Ovechkin combined for 12 hits while the trio of Matt Niskanen, Brooks Orpik, and Michal Kempny had 11. The hitting is important for the Capitals because it helps wear down the Vegas defensemen and slow down their transition game.

Full Speed Ahead – All post season, it has been so important for the Capitals to get the lead. When you are ahead at the game’s midpoint, you start forcing your opponent to change their strategy and gamble more often. The opponents will activate their defense and this opens up the opportunity for counter attacks, if you play well in your end and get the puck out to the right places. Washington has improved with that and in games two and three they’ve locked the lead down well. If not for Fleury (23 saves), game three would have been a bigger spread on the scoreboard, something Vegas Coach Gallant noted afterwards. The Caps third goal with just over six minutes remaining was the cumulative result of being physical and taking the counter attack when presented. Beagle made a super play in the offensive zone to force a Theodore turnover and then Smith-Pelly read the play perfectly and broke to the net all alone. His top shelf cheese that beat Fleury was a high skill event and a big make up for his giveaway in game one on the Nosek winning tally. It was a huge goal from the fourth line and Washington continues to get production from all of its players.

“It’s good to get contributions from everyone, we expect that, whether it’s goals or blocks or just getting the puck out on the wall. Everything matters so much, at this point. It’s good to see those guys get rewarded for their hard work,” added Carlson after the game on the Smith-Pelly goal that was set up by Beagle.

Where Do We Go From Here? – This was the first time all post season the Capitals have won the first home game of a series so now they have a chance to take a strangle hold 3-1 lead on Monday night. Vegas has endured their first two game losing streak of the playoffs and now have to deal with some adversity. Washington has been accused of lacking killer instinct in the past and now they have a chance to rewrite more narratives in game four. They must do, as Coach Trotz said, get even better with their game because the Golden Knights will be desperate to tie things up. You don’t get opportunities like this very often, so the Caps must seize the moment.

Notes: Orpik was hit hard up high in period two and didn’t play the last 12:25, but Coach Trotz said he was fine after the game…the blue line trio of Niskanen, Dmitry Orlov, and Carlson logged 27:16, 26:04, and 22:23 of ice time, respectively. Orpik only played 11:57 and Christian Djoos had just 8:40 of ice time…Schmidt led Vegas in TOI with a low total of 21:12…the Caps were 0 for 4 on the power play while Vegas went 0 for 2…shot attempts were 62-58 for the Golden Knight thanks to a 19-13 period three advantage for Vegas, who started that frame down two goals…the Capitals were much better on draws in game three, going 39-23. Nicklas Backstrom was 11-7, Lars Eller 10-7, and Oshie went 5-0. Getting the puck first against a fast Vegas team is very important…the crowd at Capital One Arena was extremely loud, especially once the Capitals seized the lead. They also didn’t panic after the Holtby giveaway that made it 2-1. They stuck behind their squad.

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Nine Thoughts on the Caps-Vegas Series After Game One

Posted on 29 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals dropped game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, 6-4, to the Vegas Golden Knights on Monday night at T-Mobile Arena. For the Caps, this was their third straight loss to Vegas this season, with the last two coming in games where Washington relinquished a third period one goal lead.

Game 2 is Wednesday night from Sin City and the Capitals will be looking to play much better and even this series up heading back to Washington for game three on Saturday night at Capital One Arena.

After digesting the loss, what follows are nine thoughts and analysis after one tilt.

Clean up on Aisle Three! – The Caps lost this game in one particular area of the ice, the defensive zone. Washington had, by far, their worst defensive performance of the post season. There were too many turnovers and blown coverages. Pucks were bouncing over players sticks and instead of doing the safe thing and making sure they cleared pucks out of harms way, the Capitals allowed Vegas to get in deep for five goals just to the left of Braden Holtby (28 saves). The biggest turnover of the night was clearly the Devante Smith-Pelly one up the right wing boards that Shea Theodore kept in the offensive zone and fed to Tomas Nosek for the game winning tally with 10:16 remaining. DSP needed to either go high glass there or bank it hard off the boards and, at worst, take an icing. John Carlson and Michal Kempny were the duo that struggled the most on the back end. Those guys both need to be harder on the puck or the man to prevent these layups that the Golden Knights feasted on in their game one triumph.

Somebody Get Me Some Ice – The ice was horrible at T-Mobile in 90 plus degree weather in the desert, but the Golden Knights had to deal with the same sheet. The referees and linesmen were constantly having to fix patches of the playing surface throughout the evening and with temperatures even higher on Wednesday, I don’t see how the ice will be better. Matt Niskanen told me the ice was terrible or they didn’t freeze the pucks, or both, afterwards. Vegas was the team that took advantage of the issue better, by using their quickness to pressure the Capitals into mishandling the biscuit more often. In game two, Niskanen said the best thing for Washington to do is simplify their game to make the bad ice less of a problem. Passes have to happen quicker and be harder to prevent the turnover fest we saw in game one.

Four Score – Washington’s offense was pretty good in this affair and if you score four times, you should win. The line of Jakub Vrana, Nicklas Backstrom, and T.J. Oshie was the best for Washington. The Osh Babe had two gorgeous assists, to Backy and Carlson, for the second and third Capitals goals, respectively. Vrana and Oshie made life difficult for Vegas on the boards using their speed and tenacity to make their opponents uncomfortable in their own end. Also, Backstrom finally looked closer to the dominant guy we saw in games two and three of the Penguins series, so clearly his right-hand injury is not as much of an issue. This line was one of the big positives in game one and Coach Barry Trotz will be riding this trio a lot on Wednesday. Brett Connolly had a great tip in for the first Caps marker off of a Kempny point shot and Tom Wilson scored on a tipped Alex Ovechkin attempt just 1:10 into period three. The Capitals dented long time nemesis, Marc Andre-Fleury, for four tallies and that was done via a lot of crashing the cage and net presence. Washington must keep that mentality up in game two.

Dynamic Duo– As much as the Caps struggled in their own end, the pair of Dmitry Orlov and Niskanen was plus two when on the ice together in game one. Orlov was the best defensemen for his club and his skating and passing ability is a great counter to Vegas’ heavy forecheck pressure game. Number nine created a lot of scoring chances for the Capitals and he had eight shot attempts. Both played over 24 minutes and will be counted on a ton in game two, like the Backstrom line.

Bad Zebras – The officiating of Marc Joannette and Wes McCauley was an absolute disgrace in game one. The game tying goal in period three from Ryan Reaves came after a blatant cross check of Carlson and Niskanen said afterwards that should have absolutely been a penalty and that if Andre Burakovsky’s penalty in period one was going to be called, then the Reaves hit was way worse and should’ve been whistled. Caps Coach Barry Trotz stated after the game, “I thought we were going on a power play there before their fourth goal.” The impartial former NHL player now turned analyst, Aaron Ward, had a big issue with the missed cross check, but also cited Derek Engelland for “lumberjacking” the whole game as well as an Alex Tuch elbow to the head of Orlov. The zebras also missed too many men on the ice during the Wilson-Jonathan Marchessault incident. Ward was adamant that had the referees huddled on the Reaves goal and called the cross check then they wouldn’t have had to huddle on the Wilson hit because the frustration level wouldn’t have been where it was at. The Capitals were clearly incensed with the lack of calls and Willy took it a little too far with the interference on #81, but again, if the referees call the game correctly, that doesn’t happen. I also thought the linesmen had a bad outing as the icing calls were not consistent. The NHL Supervisor of Officiating needs to call this crew in and reprimand them for overshadowing and becoming too much of a factor in a huge game. Unacceptable! Kelly Sutherland and Chris Rooney will officiate game two, so hopefully the zebras have a better performance.

Not So Gr8 – Ovechkin started the first and second periods and, in both frames, the Capitals came out flat, prompting coach Trotz to start the Backstrom line for period three. Ovi’s first shift of the final frame was his best and his shot was tipped home by Willy to give the Caps a brief third period lead. For the game, Alex only had five shot attempts in 19:09 of ice time. He had four hits, as Washington is trying to be more physical to negate the speed of the Golden Knights, but he didn’t skate well or handle the disc cleanly most of the night. If the Capitals are going to win this series, Ovechkin needs to be a lot better.

Sticking to their Game Plan – Vegas, as I stated in my series preview blog on Sunday, is no fluke. That team plays hard, smart, and sticks to their system. Coach Gerard Gallant pretty much rolled his defensive pairs and forward lines with no Golden Knight blue liner logging more than 20:36 (William Karlsson). Their fourth trio only played just under 10 minutes together, but they dominated the Caps when on the ice. Sure, they got away with some mayhem that should’ve been penalties, but they took advantage of the ignoring of the rulebook by the guys in stripes and scored three times. Nosek had two tallies, with the last being an empty net goal. Both he and Pierre-Edouard Bellemare were plus three in game one and a big reason why Vegas was victorious. On the blue line, Theodore led the way with 21:52, which is a pretty low total. The Golden Knights also scored on their only power play, a point shot from Colin Miller that went through traffic and by Holtby. Vegas is playing with confidence and is now 7-1 on home ice in these playoffs. Their crowd was a big factor in game one – whenever the Knights fell behind, the fans picked up their noise level and it seemed to bring the team energy. T-Mobile arena is loud and boisterous, and that clearly helps their club.

Urgency – The Caps have their work cut out for them in game two. They must play with more urgency to start each period and after they light the lamp, especially since Vegas scored goals on their very next shot after the Caps took their two leads in this affair. Vegas is quicker, but the Capitals had some breakouts that exposed them on the back end for odd man chances. Washington must continue to do that on Wednesday, but most important is puck management and better coverage in their own end. The things to be encouraged by are the strong performance of Backstrom’s line and the Orlov-Niskanen duo. The Caps played a very poor game on Monday, but still had the lead in the final frame, so that is another positive. They need more from Ovechkin and his line, although I thought Evgeny Kuznetsov had a pretty good outing in 19:26 of action. Based on Tuesday’s practice, the Capitals will have the same lineup, but they just need to play much better and execute the game plan.

Notes: The Caps won the shot attempt battle, 68-67, via a 30-23 third period advantage. The first period was not good for Washington, they were out attempted, 25-18 and were fortunate to be tied after 20 minutes…the face-off battle was won by Vegas, 33-31, but Jay Beagle went 11-5. The Caps need to win more draws so they can have more possession time…Carlson led the Caps in ice time with 25:03…both teams only had one power play. Vegas tallied on theirs while the Caps hit the post on their attempt…Washington had 38 hits to 25 for the Golden Knights. Brooks Orpik led the Capitals with nine.

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Caps Will Face A Strong and Confident Vegas Squad in the Stanley Cup Final

Posted on 27 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

For the first time in 20 years the Washington Capitals will be playing in the Stanley Cup Final. The last time they managed to win three rounds, in 1998, they were swept by the Detroit Red Wings, who would win their second straight title with a loaded team. In those days, there wasn’t an NHL salary cap, so many of the bigger market franchises were able to stack their rosters up with talent by spending more money. Go back and take a look at that Red Wings roster, coached by the legendary Scotty Bowman, and you’ll see the names of many Hall of Fame players such as Steve Yzerman, Sergei Fedorov, Brendan Shanahan, Nicklas Lidstrom, and Larry Murphy.

In 2018, outspending other teams by wide margins is no longer the case with the salary cap in place along with last season’s NHL expansion draft. Former Capitals General Manager George McPhee, who knew he would be getting a good player from all 30 teams, did a marvelous job of assembling a roster that is big and fast. Not many picked the Vegas Golden Knights to make the playoffs, but they bonded together after the tragedy at the country music festival last October outside Mandalay Bay, rode goalie Marc Andre-Fleury to some early wins when they were outplayed, and then found a lot of confidence along the way en route to the Pacific Division title.

This Golden Knights squad is no fluke and their accomplishments should be celebrated, because they earned it defeating the Los Angeles Kings, San Jose Sharks, and Winnipeg Jets in just 15 playoff games. Coach Gerard Gallant and his staff have done a masterful job of getting each player to buy in and play a north-south style of hockey with speed and size. Heading into the season, there were no star players on this roster, other than the three time Stanley Cup Champion goaltender, and each player arrived with a hunger to be a regular player and make a mark in this league. Boy did this squad stick to the script, turning a “Land of Misfit Toys” type group into the Western Conference Champions.

They have star players now, and it starts up front with their top line of William Karlsson (43 goals), Jonathan Marchessault (27 goals), and Riley Smith. Both Karlsson and Marchessault have had career years and moved into the star category this season. Those two have 14 of the 43 goals that Vegas has scored this post season and Smith also has added two tallies to go with his 14 assists. They are a formidable top line and the Capitals have to be careful not make mistakes against them because they will burn Washington with odd man rushes using their speed. The Caps need to continue to play a north-south style and avoid offensive zone blue line cross ice passes against the whole Golden Knights squad, but especially this top line. I look for Coach Barry Trotz to try and get Nicklas Backstrom’s line, with T.J. Oshie and Jakub Vrana and the Dmitry Orlov and Matt Niskanen blue line duo out against the Marchessault trio, which averages right around 20 minutes a game in time on ice, as much as possible in this series.

Vegas’ second line at the end of the Winnipeg series was centered by the speedy Erik Haula and flanked by former Nashville Predator James Neal, and the big and superfast Alex Tuch. That trio has combined for 13 goals this post season. This line is downright scary in terms of speed and Tuch and Neal bring a lot of grit, too. They are great on the fore check and Neal is a supremely talented offensive player that knows how to go to the net. There are times, depending on the matchups, where Tuch gets moved to the third line and David Perron, who missed four playoff games due to injury, plays on the second unit. Either way, this is a line that you better not go to sleep on when they are on the ice.

Former Capital Cody Eakin and Ryan Carpenter are mainstays on the third line and complete the top nine for Vegas. Eakin is a very fast player, but is not big, while Carpenter, at six feet one, plays with size and is strong on the boards. It will be interesting to see if Gallant puts this line against the Caps top line of Evgeny Kuznetsov, Alex Ovechkin, and Tom Wilson or he tries to match the Neal-Haula-Tuch unit against Ovi and company.

Rounding out Vegas’ forwards are Pierre Edouard-Bellemare, Tomas Nosek, Ryan Reaves, and former Red Wing, Tomas Tatar. Tatar has had pass success against Washington, so I wouldn’t be surprised to see him promoted back into the lineup versus the Caps. Bellemare, a former Flyer, is a prototypical fourth line player that is strong on the puck and does a great job of killing penalties. Reaves is a big force and a protector, so the key for the Caps is to not have Wilson get engaged with the big man who scored the game winner that put Vegas into the Stanley Cup Final. Will Carrier, who has been out injured and practiced on Sunday in a non-contact jersey, could be back in later in the series to provide physical play on the fourth line, as well. The Capitals need Willy on the ice in this series and not in the penalty box.

On the back end, the Golden Knights are led by former Caps defensemen, Nate Schmidt. Schmidty is a popular guy who skates extremely well and moves the puck out of his zone quickly. He also has a strong shot and leads Vegas in average ice time in the playoffs (24:53 per contest). Number 88 is often on the ice with former Los Angeles King Brayden McNabb (average of 22:02 per game in the playoffs). Their second defensive pair is the physical former Penguin and Flame, Deryk Engelland, and Shea Theodore. Engelland fits the Brooks Orpik mold for Vegas in that he’s physical and is a penalty killing specialist. The blue line is strong for the Western Conference Champions as evidenced by a third duo of Colin Miller and Luca Sbisa. Sbisa is a very good puck mover, while the six foot one Miller brings size and a big shot on the power play.

In net, the Capitals will try to defeat Fleury for the first time in the post season. Number 29 has given up lots of tallies to the Caps in the past, but when the chips are on the line, he’s 2-0 in game sevens allowing only two goals. He’s the single biggest reason that the 2016-17 Presidents’ Trophy Winning Washington Capitals squad lost to the eventual Stanley Cup Champion Pens in round two. Fleury has been on fire in goal as Vegas has rolled through these playoffs and he clearly has taken his performance to a new level under former Capitals goalie coach, Dave Prior.

On special teams, the Golden Knights are a super penalty killing team (82.5% in the post season) and can burn you with shorthanded goals, if you aren’t careful. Karlsson is especially dangerous there. On the power play (17.6%) they rely a lot on shots from the top of the point with net presence. Both Schmidt and Miller have cannons and guys like Neal and Smith are strong at tipping pucks or potting rebounds. You also have to really watch Marchessault and Karlsson because they can pass the puck and have been successful finding that cross box seam play that has hurt the Capitals this postseason. Washington’s penalty killing crew is only at 75.4% in this playoff run, so the Caps must be better there to have a chance to win this series.

Vegas comes into this series as the favorites given their success that has led to supreme confidence, home ice advantage (only lost once at T-Mobile Arena this spring), and the fact that they are healthier and more rested than the Caps, who have played four more games. As has been the case in the past two Capitals series, having the lead by the game’s midway point will be crucial to the winner of each contest as both teams have very good goalies and a strong defensive posture that makes coming back from a deficit very difficult.

The outcome could go either way and one thing is for sure, one of these franchises is going to win their first Stanley Cup!

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Ovechkin, Burakovsky, and Holtby Shine in Caps Game 7 Triumph Over Tampa

Posted on 24 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

Alexander Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals are going to the Stanley Cup Final!

Let me say that again.

Alexander Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals are going to the Stanley Cup Final!

Ovi rifled a slap shot past Andrei Vasilevskiy just 1:02 into the contest off of a great feed from Evgeny Kuznetsov, Andre Burakovsky added two goals while in all alone on the Bolts goalie in the middle frame, Nicklas Backstrom hit the empty net with under four minutes remaining, and most importantly, Braden Holtby was an absolute wall in net making 29 saves in a Capitals 4-0 victory in game seven against the Tampa Bay Lightning.

The Caps, who won the first two and last two games of this Eastern Conference Final series that went the distance, will now face former General Manager George McPhee and the Vegas Golden Knights in the Stanley Cup Final, which will start on Monday night at 8 pm EDT from Rock Vegas.

This was a total team effort against the number one seed in the Eastern Conference and if not for the Holtbeast, the Caps aren’t up 1-0 when Burakovsky finally gave Washington a two puck margin. Holtby was outstanding in net by making the first save all evening and his teammates did a great job of clearing the rebounds. His biggest stop of the night was the Alex Killorn breakaway in period two where Holts got his blocker on the shot. There were numerous other big saves and after getting no shutouts all season, Braden came up huge with back to back blankings of the Bolts in games six and seven to hand his club the series victory and the Prince of Wales Trophy.

As has been the case all series long, getting the lead was so important in this tilt, so for the Caps to strike early really had to help their confidence given their past game seven scoring droughts, including a 2-0 season ending loss to Pittsburgh in 2017. The Caps earned a power play shortly thereafter and nearly made it 2-0, but the Bolts held them off and then the home team started to carry the play. Tampa pretty much threw the kitchen sink at the Caps in the first 30 minutes, but the Holtbeast and the Washington team defense didn’t break.

The Capitals were hanging on near the midway point of period two, but with Tampa really pressing, the Caps speed took over. Tom Wilson won a board battle in the neutral zone to get the puck to Lars Eller on the wall and #20, playing smartly with the lead, just fired the puck in a north-south manner into the Bolts zone. The disc hit Dan Girardi in the chest falling to #5’s skates, but Burkie swooped in to grab the loose biscuit and flew in on Vasilevskiy. Andre beat the Russian goalie with a gem of a shot over the right pad and just below the blocker at the 8:59 mark.

Andre was not done, though. With the Lightning really gambling to cut the margin to one, John Carlson banked a beautiful pass off of the boards from inside the Caps defensive zone to a streaking Burakovsky in the neutral zone. With the Bolts changing personnel, #65 skated in alone and beat the Bolts goaltender five hole to make it 3-0 with 3:29 to go in period two.

That tally clearly deflated Tampa and the Capitals were really able to clog the neutral zone, wall off the front of their net, and play for counter attacks from there on out. The Caps were so good on defense in the third period, that the Bolts were not able to get a single shot on net until 10:56 remained and that came on a point blast by Victor Hedman after a Tampa offensive zone face off win.

As was the case in Monday night’s game six dominant victory, the Capitals, once they had the multiple goal lead, were relentless on the puck and won numerous individual battles. Tampa did get a power play early in period three when Matt Niskanen was called for high sticking Nikita Kucherov, but the Caps penalty killing unit didn’t allow a single shot on goal.

What was most impressive about that PK was that Brooks Orpik was still in the locker room being tended to after Cedric Paquette boarded him late in period two. Somehow the zebras did not call a penalty there, which was ridiculous. So in the final frame, with a three goal lead, the Capitals were missing two of their top PK blue liners, yet they totally outworked the Bolts and easily killed the infraction off.

All season long, this crew has banded together to handle adversity and prove the critics wrong. Many said before the season they wouldn’t make the playoffs, and they won the Metropolitan Division title. Then several TSN experts had Columbus defeating them in round one and after going down 2-0 in games and facing a potential 3-0 hole in double OT of game three, they roared back with four straight wins to advance to face Pittsburgh in round two. Surely they would lose for the third straight year to the two-time defending Champions, right? At least that was the prevailing thought from the experts. But with Wilson suspended for three games and Backstrom dealing with a fractured hand he suffered early in game five, the Caps managed to defeat the Pens in game six with a lineup of five rookies and finally put to rest the Penguin demons.

That still wasn’t good enough and nearly all of the national media picked Tampa to defeat the Capitals in the Eastern Conference Final, especially with all of those ex-Rangers in their lineup. After a fast start on the road, the Caps sputtered at home and the ghosts of Washington playoff pasts seemed to be making an appearance. But this team said “no way, it ain’t happening again” and they turned in their best game, arguably ever, in the postseason with a 3-0 blanking of the Bolts on Monday night to force game seven.

That set the stage for Wednesday and the Caps 4-11 record in game seven tilts was littered all over the television channels, newspapers, and social media. But this band of brothers ignored that stat and stuck to their system to grind out a win and move on to the Stanley Cup Final, Washington’s second ever appearance in that affair and the first time since 1998.

It was another outstanding effort from the players, who adhered to the great game plan that the coaches gave them. Washington has learned, perhaps from past playoff defeats, that north-south hockey is what gets it done in the post season and they are executing that style well in the spring of 2018.

This was a huge victory, but there is still one series left to go. Vegas is a big and fast team and now they will face yet another long time nemesis, goalie Marc Andre-Fleury, who was the single biggest reason that Presidents’ Trophy winning squad lost in seven games to the Penguins in 2017.

However, we’ll have plenty of time to analyze the Stanley Cup Final before Monday, which should be a super match up.

On Wednesday night and Thursday morning, however, enjoy this series triumph because the team earned it and the fans have been waiting, some very patiently and others sometimes too impatiently, for Ovi, Backy, and company to finally break through. This is arguably not their best team on paper, but the game is played on the ice, so given their accomplishments to date, you can certainly say that this 2018 Capitals squad is their best team ever, but there is still hockey to play this spring.

So to close on this glorious night for the Washington Capitals, I’ll quote the great movie Major League, because there’s only one thing left for the Caps to do now,

“Win the whole f—in’ thing!”

Notes: Dmitry Orlov led the Caps in ice time with 25:40. Big game player Carlson logged 25:06 and was +3 with a huge assist. Hedman played a game high 28:05 for the Bolts…Game six hero Devante Smith-Pelly laid out to block a shot in period one and took it in the upper back/neck area. He only played 8:24 for the night, including one shift in period three…shot attempts were 60-38 for Tampa…Eller led the Capitals with five shots on goal. Ovechkin and Kuznetsov had four shots on net. The Caps had 23 shots on goal in the game…Washington was 0 for 1 on the power play while the Lightning were 0 for 2. The referees didn’t do the Capitals many favors in this series…the Capitals won the face off battle, 26-24. Jay Beagle went 6-4.

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Poor Start and Missed Call Doom the Caps in Game Five

Posted on 19 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

For the second time in three games, the Washington Capitals fell behind 3-0 and once again, a late rally wasn’t enough to tie the contest up. As a result, the Caps lost game five, 3-2, and now trail their best of seven series with Tampa, three games to two. Game six is Monday night at Capital One Arena at 8 pm.

Here are nine thoughts on a very tough loss at Amalie Arena, where the home team finally won for the first time in this series.

Poor Period Starts Costly – The Caps gave up goals 19 seconds into the game and 33 seconds into the second period to Tampa’s fourth line! That is inexcusable and was the biggest difference in the outcome. Washington was not prepared mentally to start either period. On the first goal, Dmitry Orlov and Evgeny Kuzentsov made soft plays to lose the puck in the neutral zone and then Orlov badly misplayed the two on one going for the disc and missed badly, which left Cedric Paquette all alone on Braden Holtby (19 saves). On the second period Bolts tally that made it 3-0, Anton Stralman goes around Matt Niskanen like an orange road cone and forced the Holtbeast to have to make a one on one stop. The Caps defense and team was caught flat footed for large stretches of the first 21 minutes.

Bad Zebras! – Referees Wes McCauley and Mark Joannette plus linesmen Johnny Murray and Matt McPherson had a terrible night. On Tampa’s second goal, an Ondrej Palat shot from the slot that Niskanen screened Holtby on, Steven Stamkos CLEARLY trips Orlov at the Washington defensive blue line before the tally and there is no call. As a result the game was 2-0 where it should’ve been 1-0 with a Capitals power play coming. NBC’s Mike Milbury was adamant that the trip should’ve been called and it was at a crucial point in the game. There is NO EXCUSE for missing such a critical infraction that leads to a scoring chance. In addition, Ryan Callahan’s goal, after Stralman went around Niskanen, went in off of his glove. You can argue either way on that one, but once again, the call didn’t go the Caps way. There were also several missed icing calls on the Bolts when the Capitals were storming the castle in periods two and three. The officials cannot be a factor in the outcome of a game and they absolutely were in game five. The Capitals had no power plays in this affair. Unacceptable officiating, once again, and the league should be ashamed, especially after game four was called so well by Chris Rooney and Gord Dwyer. Tampa has at least two or three goals in this series on bad or missed rulings (the Bolts second goal in game two after the terrible high sticking call on T.J. Oshie, the uncalled Stamkos trip in game five, and arguably the power play goal after the Wilson penalty in game two where Chris Kunitz escaped an obvious hooking call).

Stuck in Quicksand – The first period was a disaster. The Bolts had 13 of their 22 shots for the game in that frame and if not for Holtby, it could’ve been worse than 2-0. Washington showed no sense of urgency in their play and weren’t moving their legs. When guys like Callahan and Stralman are going past you, your effort is not where it needs to be. It was a very disappointing start by the Caps in such a critical game. Yes, the missed penalty call hurt, but as we’ve seen for years, if you put the game in the referees’ hands, you will almost always not like the outcome.

Final Forty Push – After it was 3-0, we saw a different Capitals team. Unfortunately, it was too late. The Caps started skating, moving their feet, and being physical. For some reason in that first frame Washington was afraid to hit anyone or use their body to win a puck battle. Against a team like Tampa, you have to be engaged physically and mentally on all shifts, otherwise they will burn you with their effort and skill. The Caps have a lot of skill, but the will was missing in the first 21 minutes and now they have a hill to climb to come back and win this series. Over the last 40 minutes, the shots on goal were 26-9 for the Capitals. They also hit some posts, too. Christian Djoos struck iron off of a faceoff win when it was 3-1 in period two and Alex Ovechkin hit the cross bar when it was that same score in period three. John Carlson had some great looks in this one and missed the net in the second frame in close and in the dying seconds he couldn’t get off a one timer on a great feed. When he tried to go top shelf, Andrei Vasilevskiy (28 saves) slid over and cut off the short side to save the game for Tampa.

Scoring Drought – After putting up 10 goals in the first two games, the Capitals only have six tallies in the last three tilts and two of those have come with the goalie pulled. Washington is not getting enough net presence on Tampa and the Bolts are doing a good job of clogging the shooting lanes. The Caps have to simplify their attack and make the Bolts scramble in their own end. They did some of that in stretches, but we also saw guys passing up quick shots in the slot and a return of bad drop passes. North-south hockey is how the Capitals have to play if they are going to win game six. Come across the blue line and fire the puck on net. That forces the Bolts D to turn and go get the rebounds and with Washington coming with speed, they can then hit the Tampa defense and force turnovers.

Line Changes – Coach Barry Trotz adjusted his lines for period two putting Nicklas Backstrom back with Ovechkin and Tom Wilson. That line was on the ice for the Callahan tally that made it 3-0, but played better after that. Backy is clearly not close to 100%, but with Kuznetsov having a poor first frame, something had to be done. Kuzy would score the Caps first goal on a deflection of a Niskanen point shot in period two and he, Oshie, and Chandler Stephenson played fairly well together. Ovi heated up in the third frame and his rocket cut the game to 3-2 with 96 seconds left. The Caps nearly tied this one up late, but again, they need to be much better earlier.

On Fumes? – Lars Eller struggled and looked slow for much of this contest after taking five penalties in games three and four and you can’t help but think that playing all of those extra minutes with Backstrom out has taken a toll on him. However, after sitting on the bench for a good stretch in period three, he came out with some jump with the extra attacker on and looked better. The Caps need #20 to return to form if they are going to win game six.

Clearing the Mind – The Capitals have seen a 2-0 series lead turn into a 3-2 deficit yet there have been some lengthy stretches where the Caps have carried the play. Washington can’t focus on any of that and must make sure they are ready to go from puck drop on Monday night. They have to play hard and smart. They have been prone to the big mistake in this series and that’s why they are on the brink of elimination. Tampa has blown a 3-2 lead before, just two years ago to the Penguins when the Bolts also had home ice advantage. Washington must come out and check from the get go. No soft plays and make the simple decision, which is usually going north with the puck up the boards. The start in game four was good right up until Michal Kempny’s poor decision to try a blind back pass up the middle of the ice. Kempny was much better in game five, but Niskanen and Orlov along with many others didn’t come ready to play. This team has been resilient all year. Many have already written them off, but until one team wins four games it’s not over. The Capitals need to give everything they have on Monday night to force a game seven where anything can happen.

Notes: Washington won the faceoff battle, 27-26, and Backstrom won 12 of 17 draws with a bad hand…Carlson led the Caps in ice time with 25:54 and he also led the team in shots on net, with eight…Djoos played 15:06 on the back end since the Capitals were trailing and he was very good at moving the puck. He needs to look to shoot a little more, since he has a good one…Tampa’s fourth line of Kunitz, Paquette, and Callahan logged nearly 15 minutes and was +2. They simply outworked the Capitals when they were on the ice and that’s something the Caps need to address…shot attempts were 29-8 for Tampa in period one and 51-19 for Washington the rest of the way.

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Caps Overcome Adversity in 6-2 Rout of Tampa

Posted on 14 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals reeled off five unanswered goals to erase a 2-1 first period deficit to knock off the
Tampa Bay Lightning, 6-2, in game two of the Eastern Conference Final and the Caps will head home to the DMV with a 2-0 series lead.

Tom Wilson put the Capitals on the board just 28 seconds into this affair by tipping home a Matt Niskanen point blast. Washington came out fast and furious when the Bolts were supposed to be the more desperate team and they had some chances to increase their lead. On a rush to the Tampa net at the 6:48 mark, Wilson skated hard to the cage hoping for a back door pass, was hooked by Chris Kunitz and then spun around by Ryan McDonagh and crashed into goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy and the goal frame. Referee Dan O’Halloran, who the Capitals were 0-6 lifetime as a zebra in the playoffs coming into this affair, ignored the Kunitz hook and McDonagh contact and instead called Willy for goalie interference. Tampa needed all of 20 seconds to tie it up on a Brayden Point shot.

Sure, that call on Wilson could’ve gone either way, and there are valid arguments on both sides, but then something happened that should never occur in a playoff game of this magnitude. Victor Hedman was hit in the face by a puck and T.J. Oshie, who put his stick up to try and get the biscuit, but never came close to contacting Hedman’s upper body, was boxed for a phantom high sticking penalty. How does that happen with two referees and two linesmen? Surely one of them had to see it was not high sticking? Anyways, that was a bad call, for sure, and Steven Stamkos scored back door late in that power play to give the Bolts a 2-1 lead at 10:22 that they certainly didn’t deserve.

At that point, it was really important how the Capitals players and coaches would react. Would they lose their minds and get caught up in the incompetent O’Halloran officiating or would they remain calm, stick to their game plan, and focus on getting even on the scoreboard?

Judging by the last 49 plus minutes, it was clearly the latter. Even in the final nine minutes of period one, the Capitals pushed the play and had several scoring chances drawing extensive praise from Mike Milbury on NBC and then Keith Jones and Eddie Olczyk between periods. Olczyk even disagreed with the call on Wilson, pointing out the missed hook on Kunitz on a scoring chance.

The Caps would not tie it up in period one, but the tone was set and early in period two they got even. John Carlson stole an errant Tampa pass and sprung Alex Chiasson, Devante Smith-Pelly, and Jay Beagle on a three on one rush. Chiasson fed DSP and Devante was able to one time home a puck that didn’t really settle on the ice for him. The biscuit hit the far post and went in behind Vasilevskiy to really give Washington a huge goal and momentum.

The remainder of the period was tense back and forth and the Caps were getting the better of the chances, but #88 was playing fairly well in the cage. At 15:48 of period two, Michal Kempny took an unnecessary interference penalty so the Tampa power play, which had scored three of the Bolts four goals in the series, had a chance to give the home squad the lead. Washington, however, would easily kill of the infraction and they immediately started pressing the Tampa defense again.

With just over a minute left in period two, Oshie went in on a fore check and forced Anton Stralman to turn the puck over. The speedy Jakub Vrana pounced on the loose disc and alertly fed a camped in front Lars Eller on the doorstep and #20 put the biscuit in the basket for a 3-2 Caps lead with 62 seconds to go in the middle frame. Speed kills, and Tampa was supposed to be the faster team, but a fresh Andre Burakovsky put massive pressure on the fore check on the Bolts and Vasilevskiy stuck his skate out and tripped #65 with 10 seconds remaining. Once again, the Capitals won a big offensive zone faceoff as Eller beat Tyler Johnson drawing the puck to Alex Ovechkin (1 goal, 1 assist) on the left wing boards. Ovi quickly wheeled it around the back boards to Evgeny Kuznetsov and with Eller crashing the cage, Kuzy fired on net from just above the goal line. The Bolts keeper was intent on stopping that pass to Lars, but Evgeny put a lot of mustard on it and it banked in off of his pads and into the cage for a 4-2 Washington lead with just three seconds left.

That last minute, like the last 10 seconds of period one on Friday night in game one, was a huge lift to the Caps and a major deflator for Tampa. However, there were still 20 minutes left and given how the Bolts responded with a strong third period in game one, the Capitals had to be careful and concerned.

It was Washington, however, that carried the even strength play in period three and just 3:34 into the final stanza they increased their lead to three pucks. Wilson made a great chip out past a pinching Braydon Coburn on the Bolts left wing boards getting the disc to Kuzy, who immediately recognized he had a two on one with Alexander the Great. When Stralman left his feet early to try and cut off the pass to Ovi, Kuzy skated in closer and slid the puck to Ovechkin backdoor. The Gr8 made no mistake about burying the super feed over Vasilevskiy’s outstretched pad.

At that point, only a Capitals turnover or penalty would allow Tampa to get back in the game and Kempny made another poor decision at 6:55 with a high cross check on Cedric Paquette in front of Braden Holtby. Washington, however, would do another stellar job on the PK and the Bolts found themselves constantly struggling to get through the maze of players the Caps had stacked in the neutral zone and on their own blue line. Time and time again the Bolts would rush up the ice and be swarmed by guys in white at the blue line. The result was lots of turnovers when Tampa didn’t dump the puck in. At 12:57, Washington would get yet another odd man rush and Eller fed a flying Brett Connolly in the high slot where #10 one timed it past the Bolts goaltender to make it 6-2. One of Connolly’s big strengths is his ability to get off a shot very quickly and his tally bit the hand that once fed him in Tampa.

This was a huge victory and in the series the Capitals are dominating the Bolts at even strength. Washington’s speedy forwards that include Burakovsky, Vrana, Kuzentsov, Eller, Chandler Stephenson, and Connolly are really forcing the Tampa defense into poor positioning and mistakes. In the series, the Caps have outscored the Lightning, 8-1, when the manpower is even.

The Caps are playing good defense and blocking a lot of shots, plus anything that gets through to Holtby (35 saves) is pretty much being stopped. Most of Tampa’s looks are coming from the perimeter while Washington is getting into the high danger scoring areas more often. Simply put, the Capitals have looked faster and fresher and getting both Burakovsky and Wilson back plus the emergence of Vrana and Stephenson have changed the offensive dynamic for Coach Barry Trotz. Nicklas Backstrom has yet to play in this series due to his injured right hand, but with Kuzy and Eller stepping up and then Stephenson centering a very good third line with Burkie and Connolly, this Caps team has a dangerous top nine. Everyone knew about the firepower of Ovechkin and Oshie, but the Capitals have pretty much everyone on those first three lines clicking on all cylinders. Add in some fourth line goals (Beagle in game one and DSP in game two) and it’s easy to see why the Caps are up in this series.

On the back end, all six defensemen are doing a great job of making solid breakout passes. There have been some hiccups, most notably a turnover by Niskanen that led to Johnson hitting the post when the game was tied in period two, but overall the pass out of the zone is allowing Washington to move into the Tampa end with speed and put a not so fast D that includes Dan Girardi, Coburn, and McDonagh on their heels. Dmitry Orlov has been sensational with his ability to turn defense into offense for the Capitals.

Add in some clutch goaltending and you can see why this series is at two games to nil.

But the series is not over until one team gets to four wins and Washington must stick to the script at home and play the same way they’ve done in amassing a 7-1 road record in this 2018 post season. The Caps can’t try to impress their fans with over passing and fancy plays. They must adhere to a game plan that is hard on the puck, swarms the Bolts in all zones, and is focused on north-south hockey. The cross ice passes, especially at the offensive blue line, are the ones Washington must keep out of their arsenal because the Bolts feast on odd man rushes. Finally, staying out of the box is paramount. O’Halloran and Brad Meier had a poor first period and it was nearly costly for the Caps. Even strength play has been good for the Capitals so far in this series, so it’s to their advantage to keep it that way.

Notes: Carlson had two assists and led the Caps in ice time with 25:01. Niskanen logged 23:10 and Orlov played 22:44…the Caps were one for three on the power play while Tampa went two for four…the face off edge went to the Lightning, 36-28, but the Capitals won that huge draw late in period two on the power play. Beagle was 11-7 and Eller went 10-9 from the dot…Orpik and Wilson each had six hits while Ovechkin had five…game three is Tuesday at 8 pm from Capital One Arena.

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Ovi Game 3

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Ovechkin’s Late Goal and Backstrom’s Monster Night Propel Caps to a Game 3 Victory

Posted on 01 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

Alex Ovechkin tallied with 1:07 remaining by batting home the rebound of his initial shot that hit the right post following a superb play and feed by the great Nicklas Backstrom to lead the Washington Capitals to a come from behind, 4-3, victory in game three in Pittsburgh. Braden Holtby made 19 saves and the Caps now lead this best of seven series, two games to one.

Wow, what a stud of a performance by Mr. Backstrom!

Nicky had three assists on goals by John Carlson, Chandler Stephenson, and of course the game winner by Ovi. Backstrom logged a game high, for all forwards, of 22:29 and he was on the ice for three of the Capitals four goals and none against. Simply put, he’s been outstanding in the last two games and along with the Holtbeast, he’s the biggest reason Washington has won the last two contests.

The Gr8 now has eight goals in the post season and he’s playing extremely well offensively. He still has some issues defensively, but he’s making an effort in his own zone and he’s producing at a great clip on the offensive end in just nine playoff tilts this spring. Tuesday’s goal was as big as they come in his career right now.

T.J. Oshie, after hurting his hand blocking a shot at the end of game two, had a strong outing on Backstrom’s line and it was his sensational pass to Stephenson in the slot that got the Caps a big goal to tie this one up at two after Pittsburgh had seized momentum with two quick strikes. Those goals came shortly after Carlson’s power play tally gave Washington a 1-0 lead early in period two.

Jake Guentzel continued his tear scoring the first Pens marker on a sweet deflection when Brett Connolly made the mistake of leaving Justin Schultz, which allowed #4 to move to the center of the ice and fire away with lots of traffic in front of Holtby. After a really ticky tacky hooking call on Brooks Orpik, the Penguins went ahead when Patric Hornqvist outmuscled Dmitry Orlov in front for a tap in power play lamp lighter.

Orlov would then get burnt again in a four on four situation by Guentzel and as a result, Matt Niskanen slid over to help leaving Sidney Crosby all alone back door. #59 made a great feed to #87 and Sid buried it.

That gave the Pens a 3-2 lead going into the third period, but Washington dominated that frame, outshooting the Penguins, 10-3. Still, Pittsburgh seemed to have the upper hand given they were at home, but speaking of hands, a Niskanen unscreened point blast after a nice D to D pass from Orlov eluded Matt “Glitchy Glove” Murray and went into the net just 5:06 into the period. That goal seemed to really take the starch out of Pittsburgh and the Capitals continued to amp their play up.

The Caps were storming the castle, but on a few occasions they got caught up in a rush game in the third period with the Pens and Holtby bailed them out once by stopping Brian Dumolin on a breakaway with a sweet toe save. Pittsburgh also somehow didn’t connect on a couple of three on two opportunities before Ovechkin’s magical goal. In the remainder of this series, the Capitals have to really make sure they keep a third forward high in the offensive zone so that the Pens can’t feast on their stellar rush game.

Overall, this was a crazy contest. The zebras, Francois St. Laurent and Kevin Pollock, as expected called a lot of penalties early on. In the first two periods each squad received four man advantage situations and both teams connected once. Through 40 minutes the difference was the Crosby goal at four on four. Things got a bit out of control in period two as the Penguins were going after Tom Wilson after Willy knocked Zach Aston-Reese out of the game and the series with a broken jaw on a clean shoulder to shoulder hit. This was all physics as Wilson is six foot four and Aston-Reese is four inches shorter. #46 was also crouching as he ran into Wilson, who was gliding on his skates upon impact.

In the final frame, there were no penalties called and five on five situations seem to favor the Capitals. Washington outworked the Penguins in the last 20 minutes and Murray’s struggles in net yielded the tying goal. #30 had no chance on the game winning goal as the Pens were gambling to take the lead and Olli Maatta got caught at the offensive blue line. Backstrom found another gear and beat Kris Letang badly to set up the Gr8 for the game winner.

The last two springs, the Penguins have surged to a 3-1 series lead and have won in six and seven games, respectively. This year, Pittsburgh will have to win game four to tie the series up on Thursday night. They’ll have to do it with a goaltender that appears to be having some struggles, as well.

Notes: Dumolin, who was injured throwing his head into Wilson’s shoulder pads in game two, looked fine in game three. Evgeni Malkin returned to the Pittsburgh lineup after missing three games and logged 19:07. He was -2 on the night, but did have an assist…Crosby had a goal and an assist in 20:41. He was not on the ice much of the game against Backstrom since Penguins Coach Mike Sullivan had the last change…Carlson played a game high 29:17 and had four shots on goal. He’s a big game player and performs extremely well against the Pens…Connolly was bumped down to the fourth line and played just 6:42. Jakub Vrana was moved up and played fairly well in 10:41 of ice time…the Penguins creamed the Caps in face-offs, 36-23, but Jay Beagle won two big draws in the final minute to help seal the deal for Washington…shots on goal were even at 22 as were shot attempts (48 each)…Wilson had a game high nine hits. Game four is Thursday at 7 pm from Pittsburgh.

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Ovi Game 6

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Caps Win Fourth Straight Over Columbus to Advance to Round Two

Posted on 23 April 2018 by Ed Frankovic

Alexander Ovechkin scored in succession in the second period to give the Washington Capitals a 3-1 lead and then they took advantage of a Columbus blue line gambling to try to tie the game up with two rush goals, from Devante Smith-Pelly and Chandler Stephenson in the third period, en route to a 6-3 victory at Nationwide Arena in game six. The win, the Caps fourth straight in this series after losing the first two tilts on home ice in overtime, advances them to the second round with another show down against you know who. Braden Holtby was stellar in the cage, once again, stopping 35 of 38 shots, and the Holtbeast is a major reason why this Capitals club is moving on.

There were so many key moments in this hockey game and Coach Barry Trotz’ crew showed some serious intestinal fortitude in the triumph.

The Caps, after taking a 1-0 first period lead on Dmitry Orlov’s sensational individual effort tally, had a 32 second five on three power play in the middle frame, but couldn’t connect. That misfire led to the Columbus crowd getting into the game and gave their home team momentum. Nick Foligno then scored his first goal of the playoffs to tie the game up on an overlap play where a Blue Jackets forward simply skated into Brooks Orpik while #71 shot past a screened Holtby. There was clearly a missed Capitals forward assignment there and suddenly the Blue Jackets had life.

Washington would then answer that tally just over four minutes later and it was none other than the Gr8 who seized the moment and turned the tide back for the Caps. Ovechkin put a massive hit on Oliver Bjorkstrand as #28 was trying to make a pass up the right wing boards and the puck went straight to Christian Djoos inside the blue line. Djoos alertly moved it quickly to his right for Tom Wilson and Willy then found Evgeny Kuznetsov coming with speed down the high slot and that backed the Columbus defense up. Kuzy, with too much traffic in front to get a clear shot off, fed Djoos down in the left wing circle and with the Blue Jackets sagging in front, Christian put it on a tee for Orpik at the left point. #44 smashed a shot that Sergei Bobrovsky (22 saves) stopped with his right pad, but he threw the disc right into the slot. The Captain was parked there between three Blue Jackets and he backhanded the rebound quickly into the cage for a 2-1 lead.

Ovechkin then drew a holding penalty on Seth Jones and Washington went on a late second period power play. 63 seconds into the man advantage, John Carlson made a super pass to Ovi in his office and the Gr8 lasered one off of the near post and past Bob for a 3-1 lead.

At that point, the zebras tried to really help out Columbus. Stephenson was called for a weak roughing call with five seconds left in period two so the Blue Jackets, trailing by two pucks, started period three on the man advantage. The Caps easily killed that one off, but then Matt Calvert blatantly tripped Djoos behind the net, gathered in the puck below the goal line while #29 was still down on the ice, and backhanded a pass to Pierre Luc-Dubois in the low slot. #18 fired quickly past Holtby and suddenly it was 3-2 on a goal that should’ve never been. Clearly Dan O’Rourke and Jean Hebert were out to lunch on that play.

In the past that goal might have derailed the Capitals, and I’m going to steal the words of legendary Ravens Head Coach Brian Billick from the 2000 NFL Playoffs with the following line, “BUT NOT TODAY.”

This Caps team did not sulk. Sure the coaches let the bad zebras have it, and rightly so, but this Washington club just pressed on and kept working. 91 seconds later Smith-Pelly burnt David Savard on the left wing boards in the defensive zone and sped down the ice with Ian Cole giving chase. Cole isn’t exactly the fastest skater and as DSP opened up to shoot, Cole put his stick in the lane. The shot went top shelf over Bob’s glove for a 4-2 Caps advantage.

The zebras then struck again calling Djoos for a very shaky interference penalty, but Jay Beagle made a super clear off of the left wing boards that sprung the speedy Stephenson for a shorthanded breakaway. Chandler opened up Bobrovsky and slid the puck five hole to give the Caps a 5-2 lead with 14:30 to go. It was two quick and huge goals after a terrible missed call by the referees led to a Columbus marker. That is how you respond to adversity, right there!

Coach John Tortorella’s crew would not quit and they used sheer power and some missed Capitals defensive zone coverage to will themselves within two goals at 5-3. An all alone Foligno notched his second goal of the game from the doorstep and with 11:38 still to go, this tilt was not over.

Credit the Caps mental toughness again, they knew that the only way the Blue Jackets could come back was with some physical cycling tallies so Washington did a good job of walling off the front of their own net and kept the Columbus shots coming from the perimeter. When pucks got through the wall of white, the Holtbeast was there to clean them up. The zebras gave the Blue Jackets one more power play, but for the fourth straight contest, Columbus was blanked with the man advantage (0 for 4 in this game).

Lars Eller then hit the empty net with 14 seconds remaining and the Blue Jackets were officially dispatched.

This was one heck of a comeback win for Washington after dropping the first two tilts at Capital One Arena. The switch in the cage to Holtby turned things around as CBus couldn’t rely on their top shelf shots going over #70’s glove hand like occurred in the first two games. The Holtbeast was sensational in this series, especially in the game five robbery on Saturday afternoon.

After the Holtbeast, you can go on and on down the line calling out super performances from the Capitals in this series. Every guy contributed to the four straight triumphs from Beagle’s face off wins and great PK work to Backstrom and Ovechkin coming up large as superstars in games five and six, respectively.

Perhaps the biggest play of the series, and the turning point, was Brett Connolly’s decision to shoot the puck in the second overtime of game three that Eller deposited into the cage off of his boot for the win. If #10 doesn’t fire quickly and generate a rebound, then the Blue Jackets could’ve eventually scored and gone up three games to none. Good things happen when you shoot!

Washington, as the series went on and especially in the three road wins, played the right way. They put pucks on net or behind the Columbus defense and went for rebound and gritty goals. When the Caps were wearing their road whites, there was not a whole lot of the East-West passing that has gotten the Capitals into trouble in the postseason. They need to keep that mentality when they start round two at home. Pittsburgh has elite talent that can go the other way and bury you with rush goals when you make those types of mistakes. The Capitals have seen the results of that style of play the last two springs. Now they get a chance to perform the right way against the two time defending Stanley Cup Champions.

The Caps have a goalie who has found his groove, a defense that is getting some monster performances from guys like Carlson, Niskanen, and Orpik and a power play that is clicking. They are also generating scoring from their bottom six forwards, something we haven’t seen consistently during the last three springs. It’s going to take everything the Caps have to defeat the extremely talented and heavily favored Penguins, for sure.

But that talk can wait another day because on Monday night Washington showed that they are a tight knit club that is mentally tough and can overcome some serious adversity. That’s clearly something they can build on this spring.

Notes: Niskanen led the Caps in ice time with 26:53. Orlov logged 25:33, and Carlson played 24:50…Oprik and Beagle each had two assists and were +2. This was a good match up for both of them and Washington clearly missed #83 in game one (upper body injury)…Orpik had five of the 23 shots the Caps blocked…Columbus won the face off battle, 30-25, but Beagle went 9-3 for the Caps…Stephenson assisted on Orlov’s goal and notched four points in the series. He filled in nicely on the second line for an injured Andre Burakovsky (upper body, minor surgery)…the Holtbeast stopped 137 of the 147 shots he faced in the series (.932 save percentage).

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