Tag Archive | "Ravens"

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A Flacco surfaces on practice field for Ravens

Posted on 07 May 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Joe Flacco won’t be ready until training camp and wouldn’t have been anywhere near the practice field for Ravens rookie camp anyway, but the family was still represented on Saturday.

Continuing to pursue an NFL career after brief opportunities with San Diego and Jacksonville, tight end Mike Flacco, the younger brother of the Super Bowl XLVII MVP, was a tryout participant for Baltimore this weekend. The Ravens have a very deep group of tight ends on their offseason roster, but the 29-year-old can’t help but think about having the opportunity to catch passes from his older brother.

“That’d be a dream if I could make it that long,” said Mike Flacco, who played his college football at New Haven. “Just day by day and try to give it all I’ve got.”

Of course, this weekend’s tryout isn’t Mike Flacco’s only link to Baltimore sports as he was drafted by the Orioles in the 31st round of the 2009 draft out of CCBC-Catonsville. Primarily a first baseman, he advanced as high as Double-A Bowie before being traded to the Boston Red Sox and electing to retire from professional baseball in 2013 with a career .253 average.

In 2013 with Division II New Haven, Mike Flacco caught 30 passes for 591 yards and nine touchdowns. He was signed by the Chargers the following spring but cut at the end of the 2014 preseason. The Jaguars then signed him to their practice squad in October 2014, but he only stuck with that organization for a few weeks.

The 6-foot-5, 251-pound tight end has only received a few tryouts since then, but he isn’t ready to give up on the possibility of a football career just yet.

“It’s been long. It’s been all over the place,” said Mike Flacco about his athletic endeavors. “Unfortunately, I’ve never quite gotten to the point where I want to yet. You just push and if it happens, it happens. If not, I’ll go back to school and I’ll be happy.”

He has been pursuing a degree in chemical engineering at Villanova.

His chances of receiving an extended look with the Ravens beyond this weekend are remote, but that didn’t stop him from showing off some athletic ability on Saturday as he caught a long pass in 1-on-1 drills and made a few other receptions during the practice session.

“It’s been great. Mike is a great kid,” head coach John Harbaugh said. “He does move a little bit like Joe. The body mechanics, a little bit, are similar, so it’s fun to watch.”

Two draft picks sidelined

Third-round defensive end Bronson Kaufusi was the only member of Baltimore’s 2016 draft class not on the field during Saturday’s practice open to media.

“Bronson tweaked his back a little bit yesterday,” Harbaugh said. “He was out here yesterday practicing, did a good job, and strained his lower back a little. He’s not practicing today.”

Fourth-round running back Kenneth Dixon only observed Saturday’s practice as he continues to deal with a hamstring issue stemming from his March pro day.

Harbaugh also announced that fullback Trevon Pendleton, a tryout player from Michigan State, suffered a broken foot on Friday.

No joint training camp practices this year

Harbaugh confirmed that the Ravens would not have any joint practices with another team this summer.

Baltimore hosted San Francisco in Owings Mills two years ago and traveled to Philadelphia to practice against the Eagles ahead of their preseason meeting last August.

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Reynolds reaches out to enemy lines for NFL advice

Posted on 06 May 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Before the draft, new Ravens wide receiver Keenan Reynolds sought advice from a former NFL player who understood the transition he’s currently going through.

Former Pittsburgh Steelers great Hines Ward began his career at the University of Georgia playing quarterback and running back before finally excelling at the wide receiver position. And after racking up 1,000 catches and more than 12,000 receiving yards in 14 NFL seasons, Ward was a valuable source of information for Reynolds.

After being drafted by the Ravens in the sixth round of last weekend’s draft, however, the former Navy quarterback knew he might receive flak for fraternizing with a former member of Baltimore’s AFC North rival.

“I know that’s like a cardinal sin in this building,” said Reynolds as he laughed. “We got to talk before the draft — to ease anybody’s mind. I talked to him, because in his college experience, he did play wide receiver, but he also played quarterback [and] running back. He was all over the place, so he had to adjust to the new role of being a permanent wide receiver. He gave me some tips and tricks and things to work on to perfect my craft.”

The Ravens have already said that they envision Reynolds as a slot receiver and a contributor in the return game. Though making it clear that he’s willing to play anywhere to succeed at the NFL level, the 21-year-old acknowledged it has been an adjustment realizing he would no longer be a quarterback after setting the FBS record with 4,559 rushing yards at the position.

In fact, Reynolds didn’t even learn that he’d work as a running back at the East-West Shrine until reading an article listing him at the running back position.

“When I got invited to the Shrine game, I saw that I wasn’t a quarterback anymore, and I was like, ‘Well, this is fun,'” said Reynolds, who scored more touchdowns than anyone in NCAA Division I history. “I was like, ‘This is an opportunity to pursue the dream at the next level,’ and I’m embracing it with everything I can. [There have] been several guys that have come before me that have been able to make the transition successfully, so I’ve been trying to model my game after them, talk to them, and just hear what they have to say.”

The 5-foot-11, 205-pound Reynolds has worked extensively with former Pro Bowl selection Brian Mitchell to learn the finer points of the return game. He wouldn’t be the first college quarterback to succeed as an NFL return specialist as Antwaan Randle El did it for the Steelers and New England’s Julian Edelman has thrived as both a receiver and returner more recently.

Reynolds even thinks his experience running the triple-option offense at Navy will better prepare him for his new role as a return specialist.

“I think there are some similar traits that you have to have on that level as a punt returner,” Reynolds said. “You have to be able to make quick decisions; you have to be quick in tight spaces, make a move and make somebody miss. Every day in practice, anytime we ran an inside run as a quarterback, we were making the safety miss, making the safety miss. That was something that coaches always ingrained in the quarterback’s head.

“Making that first guy miss and trying to make a play is what I was doing for the last four years.”

The Ravens love Reynolds’ character and athleticism, but he knows the transition won’t be easy as he’ll be competing with a deep group of receivers who have many more years of experience playing the position than he does.

But if his career at Navy was any indication, Reynolds will embrace the opportunity to succeed at the next level. He certainly doesn’t plan on allowing his work ethic to be questioned along the way.

“Every position has a technique that you have to perfect,” Reynolds said. “Guys have spent 10 [or] 15 years perfecting these techniques, and I’m a newborn in this position. I just have to work extremely hard — twice as hard as the next man — to get used to the position [and] get better at the technique.”

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Ravens sign 11 rookie free agents, announce two roster cuts

Posted on 06 May 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — With the Ravens conducting their 2016 rookie minicamp this weekend, they announced the signings of 11 rookie free agents as well as the departure of two players on Friday.

Baltimore waived running back Terrence Magee and wide receiver Chuck Jacobs as both were victims of the crowded depth chart at their respective positions.

The organization signed Baylor guard Jarell Broxton, Florida Atlantic defensive tackle Trevon Coley, Harvard center Anthony Fabiano, Middle Tennessee State inside linebacker Cavellis Luckett, Georgia State kicker Wil Lutz, Colorado offensive tackle Stephane Nembot, Stony Brook outside linebacker Victor Ochi, Michigan outside linebacker Mario Ojemudia, Portland State inside linebacker Patrick Onwuasor, Samford defensive tackle Michael Pierce, and Duke center Matt Skura as rookie free agents.

The group is headlined by Ochi, who was the Colonial Athletic Association co-defensive player of the year and finished the 2015 season with 13 sacks, good for second at the FCS level. Another notable pickup was Broxton, who made 21 starts in two years at Baylor and was a first-team all-Big 12 selection by the Associated Press.

Though the signing of draft picks has become elementary since the latest collective bargaining agreement was signed in 2011, the Ravens announced they reached deals with second-round outside linebacker Kamalei Correa, fourth-round running back Kenneth Dixon, fourth-round defensive tackle Willie Henry, fifth-round outside linebacker Matt Judon, fourth-round offensive tackle Alex Lewis, and Cincinnati wide receiver Chris Moore to four-year contracts. Five of their 2016 draft picks remain unsigned, including first-round offensive tackle Ronnie Stanley, but those players are still allowed to take part in rookie minicamp.

The Ravens also announced jersey numbers for their rookie players:

2016 draft class
OT Ronnie Stanley — No. 79
OLB Kamalei Correa — No. 51
DE Bronson Kaufusi — No. 92
CB Tavon Young — No. 43
WR Chris Moore — No. 81
OT Alex Lewis — No. 72
DT Willie Henry — No. 69
RB Kenneth Dixon — No. 48
OLB Matt Judon — No. 91
WR/RS Keenan Reynolds — No. 6
CB Maurice Canady — No. 49

2016 rookie free agents
G Jarell Broxton — No. 61
DT Trevon Coley — No. 70
C Anthony Fabiano — No. 65
ILB Cavellis Luckett — No. 46
K/P Wil Lutz — No. 3
OT Stephane Nembot — No. 67
OLB Victor Ochi — No. 44
OLB Mario Ojemudia — No. 53
ILB Patrick Onwuasor — No. 47
DT Michael Pierce — No. 78
C Matt Skura — No. 62

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Ravens cut two from roster following 2016 draft

Posted on 03 May 2016 by Luke Jones

After coming away with their biggest draft class since 2003 this past weekend, the Ravens have cut two players to make more roster room for incoming undrafted free agents.

The team announced the rescinding of its exclusive-rights tender to tight end Konrad Reuland and the waiving of guard Leon Brown, bringing the total number of players on the offseason roster to 81 after 11 players were drafted over the weekend. The 90-man limit is now expected to be filled out by undrafted free agents over the next few days ahead of rookie minicamp.

Reuland spent parts of the last two seasons with the organization and was promoted to the active roster last December when Crockett Gillmore was injured and rookie Nick Boyle was serving a four-game suspension. The 29-year-old appeared in four games, but he did not catch a pass.

Brown, an undrafted free agent out of Alabama, was signed to the Ravens’ offseason roster last year and was cut at the end of the 2015 preseason. Baltimore re-signed Brown to its practice squad in late December and signed him to a reserve-future deal.

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Nov 10, 2013; Baltimore, MD, USA; Baltimore Ravens safety Matt Elam (26) in action against the Cincinnati Bengals at M&T Bank Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mitch Stringer-USA TODAY Sports

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Ravens decline fifth-year option on safety Matt Elam

Posted on 02 May 2016 by Luke Jones

After completing the 21st draft class in franchise history over the weekend, the Ravens decided against making a longer commitment to a former first-round pick on Monday.

Baltimore declined its fifth-year option for 2013 first-round safety Matt Elam, which will make him a free agent next offseason. The 24-year-old from the University of Florida missed the entire 2015 season after suffering a torn biceps early in training camp, but he has been considered one of the most disappointing first-round picks in franchise history.

The 2017 option was expected to cost north of $5 million, making it a relatively easy choice for the Ravens not to use it on the safety. Elam is scheduled to make $1.327 million in base salary and to carry a $2.14 million salary cap figure for 2016, making him no sure thing to make the 53-man roster for the coming season.

Elam was benched during the 2014 season and general manager Ozzie Newsome admitted last spring that the Ravens had been disappointed in his performance to that point in his career. Pro Football Focus graded the 5-foot-10, 200-pound as Baltimore’s worst defensive player in 2014, and he missed a team-high 18 tackles while primarily playing out of the nickel position.

With Eric Weddle and Lardarius Webb expected to start at the safety spots this season, Elam is expected to compete with Kendrick Lewis and Terrence Brooks for the primary backup spot.

In 32 career games, Elam has collected 127 tackles, one interception, one forced fumble, and seven pass breakups.

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Ravens wouldn’t step up to get Ramsey in end

Posted on 02 May 2016 by Luke Jones

General manager Ozzie Newsome confirmed over the weekend that the Ravens attempted to trade up to the fourth overall pick to draft Florida State defensive back Jalen Ramsey, but we now know more details about why a deal never came to fruition with Dallas.

According to Sports Illustrated, Dallas offered to trade the No. 4 pick to Baltimore for the sixth overall selection and a third-round choice (70th overall), but the Ravens only offered their first-round pick and their original fourth-round selection (104th overall) to move up. Of course, the trade never happened as the Cowboys took Ohio State running back Ezekiel Elliott, Jacksonville nabbed Ramsey, and the Ravens selected Notre Dame left tackle Ronnie Stanley.

So, why wouldn’t the Cowboys move down two spots since Jacksonville was never considered a threat to take Elliott? Because they didn’t deem an extra fourth-round pick worth the risk of another team potentially calling the Jaguars to move into the fifth spot — ahead of Dallas — to take the best running back in the draft.

If you study the many draft trade value charts out there — which aren’t gospel, of course, but provide a nice guideline — the difference in value between the No. 4 and No. 6 picks in the draft comes to 200 points. The 70th pick that the Cowboys requested is worth 240 points, which Newsome and the Ravens considered to be too pricey. However, the 104th overall pick offered to Dallas is valued at just 86 points, making you understand why Dallas balked at a low-ball offer to move down.

Was the Cowboys’ asking price steep? A little bit, but it was more reasonable than the reported counteroffer made by the Ravens, making you question just how badly they wanted Ramsey.

In the end, the Ravens took Stanley at No. 6 and then Brigham Young defensive end Bronson Kaufusi with that third-round pick instead of pulling the trigger to draft Ramsey. Newsome used the fourth-round pick he had offered to the Cowboys to select Temple cornerback Tavon Young with his first pick on Saturday.

We’ll see how that decision plays out over time, but the inability to pull off the trade contributed to the Ravens not drafting a cornerback in the first three rounds for the fifth consecutive year.

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What to expect from each of Ravens’ 2016 draft picks

Posted on 01 May 2016 by Luke Jones

The picks are in for the 2016 draft, so what should we expect from each of the Ravens’ 11 selections?

Below is an early look at how each rookie fits this coming season and in the future:

OT Ronnie Stanley
Drafted: First round (sixth overall) from Notre Dame
2016 projected role: The Ravens have sent plenty of mixed signals regarding the future of Eugene Monroe over the last several months, but Stanley will start at either left tackle or left guard.
Long-term view: It’s conceivable that the Ravens keep Monroe around for one more season, but the fact that they drafted two offensive tackles makes you think they’re in position to cut him and save $6.5 million in base salary for 2016. The expectation is that Stanley can be their left tackle for the next decade.

OLB Kamalei Correa
Drafted: Second round (42nd overall) from Boise State
2016 projected role: With Terrell Suggs, Elvis Dumervil, and Za’Darius Smith all ahead of him on the depth chart, Correa will likely serve as a situational edge rusher and special-teams contributor.
Long-term view: The 245-pound edge defender will need to get stronger for an every-down role and to consistently wreak havoc in the pocket, but he will use his speed to try to blow by slower linemen. The Ravens wouldn’t have used a second-round if they didn’t think he can be an eventual successor to Suggs.

DE Bronson Kaufusi
Drafted: Third round (70th overall) from Brigham Young
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-6, 285-pound defensive end figures to be a part of the rotation at the 5-technique spot and will likely compete with Lawrence Guy and Brent Urban for the starting job.
Long-term view: An opposing coach labeled Kaufusi a “modern-day Goliath” last year and the Ravens hope he can be a starter and an interior rusher in passing situations. Ozzie Newsome passed on the chance to draft DeForest Buckner in the first round, so Kaufusi’s development will be worth watching.

CB Tavon Young
Drafted: Fourth round (104th overall) from Temple
2016 projected role: After impressing the Ravens at the Senior Bowl, Young enters the mix with a chance to compete with veteran Kyle Arrington at the nickel spot and to contribute on special teams.
Long-term view: Young was a feisty competitor in college who started games in all four of his years with the Owls, but the 5-foot-9, 185-pound defensive back doesn’t project to be much more than a slot corner. The Ravens hope he shows more than recent mid-round picks such as Asa Jackson and Chykie Brown.

WR Chris Moore
Drafted: Fourth round (107th overall) from Cincinnati
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-1 wideout will compete for playing time in four-wide sets, but he is more likely to contribute on special teams if he’s to be active on Sundays as a rookie.
Long-term view: With Steve Smith and Mike Wallace potentially only in Baltimore for the coming season and Kamar Aiken set to become a free agent after 2016, Moore provides another deep-ball option to go with 2015 first-round pick Breshad Perriman. In a perfect world, both Perriman and Moore take major steps in 2016 and the Ravens re-sign Aiken as the possession receiver for 2017 and beyond.

OT Alex Lewis
Drafted: Fourth round (130th overall) from Nebraska
2016 projected role: His role will largely depend on what happens with Monroe and Stanley, but Lewis should have every chance to unseat third-year lineman James Hurst as the top reserve tackle.
Long-term view: With Monroe on his way out sooner or later and right tackle Rick Wagner scheduled to hit the free-agent market after 2016, Lewis could find himself competing for a starting role next year. Despite questions about his quickness, he has a shot to be a starting right tackle or a starting guard.

DT Willie Henry
Drafted: Fourth round (132nd overall) from Michigan
2016 projected role: It won’t be easy for Henry to crack the defensive line rotation, but his explosiveness and ability as a rusher could put him in the mix as an interior lineman in passing situations.
Long-term view: Henry brings versatility to the defensive line, but he didn’t show great awareness and consistency as a run defender at Michigan, making you wonder if he’s suited to be more of a third-down player. If Brandon Williams departs as a free agent after 2016, Henry could quickly see a larger role.

RB Kenneth Dixon
Drafted: Fourth round (134th overall) from Louisiana Tech
2016 projected role: His dynamic ability as a receiver out of the backfield will quickly put him in the offensive mix as a rookie, and he could challenge for the starting role sooner rather than later.
Long-term view: Dixon has the track record and skill set to rise above the other Baltimore running backs who may all be best suited to be No. 2 options. However, the 5-10, 215-pound back carried the ball 801 times in his college career, making you wonder if that could limit his shelf life at the NFL level.

OLB Matt Judon
Drafted: Fifth round (146th overall) from Grand Valley State
2016 projected role: Making the adjustment from the Division II level won’t be easy, but Judon could eventually work his way into a situational pass rusher role and contribute on special teams as a rookie.
Long-term view: The Ravens loved how he tested at the scouting combine and hope he will be the next Division II product to excel for them, but there will be a learning curve to develop more sophisticated pass-rush moves against better competition. This pick has plenty of upside, but patience will be the key.

WR Keenan Reynolds
Drafted: Sixth round (182nd overall) from Navy
2016 projected role: The record-setting Midshipmen quarterback will practice as a receiver, but his best chance of making the roster and contributing as a rookie will probably come as a return specialist.
Long-term view: The Ravens hope his athleticism can translate to the receiver position with visions of him working effectively out of the slot and being able to run a variety of plays. His 5-foot-10, 190-pound frame isn’t ideal for the NFL, but other college quarterbacks of similar build such as Antwaan Randle El and Julian Edelman made quick transitions to the NFL and you shouldn’t doubt Reynolds’ work ethic.

CB Maurice Canady
Drafted: Sixth round (209th overall) from Virginia
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-1, 195-pound defensive back had a disappointing senior season at Virginia, but he will have a chance to compete for a roster spot in a light group of cornerbacks.
Long-term view: Canady struggled to defend the deep ball and will need to play with more confidence than he did toward the end of his collegiate career. His best bet to stick with the Ravens and eventually develop into a contributor might come as a member of the practice squad.

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Final day could make 2016 draft class special for Ravens

Posted on 01 May 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Safe and clean summarized the Ravens’ first three selections of the 2016 draft.

First-round left tackle Ronnie Stanley, second-round outside linebacker Kamalei Correa, and third-round defensive end Bronson Kaufusi looked to be picks of good value and minimal risk in terms of health and off-field conduct, but they were hardly the big splashes that make you salivate about upside. Right or wrong, general manager Ozzie Newsome preferred that route in lieu of gambling on high-risk, high-reward prospects such as edge rusher Noah Spence or inside linebacker Myles Jack in the early rounds.

Even if they prove to be quality picks in the long run, they just weren’t exciting ones. And, frankly, the Ravens would be the first ones to tell you that they better find good players when they’re choosing so early in each of the first three rounds.

But all along, the fourth round was going to be a key to this year’s draft. The Ravens had known since March that they’d be making four selections in the round and added a fifth through a trade on Friday night.

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Five choices in the fourth round would set an NFL record, but the problem was that the Ravens hadn’t done particularly well there over the previous five drafts. Since 2011, a fourth-round list consisting of Tandon Doss, Gino Gradkowski, Christian Thompson, John Simon, Kyle Juszczyk, Brent Urban, Lorenzo Taliaferro, Za’Darius Smith, Buck Allen, and the late Tray Walker had produced a solid player or two — with a few still to be determined — but it was hardly a dynamic group.

Assistant general manager Eric DeCosta set out to change that trend on Saturday.

“I think we had a great game plan, and we put a lot of pressure on ourselves to nail those picks,” said DeCosta, who extensively researched the historical sequencing and tendencies of teams picking in that portion of the draft. “We’ve said it lot. This was a critical part of our draft — the fourth round. It became a mission for all of us to do the best we could and get the best players we could.

“It fell that way today. We had a bunch of players and we had a sense of who might be there in different spots. The players that we targeted, they were there. We’d go back down and wait on a guy, and he’d be there. Then, we’d go back down and wait on a guy, and he’d be there. It just came out the right way for us.”

First, the Ravens netted Temple cornerback Tavon Young, who they think can compete with veteran Kyle Arrington at the nickel position after being impressed with his work at the Senior Bowl.

Then, they took receiver Chris Moore, who averaged an impressive 22.0 yards per catch over his final two seasons at Cincinnati. With Steve Smith planning to retire after 2016, Mike Wallace potentially only around for one season, and Kamar Aiken set to become a free agent next winter, Moore is an interesting name to add to a young group of receivers headlined by 2015 first-round pick Breshad Perriman.

Their third fourth-round pick, Nebraska offensive tackle Alex Lewis, gives Baltimore much-needed depth with Eugene Monroe’s future with the organization in doubt and right tackle Rick Wagner set to become a free agent after 2016. At the very least, the Ravens needed an upgrade from reserve tackle James Hurst and Lewis should be able to provide that. The selection came with character risk, however, as Lewis was sentenced to 45 days in jail and two years probation for pleading guilty to misdemeanor assault when he was attending the University of Colorado, but the Ravens claim to be “very comfortable” with him after talking extensively to staff at both schools and bringing the lineman to Baltimore for a daylong visit.

The Ravens had no excuse not to know what they were getting with defensive tackle Willie Henry after he was coached by John Harbaugh’s brother Jim and former Baltimore defensive coordinator Greg Mattison at the University of Michigan. Defensive tackle wasn’t a need, but the Ravens continue to build one of the deepest young defensive fronts in the NFL.

Finally, Louisiana Tech running back Kenneth Dixon was incredibly still on the board with the 134th overall pick and was immediately labeled by some pundits as one of the biggest steals of the final day. Added to a crowded group of running backs with no clear No. 1 option, Dixon could emerge as the starter sooner rather than later and was even regarded by some experts as the second-best running back in the draft behind Ezekiel Elliot, who went as the fourth overall pick on Thursday. It’s difficult not to get excited about his big-play potential as a receiver out of the backfield when you watch his college tape.

The five picks were impressive on paper as ESPN draft analyst Todd McShay even said it may have been the best fourth round he’d ever seen from any given team.

Their fifth-round selection brought the customary small-school prospect in Grand Valley State pass rusher Matt Judon, who collected 20 sacks as the consensus best defensive player in Division II football and impressed at the scouting combine. Before automatically scoffing at the lower level of competition, Ravens fans will remember that Brandon Williams was a Division II standout at Missouri Southern State a few years ago and is now one of the best nose tackles in the NFL.

Judon felt like a worthy gamble as the 146th pick of the draft.

“I remember texting [Harbaugh] and saying, ‘This kid from Grand Valley State is having a great workout,'” said DeCosta about watching Judon at the combine. “And John said, ‘I know. We’ve got to spend more time looking at this guy.’ That’s the great thing about the combine is you get a chance to see guys from all different conferences and backgrounds and levels of football competing on the same stage. He had all the skills you look for — the athletic ability, the size, and he had the production on tape [and] the ability on tape.”

But the best story of the weekend came when the Ravens tabbed Navy quarterback Keenan Reynolds with their penultimate pick of the draft. Of course, it’s no sure thing that he’ll be able to make the transition to the next level as a wide receiver and return specialist, but Baltimore wouldn’t have made such a high-profile pick in the sixth round if the organization didn’t feel like he had a solid chance this summer to make the team.

Reynolds was already a household name locally after scoring an NCAA Division I record 88 touchdowns over his four years in Annapolis — amazingly breaking the record held by his new teammate Dixon — but the Ravens were impressed with the work he has already put in running routes as a receiver and working as a return specialist with former three-time Pro Bowl selection Brian Mitchell. The hope is that Reynolds could eventually turn into an effective slot receiver and returner reminiscent of former Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver — and Indiana quarterback — Antwaan Randle El.

The entire area will be rooting for him.

“What a great story,” Newsome said. “We were at the East-West [Shrine] game, and Eric and I were sitting there, and on Day 2 he said, ‘Are you really paying attention to Keenan Reynolds?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, he’s doing some things that are catching our eye.’ It’s just something we kept in the back of our mind. He came here for our local pro day, and he did a good job there.”

With their final pick of the 2016 draft, the Ravens added 6-foot-1 cornerback Maurice Canady out of Virginia to give them 11 selections, their highest total since 2003.

After a nondescript first two days — at least if overlooking whether the Ravens would have drafted left tackle Laremy Tunsil had it not been for the infamous marijuana video released on Twitter — the final day had some of everything for the Ravens. It brought a high number of picks, some interesting upside, an off-field risk, the addressing of needs, a Harbaugh brother connection, a small-school sleeper, and a fantastic story involving one of the best local sports role models in recent memory.

We know at least a few of these third-day picks won’t work out. That’s just the nature of the business.

But the final day’s haul carried enough intrigue to potentially turn a solid 2016 draft into a special one. All teams around the league talked about how much they liked their draft classes on Saturday, but you could sense that the Ravens were gushing a little more than usual as Newsome went as far as saying he didn’t know if he’s ever felt as good about a collection of talent. Even with some of the Ravens’ recent drafting pains, those words shouldn’t be easily dismissed when you consider his body of work over the last two decades in Baltimore.

In a few years, we’ll remember the final day of the 2016 draft having plenty of sizzle for the Ravens — at least as much as the final four rounds are capable of having. But they’ll ultimately need the substance to be there to help them get back to a championship-caliber level after a 5-11 season a year ago.

If not, the weekend will be remembered as nothing more than a missed opportunity with so many picks.

“The board came off, basically, the way we thought it would,” Newsome said. “We were able to get some good young talent to come in here and compete to make this roster. Right now, the Baltimore Ravens are a much better football team.”

Time will reveal if they really are.

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Ravens take Temple cornerback Tavon Young to begin Day 3

Posted on 30 April 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — After refraining from drafting a cornerback in the first three rounds for the fifth consecutive year, the Ravens nabbed Tavon Young from Temple as their first fourth-round pick on Saturday.

The 5-foot-9, 185-pound defensive back will likely compete at the nickel position after starting 32 games over four college seasons. Young recorded seven interceptions and 21 pass breakups at Temple, but the Oxon Hills native did not pick off a pass as a senior.

“I’m a tough player, and that’s what a lot of coaches and people appreciate about me,” Young said. “They always talk about my size, but no matter who it is or how big they are, I always come out on top. I think that’s what makes me special.”

Young participated in the Senior Bowl and will likely compete at the nickel position with veteran Kyle Arrington. He told reporters that he met with the Ravens at the scouting combine in Indianapolis in February and also participated at the workout day the organiztion held for local talent earlier this spring.

The Potomac High grade is just the second player the Ravens have drafted from Temple, joining 2012 third-round running back Bernard Pierce.

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Correa brings much-needed youth to Ravens’ aging pass rush

Posted on 29 April 2016 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Boise State edge defender Kamalei Correa noting how he’s been watching Terrell Suggs and Elvis Dumervil play since he was in middle school told all you needed to know.

The Ravens had to add youth to their aging pass rush and did so by selecting Correa in the second round with the 42nd overall pick on Friday night. The pick came after general manager Ozzie Newsome traded down in separate deals with Jacksonville and Miami earlier in the night, allowing the likes of UCLA’s Myles Jack and Eastern Kentucky’s Noah Spence to go elsewhere.

A two-year starter for Boise State, the 6-foot-3, 245-pound Correa collected 19 sacks over the last two seasons. In 2015, he started all 13 games and led the defense with seven sacks and 11 tackles for a loss.

“They picked a guy who is a hard worker who isn’t going to stop,” Correa said. “[I’m] dedicated and will help them win a Super Bowl.”

With the 33-year-old Suggs coming off his second Achilles injury in four years and Dumervil having turned 32 in January, the Ravens made no secret about their desire to add pass-rushing help. They now hope second-year outside linebacker Za’Darius Smith and Correa will pick up some of the slack for the aging starters and to fill the void of departing players such as Pernell McPhee and Courtney Upshaw.

Correa told reporters Friday night that he hadn’t met with the Ravens since February’s scouting combine, but he was looking forward to learning from the experienced pass-rushing duo of Suggs and Dumervil. The Ravens will likely work him into a situational role early as he adjusts to the outside linebacker position, but the Broncos defensive end brings impressive athleticism and burst off the edge.

“I don’t see it too much as a challenge, and that’s just because of my work ethic,” Correa said. “I’m going to keep working at something and if I don’t get it, I’m going to keep trying. I know one day that I will be a great one.”

In moving back twice from their original 36th pick to ultimately take Correa 42nd overall, the Ravens picked up the 107th and 146th overall picks on Day 3 of the draft.

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