Tag Archive | "Peter Angelos"

Report: Orioles intend to extend Showalter beyond 2013

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Report: Orioles intend to extend Showalter beyond 2013

Posted on 07 November 2012 by Luke Jones

In what doesn’t exactly qualify as news by any stretch, the Orioles intend to negotiate a contract extension with manager Buck Showalter this offseason.

A report from CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman Tuesday night said owner Peter Angelos has informed individuals of his plans to extend Showalter, but no timetable appears to be in place for finalizing a new contract. The Baltimore manager recently underwent knee surgery and is recovering at his home in Texas. Showalter’s contract expires after the 2013 season, but it was elementary that the Orioles would want to keep the 56-year-old in Baltimore after he guided the club to a 93-69 record and its first postseason appearance in 15 years.

Whenever asked about the possibility of receiving an extension, Showalter has repeatedly downplayed any urgency by reminding media he was already under contract for the 2013 season. Arriving in Baltimore with a reputation of being a control freak who wore out his welcome quickly in previous stops, Showalter has drawn affection from players and has enjoyed his time with the Orioles.

Showalter has developed a good working relationship with executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette despite the latter being hired more than a year after the manager took the gig in Baltimore. The two worked in tandem to construct a roster that won the inaugural American League Wild Card Game before taking the New York Yankees the full five games in the AL Division Series.

“If [he's] interested in staying, nobody’s more interested in keeping him than I am,” Angelos said in the Orioles clubhouse following the Game 5 ALDS loss at Yankee Stadium. “And, certainly, I speak for everyone in the organization. They had Buck as the manager, Dan Duquette as the GM and you certainly couldn’t ask for a better, better combination.”

Any outcome other than a new contract for Showalter will be met with negative reaction, so the Orioles would be better served to get something done sooner rather than later in the offseason. After completing their first winning season in 15 years, the Orioles can finally sell Baltimore as a viable destination for free agents and Showalter would be a prime selling point in that process.

It won’t prompt free agents to offer their services at a discounted price, but a long-term assurance of Showalter being in Baltimore could go a long way in the Orioles being able to sign premium talent at fair-market prices as opposed to the long-held perception of needing to vastly overpay notable free agents.

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Dear Mr. Angelos:

Posted on 26 October 2012 by Max Buchdahl

Dear Mr. Angelos:
First of all, this is not hate mail. I am simply writing to you as a concerned Orioles fan. It is not my intention to debase you or your actions in any way by writing this letter. I wish only to bring to your attention something that has affected my life greatly.

My father’s name is Ezra Buchdahl. He was born on November 10, 1965, and is currently 46 years old. He has attended thousands of Orioles games throughout the years. He sat rows behind Wild Bill Hagy in the heyday of “Orioles Magic.” He watched as Tippy Martinez picked off three runners in the same inning.  He was at Memorial Stadium for Game 1 of the 1983 World Series just months later. He cried from the upper deck while watching the final innings played in that same stadium. He was at Oriole Park at Camden Yards to watch Cal Ripken, Jr., tie and the next day break, Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games streak. In his lifetime, my dad has seen the Orioles win 8 American League East titles, 6 American League pennants, and 3 World Series championships. He has witnessed 3 different Orioles win the AL MVP Award. He has seen 4 Orioles win the AL Cy Young Award and 4 different Rookie of the Year Award winners. He has also seen 10 different Gold Glove winners, many of whom did so multiple times. Undoubtedly, my dad has seen some of the greatest moments in the history of this ball club.

My name is Max Buchdahl. I was born on March 20, 1996, and I am currently 16 years old. My family raised me to be the die-hard Orioles fan that I currently am. Over these past 16 years, I have attended hundreds of Orioles games, both at home and on the road. My dad took me to my first game when I was just three months old. At age five, I could name every player on the team and their number. I could name the numbers of past players, as well as their positions. I cried in my living room as my early childhood hero, Cal Ripken Jr., retired from the game he loved. I watched as young players like Luis Matos, Larry Bigbie, David Newhan, and Sidney Ponson failed to stay healthy and consistent.

I threw my hands in the air when I heard we had signed veterans such as Sammy Sosa and Javy Lopez, only to see them throw away the final years of their careers in the Charm City. My dad let me stay up past my bed-time to watch my other hero, Rafael Palmeiro, record his 3,000th hit. Just weeks later, I listened to the radio as he failed a drug test. I scratched my head as Miguel Tejada refused to run to first on a ground ball. My dad told me to never even think about doing that. I cried while watching my favorite group of 25 men lose to the Texas Rangers, 30-3. I have cheered while watching my team draw within two games of the AL East division lead at the All-Star break, only to fall apart during the second half of the season. I have been forced to endure endless chants of “Let’s Go Red Sox” in OUR ballpark because people don’t want to watch a losing team. The last time the Orioles had a winning season, I was only a year and a half old. As far as I am concerned, I have given way too much for this team considering what I’ve received in return; heartbreak, sorrow, and shame.

My concern, however, is far more universal. I often wear Orioles gear to school. Words cannot describe what I feel when my friends say, “Oh, the Orioles suck. They’re a waste of space. Go Yankees!” I would much rather be an Orioles fan than stoop to the level of the millions of bandwagon Yankees fans. But with a ballpark as beautiful as Camden Yards, and in a city where we’ve seen “Orioles Magic” sweep through like wildfire, this team should be a source of pride, not shame. Baltimore natives should feel proud of their hometown team, not forced to follow another.
After all that I have said, you may be wondering what I am really getting at. Before we get a competitive team back on the field, the city of Baltimore deserves an answer for the past 14 years. An explanation for why we have had to go through these years of heartbreak. Don’t worry, I am not saying that you have all of these sacred answers. But, as the owner of the team, I am interested to hear your insight into the situation. Why, for the past 14 years, have we not experienced October baseball? And more importantly, what can we do to turn things around? What is happening within the organization right now that will provide us with a winning baseball team?
Thank you for your time, patience, and understanding while reading this letter. I would like to stress again that I mean no harm or insult by writing this, all I want is an answer. All I want is a winning baseball team.
Thank you again,
Max Buchdahl

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The time has come for Peter Angelos to re-sign Buck Showalter (like, sometime today…)

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The time has come for Peter Angelos to re-sign Buck Showalter (like, sometime today…)

Posted on 06 October 2012 by Drew Forrester

The most special part of Friday night’s thumping of the Rangers wasn’t Joe Saunders or J.J. Hardy or even those insurance RBI’s from McLouth and Machado.

Those were acts in the play.  They were important parts of the story, but they weren’t the most “special” thing I saw.

The best part – “special” in its full definition – of Friday night in Arlington?  The look on Buck Showalter’s face as he stepped out to the field while the celebration started near the pitcher’s mound.  One word came to mind as I watched him:  Pride.  He looked like a dad who just watched his 16-year old son return an interception for a touchdown in the last minute of the homecoming game to seal the win.

So…maybe it’s too soon for someone in the media to start talking and writing about this, but I’ll do it.

It’s time for Peter Angelos to pay Buck Showalter.

Buck’s original deal ends after the 2013 season, but I don’t think any of us need to be convinced he’s worth keeping around.

True, it’s not my checkbook, but even stingy old Pete has to know a good thing when he’s stumbled upon it.

Pay Buck Showalter.

Whatever he wants.

Sometimes…what you think you want, you’re not prepared to deal with when you actually get it.

The Orioles franchise supposedly wants to win.  People in the trenches at The Warehouse have tried to quietly convince anyone who would listen that “Peter really wants to win”.  Angelos himself, when he lets Channel 13 interview him once every five years, always talks about his desire for the team to be successful.

Well, well, well…look what happened.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner.

And now it’s time to sit down with the manager and fork over a big plate of money.

I remember what happened the last time the Orioles went to the playoffs with a manager who knew what he was doing.  The manager was canned in the off-season and we endured 14 years without a post-season baseball game in Baltimore.

That better not happen this time around.

Back up the Brinks truck in Buck’s driveway and pay the man the money he’s worth.

 

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Filling Oriole Park Has Nothing To Do With Fans

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Filling Oriole Park Has Nothing To Do With Fans

Posted on 29 August 2012 by Thyrl Nelson

This is a great time to be an Orioles fan. I wrote a couple of weeks ago that the absence of expectations coupled with the success of this team has created a perfect storm of circumstance that’ll make this (regardless of the way that it ends) likely the most exciting season of Orioles baseball since 1989 at least. And given that it took 14 years of futility to sap this fan base of its enthusiasm and optimism we can only hope that another season like this will never happen again.

That said, the excitement that is Orioles baseball 2012 hasn’t seemed to get the turnstiles at the stadium moving, at least not to the degree that many would have expected so far. That’s led to a spirited debate about what can and should be done to get back the fans as well as a number of divergent theories about what’s keeping them away now despite the successes of the team to date.

 

So, for what it’s worth…here’s mine:

 

The first and easiest reason why fans aren’t flocking to the ballpark right now is because they can.

 

On any given night, it’s easy to head to the ballpark without planning or preparation, pick up tickets for any seat in the house and enjoy the show. Therefore, there’s simply no urgency about having to do it today. For as long as that remains the case, fans will take to the ballpark whenever they’re good and ready and so far they just haven’t been ready.

 

While many expected that winning would bring back the fans, expecting it to happen overnight was just wrong. It’s my best guess that if the excitement of this season is going to get more folks out to the park, the real impact won’t be felt until next year with the purchase of new season tickets. My other best guess, and the tougher pill for fans to swallow is that this won’t happen by the team appeasing or satisfying the “regular fans”. As ticket selling priorities go, “regular fans” are and will remain at the bottom of the pecking order. If the Orioles are able to take care of the top end of that pecking order, the regular fans will simply fall back into line because they’ll have little choice.

 

Think for a second about why or how Oriole Park ever sold out regularly in the first place. Think about why or how any Major League ballpark sells out regularly. It starts with a firm base of season tickets sold. Since this season began with no expectation of success or of ticket scarcity, it stands to reason that there wasn’t a whole lot of urgency for anyone to buy or renew their season tickets. No reason, that is, except to avoid the game day surcharge.

 

Without getting off on too much of a tangent here, this is also why the surcharge is viewed by the team, as a necessary evil. We’ve already established that on any given night a fan can show up on a whim and buy pretty much any seat in the house. Therefore why would fans ever buy any tickets in advance, much less commit to 13, 26, 81 or some other fixed number of games in a season ticket package when they can simply show up and buy tickets whenever they want?

 

Thursday September 13th against the Rays looks to me like a nice day to take in a ballgame. But if I buy those tickets today, and my wife winds up sick, or it rains on September 13th, I’m stuck with them. If Wei-Yin Chen is pitching against David Price on the 12th, I might rather go to that game instead. If I can wait until the day of the game to decide, there’s no reason to buy in advance except to avoid the surcharge, there are however plenty of good reasons not to buy in advance.

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Will Angelos, Buck and DD man-up as trade deadline approaches? (They damn well better…)

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Will Angelos, Buck and DD man-up as trade deadline approaches? (They damn well better…)

Posted on 08 July 2012 by Drew Forrester

News flash:  The Yankees are winning the AL East.  That’s a done deal.  But the rest of the division?  Not as easy to figure out.  The Red Sox can’t string together three wins in a row, let alone get themselves back in the AL East race.  Toronto’s pitching staff is auditioning for a role in an upcoming M*A*S*H* movie.  Tampa Bay seems to be in one of those ruts where they just don’t have what it takes.

In other words —  it’s July 8th and the Orioles are firmly alive and well in the American League East.  They’re so alive, in fact, that it’s not out of the question that our beloved Birds might be legitimate wild card contenders come Labor Day.

I know, that’s as rare as summer temps in the 100′s in Baltimore.  Oh, wait…

Anyway, it’s not a joking matter when the All Star Game approaches and the Orioles aren’t already cooked for the summer.

The next few weeks are going to be very interesting for the Orioles, for they’re about to enter unchartered territory.  Since 1997, this team has never headed to the trading deadline with a legitimate chance to be a player in the post-season race.  Sure, they got off to a great start in 2005 and were just 2.5 games back at the All-Star Game, but that edition of the Orioles was taking on water by mid-June and lumbered into the All-Star break with a collapse all but guaranteed.

This Orioles team, while also blemished with plenty of pot holes, looks much different to me than the Lee Mazzilli-managed squad of ’05.  This team, for what it’s worth, looks like they actually want to win.  The ’05 team was winning by accident.  This team, even with no real left-fielder, no regular 3rd baseman, a bunch of guys at first base who are there only because they can’t play anywhere else, and a starting rotation in tatters…well…that sure sounds like a last place team — not a team on the verge of competing for a wild card spot in the American League.  But that’s your 2012 Orioles.  Full of question marks?  Absolutely.  In the race?  You bet.

So…now what?

That’s the question.

Now what?

Fourteen straight years of losing in Baltimore.

Fourteen.

Bill Clinton was the President the last time we saw September baseball that mattered.

Remember him?

Yep, it’s been (such) a long time, as the band “Boston” once said.

The next three weeks will be a great litmus test for the Orioles and their commitment – if it exists – to winning.  Will they try and pry Zack Greinke from Milwaukee and bolster a pitching staff that sorely needs a high quality arm?  What about Matt Garza or Ryan Dempster in Chicago?  Would the Orioles give up whatever is necessary to get one of those two?  How about another bat, preferably one that works when runners are on the bases?

Are the Orioles prepared to live life like the Yankees and Red Sox have lived it for the last decade or so?  Are they ready to trade away a high-level prospect or two and gamble that such a move helps push them over the top and give their fans playoff baseball for the first time in 15 years?  The Yankees and Red Sox are always nibbling at the deadline…mainly because they’re always in the hunt every July.  But those two franchises rarely let a chance to improve get away without trying to get better.  Lance Berkman didn’t exactly light it up for the Yanks a few years back, but it was a good thought at the time.  Sometimes those moves work, sometimes they don’t.

The Orioles are not a gambling franchise.  The owner certainly feels much more comfortable holding on to what he has rather than raising the ante and making the game more interesting.  And we all know, in Baltimore at least, money is always the final question when any type of move is considered.

(Please see next page)

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Big Trade Looming?

Posted on 07 July 2012 by Erich Hawbaker

The All-Star break is upon us. And, if the season ended today, the Orioles would be headed to the playoffs. Thursday’s disaster with the Angels notwithstanding, the Orioles have reached halftime without completely faceplanting as most of us expected they would. The bullpen has been the most pleasant surprise, with an ERA still close to the best in baseball. The offense (long balls in particular) has also been a big reason for the success, with Adam Jones on pace for 40 homeruns and several others flirting with 30.

However, just like last year, the most glaring weakness has been the defense. Unfortunately, the O’s also lead the league in errors, which has cost them at least three or four winnable games already this season. The other coin flip has been the starting pitching, which lately seems to always be either stellar or awful on any given night. Jason Hammel and Wei-Yin Chen are aces more often than not, but the other three rotation spots have been consistently shaky with occasional flashes of brilliance.

The Orioles have already made a splash in the trade market this year by acquiring DH Jim Thome from the struggling Phillies for a pair of minor leaguers. For awhile now, I’d been wondering if they were really serious about being buyers this year like Dan Duquette said, and if, to that end, they would be looking to pick up another legitimate starting pitcher. Today when I checked my fantasy team (the Mercersburg Rebels, currently in 1st place), the news feed told me that the Orioles are trying to make a trade with the Brewers for RHP Zack Greinke. It also mentioned that the O’s have two highly-touted prospects in Dylan Bundy and Manny Machado that might be part of such a deal.

For the last few years, I’ve always made it a point to have Greinke on my fantasy team. He routinely goes deep into games, puts up lots of strikeouts, and has a very good ERA and WHIP. He won the 2009 AL Cy Young with the Royals, no easy feat when one considers that they’ve been about as bad as the Orioles over the last decade. This year, his record is 9-2, while his team is currently under .500 by five games.

So, all indications are that he would be an excellent pickup if the Orioles can pull this off. However, I would not part with Bundy or Machado to make it happen. Since Milwaukee lost Prince Fielder, they’re in need of a firstbaseman. Perhaps Mark Reynolds could be part of this trade? True, he’s not crushing the ball like he was last year, but Miller Park is definitely hitter-friendly. And now that the Orioles have Chris Davis, there isn’t a tremendous need for Reynolds here anymore. It would also make a big dent in that error rate.

Another thing to consider here is that the era of Brian Roberts is, regrettably, over. He’s given us some tremendous years, but unfortunately the Orioles simply cannot depend on him as an everyday player anymore. Therefore, letting go of Manny Machado would be unwise, because he will be coming of age right about the time when Roberts is officially finished. I don’t think I even need to elaborate on why trading Dylan Bundy would be a bad move, unless of course the Brewers are offering significantly more than just Greinke.

I have to admit, it’s a VERY nice thought that the Orioles’ rotation could eventually consist of Hammel, Chen, Greinke, Britton, and whoever gets their act together. That, coupled with Jones, Wieters, Davis, Markakis, Hardy, and our current bullpen would almost have to be a serious contender.

However, I must reiterate that even if this becomes reality, we are not yet free of Peter The Terrible, and I still remain unconvinced that the Orioles have truly turned the corner as long as he remains in the warehouse.

What do you think? Should the Orioles trade for Greinke? Is there someone else out there you’d like to see them pursue? Comments are always welcome.

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MASN has gobs of money but they don’t want to give any of it to the Nationals

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MASN has gobs of money but they don’t want to give any of it to the Nationals

Posted on 12 June 2012 by Drew Forrester

You would think the prospect of the Orioles getting $75 million or more annually via TV rights fees would make the ballclub happy.

It might also make them better.

But that’s not the case.

It’s not the case because the same guy who owns the Orioles also happens to own the TV network that pays that rights fee to the team.  Confused?  Conflict-of-interest, you say?  Perhaps it is, but that’s what the story involving MASN and the Washington Nationals has become — one giant conflict of interest.

Sadly, it’s the Orioles on-field product that could suffer the most during this time of uncertainty.

THE REALITY OF WHAT’S GOING ON

The short version of the story is this:  The Washington Nationals currently receive $29 million a year from MASN for a rights fee.  They are allowed to “challenge” that rights fee figure every 5 years.  The Nationals believe they should receive somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 million per-year in exchange for MASN televising their home and away games.  MASN feels like $35 million is a fair number.  Therein lies the conflict, one that has remained unresolved for so long that Major League Baseball had to step in to arbitrate the situation and award a new rights fee figure to the Nationals.

Oh, yeah, the Orioles also receive $29 million annually from MASN.

Peter Angelos owns MASN.

And he also is the majority stockholder of the Orioles.

You get it, now?

MASN receives roughly $14 million a month (yes, a MONTH) from Xfinity (nee Comcast) according to a source familiar with the financial agreement between those two.  That $168 million alone would be more than enough for MASN to generate nearly a $70 million profit according to the source.  Add in payments from Verizon, DirectTV and other cable carriers in the Mid-Atlantic and the sports network could be pocketing more than $100 million in annual profits.

So what’s the issue at hand?

Money.

The Nationals  - currently receiving $29 million – think their fair value is more like $100 million a year.

MASN doesn’t want to give it to them.  In fact, they’d rather just hand over $35 million annually to the DC franchise.

Wrapping this up and making it into a real barnburner is the added situation involving the Orioles and their rights fee.  When Peter Angelos (MASN) negotiated with Peter Angelos (Orioles), Peter made Peter agree to a clause that stipulates the Orioles will always receive the same amount of annual rights money as the Nationals receive from MASN.  Pretty tricky, huh?

Now, though, Peter doesn’t want to pay the Nationals $50 million or $75 million or $100 million because…yep…he’d also have to pay the Orioles the same amount.

It’s not quite as intriguing as “50 Shades of Grey” but it’s a helluva story.

MORE MONEY MEANS SPENDING MORE ON PLAYERS 

When the TV network originated back in 2006, it was done so almost purely to provide the Orioles with enough additional revenue to compete with big market teams like the Yankees and Red Sox.  There’s the still-legendary story that Angelos handed to then-fledgling “Press Box” in which the owner claimed the only way to compete with the beasts of the AL East would be to spend with them for free agents using a RSN (Regional Sports Network) as the catalyst for such spending.

Interestingly enough, it’s the Nationals – not the Orioles – who have become players in the free agent market over the last few years.  Whether or not you like Jayson Werth as a player, one thing is for sure:  the Nationals weren’t afraid to put money on the table for him a few years ago.  They made a legitimate effort for Mark Teixeira in 2009 and reportedly made overtures to Prince Fielder before he signed on in Detroit.

That Washington is in first place right now isn’t really part of this story.  That the Nationals aren’t afraid to spend money – lots of it – on baseball players most certainly is, though.

Therein lies another reason that MASN (Angelos) doesn’t want to inflate the rights fee paid out to the Nationals.  He knows the Nats will spend it on players.  He knows, in stark contrast to what his club has done since MASN hit the scene in 2006, the Nationals will improve their team with his money.

And if Washington spends their (just for for argument sake) $70 million on players and ups their annual payroll to the $125 million or so mark, what will the Orioles do with the $70 million THEY receive from MASN?  Will they spend that extra money (roughly $45 million more than they receive right now) on players, too?

(Please see next page) 

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I hope contract helps Jones keep Birds accountable

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I hope contract helps Jones keep Birds accountable

Posted on 27 May 2012 by Glenn Clark

I’ve already used both space on Twitter (@WNST, @GlennClarkWNST) and on AM1570 WNST.net to opine about the significance of the Baltimore Orioles giving CF Adam Jones the richest contract in franchise history.

We now finally know all of the details and Jones is set to discuss those details Sunday at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

I won’t be attending Sunday’s press conference. I would, but our WNST.net Ballpark reporter Luke Jones has been denied the right to ask questions at previous press conferences and I don’t want to run the risk of causing a scene at what should almost certainly be a day of celebration.

Adam Jones’ contract extension is as much an event to celebrate as almost anything we’ve seen in the last 15 years of baseball in Charm City. The Birds have perhaps addressed both their present and their future and made a major statement about their willingness to do things differently than they have for more than decade while losing many more games than they won.

I’m aware Jones perhaps took a hometown discount in signing the contract a season and a half shy of free agency. I’m aware the team still appears to need more pitching than they currently have to be an annual contender. I’m aware that the team now needs to shift attention to catcher Matt Wieters when it comes to contracts.

There was something bigger than jumped out at me though.

As I was given more time to dissect what Jones’ deal really means, I thought back to December 1997. For O’s fans around my age, Brady Anderson was about the coolest thing to ever happen to the Orange & Black. He had young female fans worship him and young male fans…well…basically worship him. He had it all. Sideburns, muscles, personality, charm, speed, defense and an amazing 50 home run season.

(I didn’t mention anything about performance enhancing drugs. You do what you want there.)

After Anderson’s 50 home run campaign in 1996 and the Orioles’ run to the ALCS in ’97, young fans like myself lived in fear of waking up one morning to be informed that Anderson had signed a major deal with the New York Yankees or Atlanta Braves or Cleveland Indians.

Anderson was certainly not the commodity at 34 that Jones would have been had he reached free agency at 28, but he still had market interest. He ultimately passed on shorter deals with more per season to accept five years and $31 million from Peter Angelos and the Orioles. Anderson’s best seasons were clearly behind him, but it still meant quite a bit for the franchise to make the move.

I also thought back to January of 2009, when Andy MacPhail locked up OF Nick Markakis for six years and $66 million, the richest contract extension the franchise had given to a player until Jones’ deal. (SS Miguel Tejada had received the overall most lucrative contract in team history until Jones.) While certainly not reaching superstar status, Markakis has given the Birds stellar defense and a mostly consistent bat.

But beyond the significant contracts, there is a more important similarity between the two players whose time has spanned much of the team’s “Rock Bottom Era.” The issue is that neither player was able to use his major contract to help keep the team accountable.

A baseball player with a rich contract is in a unique situation with the franchise paying the deal. Because the money is guaranteed, the player has the right to get away with certain things a player in another league might not be able to. In the case of the Orioles, they’ve really needed a player who has been willing to stand up and say “we need better” as the team suffered through losing seasons after losing season.

Allow me to be fair to the two players involved. Anderson was only part of the club at the very beginning of their lean years, and the team was still making at least some attempts to improve by bringing in the likes of Albert Belle and others. (Anderson however has become a well known defender of the Angelos regime in recent years, which has helped him find his way back into the organization.) Markakis has never been much of a vocal type, but he did publicly question the direction of the organization. His participated in a dinner with Angelos that season to discuss those very issues.

Perhaps there is an argument to be made that Markakis’ 2010 outburst DID lead to accountability, as two years later the Orioles have shown themselves (at least for two months) to be one of the better teams in baseball.

But moving forward, I hope it’s a role that suits Jones well. I hope the fire, drive, passion and determination to win that have made Jones an emotional figure in recent years will translate both on field and off. I hope that if the Birds make questionable decisions, he’ll call them out for them. It doesn’t need to be something he does publicly, just a statement made privately from the player slated to receive more money during his tenure than any Oriole before.

I hope Jones embraces not only the responsibilities of an on field leader and star, but as a bit of a caretaker for an organization that has so desperately lacked the right man for the role. I hope he puts pressure on the organization to make the moves necessary to stay in contention every season. I hope he never takes the easy way out and thinks “Mr. Angelos (or insert future owner’s name here) has made me a rich man. It’s not my place to stand up to him.”

I feel as though Jones can be a significant part of the solution for the Orioles. I hope he’s up for everything that comes along with the task.

-G

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Your Monday Reality Check-Horse Racing, Orioles in similar spot for three weeks

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Your Monday Reality Check-Horse Racing, Orioles in similar spot for three weeks

Posted on 21 May 2012 by Glenn Clark

I’ve attempted to put events I’ve attended into words for years.

Baltimore Ravens football games, University of Maryland football and basketball games, a multitude of local hoops and lacrosse games and even a press conference or twenty have quickly turned into 600-1400 words worth of type off my fingers.

Almost every time I’ve written something, even the columns I’ve been particularly pleased with, I’ve looked somewhere else on the web and thought to myself “damn, that person can WRITE” after reading what they had to say about the same event.

Such was the case again this weekend. I had already decided my Monday morning column would be related to the 137th running of the Preakness Stakes, but I hadn’t exactly decided what angle I was going to take. It only took me a trip to my friend Kevin Van Valkenburg (of ESPN The Magazine/Hug It Out Radio fame and late Baltimore Sun)’s Facebook page for me to once again utter the phrase.

It wasn’t because of something KVV had written this time though. It was one of his colleagues’ stories he had linked, and it made me say “damn, Jeff MacGregor can WRITE.”

MacGregor scribed this exceptional postscript to an incredible victory from Kentucky Derby champ I’ll Have Another, celebrating the excitement of an underdog champ at the coming buildup to a Triple Crown chance in the context of a fledgling sport.

Many commenters on ESPN.com and throughout social media however were turned off by the nature of MacGregor’s tone, most notably this line…

“None of which matters, because horse racing is dead.”

MacGregor didn’t really say anything we haven’t already accepted as fact, we’ve just been more apt to use a kinder term like “struggling” or “suffering” instead of flat out placing the industry in a black bag and shipping it to the morgue.

Horse racing HAS been troubled for some time. The depth of the fall has been particularly evident in the state of Maryland, where “the sport of kings” has been all but nonexistent for years. Sure, the industry shines for a few days each spring at Pimlico and each fall at Laurel Park, but even on the brightest day the problems in the industry are obvious.

Unlike some, I have no interest in fighting with MacGregor. I think he’s absolutely right. I just feel as though the potentially monumental turn for horse racing in the next month can be celebrated whether or not the sport is staring into the face of imminent doom.

I’ll Have Another’s charge to the wire Saturday was breathtaking. 14 days earlier we had no way to know that an unknown trainer (Doug O’Neill) and jockey (Mario Gutierrez) had a longshot in position to track down the exceptional favorite (Bodemeister) trained by the Hall of Famer (Bob Baffert) and ridden by a Hall of Famer (Mike Smith) as well. On Saturday we knew it was possible but found it no less amazing.

“There’s no way this can happen again.”

You definitely heard me make the argument for Bodemeister throughout the week. “There’s no speed horse to take Bodemeister out to a dangerous speed this time. The race is 1/16 of a mile shorter. There are nine fewer horses to crowd things at the front and push the favorite too much early. There’s just no way things can shape up for I’ll Have Another as perfectly as they did in Louisville.”

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Dämmerung

Posted on 13 May 2012 by Erich Hawbaker

Well, the Birds overcame a 7-1 deficit and came within an out of sweeping the Rays on Mothers’ Day 2012. Quite a different story than the infamous Mothers’ Day Massacre up in Boston a few years ago (in case you’ve forgotten that one, poor Jeremy Guthrie took a 5-0 shutout into the bottom of the 9th inning only get pulled from the game and watch the bullpen give up 6 runs; it was also the beginning of the end for Sam Perlozzo’s managerial career). But thusfar, this Orioles team has made it easier to put that one and the 13 others like it behind us.

If you had told me in March that the Orioles would ever be 10 games over .500 this year or would have the best bullpen ERA in baseball, I would ask you when the mother ship was going to pick you up. Is it really that hard to figure out? When you have good pitching, you can win most of the time. Of course, a potent offense doesn’t hurt either, but as we’ve seen plenty of times before, hitting alone isn’t enough when your pitchers can’t hold the lead.

And so, the big question inevitably becomes whether or not the O’s can keep this up all the way thru the season. Your guess is as good as mine. It’s the same kind of nervous optimism you get playing poker when you have pocket kings and an ace comes on the flop. From the beginning, I’ve been enough of a cynic to believe that this phenomenally hot start is going to cool off sooner or later. But at the same time, I can’t deny that being an Orioles fan right now is more fun than it’s been in over a decade. They’re getting the big hits when they need them. They’re playing good defense. And perhaps most importantly, they’re NEVER out of the game until the last out is recorded.

Only time will tell. But if current trends continue, the Orioles are on pace to win 96 games this year. Maybe, just maybe, the baseball gods are finally smiling on Baltimore again. Heaven knows we’ve waited and suffered long enough. But I’ve also heard it said that the devil’s greatest achievement is making people believe that he doesn’t exist. And, although it’s easy to forget right now, Peter G. Angelos is still running this show.

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