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The Five Plays That Determined The Game: Ravens/49ers

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The Five Plays That Determined The Game: Ravens/49ers

Posted on 05 February 2013 by Glenn Clark

Following every Baltimore Ravens game this season, Ryan Chell and I will take to the airwaves Tuesdays on “The Reality Check” on AM1570 WNST.net with a segment known as “The Five Plays That Determined The Game.”

It’s a simple concept. We’ll select five plays from each game that determined the outcome. These five plays will best represent why the Ravens won or lost each game.

This will be our final analysis of the previous game before switching gears towards the next game on the schedule.

Here are the five plays that determined the Ravens’ 34-31 win over the San Francisco 49ers at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome Sunday in Super Bowl XLVII…

(Note: not all pictures are always of actual play)

Glenn Clark’s Plays…

5. Jacoby Jones 108 yard kickoff return TD (3rd quarter)

4. Jacoby Jones 56 yard TD catch from Joe Flacco on 3rd & 10 (2nd quarter)

3. Colin Kaepernick pass intended for Randy Moss on two point conversion attempt incomplete (4th quarter)

2. Joe Flacco 15 yard pass to Anquan Boldin on 3rd and inches (4th quarter)

1. Colin Kaepernick pass intended for Michael Crabtree on 4th and goal incomplete (4th quarter)

(Ryan’s Plays on Page 2…)

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49ers WR Moss still pursuing first career title

Posted on 31 January 2013 by WNST Staff

WIDE RECEIVER RANDY MOSS

 

(on advice to kids hoping to play in the NFL) “I think just keeping a positive attitude first and foremost, because as a kid you go through a lot, a lot of ups and downs from school, in the house, just everyday life. Keeping a positive attitude and wanting to get out there and play.”

 

(on Donald Driver’s retirement and his career) “I didn’t really pay attention to a lot Donald Driver or really his career. For him to announce his retirement, I think a lot of people saw it coming. You won’t play forever in this league. There’s high schoolers that are going to get to college and then to the professional level, so there’s always a replacement for you. He won him a Super Bowl. He got to play with two Hall of Fame quarterbacks, so I don’t think he can really ask for more.”

 

(on where he would rank winning a Super Bowl in terms of priorities he would like to accomplish in his career) “Well, by (football) being a team sport, it would be sitting right at the top because you play for a championship. I think I said yesterday there’s a lot of people that have played in this league, past and present, and have never been on this stage before. So you really get to enjoy the moment and you prepare all week with media requests and practice and all the other stuff. Then you go out here and you try to relax your mind on Friday and Saturday to get ready for a hell of an event on Sunday. So to do be able to win a championship really would complete my career, but, like I said yesterday, I love the game of football. Who knows what the future holds. I’m just living in the moment right now.”

 

(on what it’s like being at the Super Bowl at this point in his career) “I’m not really overexcited. I’m really not. I’m really not that type of person. I’m blessed, very lucky, very fortunate to be in this position. Just trying to stay grounded and do my work each and every day and just prepare and get ready for Sunday. That’s about all you can do.”

 

(on if he had any memorable matchups with Donald Driver) “No. My memorable matchups are against Brett Favre. That’s about it.”

 

(on reactions to his ranking on the all-time receiving list) “Everybody has their personal opinion. My own personal opinion, you’re going to have two sides and I really don’t care what people think. I just know what I’m able to do and how I dictate and how I think I’ve revolutionized the game of football at wide receiver. A lot of people think that I’m a very cocky person, but I’m not cocky. I’m very confident. I’m blessed to be in this position. Throughout my whole life, I’ve always wanted to play football. None of that football stuff, that’s been very secondary for me. Like I say, I enjoy. I go each and every day, prepare to be the best. That might not always be the outcome, but that’s my motivation, is just to be the best each and every day. I don’t really go and stroke my own ego or anything like that. Like I said, I was blessed to be able to have the talent that I have and I just utilize it the best way I can.”

 

(on what the game of football means to him and what he wants his legacy to be) “My legacy is just more of how I treat people, it doesn’t really have to do with football. Football’s just a game, you know? I think a lot of people, especially the sports fans, really take this to heart. They die for their team. They get tattoos for their team. They’ll fight in the club over their team. I think that the game – the sport itself – I do love the game, don’t get me wrong, but I don’t love it enough to really come out of element to do anything crazy. So, I love it. I do enjoy playing the game, but at the end of the day it’s just a game. I was telling a guy yesterday, for me and him to play a game of Monopoly, it’s just a game and football is sort of similar to that. It’s just a game and people get bent up out of shape over a loss, a sports comment or something like that. Not all athletes in this world are alike, but at the same time we do the same time, we prepare to go out there and try to win. If it’s an individual sport from tennis to golf, or a team sport from basketball, baseball and football, hockey we try to go out there and win each and every day. If you’re not preparing yourself to go out there and win each and every day then you’re in the wrong profession.”

 

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Moss believes he’s helped Crabtree grow ahead of Super Bowl

Posted on 30 January 2013 by WNST Staff

WIDE RECEIVER RANDY MOSS

 

(on wide receiver Michael Crabtree) “I think first and foremost Michael really has all the skills to be a complete wide receiver. If he did not have him so high. I just think that he just needed somebody really older that has really been through what he has been through to be able to get him down that path. Not look at me as a father figure or anything like that, just more as a friend and a teammate. Like I said yesterday, the first thing that I told him was that I am not here to replace him or do anything. I said (to him), ‘Man, I want to play with you and let things happen together.’ He has had a hell of a year man. I think it is his best year in his professional career. Only thing I can hope is he continues to be the person he is. Keep making plays.”

 

(on if he enjoys playing with Crabtree) “Yeah, because I think that I can speak for the whole offense, Crabtree has made some phenomenal plays this year. I think it starts out in practice really. I have not been here, I just came for camp. I do listen and I do read. The things he was doing in practice—and I told him ‘The things you do in practice you have to be able to let them roll on over to the field.’ Like I say, speaking for the whole offense he has got us out of some traps this year with his hands and run after the catch. He has had a hell of a year. Only thing you can do is just tip your hat off to him and hope it keeps going.”

 

(on getting back to practice) “I think that we have been here the last couple of days and we have been out walking streets and out eating. Sort of what I am saying is we have gotten our fun out of the way. We are here to do a job and that is to play football. I think that (Coach Harbaugh) said it right, I am excited to get out there and practice today. We have a defensive back, Tramaine Brock, and he gives us hell each and every day. I actually am ready to go out there and compete with him today. So I am excited, I really am.”

 

(on helping the 49ers defensive backs)  “I think that I have seen enough football to kind of know that what I see is what I see. I have given some input. Have they used it? I really do not know. If they see something going on out there, I expect them to come over and talk to me about it. That is what teammates do. That is what football is all about. It is very important for us to get out to a fast start and be there for one another. We have one game left. After that, it will be a long offseason. I think it will be a long offseason if we lose, but a short offseason if you win. Like I said, we are teammates and I think whatever we can do to help each other out. Let’s win a game.”

 

(on writing a book in the future) “I have not really figured it out yet. I just know that I think for people to understand me a little more, to understand what I have been through, I would like to write a book. I really do not have a title for it right now. I think once it is all said and done and everything settles down for me, slows down a little bit, I think I am going to write a book. A lot of you guys at this table, I have never seen you before and I know you do not me. You just know what you read. I think for you to really understand me and what I come from and how I do things, you need to read it.”

 

(on what people do not know about him) “Well right now, I am playing in the NFL. When the book comes out you will be able to sit down and read it. I am not trying to write a book that is going to be disrespectful and like that. I think it is just something like when you go to Starbucks to get coffee or you go to see people and read a book, I would like for people to really sit down and enjoy my book. Get to know me a little better. Like I said, I have been through a lot and I put a lot of heart, soul and dedication into this. Sacrificing each and every day to make sure I go out here and prepare myself to be the best. I think that is going to be one of the main focal points of my book. The approach that I took to be how I am.”

 

(on the importance of the 49ers locker room getting to know him) “Yeah because I think that they already had their perception of me already made up. Good or bad, I did not really care. I just wanted to let them know I am all the way in. I told Coach Harbaugh back during the OTAs and minicamp that, first of all, I wanted to make the team and then be able to go out here and make plays. The playmaking has not really been there this year, but, like I said, everything else has really been there.”

 

-more-

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Super Bowl XLVII – Wednesday, January 30, 2013

 

QUOTES FROM SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS MEDIA SESSION

 

MORE WIDE RECEIVER RANDY MOSS

 

(on quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s improvements) “I really do not know. I would say his preparation I guess. (Kaepernick) has come into being our starting quarterback with his eyes forward. Not looking on either side of the road. Just keep it straight forward. I would say his preparation because when he came in, everybody makes mistakes, but you could see some of the mistakes he was making and now he is ready to lead. That is something you can appreciate in a quarterback.”

 

(on Colin Kaepernick’s toughness) “I think his inner toughness is as tough as his outer. I like him. I really do. I like everything that he does and everything that he stands for. The kissing of the tattoos and all of that. I like him, I really do. I am a fan of his.”

 

(on what he has learned from the team’s younger guys) “I think being around a group of young guys does not make me feel so old. What I mean by that is there are days I have come out, been a little achy or a little sore and not really ready to go out there and practice. Then you get the jokes and stuff coming from Aldon Smith, Michael Crabtree, Carlos Rogers and C.J. Spillman. It is really something that motivated me to loosen my bones up and get myself ready to practice.”

 

(on what the young guys say to him) “You name it. Really, you name it. It is nothing that I have not heard from them just as far as my age. Like a lawn mower—you know how you start a lawn mower up and you have to pull the string to start it up? They are talking about, ‘Moss let’s get ready. Go ahead and start your lawn mower.’ It is all in fun. It is not out of disrespect. They have to have somebody to pick on. It goes both ways. We have a great time. Being around those great groups of guys who are young and keep me young too.”

 

(on Jerry Rice disagreeing that Moss is the greatest receiver of all-time) “Everybody is going to have their opinion. I do not live on numbers. I really do not. If you sit here and just said who is the greatest running back? Statistically it is Emmitt Smith. People would say Barry Sanders, Gale Sayers or Jim Brown. Their numbers do not match Emmitt Smith, but people would say Emmitt Smith is the best running back.”

 

(on how to judge the best receiver) “You make your own judgment. You really do. I know what I think. I am not going to sit up here and tell you how to look at it and how to judge it. I think when it comes to going out there, making plays and helping the team do the things that they are able to do to win the game—I think I am the greatest receiver ever, point blank. Next question.”

 

(on people’s reaction to him calling himself the greatest ever) “I think that it speaks of the impact that I have made on this NFL football league. If Joe Blow would have said it, I do not know if it would have been in USA Today. Since Randy Moss said it, it is front of the sports page. Like I said, I just try to stay humble and do my job. That is what I am able to do. I am able to come out and try to say these things, but I do believe in my heart and my mind I am the greatest to ever do it.”

 

(on the 49ers offensive weapons) “It goes on. We have a lot of weapons really. I think it is really true to say there is not really enough balls to go around on this offense. I do not mean that in a disrespectful way. I just think that we have so many weapons. We have tight ends. We have receivers. We have running backs, and injuries do occur. When Kendall Hunter went down, LaMichael James came in and stepped up. (Mario) Manningham went down and we have a young A.J. Jenkins. He has bloomed and been able to go out here and make a couple of plays for us this last month. This team is very talented. When it comes to salary caps in this league, it is hard to really keep a talented team together for so long. Hopefully the 49ers can keep them a good team together because it is a great core of guys and they love to play football.”

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Randy Moss thinks Ravens’ Boldin, Smith “magical” WR’s

Posted on 29 January 2013 by WNST Staff

WIDE RECEIVER RANDY MOSS

 

(on if he plans on coming back and playing another season) “I’ve thought about it. I do want to play another year.”

 

(on what he has said to his teammates regarding their business this week) “I think for us being here, and this is my second trip here, some guys have never experienced the atmosphere of the whole week of the Super Bowl. It’s more of a business approach. Early in the week, get your fun out of the way. Whatever partying that you may do, get it out early in the week because I think towards the middle of the week, and the end of the week, it’s all preparation. We put a lot of work in last week because we didn’t really know what to expect this whole week. It’s more just getting the fun out of the way early in the week and starting this evening all the way up to Sunday, it’s all business.”

 

(on getting another chance to play in the Super Bowl at the end of his career) “It’s actually a dream, really. By me taking a year off and having to work out for almost a whole year, being able to come back and be in the Super Bowl one year later is just a dream. I really didn’t expect this. Everybody has their own goals and has their own dreams of what they want to do and what they want to accomplish. For me to be here, I couldn’t have told you this back in June or July. It would’ve been more of a, ‘Keep your fingers crossed. I hope I’m in New Orleans for the Super Bowl in February.’ Now that it’s here, I just want to make the best of it and take advantage of it and bring a trophy back to San Francisco.”

 

(on what having a Super Bowl championship would mean to him) “I think that what I’ve accomplished in my professional career and throughout my whole life of playing football, I’ve really wanted a championship on every level. I’ve always told myself that I wanted to win a championship on this level. Having a Super Bowl ring, I think my career would be complete.”

 

(on if he came back just to win a Super Bowl) “No, I think the reason I came back was I really wasn’t ready to leave the game. I think I told y’all earlier, just going through some family problems with my kids and trying to put them on the same page because football takes a lot of our time up. Sometimes we forget, as parents, about our main objective in life. I think that I keep my family dear to my heart. I really do. I play each and every game. I collect the game check and my family spends it. I think that for me to be able to take a year off; I’ve said it before that I really did cry, I really did. I love this game of football so much. I don’t like everything that comes with it, but going out on the field between the white lines and playing football is something I’ve always done. I’ve been doing it since I was six years old. For me to be able to just walk away from the game, knowing that I wasn’t ready, mentally or physically, it really hurt me, man. It really depressed me. It warmed me up to know that I wasn’t ready to leave the game. Now that I’ve made the decision to come back and play, it was something that I was ready to do. I think that my conditioning in the offseason really showed that I was ready to go. I feel good. I really do. Throughout the whole season, I’ve been healthy. I’ve come out of games where it felt like I didn’t really do anything. I always want to compete. I always want to contribute to the team. For me to be here, it’s just like a dream because I would have never thought in a million years that this would happen. It’s something that you keep your fingers crossed and hope you get here.”

 

(on if he has taken on a leadership role of the team) “I don’t really want to get into that, because I never considered myself to be trying to be a leader. This team already has the leaders. It already has Joe Staley, has Justin Smith, has Patrick Willis, Frank Gore of course. I just wanted to play football. That’s something I’ve always done. I’ve never been vocal. I think it’s something you develop over time, especially when your peers look to you for vocal leadership. If there is anything that I’ve been able to give back to the younger guys, it’s my experience. That’s something I’ve taken to heart because by looking at the younger guys and how they respond and how they look at me, it’s something I never would have imagined. I never wanted to be a vocal guy and lead by my mouth. I always wanted to lead by example and that’s by making plays on the field.”

 

(on the main thing that he missed when he was away from the game) “I think the main thing that I missed was the locker room, the meetings each week and going out here to put a show on for the fans. I really consider us as entertainers because I’ve always said [that] no matter what a person may go through during the week at their 9-5 job, that they can always depend on the NFL to keep them smiling and perk them up. That’s the main thing, just going out here to compete, being around my teammates and going out here and showing out for the fans on Sunday.”

 

(on the difference between his Patriots Super Bowl teams and this 49ers squad) “In ’07 with the Patriots, we were riding high being undefeated leading up to the Super Bowl. I think that’s just something that we wanted to accomplish as a whole team, something to set ourselves in history. Being here with the 49ers—they were so close last year with a couple mishaps against the Giants in the NFC Championship game—I think by the way we practice and the way guys speak in the locker room, they were determined to get back here. I just wanted to be a part of it.”

 

(on kids using the term ‘Mossing someone’ to describe catches over defensive backs and what he sees as his legacy in the game) “For me to be able to go up above the defensive back and make a catch, sort of like a slam dunk, I hear it still to this day and it’s really hard to believe that it’s me that they’re talking about. I try to stay focused and try to stay humble and try to stay grounded, but if you go out to different parts of the country, and sometimes different parts of the world, and you hear that phrase, that little slogan, it’s hard to believe. I’m overwhelmed by it. I never thought in a million years that something like this would happen. I’ve always just wanted to play football and everything else comes secondary. For that slogan, ‘You’ve been Mossed’, is something I definitely hang my hat on.”

 

(on how he spent his Sundays when he wasn’t playing last year) “My Sundays last year, I watched a little football. I usually would fish during the week or maybe on Saturday, but I still love football. It’s hard to get away from. It really is. I like to see the guys go out there and compete even though I’m not playing. I think for me to be able to sit home on Sundays one of these days and just watch guys I played with and the future of the NFL will hopefully grow. I look forward to it. I would like to, one day, tailgate a football game. I’ve always said that. I think there is something that I’m missing from the food to the drinks and seeing the camaraderie and how the fans interact. I think that most of my Sundays were spent watching football. I watched a little basketball, but mainly football. That’s what I do; I’m a football player.”

 

(on the discussion he had with his family about returning to football) “We were at dinner, at my Mom’s house. I told my 18-year old daughter. She’s actually a freshman at the University of Florida. I asked her if it was okay for me to get back into football. She said, ‘Dad, I don’t even know why you left the game.’ For her being older, I had to really sit down and explain to her the importance of family and how much I love them and what I’ve sacrificed all these years so they’re able to have and able to do. After I explained it to my mom, I had to explain to her that if I come back to this game, you’re not going to see me as much. She didn’t earlier in her life. She said, “Dad, if you come back to the game, I want you to win a Super Bowl because I’m going to the University of Florida to win a National Championship [in basketball].’ That really made me smile because I’ve never heard my daughter talk like that. For her to be able to tell me that face-to-face, well I’m on the verge of trying to win my first Super Bowl. Hopefully, we’ll get it and the next thing is to see her get her NCAA Championship.”

 

(on his role in the offense as a decoy compared to earlier years) “I don’t like my role; I don’t. I like to be out there playing football. One thing that I’ve always had to really understand was being a decoy. It was put to me, Coach Dennis Green just said, ‘Even though the football is not in your hand, you’re still out there dictating how the defense is playing the offense.’ It took me awhile to really understand where he was coming from. Later on and now in my career, I understand that my presence out on the field, I don’t always have to touch the ball to be able to help the offense score touchdowns. Like I said, I don’t really like that, but it’s something that I’m used to. I have to grow to understand and grow to like it. I’ve always been a team player. I’ve never been about self. Anything that is going to push our team to victory and hopefully win a Super Bowl, I’m willing to do.”

 

(on his love for the game) “I don’t think I’ve really expressed how much I love to compete. I’ve been in fights in practice. I’ve been in verbal arguments in practice with coaches and players, even in college and high school. I don’t think the football world understands how much I love to compete. When I hear people talk about how talented I am and how easy I make it look, I can honestly tell you people that it’s very hard work. I work out five times a week. I put the work in and for me to be able to go out there and have results it something I am proud of. It’s not always the individual results that I’m proud of. For me to be able to talk to a Michael Crabtree or talk to a Frank Gore or Percy Harvin and for them to go out there and have a good game that week, that’s something I can be proud of. That’s just me giving back to the NFL. I’ve always said, I don’t like what the NFL does for me because I’m very blessed. My family is blessed. I’ve always been the type of person to know what I can do to make the League better. At this point in my career, if I’m able to be vocal, to share a little knowledge and also to go out there and play, if that’s what it takes to win a championship, then I’m willing to do that. I’ve always been that way.”

 

(on Anquan Boldin and Torrey Smith) “We don’t like to talk about how age finds every player, but I think that Anquan Boldin, I’ve watched him back when he was in college. I was a fan of his since he was in college. He went to Arizona and teamed up with (Larry) Fitzgerald. There are a couple duos out there in the NFL that are very exciting to watch. I think Anquan Boldin and Torrey Smith are a nice duo to watch. The guys in Atlanta [Roddy White and Julio Jones] are a nice duo to watch. I don’t know how many years he has left, but in the 3-6 years, I think they can do some magical work.”

 

(on the Harbaugh brothers facing each other and how he would be if he was facing his own brother) “Knowing they grew up in the same house—same room? That makes it worse because me and my brother shared a room. I don’t really think that I could talk to my brother for that week. If our mom came down to have dinner, I’d probably have to cancel that. I understand that it’s the 49ers against the Baltimore Ravens, but I know John and Jim would like to beat one another. That’s bragging rights forever. You know what I’m saying? They could be long gone, grandfathers or great grandfathers, but they still have something to hold over the other brother’s head. I think that both Jim and John want to beat each other. They don’t care how they do it. They just want to win. I think that’s the approach of each team.”

 

(on how he would describe Jim Harbaugh) “A coach.”

 

(on where he ranks Colin Kaepernick among the other quarterbacks that he’s played with) “I’ve never really ranked them. I think for what me and Tom Brady accomplished in ’07 would put him at the top, just because trying to be undefeated and coming to the Super Bowl. I can’t really rank Kaepernick because he came in midseason. It was Alex Smith’s team and Kaep took over. All I can say about Kaep is I’m happy to play with him. I wish he would take some of the heat of those balls sometimes. His future is very bright. Either he or Frank Gore asked me, they said, ‘Moss, how long do you think this pistol offense will work?’ I said, ‘Man, as long as you keep doing what you’re doing, it’ll go as far you will take it.’ I’m a big fan of Kaepernick’s. I told him and he’ll tell you, it could’ve been April or it could’ve been May, that I saw something in him. I pulled him to the side and shared a few words with him. I’m not going to share what we were talking about. I had just seen something in him. He’s very athletic. Just seeing his focus and determination to go out and lead the offense up and down the field like the Atlanta game, it’s what you want to see in your quarterback. Alex Smith, I’m not taking anything from Alex Smith. I’ve watch him and I don’t really think that in his career that Alex had a fair chance because he could never get a coaching staff or offense to grasp and learn. Each and every year, it was always an offense this year and another offense the next year and then the following year had another offense. Alex Smith can still play this game. He really can. He can still play the game. He’s still throwing the ball in practice. When it comes to sports, I think you take advantage of your opportunities. One thing that Kaep did was he took advantage of his opportunities. He’s a blessed young man. Not just this year, I’m looking for big things out of Kaepernick.”

 

(on what his responsibility is to the younger players around the league) “My responsibility is to try and lead, going out there and showing them how professionals are supposed to work. Early in my career, I looked at Cris Carter, Randall McDaniel, Randall Cunningham and John Randle, just seeing how professionals are supposed to work each and every day. That’s something that I thought I knew how to work, but then I went up to New England and ran into Kevin Faulk. Me and Kevin Faulk, we have a little bit of history together because we came out the same year in high school and were on the same All-American team. I said, ‘Man, this is really how y’all work?’ Like I said, I thought I knew how to work. I was working out in the mornings doing this and doing that. He took it an extra mile. He took it to the next level. What I’ve learned and what I’ve experienced and what guys like the Faulks and the John Randles and the Carters have taught me is that it’s my duty to give it back. Like I said, I’ve always wanted to make the NFL better because there are different topics, good and bad, that come up every day about the NFL. As you know now, talking about concussions and trying to take player safety downward instead of upward, I think it’s my duty to do whatever I can to give back to the league to make it better.”

 

(on what he has done to become a better professional) “I just think my work ethic and my preparation each and every day. I don’t do anything different. Probably the last five or six years, I’ve always taken the approach to do everything that I need to do in the morning. Once you sit in the classroom all day and jot down your notes, look at film and go out to practice, I think I’m so mentally and physically drained that I can’t go lift another weight. There are a lot of guys that can vouch for this, that once that evening meeting comes after practice, a lot of guys are tired and a lot of guys do doze off. Not in Coach Harbaugh’s meetings. He’ll call you outside and want to talk to you for a minute. What’s said? I don’t know. I haven’t been caught yet. Hopefully, I’ll be able to hold strong this week.”

 

(on what are some of his good memories from New England) “The memories that I have in New England are just something that I hold dear to my heart because of what we accomplished. I’m trying to do something here special in San Francisco, too. I don’t want to sit up here and talk about the Patriots because the Patriots are the past. I’m living in the present. It’s not hard to get what we did because we did some great things up there. I think being here with the 49ers and the organization giving me the opportunity to come back to this game, it’s something that I wanted to do and I just want to go out here and play football. I know in a couple days, this stadium is going to be full of cameras, full of 49ers and Ravens fans. The atmosphere is going to be crazy. It’s something that I look forward to and hopefully I’ll step up for the moment.”

 

(on why he’s always been so reserved with the media) “Because I live for myself. The thing about the media is that everything is not said and the truth is not always told. I grew up just respecting myself. I do respect other people, but when it comes to the pen and pad that you’re writing on right now, you’ve got a job to do. You’ve got papers to sell. I’ve always said I’ve never come off negative. I think a lot of people see my focus. I don’t like anything that comes outside of football when it comes to sports. I love the game. I love to play in between the white lines. It’s like a kid at school, when you’re sitting in the classroom and the teacher says it’s recess and that door opens. All the kids just go running and screaming and jumping on swing sets and swinging and stuff. That’s kind of how I treat the football field because we are clamped up all week. We have to do the interviews and things like that. Once it’s kickoff, it’s like you’re opening that door. Any time that I step on the field, that’s when I feel free and I can do anything I want and act any way I want. You’re having fun and it’s all a game. It’s like me and you sitting down and playing a game of Monopoly. It’s just a game. I love to compete and I keep it dear to my heart.”

 

(on Moss TV) “Moss TV, it was something for the fans. A friend of mine told me that I’ve never really given back to the fans. I think that when I started Moss TV, that was just the way of my fans being able to interact with me and ask questions and things like that and feel like we were face-to-face. I couldn’t see them, but they could see me and I could see their questions. I think that was just my way of giving back to the fans. I know there are some true Moss fans out there. I mess with them every day on Twitter. My little slogan is ‘My comeback is our comeback.’ I really do believe that because I do know there are some true fans out in the world that love me for who I am. I really thank them for that. When I’m able to give back, it’s what I do on Sundays. I look forward to a good game this Sunday.”

 

(on if he wishes the end of his career  was celebrated the way Ray Lewis’ career is being celebrated currently) “No, because that’s not me. I’m not a celebrator. I love to do my work and go home. A lot of people see me out there in public and I’ve always wanted to be normal my whole life, from elementary school until now. I’ve been a big fan of Michael Jackson’s, I really was. Everybody grew up, in the era I grew up in, was a big Michael Jackson fan. I think it was his sister or brother, one of them said Michael just always wanted to be normal. I’m not putting myself on Michael Jackson’s pedestal, but I kind of understood where they were coming from. I always wanted to be able to go to the park and play a game or go shopping or go to the grocery store. I’ve always wanted to be normal, still to this day. When people see me and they are overwhelmed that they’re meeting me for the first time, I just try and let them know and understand that I’m normal. I just want to be a normal person. Hopefully, one day, I don’t know if I will ever get to do that, but one day, hopefully all of this will die down where I can just live my life and just go play a pickup game and go to the grocery store and just be normal.”

 

(on his post-football plans and if he thinks he’ll do any coaching once his playing career is over) “I think if I do any type of coaching, I think I would like for it to be on the high school level. The collegiate level and professional level takes up a lot of your time. Being able to go to high school is where you’re on the verge of thinking you’re something and you might not be, but you could be something. My experience, throughout my whole life, I think that’s where I’m able to impact and give back the most is probably on the high school level. So if I did any type of coaching, it would be on the high school level. I just want to love my family and do a little fishing. That’s about it.”

 

(on if he’s ever had an imaginary girlfriend) “No. If I did, I never told anybody about it.”

 

(on what would happen if someone tried to hoax him) “Speaking of the linebacker from Notre Dame, I feel for the young guy. We all do some things in our life that we wish we could have back or we regret. Like I said, when you’re going to a prestigious school such as Notre Dame and being in the limelight, being up for the Heisman, I think that you have to expect—I’ve always said you have to take the good with the good and the bad with the bad. I’ve been a fan of his since he came on the scene playing football and being catfished I guess. He’s not the only one. Big ups to him and I hope he keeps his head up.”

 

(on if he still thinks about the Super Bowl loss to the Giants) “I still think about it. I still think about the loss in ’07. I can still say that I haven’t seen the game. I haven’t watched the game of it yet. The only time that I really watch the game is when we are doing film study and critiquing ourselves after a win or loss. I go to the coaches—I’ve always been coachable. I think there was some stuff out there early in my career that I wasn’t coachable. I still don’t know everything. I think when it comes to players and coaches, sometimes the coaches need to sit their butts down and listen too because they expect us to listen. We’re out here playing. We’re out here putting our lives on the line. I think I’ve always been coachable. I love to be coached by a guy that loves to listen.”

 

(on if he typically watches the replays of games) “I would probably love to watch it. I really do. There’s just something about ’07, being undefeated going into a Super Bowl and losing it like that. I’ll never forget that moment because it’s not fun when you’re sweating and you have confetti dropping down and sticking to your face knowing that you’re not on the winning side of the confetti.”

 

(on if winning this Super Bowl will make up for losing in 2007) “No, I think I’ll still remember that because if I win this one, that means I could have had two. That’s something I’ll never forget.”

 

(on comparing Jim Harbaugh to Bill Belichick) “They both have their styles of coaching. I think Coach Harbaugh, he loves to have fun. He has a lot of stories. Some are very, very comical. Others are just pushing forward and keep striving. Coach Belichick is very business-oriented. He doesn’t really show a lot of emotion. He prepares his guys and really doesn’t crack a smile. I think the comparison between the two, if I could put it on, is Coach Belichick is really straight forward and Coach Harbaugh sometimes gets off the road and keeps it humorous.”

 

(on if Bill Belichick was a good listener) “Yeah, not every coach is going to listen because certain coaches are stuck in their ways and I’m not talking about any particular coach. If a certain coach has gotten to this point doing it the way he’s done it, they just do it their way. This game has changed and evolved like no other. I think it’s time for the coaches, and you can take it down to high school even, these guys watch us train. I think if coaches would take time to really talk to the players and see how they see it on the field because if you’re sitting up there watching as the eye in the sky or watching from afar to see what’s going on, it might not be as easy as it looks because football is a game of reaction and how you react to the play.”

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Your Monday Reality Check-Umenyiora? Crabtree? Sure, make the call

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Your Monday Reality Check-Umenyiora? Crabtree? Sure, make the call

Posted on 07 May 2012 by Glenn Clark

As first reported by the NFL Network, the Baltimore Ravens hosted former Houston Texans WR Jacoby Jones for a visit Sunday.

Jacoby Jones became an interesting name for Ravens fans after the NFL Draft, as the Texans’ selection of DeVier Posey made it appear as though the veteran receiver could become expendable for the team. He obviously was, as the team took only days to part ways with Jones.

Perhaps adding Jones to the mix would be a good idea for the Ravens. He’s been in the league for five years, but has only spent the last three seasons getting significant reps as a wide receiver. His numbers aren’t spectacular (31 catches, 512 yards and two touchdowns in 2011), but they’re certainly serviceable for a complementary receiver. The Ravens clearly need depth, as behind starters Torrey Smith and Anquan Boldin they have just four combined career receptions (all belonging to LaQuan Willams) from a group that also includes Tandon Doss, David Reed, Phillip Livas, Rodney Bradley, Patrick Williams and 6th round pick Tommy Streeter.

As much as the Ravens may have needed a playmaker type, they clearly needed depth at the position in general. Jones could bring that, and could also bring experience in the return game. Despite his two fumbles against the Baltimore Ravens in the 2011 NFL Playoffs, he has four TD returns (3 punt, 1 kickoff) in his career.

An even more intriguing name that has loosely been discussed amongst Ravens fans is the name Michael Crabtree. The San Francisco 49ers wide receiver has been a hot topic after the team drafted Illinois WR AJ Jenkins in the first round of the NFL Draft. In addition to Jenkins, the team has added veteran free agent receivers Mario Manningham and Randy Moss this offseason, leading to some speculation that the team could be prepared to move on from Crabtree after selecting him with the 10th overall pick in the 2009 NFL Draft.

I want to reiterate that the rumors surrounding Crabtree have been thinly veiled. While a National Football League source told me he “wouldn’t be surprised” if the Ravens had interest in trading for Crabtree, no true source has been able to confirm that actual interest exists. However, in my chat with CBSSports.com NFL writer Clark Judge (who is honestly amongst the absolute best in his line of work) last Friday on “The Reality Check” on AM1570 WNST.net, the Crabtree-Ravens conversation came up…

JUDGE: “Hey one other question for you, are you serious about taking that caller’s suggestion and trying to acquire Michael Crabtree?”

ME: “No, I don’t think that’s realistic at all. I was trying to play devil’s advocate.”

JUDGE: “The thing about Crabtree is that they would probably be willing to give him away because while he’s young, he’s an underachieving diva. A second rounder? I’d probably give him away for a fourth rounder.”

ME: “If they were willing to give him away for a fourth rounder, I’d be willing to have the conversation.”

JUDGE: “I wouldn’t want him on my team.”

It should be made clear that Judge didn’t report to me that the Niners were interested or willing to trade Crabtree away for a fourth round pick. He simply said that HE would be willing to do that if he were making the calls for San Fran. (The chat is available here in the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault.)

I’ll say again what I said to Clark Judge. If the San Francisco 49ers were willing to trade Michael Crabtree away for a fourth round pick, I’d have the conversation. I’m aware that Crabtree has yet to fully live up to his potential as a Top 10 pick and has certainly had “personality issues” that stem back to his lengthy rookie holdout. I’m also aware that the former Texas Tech standout has become more and more productive in each of his three years in the league and his best year (2011) coincided with the year his quarterback (Alex Smith) finally moved into the “credible” category of NFL signal callers.

Let me stress, I’d have the conversation. But it’s important to point out again that this is not a fantasy football league. This is the NFL.

(Continued on Page 2…)

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Time is right for Ravens to consider risk (and reward) of adding Moss

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Time is right for Ravens to consider risk (and reward) of adding Moss

Posted on 14 February 2012 by Luke Jones

When Randy Moss announced the news of his intention to return to the NFL in 2012, I tried to dismiss him as an option for the Ravens as quickly as I could.

I just didn’t want to consider him as a real possibility to come to Baltimore.

The poor attitude, playing for three teams in his final season, and his turning 35 on Monday are all strikes against him. Not being able to help himself, Moss took to his Twitter account on Tuesday to fire back at former Minnesota Vikings teammate Cris Carter, who called the seven-time Pro Bowl receiver’s “quit mechanism” unlike any other superstar he’s been around.

The character blemishes are there, and there’s no way to overlook them. The guy can be a clown, and that’s putting it kindly.

His eye-popping numbers worthy of the Pro Football Hall of Fame include 153 touchdowns and 14,858 yards in 13 seasons, but you’re not getting the Moss of 1998 or even 2007 when he made a league-record 23 touchdown catches in his first season with the New England Patriots. His 2010 season split between New England, Minnesota, and Tennessee resulted in just 28 catches, 393 yards, and five touchdowns while wearing out his welcome in two places and making little impact at his final destination before announcing his retirement last summer.

But the past images of watching him sprint by a helpless cornerback or leap over a defender to haul in another touchdown are still too bright in my mind to ignore. Call me a sucker, but people said Moss was finished before he escaped football purgatory in Oakland and went on to have the best season of his career.

The possibility of the 6-foot-4 veteran still having something left in the tank cannot be overlooked by a team that was only a few tenths of a second away  — in holding onto a catch in the end zone — from a trip to the Super Bowl three weeks ago. Eliminating all other variables, the mere subtraction of the disappointing Lee Evans and his near-$6 million cap number and the addition of Moss at a cheaper rate is enough to make you salivate at the possibilities.

Moss certainly can’t do any worse than four receptions in an injury-plagued season and failing to secure a championship-clinching catch in the final seconds in Foxborough, right?

The first order of business before coach John Harbaugh and the Ravens should even consider welcoming Moss to Baltimore is determining where he stands physically. Can Moss still run with the speed to blow the top off a defense and force safeties to play deeper than they normally would? Would opposing defenses still have to account for him on every play?

If not, you run the risk of dealing with a broken-down former star with an ego still in its prime. In other words, the reward wouldn’t be worth the potential headaches.

But unlike the other volatile veteran receiver who will be on the open market, Terrell Owens, Moss isn’t returning from a serious knee injury. Other than the potentially cruel reality of being 35 years old and the question of how well he kept himself in shape over the last calendar year, there’s no reason to believe Moss isn’t up to the physical task of once again donning the cleats and striking fear in the hearts of opposing secondaries.

If the 40-time is right, you now move to the more complicated piece of the equation. You sit down with the combative receiver, reminding him he’s no longer in a position of power after a year away from the game. You press him to see how serious he is about not just playing again but also being part of a winning organization like he was in New England for three years — quite harmoniously — before an expiring contract flushed the relationship down the drain in year four. And reminding him of that heartbreaking defeat in Super Bowl XLII and how he’s never won a championship probably wouldn’t hurt, either.

You allow Moss to explain exactly what happened in his disastrous 2010 season.

And you listen.

“A team like the Ravens would be perfect,” Steve Wyche of the NFL Network told WNST.net on Tuesday. “I work with [former Patriots fullback] Heath Evans, who played with Randy in New England, and Heath said, ‘If Randy’s in a situation where he’s winning, where everybody on the team has bought in, he’s fantastic.’

“I talked to people at the Patriots when he was there. He was the leader. He was the guy who organized a lot of meetings. He was the guy who broke down the huddle.”

Continue >>>

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Wrapping Up A Week at Radio Row in Indy

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Wrapping Up A Week at Radio Row in Indy

Posted on 04 February 2012 by Glenn Clark

It was another incredible week of Super Bowl coverage for us here at AM1570 WNST.net. Both “The Morning Reaction” with Drew Forrester and Luke Jones as well as “The Reality Check” with Glenn Clark emanated from Radio Row at Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis every day. “Nasty” Nestor Aparicio was also part of the daily fun.

In case you missed anything we did, here is a list of the guest segments available for your consumption right now in the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault here at WNST.net.

-Adam Sandler (Actor)

-Matt Birk (Baltimore Ravens C)

-Chuck Pagano (Indianapolis Colts Head Coach, former Ravens DC)

-Curt Schilling (Former Baltimore Orioles/Boston Red Sox/Arizona Diamondbacks/Philadelphia Phillies Pitcher)

-Shannon Sharpe (Former Baltimore Ravens/Denver Broncos Hall of Fame TE, CBS)

-AJ Green (Cincinnati Bengals WR)
-Ingrid & Sarah Harbaugh (Wives of John & Jim Harbaugh)

-Jim Schwartz (Detroit Lions Head Coach)

-Mike Smith (Atlanta Falcons Head Coach)

-Marcus Allen (Hall of Fame RB)
-Larry The Cable Guy (Comedian)

-Priest Holmes (Former Baltimore Ravens/Kansas City Chiefs RB)

-Vanilla Ice (Musician/Actor)
-Will Forte (Actor/Comedian/Saturday Night Live alum)

-Lynn Swann (Former Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame WR)
-Greg Ballard (Mayor of Indy)

-Dustin Keller (New York Jets TE)
-Jason Taylor (Former Miami Dolphins DE)
-Frank Caliendo (Comedian)

-Jay Mohr (Actor/Comedian)

-David Feherty (Golf Channel)

-Mike Haynes (Former New England Patriots Hall of Fame CB)
-Brian Billick (Former Baltimore Ravens coach FOX/NFL Network)
-Herm Edwards (Former New York Jets/Kansas City Chiefs coach, ESPN)

-Dick Vermeil (Former Super Bowl winning St. Louis Rams coach)
-Marv Levy (Buffalo Bills Hall of Fame coach)

-Joe Theismann (Former Washington Redskins QB, NFL Network)

-Lorenzo Neal (Former Baltimore Ravens/San Diego Chargers FB)
-Rich Gannon (Former Oakland Raiders QB, CBS)
-Antonio Pierce (Former NY Giants LB)

-Jack Youngblood (Los Angeles Rams Hall of Fame DE)

-Dhani Jones (Former Cincinnati Bengals LB)

-Robbie Gould (Chicago Bears Kicker)
-Morten Anderson (Former New Orleans Saints/Atlanta Falcons Kicker)
-Bonnie Bernstein (ESPN/University of Maryland alum)
-Peter King (SI/NBC)
-Lesley Visser (CBS)
-Sal Paolantonio (ESPN)
-Laura Kaeppeler (Miss America 2012)

-Chrissy Teigen (SI Swimsuit Issue model)
-Will Witherspoon (Tennessee Titans LB)

(More on Page 2…)

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Fantasy Super Bowl Party Invites

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Fantasy Super Bowl Party Invites

Posted on 25 January 2012 by Thyrl Nelson

As I look ahead to the Super Bowl with far less excitement than I had at this time last week, I’ll begrudgingly admit that while not as interesting as the Ravens projected to be the Patriots and Giants match up in the big game is an interesting one and worth looking forward to. It is after all a chance to revisit the defining match up of the most important season in recent NFL history (in my opinion) with plenty of other storylines to be gathered along the way.

With some of those storylines in mind I present my ideal octet for Super Bowl companionship, or the 8 people I’d most like to have in a room for this year’s Super Bowl.

 

Peyton Manning

 

I’d like to see Manning’s emotions up close as his brother goes for a second ring (or one more than Peyton has) against the rival against whom Peyton will most often be measured in Tom Brady. I wonder if there’s just a little hater in him.

 

 

Rex Ryan

 

Call this pick the hater in me, as I’d love to sit next to Rex (with my shoes on of course) as he watches the two proverbial bears that he poked this season compete for the trophy he once again guaranteed to deliver himself. Rex may have been right in promising New York a Super Bowl this season, but he can’t be happy about it.

 

 

Tiki Barber

 

Speaking of haters, why not bring Eli Manning’s biggest basher to the celebration? We’ll be serving plenty of humble pie at my fictional gathering it seems.

 

 

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A look inside Thanksgiving feast of Ravens-49ers

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A look inside Thanksgiving feast of Ravens-49ers

Posted on 24 November 2011 by Chris Pika

One of the more-hyped games of the 2011 schedule once it came out in April is tonight’s Thanksgiving game in Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium when the broithers Harbaugh meet as the San Francisco 49ers take on the Baltimore Ravens (8 pm ET; NFL Network).

The 9-1 49ers have a stranglehold on the NFC West and can clinch the division with a victory and either a loss or tie by Seattle on Sunday or a tie and a Seattle loss.

The 7-3 Ravens lead the AFC North, and are tied for the AFC’s best record.

The combined 16-4 record (.800) of the two teams is tied for fourth-best between Thanksgiving Day combatants since 1970.

It will be Baltimore’s John vs. San Francisco’s Jim, and Jim, and according to NFL Network’s Mike Mayock, who will help call the game with Brad Nessler, this matchup is one to watch:

When you combine the surprising success of San Francisco, along with Baltimore being pretty much where you expect them to be, we’ve got one of the best games of the season on Thursday night.

In a national teleconference to promote the game earlier this week, Jim mentioned how brotherly love goes out the window once competition is involved:

Leading up to this, John has talked freely and openly about football with me. Now, it’s more talking in code. I’m being serious. I can see there are limitations to what he’s telling me. I thought love had no boundaries, but now I see that it does.

— Jim Harbaugh, on football communication with John since the 2011 NFL schedule was announced

For John’s part, it is a continuation of competition that has gone on since they were kids:

We were in the same room for 16 years, and we had to draw a tape line. If you stepped across, there was a fight. The last time we fought, I was 27. He was the quarterback for the Bears. He got up to 6-4, 230 pounds. I was 195, something like that. He takes us on vacation to Florida, we’re on the beach, and we get into this wrestling match. It’s getting a little aggressive and works its way over to the water. He gets a shot in; I get a shot in. I’m starting to think maybe I can hang with the big little brother. Next, he grabs me in a headlock, picks me up, and slams me into three feet of water. My head is on the sand underneath the water. Of course, he’s not going to drown me, but I’m thinking maybe he’s snapped. My dad’s trying to pull him off, but he’s too strong. I’m going to drown. Before I died, he pulled me up. He didn’t do mouth-to-mouth; that would have been against the rules. I then realized I’m never going to fight my brother again. He’s too big.

— John Harbaugh on his brother

The first-ever coaching matchup between two brothers in NFL history is a testament to their father, Jack, himself a former college head coach:

Their father gave them a gift; by making them and teaching them how to compete. If we can instill competition in our kids, that’s all we want. We want them to go out in the world and compete.

— NFL Network’s Marshall Faulk on the relationship between Jack Harbaugh and his sons, Jim and John

Baltimore is coming off a 31-24 victory over AFC North rival Cincinnati at home last Sunday:

NOTE OF THE WEEK: SMITH SOARS

  • Ravens rookie WR Torrey Smith leads the NFL with a 20.3 yardsper-catch average (29 receptions for 590 yards).
  • Impressively, 4 of Smith’s 5 TD receptions have covered at least 25 yards (74, 41, 38, 26 and 18 yards), and he’s averaging a sensational 39.4 yards per TD catch.
  • Smith now owns the Ravens’ single-season (590) and single-game (165 vs. Cin. last week) records for receiving yards by a rookie.
  • Never before has a Ravens’ wideout posted dual 150-yard receiving games in a season (165 vs. Cin. and 152 at STL).
  • Smith also owns the top two receiving yards performances by a rookie in the NFL this season.
  • Smith’s 590 receiving yards this season rank second in the NFL among all rookies (635, Cincy’sA.J. Green).
  • Last week, Smith joined Ken Burrow (2 in 1971) and Randy Moss (3 in 1998) as the only rookies in NFL history to have multiple games with at least 150 receiving yards and a touchdown catch.

WEEK 12 QUICK HITS:

  • The Ravens have won 15 of their last 16 games at M&T Bank Stadium. Baltimore is 24-5 at home under head coach John Harbaugh, tied (New England) for the NFL’s most home wins since 2008 (as of games played by 11/20).
  • The Ravens aim for their eighth consecutive win at home and sixth this season (5-0 in 2011).
  • Baltimore’s seven-game winning streak at home currently ranks as the NFL’s second longest (Green Bay is first at 10 games).
  • Baltimore aims to reach 8-3 for just the second time in team history (2010 season).

STOUT VS. NFC: Dating back to the 2008 campaign, when head coach John Harbaugh took over in Baltimore, the Ravens have posted a 10-5 record (.667) vs. the NFC, good for the fourth-best mark among AFC teams against the “other conference” during that span.

AFC’s BEST RECORDS VS. THE NFC
(since 2008)
1t. New England Patriots 12-2 .857
1t. Tennessee Titans 12-2 .857
3. Pittsburgh Steelers 10-4 .714
4. Baltimore Ravens 10-5 .667

San Francisco is working on an eight-game win streak, and beat NFC West rival Arizona 23-7 last Sunday at home:

WINNING WAYS: With the win last week vs. Arz. (11/20), head coach Jim Harbaugh became just the 3rd rookie head coach in franchise history to start his career with a 9-1 record.

  • The 49ers have won eight consecutive games, making Coach Harbaugh’s eight-game winning streak the fourth longest by a rookie head coach since the 1970 NFL/AFL merger, according to Elias Sports Bureau. Jim Caldwell’s Colts won 14 in a row in 2009. Steve Mariucci’s 49ers won 11 in a row in 1997. Ted Marchibroda’s Colts won nine in a row in 1975. Bobby Ross’Chargers won seven straight in 1992.
  • With a 9-1 record to start 2011, the 49ers are tied for the 4th-best start since the team joined the NFL in 1950, behind 1984 (15-1); 1990 (13-1); 1997 (11-1); 1989 (9-1).
  • Harbaugh became the first rookie head coach in franchise history to inherit a team with a losing record and lead them to a 9-1 start in his first season.

GOLDEN NUGGETS:
A HOT START

  • With a 9-1 record to start 2011, the 49ers are tied for the 4th-best start since the team joined the NFL in 1950, behind 1984 (15-1); 1990 (13-1); 1997 (11-1); 1989 (9-1).

ROAD WARRIORS

  • With a 4-0 record on the road, the Niners join the Green Bay Packers as the only two teams in the NFL to remain undefeated away from home.

THAT’S THE DIFFERENCE

  • The 49ers have outscored their opponents 256-145. The +111 scoring differential ranks 2nd in the NFL.

A SHORT FIELD

  • The 49ers have started 25 drives in their opponents territory, ranking 1st in the NFL, and have scored 81 points on those drives, ranking 3rd in the NFL.

YOU WANNA START SOMETHING?

  • The 49ers average starting field position is at their own 33.1-yard line, ranking 1st in the NFL.

LONG WAY TO GO

  • The 49ers rank 1st in the NFL with an opponents average starting field position of the 24.3.

BRINGING IT BACK

  • The 49ers rank t-1st in the NFL with 7 PRs of 20+ yds, while ranking 2nd in the NFL with a KOR avg. of 28.0 yds.

POINTS HARD TO COME BY

  • The 49ers have allowed just 145 points on the season, ranking 1st in the NFL for the fewest points allowed.

SHORT AND TOUGH

  • The 49ers have allowed just 16 first downs on 3rd and less than 4 yds. (15 of 33 – 48.5 pct.), ranking 2nd in the NFL.

EFFICIENCY ON D

  • The 49ers defense has allowed opponents to score on just 24.0 pct. of their possessions, ranking 1st in the NFL.

STICKY FINGERS

  • The 49ers have only committed 9 turnovers on the year, ranking t-1st in the NFL for fewest turnovers (Houston – 9).

PRODUCTIVE ON FIRST

  • The 49ers offense has gained 4+ yds. on 52.2 pct. (142 of 272) of their first down plays, ranking 4th in the NFL.

THE COMEBACK TRAIL: Four, 4th quarter come-from-behind-win epitomizes the never quit attitude the 49ers embody this season. One player in particular can parallel his career to the theme, QBAlex Smith. Smith is now tied with NYG QB Eli Manning for the most comeback wins by an NFL QB this season.

Smith became just the second quarterback in franchise history to record 3, 4th qtr. comebacks on the road (QB Joe Montanta - 4 in 1989 and 3 in 1990).

For up-to-date Tweets on the NFL and the Ravens, please follow me on Twitter (@BlogAndTackle). For more national NFL stories, please visit my personal site at BlogAndTackle.net.

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Morning Reaction Tuesday Top 7: Most Entertaining Sports Figures I’ve Ever Watched

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Morning Reaction Tuesday Top 7: Most Entertaining Sports Figures I’ve Ever Watched

Posted on 02 August 2011 by Luke Jones

In honor of the great Deion Sanders being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton this weekend, today’s Morning Reaction Tuesday Top 7 was “The 7 Most Entertaining Sports Figures I’ve Ever Seen.”

With Glenn Clark filling in on The Afternoon Drive this week, Drew Forrester kindly included me in the weekly spot.

Remember you can hear our explanations for our Top 7 lists in the BuyAToyota.com Audio Vault right here.

Luke Jones’ list…

7. Bo Jackson
Bo

6. Ray Lewis
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d60hKgNPlVE[/youtube]

5. Randy Moss
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmJcUlrkMNg[/youtube]

4. Tiger Woods
Tiger

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