Tag Archive | "Paquette"

Callahan goal

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poor Start and Missed Call Doom the Caps in Game Five

Posted on 19 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

For the second time in three games, the Washington Capitals fell behind 3-0 and once again, a late rally wasn’t enough to tie the contest up. As a result, the Caps lost game five, 3-2, and now trail their best of seven series with Tampa, three games to two. Game six is Monday night at Capital One Arena at 8 pm.

Here are nine thoughts on a very tough loss at Amalie Arena, where the home team finally won for the first time in this series.

Poor Period Starts Costly – The Caps gave up goals 19 seconds into the game and 33 seconds into the second period to Tampa’s fourth line! That is inexcusable and was the biggest difference in the outcome. Washington was not prepared mentally to start either period. On the first goal, Dmitry Orlov and Evgeny Kuzentsov made soft plays to lose the puck in the neutral zone and then Orlov badly misplayed the two on one going for the disc and missed badly, which left Cedric Paquette all alone on Braden Holtby (19 saves). On the second period Bolts tally that made it 3-0, Anton Stralman goes around Matt Niskanen like an orange road cone and forced the Holtbeast to have to make a one on one stop. The Caps defense and team was caught flat footed for large stretches of the first 21 minutes.

Bad Zebras! – Referees Wes McCauley and Mark Joannette plus linesmen Johnny Murray and Matt McPherson had a terrible night. On Tampa’s second goal, an Ondrej Palat shot from the slot that Niskanen screened Holtby on, Steven Stamkos CLEARLY trips Orlov at the Washington defensive blue line before the tally and there is no call. As a result the game was 2-0 where it should’ve been 1-0 with a Capitals power play coming. NBC’s Mike Milbury was adamant that the trip should’ve been called and it was at a crucial point in the game. There is NO EXCUSE for missing such a critical infraction that leads to a scoring chance. In addition, Ryan Callahan’s goal, after Stralman went around Niskanen, went in off of his glove. You can argue either way on that one, but once again, the call didn’t go the Caps way. There were also several missed icing calls on the Bolts when the Capitals were storming the castle in periods two and three. The officials cannot be a factor in the outcome of a game and they absolutely were in game five. The Capitals had no power plays in this affair. Unacceptable officiating, once again, and the league should be ashamed, especially after game four was called so well by Chris Rooney and Gord Dwyer. Tampa has at least two or three goals in this series on bad or missed rulings (the Bolts second goal in game two after the terrible high sticking call on T.J. Oshie, the uncalled Stamkos trip in game five, and arguably the power play goal after the Wilson penalty in game two where Chris Kunitz escaped an obvious hooking call).

Stuck in Quicksand – The first period was a disaster. The Bolts had 13 of their 22 shots for the game in that frame and if not for Holtby, it could’ve been worse than 2-0. Washington showed no sense of urgency in their play and weren’t moving their legs. When guys like Callahan and Stralman are going past you, your effort is not where it needs to be. It was a very disappointing start by the Caps in such a critical game. Yes, the missed penalty call hurt, but as we’ve seen for years, if you put the game in the referees’ hands, you will almost always not like the outcome.

Final Forty Push – After it was 3-0, we saw a different Capitals team. Unfortunately, it was too late. The Caps started skating, moving their feet, and being physical. For some reason in that first frame Washington was afraid to hit anyone or use their body to win a puck battle. Against a team like Tampa, you have to be engaged physically and mentally on all shifts, otherwise they will burn you with their effort and skill. The Caps have a lot of skill, but the will was missing in the first 21 minutes and now they have a hill to climb to come back and win this series. Over the last 40 minutes, the shots on goal were 26-9 for the Capitals. They also hit some posts, too. Christian Djoos struck iron off of a faceoff win when it was 3-1 in period two and Alex Ovechkin hit the cross bar when it was that same score in period three. John Carlson had some great looks in this one and missed the net in the second frame in close and in the dying seconds he couldn’t get off a one timer on a great feed. When he tried to go top shelf, Andrei Vasilevskiy (28 saves) slid over and cut off the short side to save the game for Tampa.

Scoring Drought – After putting up 10 goals in the first two games, the Capitals only have six tallies in the last three tilts and two of those have come with the goalie pulled. Washington is not getting enough net presence on Tampa and the Bolts are doing a good job of clogging the shooting lanes. The Caps have to simplify their attack and make the Bolts scramble in their own end. They did some of that in stretches, but we also saw guys passing up quick shots in the slot and a return of bad drop passes. North-south hockey is how the Capitals have to play if they are going to win game six. Come across the blue line and fire the puck on net. That forces the Bolts D to turn and go get the rebounds and with Washington coming with speed, they can then hit the Tampa defense and force turnovers.

Line Changes – Coach Barry Trotz adjusted his lines for period two putting Nicklas Backstrom back with Ovechkin and Tom Wilson. That line was on the ice for the Callahan tally that made it 3-0, but played better after that. Backy is clearly not close to 100%, but with Kuznetsov having a poor first frame, something had to be done. Kuzy would score the Caps first goal on a deflection of a Niskanen point shot in period two and he, Oshie, and Chandler Stephenson played fairly well together. Ovi heated up in the third frame and his rocket cut the game to 3-2 with 96 seconds left. The Caps nearly tied this one up late, but again, they need to be much better earlier.

On Fumes? – Lars Eller struggled and looked slow for much of this contest after taking five penalties in games three and four and you can’t help but think that playing all of those extra minutes with Backstrom out has taken a toll on him. However, after sitting on the bench for a good stretch in period three, he came out with some jump with the extra attacker on and looked better. The Caps need #20 to return to form if they are going to win game six.

Clearing the Mind – The Capitals have seen a 2-0 series lead turn into a 3-2 deficit yet there have been some lengthy stretches where the Caps have carried the play. Washington can’t focus on any of that and must make sure they are ready to go from puck drop on Monday night. They have to play hard and smart. They have been prone to the big mistake in this series and that’s why they are on the brink of elimination. Tampa has blown a 3-2 lead before, just two years ago to the Penguins when the Bolts also had home ice advantage. Washington must come out and check from the get go. No soft plays and make the simple decision, which is usually going north with the puck up the boards. The start in game four was good right up until Michal Kempny’s poor decision to try a blind back pass up the middle of the ice. Kempny was much better in game five, but Niskanen and Orlov along with many others didn’t come ready to play. This team has been resilient all year. Many have already written them off, but until one team wins four games it’s not over. The Capitals need to give everything they have on Monday night to force a game seven where anything can happen.

Notes: Washington won the faceoff battle, 27-26, and Backstrom won 12 of 17 draws with a bad hand…Carlson led the Caps in ice time with 25:54 and he also led the team in shots on net, with eight…Djoos played 15:06 on the back end since the Capitals were trailing and he was very good at moving the puck. He needs to look to shoot a little more, since he has a good one…Tampa’s fourth line of Kunitz, Paquette, and Callahan logged nearly 15 minutes and was +2. They simply outworked the Capitals when they were on the ice and that’s something the Caps need to address…shot attempts were 29-8 for Tampa in period one and 51-19 for Washington the rest of the way.

Comments (1)

Tags: , , , , ,

Loyola reports strong graduation rate numbers

Posted on 25 October 2013 by WNST Staff

INDIANAPOLIS – Loyola University Maryland recorded 100-percent graduation success rate scores for eight sports, according to NCAA graduation success rate numbers released today.

Five men’s sports and three women’s sports posted perfect scores, as the Greyhounds achieved a 95-percent cumulative graduation rate for all sports for the 2003-2006 cohorts that make up this year’s report. That rate is tied for 20th among the 346 NCAA Division I schools included in the report.

Loyola has been ranked in the top-20 of the overall Graduation Success Rate in each of the report’s nine years.

“Loyola has a strong commitment to the academic success of our student-athletes, and we are proud that we have achieved this at the highest of levels again in this report,” said Jim Paquette, assistant vice president and director of athletics at Loyola. “Our student-athletes work tremendously hard to achieve high academic standards, and they are supported by a extraordinary network at Loyola. I would like to personally thank our academic support group, the faculty and coaching staffs here who have helped them during their academic careers.”

Loyola attained 100 percent scores for men’s cross country, men’s lacrosse, men’s soccer, men’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis, women’s basketball, women’s rowing and women’s tennis.

The NCAA developed the Graduation Success Rate as part of its academic reform initiative to more accurately assess the academic success of student-athletes. The Graduation Success Rate also accounts for midyear enrollees and is calculated for every sport, which increases the total number of student-athletes tracked for graduation by more than 37 percent.

Under the calculation, institutions are not penalized for outgoing transfer students who leave in good academic standing. Instead, the outgoing transfers are passed to the receiving institution’s Graduation Success Rate cohort.

The NCAA also calculates the federal graduation rate for student-athletes, which does not hold institutions accountable for transfer student-athletes; it is the only rate by which to compare student-athletes to the general student body.

Comments Off on Loyola reports strong graduation rate numbers

Tags: , , , , ,

Loyola officially joins Patriot League Monday

Posted on 28 June 2013 by WNST Staff

Monday To Mark Loyola’s Transition To Patriot League

July 1 Deemed Patriot League Day In Baltimore

BALTIMORE – More than 10 months after making the announcement that it would join the Patriot League beginning with the 2013-2014 academic year, Loyola University Maryland will officially join the conference on Monday, July 1.

Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young also proclaimed that July 1 will be ‘Patriot League Day’ in the City.

Loyola formally joins the Patriot League along with Boston University, bringing the conference’s membership to 10: American University, Boston University, Bucknell University, Colgate University, College of the Holy Cross, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Loyola, the United States Military Academy and the United States Naval Academy.

The Greyhounds will participate in 17 League sports: men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s cross country, men’s golf, men’s and women’s lacrosse, women’s rowing, men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s tennis, women’s indoor and outdoor track and field and women’s volleyball. The League does not sponsor a championship for men’s rowing, but Loyola will continue to row a regionally competitive schedule in the sport.

“It is an honor to join the Patriot League’s distinguished member institutions, all of which consistently demonstrate a profound commitment to excellence both in the classroom and on the field,” said Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., Loyola’s president. “That commitment is one we share at Loyola, and we see this move as a vital opportunity to continue to elevate our already outstanding athletics programs in keeping with our goal of becoming the nation’s leading Catholic, comprehensive university.”

Jim Paquette, Loyola’s assistant vice president and director of athletics added, “Loyola athletics’ primary mission is to support the development of student-athletes who thrive academically, athletically, spiritually, and socially. The Patriot League embraces and supports those values, and we are thrilled to become partners with the league. Its members’ histories of academic and athletic excellence are impressive, and consistent not only with Loyola’s past achievements, but our future ambitions as well.”

Both BU and Loyola will be immediately eligible for Patriot League titles and NCAA Tournament berths in each of their incoming sports.

The Patriot League was formed as an all-sport conference in 1990-91 after beginning as a football only conference (Colonial League) in 1986. Army, Bucknell, Colgate, Holy Cross, Lafayette and Lehigh were founding members of the League, and Navy joined the Patriot League for the 1991-92 academic year. Prior to the addition of BU and Loyola, American was the last full member to join the Patriot League (2001-02).

Comments Off on Loyola officially joins Patriot League Monday

Tags: , , , , ,

Loyola hoops recognized by NCAA for academics

Posted on 05 June 2013 by WNST Staff

Seven Greyhound Teams Recognized By NCAA For Academic Success

 

INDIANAPOLIS – Seven Loyola University Maryland athletic teams were recognized Wednesday by the NCAA for being in the top-10 percent of their respective sports in the most recent multi-year tracking of the Academic Progress Rate (APR).

 

The Loyola men’s basketball, women’s cross country, women’s rowing, men’s and women’s tennis, women’s indoor track and field and women’s outdoor track and field were among those NCAA Division I programs honored.

 

“It is always special when our student-athletes and teams are recognized for their achievements in the classroom,” said Jim Paquette, Loyola’s Assistant Vice President and Director of Athletics. “Throughout the academic year, they do tremendous jobs balancing the rigors of athletics, academics and other responsibilities with being a college student, and I am so proud of them for their efforts.

 

“I would also like to thank our academic affairs staff — Colleen Campbell, Adriana Mason and Abbie Day — as well as our coaches and other members of the University community for their support and work with our student-athletes.”

Loyola had the most teams honored, for their fourth year in a row, of any of the schools the Greyhounds competed against this year in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Additionally, Loyola’s men’s basketball team was the only one from that sports in the conference so recognized.

 

Each year the NCAA honors selected Division I sports teams by publicly recognizing their latest multi-year NCAA Division I APR. This announcement is part of the overall Division I academic reform effort and is intended to highlight teams that demonstrate a commitment to academic progress and retention of student-athletes by achieving the top APRs within their respective sports. Specifically, these teams posted multi-year APRs in the top-10 percent of all squads in each sport. The most recent APRs are multi-year rates based on scores from the 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years.

 

The APR provides a real-time look at a team’s academic success each semester by tracking the academic progress of each student-athlete on scholarship. The APR accounts for eligibility, retention and graduation and provides a measure of each team’s academic performance.

Comments Off on Loyola hoops recognized by NCAA for academics

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

GG Smith tabbed to replace Patsos at Loyola

Posted on 12 April 2013 by WNST Staff

G.G. Smith Named Loyola University Maryland Men’s Basketball Coach

 

BALTIMORE – Orlando “G.G.” Smith has been named the head men’s basketball coach at Loyola University Maryland, the school’s president, Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., announced today at a press conference in Reitz Arena.

 

Smith, who is the son of current Texas Tech University Head Coach Tubby Smith, has been an assistant at Loyola for the past six seasons under former coach Jimmy Patsos.

 

“At Loyola, we take great pride in a Greyhounds athletics program where our students’ achievements and contributions in the classroom and in the community are as remarkable as their accomplishments in competition,” Fr. Linnane said. “G.G. Smith shares this commitment, and I know he will build on our program’s recent successes to bring even greater excitement and spirit to Loyola basketball and our university.”

 

Smith, 36, is the 20th head coach in Loyola history and takes the reins of a program that won 62 games over the last three seasons and reached the postseason in each of the last two.

 

“It is an honor to be asked to continue building on what Loyola men’s basketball has accomplished,” Smith said. “Loyola is a wonderful school that has been a great home for the last six years, and I look forward to leading the program going forward. I would like to thank Father Linnane, (executive vice president) Susan Donovan, (vice president) Marc Camille and (assistant vice president and director of athletics) Jim Paquette for their support and commitment to Loyola basketball and me.”

 

Smith was a three-year starter at guard at the University of Georgia where he earned his bachelor’s degree in 1999, and he later received his master’s degree from the University of Kentucky.

 

“G.G. is the right person to lead our men’s basketball program as Loyola transitions to the Patriot League next season,” said Jim Paquette, Loyola’s assistant vice president and director of athletics. “His knowledge of basketball, care for our student-athletes and desire to develop them as leaders has been evident in his time at Loyola, and we are excited that G.G. will build on the success Loyola basketball has achieved in recent years.”

 

As a member of the Loyola coaching staff, Smith helped guide the Greyhounds to their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1994 when Loyola won the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference title in 2012. That season, the Greyhounds won a school Division I record 24 games and also were successful in a school-best 13 conference games.

 

“G.G. was a huge part of our success,” Patsos said of his former assistant. “G.G. is not only a tremendous coach, but he is a better person. His knowledge of the game is outstanding, and I believe that he will be a great leader of the program going forward.”

 

During his time at Loyola, Smith has handled many on-court coaching and scouting responsibilities for the Greyhounds. In the last two seasons, Loyola posted its first two Division I 20-win seasons, and this year’s trip to the CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament Quarterfinals marked the first back-to-back postseason appearances since 1951-1953.

 

Smith has been instrumental in the development of Loyola guard Dylon Cormier, a back-to-back All-MAAC performer who earned First Team honors in 2012-2013 when he averaged 16.4 points per game. In his six years at Loyola, Smith has coached 10 All-MAAC performers, four members of the league’s All-Rookie Team, four MAAC Sixth Players of the Year and a Rookie of the Year.

 

“I am very excited that G.G. Smith is our next coach,” Cormier said. “He has played at the highest levels, and as a team, we are looking forward to playing for him. He knows us as players, but he knows so much about basketball that we love to learn from him.”

 

Prior to joining the staff at Loyola prior to the 2007-2008 season, Smith was an assistant at nearby Johns Hopkins University in 2006-2007, helping the Blue Jays to a 24-5 record and berth in the NCAA Division III Tournament.

 

He spent two seasons, 2004-2006, at Armstrong Atlantic State University. The Pirates finished 23-8 in 2005-2006 and earned a No. 2 seed in that season’s NCAA Division II Tournament. Smith was an assistant at Tennessee Tech University in 2002-2003 when the Eagles went 21-10 and were the runners-up in the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament.

 

After graduating from Georgia, Smith was an assistant coach for a year at Lexington (Ky.) Catholic High School before spending two years, 2000-2002, as a graduate assistant coach at the Kentucky. The Wildcats advanced to a Sweet Sixteen and won an Southeastern Conference regular-season title in his time at Rupp Arena.

 

“While all of us at Loyola know that the men’s basketball coaching position is a great job and the vacancy comes at an exciting point in time due to the team’s recent successes and the University’s impending move to the Patriot League, it quickly became evident to me that the college basketball world has caught on as well,” said Marc Camille, Ed. D. Loyola’s vice president of enrollment management and communications, who chaired the search process. “The level of interest in the position from quality candidates around the country made the process of narrowing down the pool more challenging, but equally so, more promising. We could not be more pleased with how things turned out.”

 

Smith earned his bachelor of science in health and physical education from Georgia in 1999. He was a three-year starter and four-year letterwinner for the Bulldogs as a point guard. He earned All-SEC Third Team honors and helped Georgia advance to the NCAA Tournament twice, including to the 1996 Sweet Sixteen.

 

He graduated as the program’s all-time leader in games played (129), wins in a season (24) and 3-pointers in a game (three).

 

Smith then earned his master’s degree in education in sports management from Kentucky in 2002.

 

Smith, and his wife, Lorie, have a young daughter, Jayna.

Comments Off on GG Smith tabbed to replace Patsos at Loyola