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Bisciotti vows troubled running back Ray Rice not going anywhere

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Bisciotti vows troubled running back Ray Rice not going anywhere

Posted on 25 March 2014 by Luke Jones

Echoing the sentiments offered by head coach John Harbaugh and general Ozzie Newsome in recent weeks, Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti offered his support to running back Ray Rice and reiterated that he will be part of the team in 2014.

Speaking to The Baltimore Sun as the league meetings commenced in Orlando on Monday, Bisciotti described the incident as “disappointing” and one that the running back will live with for the rest of his life, but Rice’s future with the organization — at least for the upcoming season — isn’t in jeopardy regardless of how the legal situation is resolved. Rice and Janay Palmer were arrested and charged with simple assault-domestic violence in mid-February after the two allegedly struck one another with their hands.

“Ray will be here,” Bisciotti said. “This is a singular moment six years after we drafted him. It’s embarrassing for him and his fiancée. It is especially hard to see somebody that is proud of his reputation have to take this kind of public-relations hit.”

Atlantic City police referred the case to the county prosecutor’s office for review, but there’s been no update if any additional or different charges have been filed.

NOTES: The Ravens awarded Harbaugh with an extra year on his current contract, extending him through the 2017 season. Bisciotti said he offered an extra year to his head coach as a show of support that nothing has changed in his mind despite Baltimore missing the postseason last year for the first time since 2007. … Bisciotti also confirmed the Ravens will honor future Hall of Fame linebacker Ray Lewis with a statue planned to be unveiled outside M&T Bank Stadium before the start of the 2014 season. The likeness of Lewis will stand in Unitas Plaza.

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It’s time to honor some local sports “saints” with our #WNSTSweet16

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It’s time to honor some local sports “saints” with our #WNSTSweet16

Posted on 18 March 2014 by Glenn Clark

This one was far too tough. I’ll be on Tuesday morning at 8am to discuss it with Drew Forrester and Luke Jones. If he tells me I’m wrong, I’ll probably just agree with him.

If you need a reminder of what this week’s topic (Sweet 16 Local Sports Saints-Athletes Who Gave Back) is all about, check it out here.

If you’re someone who I left off the list, I apologize in advance. This was agonizingly difficult.

(Editor’s note: You’re going to ask me why Elrod Hendricks isn’t on the list. It isn’t an easy answer. It’s a complicated thought about the difference between Elrod the “player” and Elrod the “coach”. Elrod the coach is ABSOLUTELY part of this list-but we said the list was for “athletes.”

In the end, I should have just put him on the list. In that case, he would have been Top 5. I told you it was agonizing. Stop yelling at me.)

16. Keion Carpenter

Carpenter never played for the Baltimore Ravens, but as a Baltimore native he has shown great concern for his hometown via The Carpenter House and the fight for affordable housing for the underprivileged.

Carpenter is also involved in what seems like every youth football camp in the area, including many with Baltimore Ravens players.

(Continued on Next Page…)

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Former Ravens Lewis, Williams, Cunningham on College Football HOF ballot

Posted on 06 March 2014 by WNST Staff

2014 College Football Hall of Fame Ballot Released

The sport’s top players and coaches vie for college football’s ultimate honor; Announcement of the 2014 Hall of Fame Class to be made live in May from Irving, Texas. 

IRVING, Texas (March 6, 2014) – The National Football Foundation (NFF) announced today the names on the 2014 ballot for induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, including 75 players and six coaches from the Football Bowl Subdivision and 87 players and 26 coaches from the divisional ranks.

“Having a ballot and a voice in the selection of the inductees is one of the most cherished NFF member benefits,” said NFF Chairman Archie Manning, a 1989 Hall of Fame inductee from Ole Miss. “There is no group more knowledgeable or passionate about college football than our membership, and the tradition of the ballot helps us engage them in the lofty responsibility of selecting those who have reached the pinnacle of achievement in our sport.”

The ballot was mailed this week to the more than 12,000 NFF members and current Hall of Famers whose votes will be tabulated and submitted to the NFF’s Honors Court, which deliberates and selects the class. Chaired by Gene Corrigan, a former ACC Commissioner and NCAA president, the 17-member NFF Honors Court includes an elite and geographically diverse pool of athletics directors, conference commissioners, Hall of Famers and members of the media.

“It’s an enormous honor to just be on the ballot when you think that more than 4.99 million people have played college football,” said NFF President & CEO Steven J. Hatchell. “The Hall’s requirement of being a First-Team All-American creates a much smaller pool of only 1,500 individuals who are even eligible to be on the ballot, so being in today’s elite group means an individual is truly among the greatest to ever have played the game, and we are proud to announce their names.”

The 2014 College Football Hall of Fame Class will be announced in May from Irving, Texas, and they will be inducted at the 57th NFF Annual Awards Dinner Dec. 9, 2014 at the landmark Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. The inductees will be permanently enshrined in the new College Football Hall of Fame at a date to be determined in 2015. The new Hall, currently under construction, will open in Atlanta in time for the 2014 college football season.

To be eligible for the ballot, players must have been named a First Team All-American by a major/national selector as recognized and utilized by the NCAA for their consensus All-America teams; played their last year of intercollegiate football at least 10 years prior; played within the last 50 years and cannot be currently playing professional football. Coaches must have coached a minimum of 10 years and 100 games as a head coach; won at least 60 percent of their games; and be retired from coaching for at least three years. If a coach is retired and over the age of 70, there is no waiting period. If he is over the age of 75, he is eligible as an active coach. In both cases, the candidate’s post-football record as a citizen may also be weighed.

Once nominated for consideration, all player candidates are submitted to one of eight District Screening Committees, depending on their school’s geographic location, which conducts a vote to determine who will appear on the ballot and represent their respective districts. Each year, approximately 15 candidates, who are not selected for the Hall of Fame, will be named automatic holdovers and will bypass the district screening process and automatically appear on the ballot the following year. Additionally, the Veterans Committee may make recommendations to the Honors Court for exceptions that allow for the induction of players who played more than 50 years ago.

Of the 4.99 million individuals who have played college football since Princeton first battled Rutgers on Nov. 6, 1869, only 934 players have earned induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, or less than two ten-thousandths (.0002) of one percent of those who have played the game during the past 145 years. From the coaching ranks, 205 individuals have achieved Hall of Fame distinction.

________________________________________________________________________________

If you would like to become a member and receive a voting sheet for this year’s ballot, please contact NFF Director of Membership Ron Dilatush at rdilatush@footballfoundation.com.

Ballots without valid membership numbers will be invalidated.

- A list of candidates and capsule bios are provided on the following pages. You may also click here for a pdf of the candidate names and capsule bios. -

Consensus All-America: Listed as a First Team All-America by at least half of the recognized publications.

Unanimous All-America
: Listed as a First Team All-America by all recognized publications.


2014 FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISON PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Trev Alberts, Nebraska-Linebacker-Named unanimous First Team All-American and BIG-8 Defensive Player of the Year in 1993…Recipient of the 1993 Butkus Award and two-time First Team All-Conference pick…1993 NFF National Scholar-Athlete and Academic All-American.

Eric Bieniemy, Colorado-Running Back
- Played in two national championships, leading Buffs to 1990 national title…Unanimous First Team All-American and finished third in 1990 Heisman voting… Two-time All-Big Eight pick, still holding eight CU records.

Dre Bly, North Carolina-Defensive Back
-Three-time First Team All-American, twice earning consensus honors…Three-time All-ACC pick who earned Rookie of the Year honors in 1996…Holds school records for career (20) and single-season (11) interceptions.

Tony Boselli, Southern California-Offensive Tackle
-Two-time First Team All-American in 1992 and 1994 (consensus-1994)…Named top offensive lineman in Pac-10 (1994)…1994 NFF National Scholar-Athlete and Outland Trophy finalist.

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma-Linebacker
-Two-time consensus First Team All-America pick (1985-86)…Set school record for tackles in a game (22) and named Butkus Award winner in 1985 and ’86…Led Sooners to three consecutive Orange Bowls and ’85 national championship.

Bob Breunig, Arizona State-Linebacker
-1974 First Team All-American and Silver Anniversary Butkus Award winner… Two-time WAC Defensive Player of the Year who led ASU to consecutive WAC Championships and Fiesta Bowl wins… Finished career as school’s all-time leader in both career and single-season tackles.

Jerome Brown, Miami (Fla.)-Defensive Tackle
-1986 Unanimous First Team All-American and finalist for both the Outland and Lombardi trophies as senior…Helped Canes to four consecutive New Year’s Day bowl games…Ranks 10th in school history with 21 career sacks.

Ruben Brown, Pittsburgh-Offensive Tackle
-1994 First Team All-American…Three-time All-Big East performer, earning unanimous first team honors in 1994…Named Washington D.C. Downtown Athletic Club’s National Outstanding Lineman.

Larry Burton, Purdue-Split End
-First Team All-American and Outstanding College Athlete of America in 1974 and a First Team All-Big Ten selection…Led the team in receiving in both 1973 and 1974…Named team captain and team MVP in 1974.

Dave Butz, Purdue-Defensive Tackle
-1972 consensus First Team All-American… Finalist for the Lombardi Award in 1972 and named First Team All-Conference…Named Defensive MVP of the Senior Bowl.

Freddie Carr, Texas-El Paso-Linebacker
-1967 First Team All-American who helped UTEP to two Sun Bowl victories…Named 1967 Sun Bowl MVP…Ranks in the top ten in numerous school records, including career tackles (410) and single-season tackles (148).

Mark Carrier, Southern California-Safety
-Two-time First Team All-American (1988-89) – unanimous in 1989… 1989 Jim Thorpe Award winner… Two-time First Team All-Conference selection… Led the Pac-10 in interceptions in 1989 with seven.

Wes Chandler, Florida-Split End
-1977 First Team All American, finishing 10th in Heisman Trophy balloting…Two-time First Team All-SEC performer…1977 team captain who led Gators in receiving three consecutive seasons.

Shane Conlan, Penn State-Linebacker
-1986 consensus First Team All-American and Butkus Award finalist…Led Lions to back-to-back national title appearances, winning championship in 1986…Led team in tackles twice and finished career ranked second in career tackles (274) at PSU.

Tim Couch, Kentucky-Quarterback
-1998 consensus First Team All-American who finished fourth in Heisman voting in 1998 and ninth in 1997…1998 SEC Player of the Year who led Cats to first win over Alabama in 75 years…Set seven NCAA, 14 SEC, and 26 school records.

Tom Cousineau, Ohio State-Linebacker
-Two-time consensus First Team All-American and three-time All-Big Ten performer… Recorded 572 career tackles, ranking second all-time in OSU history… Held nine school records at career’s end, still holding six.

Bob Crable, Notre Dame-
Linebacker-Two-time consensus First Team All-American in 1980 and 1981… Set ND records for most career tackles (521), most tackles in a season (187), most tackles in a game (26)… Played in 1981 Hula Bowl.

Paul Crane, Alabama-Center/Linebacker
-Two-way starter at center/linebacker, earning consensus First Team All-America honors…Member of back-to-back national championship teams…1965 SEC Lineman of the Year, helping ‘Bama to consecutive SEC championships.

Eric Crouch, Nebraska-Quarterback
-2001 Heisman, Walter Camp, and Davey O’Brien Award winner who led Huskers to 2001 national title game…Holds NCAA record for career rushing TDs by a quarterback (59)…Led team to 42-9 record and four bowl berths.

Randall Cunningham, UNLV-Punter
-Named First Team All-American as a punter in 1983 and Second Team All-America as a punter and Honorable Mention as a quarterback in 1984…Led UNLV to their first-ever Bowl game…Broke 18 UNLV records.

Troy Davis, Iowa State-Tailback
-Two-time consensus First Team All-American and two-time Heisman Trophy finalist…First player in NCAA history to rush for more than 2,000 yards in two seasons…1996 Big 12 Player of the Year who holds nearly every rushing record at Iowa State.

Eric Dickerson, Southern Methodist-Running Back
-Named unanimous First Team All-American and finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1982…Twice named SWC Player of the Year, he holds 14 SMU records including career rushing yards (4,450).

Mike Dirks, Wyoming-Defensive Tackle
-1967 First Team All-American who led Pokes to two bowl berths…Two-time First Team All-WAC selection and member of back-to-back WAC championship teams…Three-year starter who finished career with 210 tackles and 59 tackles for loss.

D.J. Dozier, Penn State-Running Back
- Named 1986 consensus First Team All-American and led PSU to perfect 12-0 season and national championship (1986)… Finished eighth in 1986 Heisman voting… First PSU back to lead the team in rushing for four consecutive seasons.

Tim Dwight, Iowa-Kick Returner/Wide Receiver
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1997… First Team All-Big Ten who placed seventh in 1997 Heisman Trophy voting…Finished career as Big Ten’s leader in punt return yardage (1,102).

Jumbo Elliott, Michigan-Offensive Tackle
- Two-time First Team All-American (consensus-’87)… Two-time All-Big Ten First Team selection and member of 1986 Big Ten Co-Champions…Paved the way for Jamie Morris, who had three-straight 1,000-yard seasons.

William Fuller, North Carolina-Defensive Tackle
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1983… Holds school record with 57 career TFL and broke Lawrence Taylor’s season record with 22 TFL in 1981…Three-time First Team All-ACC pick.

Thom Gatewood, Notre Dame-Split End
-1970 consensus First Team All-American who finished in the top 12 of Heisman voting…First African-American captain in ND history and led team in receiving for three years and set numerous school records…1971 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Willie Gault, Tennessee-Wide Receiver
-1982 First Team All-American…Led Vols to three bowl berths…Set six conference and 12 school punt / kickoff return records…Tied NCAA record for most touchdowns by kick return in a single season (3) in 1980.

Kirk Gibson, Michigan State-Wide Receiver
-Named First Team All-American, led Big Ten in receiving in league play and helped the Spartans to a Big Ten Co-Championship and a No.12 national ranking in 1978…Played MLB for 17 seasons.

Charlie Gogolak, Princeton-Placekicker
-1965 First Team All-American…Set seven NCAA records and led Princeton to an 8-1 season (1965)… Two-time First Team All-Ivy…Holds four school records…Helped popularize the soccer-style technique in the kicking game.

Joe Hamilton, Georgia Tech-Quarterback
-1999 consensus First Team All-American and Davey O’Brien award winner… 1999 Heisman Trophy runner-up and 1999 ACC Player of the Year… Led Tech to three bowl berths and share of 1998 ACC title… Set nine school records.

Al Harris, Arizona State-Defensive End
-Named unanimous First Team All-American and Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy finalist in 1978…Named First Team All-Conference, he set an ASU record with 19 sacks in 1978.

Dana Howard, Illinois-Linebacker
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous honors as a senior…1994 Butkus Award winner and two-time Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year…School’s all-time leading tackler (595) who led team in tackles each year of career.

Randy Hughes, Oklahoma-Defensive Back
-1974 First Team All-American and member of 1974 national championship team and three Big Eight championship teams…Finished fourth on OU’s career interceptions list (14)…1974 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Bobby Humphrey, Alabama-Running Back
-Named First Team All-American in 1987…Led Tide to victories in Aloha Bowl and two Sun Bowls…Named UPI Offensive Player of the Year in 1987…Ended career with 4,958 all-purpose yards and 40 TDs.

Raghib Ismail, Notre Dame-Wide Receiver
-Two-time First Team All-American earning consensus honors in 1989 and unanimous laurels in 1990…Walter Camp Player of the Year and Heisman Trophy runner-up in 1990…Led ND to national championship at the Fiesta Bowl and two Orange Bowls.

Roy Jefferson, Utah-Split End
-1964 First Team All-American who led Utes to Liberty Bowl win…Two-time First Team All-WAC performer, leading team to 1964 conference title…Twice led team in receiving and led WAC in receptions (29) and receiving yards (435) in 1963.

Ernie Jennings, Air Force-Wide Receiver
-1970 consensus First Team All-American, finishing eighth in 1970 Heisman Trophy voting…Led Air Force to 1971 Sugar Bowl berth… Holds every single-season and career receiving record at Air Force.

Keyshawn Johnson, Southern California-Wide Receiver
-1995 unanimous First Team All-American who ranked seventh in Heisman voting…1995 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year…Earned MVP honors in 1995 Cotton Bowl and 1996 Rose Bowl wins.

Clinton Jones, Michigan State-Halfback
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1966…Led Spartans to consecutive national championships…Two-time All-Big Ten performer who finished sixth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1966.

Lincoln Kennedy, Washington-Offensive Tackle
-1992 unanimous First Team All-American who led Washington to 1991 national title…Led Huskies to three consecutive Pac-10 titles and three Rose Bowl berths…Twice won Morris Trophy as conference’s best offensive lineman.

Tim Krumrie, Wisconsin-Defensive Tackle
-Named a consensus First Team All-American in 1981… Led Badgers to 1981 Garden State Bowl and earned Defensive MVP honors in 1982 Independence Bowl…Three-time First Team All-Conference selection, recording 444 career tackles.

Greg Lewis, Washington-Running Back
-1990 First Team All-American and Doak Walker award winner… Named Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year in 1990, leading Huskies to 1990 conference title… Finished seventh in 1990 Heisman voting and recorded 15, 100-yard games.

Jess Lewis, Oregon State-Defensive Tackle
-Named First Team All-American in 1967…Played in the College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game and Coaches All-America Bowl in 1970…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967, 1969).

Ray Lewis, Miami (Fla.)-Linebacker
-1995 First Team All-American and Butkus Award runner-up…Led Canes to Fiesta and Orange bowl appearances and ranks sixth all-time at Miami with 388 career tackles…Two-time First Team All-Big East performer who twice led the league in tackles.

Robert Lytle, Michigan-Running Back
-Named consensus All-American in 1976…Finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting… Named Big Ten MVP in 1976 and led UM to two conference championships.

Bob McKay, Texas-Offensive Tackle
-1969 consensus First Team All-American who helped Longhorns to national championship and unbeaten season at Cotton Bowl in senior season…Member of two SWC championship teams and 1969 all-conference selection.

Cade McNown, UCLA-Quarterback
-1998 Consensus First Team All-American and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award recipient…1998 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year who led UCLA to consecutive Pac-10 titles in 1997 (shared) and 1998…Holds numerous school records.

Mark Messner, Michigan-Defensive Lineman
-1988 unanimous First Team All-American who was a Lombardi Award finalist…1988 Big Ten Player of the Year and four-time First Team All-Big Ten selection…Led Wolverines to four bowl berths and named MVP of 1985 Fiesta Bowl.

Darrin Nelson, Stanford-Halfback
-1981 First Team All-American who was the first player in NCAA history to rush for over 1,000 yards and catch more than 50 passes in one season…Finished career as NCAA’s all-time leader in all-purpose yardage (6,885)… Four-time All-Pac-10 pick.

Ken Norton Jr., UCLA-Linebacker
-1987 First Team All-American, leading Bruins to four consecutive bowl wins… Member of the 1985 conference championship team… Led team in tackles in 1986 (106) and in 1987 (125) and ranks sixth in school history with 339 career tackles.

Tom Nowatzke, Indiana-Fullback
-Named First Team All-American in 1964…A two-time All-Conference selection (1963-64), he led the Big Ten in rushing in 1963…Played in the East/West Shrine Game, Senior Bowl and Coaches All-American Game.

Jim Otis, Ohio State-Fullback
-Named consensus First Team All-American in 1969…Member  of the 1968 National Championship team…Named First Team All-Big Ten conference in 1969 and led the Buckeyes to two conference titles…Led the team in rushing three times.

Paul Palmer, Temple-Running Back
-1986 unanimous First Team All-American…Led the nation in rushing yards (1,866), rushing yards per game (169.6) and all-purpose yards (2,633) in 1986… Set 23 school records and was named ECAC Player of the Year in 1986.

Antwaan Randle El, Indiana-Quarterback
-2001 First Team consensus All-American…First player in FBS history to pass for 6,000 yards and rush for 3,000 yards in career…Rushed for more yards than any QB in FBS history upon conclusion of career.

Simeon Rice, Illinois-Linebacker
-Two-time First Team All-American and three-time First Team All-Big Ten selection…Holds conference and school record for career sacks (44.5) and Illini record for career tackles for loss (69)…Set school record for single-season sacks (16).

Ron Rivera, California-Linebacker
-1983 consensus First Team All-American…Lombardi Award finalist in 1983 and named East-West Shrine Game Most Valuable Player…Selected as Pac-10 Co-Defensive Player of the Year in 1983…Led team in tackles from 1981-83.

Willie Roaf, Louisiana Tech-Offensive Lineman
-1992 consensus First Team All-American and finalist for Outland Trophy… Led team to 1990 Independence Bowl berth and two-time All-South Independent selection.

Mike Ruth, Boston College-Nose Guard
-1985 consensus First Team All-American and Outland Trophy winner…Three-time All-East and All-ECAC selection…Member of three bowl teams and recorded 344 career tackles, including 29 sacks.

Rashaan Salaam, Colorado-Tailback
-1994 unanimous First Team All-American and Heisman Trophy winner…1994 Walter Camp Player of the Year and Doak Walker Award recipient… 1994 Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year who led nation in rushing, scoring, and all-purpose yards.

Warren Sapp, Miami (Fla.)-Defensive Tackle
-1994 unanimous First Team All-American who finished sixth in Heisman voting… Recipient of the 1994 Lombardi and Nagurski awards and named Big East Defensive Player of the Year…Led Canes to national title game appearance in 1995.

John Sciarra, UCLA-Quarterback
-1975 First Team All-American who placed seventh in Heisman voting…1976 Rose Bowl Player of the Game and two-time team MVP…1975 First Team All-Pac-8 selection and 1975 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Larry Seivers, Tennessee-Wide Receiver
-Two-time consensus First Team All-American in 1975 and 1976…Two-time First Team All-SEC selection…Currently ranks sixth in Tennessee history in career reception yardage (1,924) and seventh in career receptions (117).

Sterling Sharpe, South Carolina-Wide Receiver
-1987 First Team All-American…Two-time First Team All-Conference…Set nearly every school receiving record by career’s end, including career receptions (169), single-season receiving yards (1,106) and career receiving yards (2,497).

Art Still, Kentucky-Defensive End
-1977 unanimous First Team All-American…Two-time First Team All-SEC performer who led Cats to 1976 SEC Championship…1977 SEC Defensive Player of the Year who set school record for 22 TFL in 1977 (still standing).

Derrick Thomas, Alabama-Linebacker
-1988 unanimous First Team All-American and Butkus award winner… Led Tide to four consecutive bowl berths, earning 1988 SEC Defensive Player of the Year… Set NCAA career sack record (52) and finished career with 74 TFL.

Zach Thomas, Texas Tech-Linebacker
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous honors in 1995…Two-time Consensus SWC Defensive Player of the Year (1993, 94) who led Red Raiders to 1994 SWC title…Ranks fifth all-time at Tech with 390 career tackles.

LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU-Tailback
-2000 Unanimous First Team All-American and 2000 Doak Walker Award winner…1999 WAC Offensive Player of the Year who led TCU to consecutive co-shares of WAC title… Holds 15 school records and is TCU’s all-time leading rusher.

Jackie Walker, Tennessee-Linebacker
-1970 and ’71 First Team All-American…Set NCAA record for career interceptions returned for TD by a linebacker (5)… Two-time First Team All-SEC selection who helped Vols to 1969 SEC Championship.

Wesley Walls, Mississippi-Tight End
-1988 First Team All-American and First Team All-SEC selection…Played as a two-way player his senior season (DE-TE)…Tallied 36 receptions for 426 yards and three touchdowns in one season at tight end…1988 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Lorenzo White, Michigan State-Running Back
-Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous (’85) and consensus (’87) honors…Led State to 1987 Big Ten title and Rose Bowl win…Led nation in rushing (1985), first MSU player to lead team in rushing four-straight seasons.

Clarence Williams, Washington State-Running Back
-Named First Team All-American and All-Conference in 1964…Twice led the Cougars in rushing, scoring and kickoff returns…Played in the Hula Bowl, East-West Shrine and All-West Coast All-Star Games in 1964.

Ricky Williams, Texas-Running Back
-Two-time unanimous First Team All-American and 1998 Heisman Trophy winner…Finished career as NCAA’s all-time leading rusher and won back-to-back NCAA rushing titles…1998 Big 12 Offensive Player of the Year who left Texas with 46 school records.

Steve Wisniewski, Penn State-Offensive Guard
-1988 First Team All-American…Member of 1986 12-0 national championship team…Helped Blair Thomas rush for 1,414 yards and 11 touchdowns in 1987 and D.J. Dozier attain First Team All-America honors in 1986.

 

2014 FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISION COACH CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Mike Bellotti-Chico State (Calif.) (1984-88), Oregon (1995-2008)-Winningest coach in Oregon football history, leading the Ducks to their first four ten-win seasons in school annals…Led Oregon to two Pac-10 titles and 12 bowl games…Led Ducks to 11-1 record and Fiesta Bowl win in 2001,with a final ranking at No. 2.

Jim Carlen-West Virginia (1966-69), Texas Tech (1970-74), South Carolina (1975-1981)
-Led teams to eight bowl games and 13 winning seasons in 16 years as head coach…1973 National Coach of the Year…Three-time Southwest Conference Coach of the Year… Coached Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers at South Carolina.

Pete Cawthon Sr.-Texas Tech (1930-40)
-Led Tech to four Border Conference titles in 11 seasons at the helm…Led 1938 team to 10-0 regular season and the school’s first-ever Cotton Bowl appearance…Boasts highest win percentage (69.3) among Tech coaches with terms of three years or more.

Danny Ford-Clemson (1978-1989), Arkansas (1993-97)
-Led Tigers to perfect 12-0 season and national title in 1981…Won five ACC championships and twice named conference coach of the year…Boasts four of the top five winningest seasons in school history and set Clemson record with 41 consecutive weeks in AP Top 20…Led Arkansas to first SEC West title in 1995.

Billy Jack Murphy-Memphis (1958-71)
-All-time winningest coach in Memphis history…Had 11 winning seasons and retired as the 15th winningest coach in the nation…Member of the Memphis Hall of Fame and Mississippi State Hall of Fame.

Darryl Rogers-Cal State-Hayward (1965), Fresno State (1966-72), San Jose State (1973-75), Michigan State (1976-79), Arizona State (1980-84)
-Took Fresno State to two bowl games.  Achieved an unprecedented national ranking at San Jose State…Was Big Ten Coach of the Year in 1977 and National Coach of the Year by Sporting News in 1978…Won the Big Ten title in 1978.

2014 FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Archie Amerson, Northern Arizona-Running Back-Named First Team All-American in 1996…Finished as school’s all-time career rushing leader despite only playing two seasons (3,196 yards)…1996 Walter Payton Award recipient as Division I-AA’s most outstanding offensive player… Led NAU to its first-ever I-AA playoff appearance.

Rennie Benn, Lehigh-Wide Receiver
-Named First Team All-America in 1985…Currently ranks second in NCAA Division I-AA history in touchdown receptions (44), behind only Jerry Rice…Ranks seventh in Division I-AA history in career receiving yards (3,662).

Carl Boyd, Northern Iowa-Running Back
-Named First Team All-America in 1987…Selected First Team All-Conference and Offensive Player of the Year in 1987…In 1987, he was Conference Player of the Week four times…Two-time team captain…Totaled 2,735 career rushing yards and 1,987 receiving yards.

Joe Campbell, Middle Tennessee State-Running Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1990-91)…A three-time First Team All-Conference pick, he was named OVC Player of the Year in 1990…Led the team in rushing all four years.

Bruce Collie, Texas-Arlington-Offensive Tackle-
Named First Team All-America in 1984…Led UTA to 1981 Southland Conference title…Three-time All-SLC selection…Played six seasons in the NFL with San Francisco and Philadelphia.

Case deBruijn, Idaho State-Punter-
Named First Team All-America in 1981…Twice led the nation in punting (1980-81) and was twice the runner up (1978-79)… Season average of 45.9 in 1981 is third all-time in I-AA.

John Dorsey, Connecticut-Linebacker
-Named First Team All-America in 1983…Led the team in tackles from 1981-83…Two-time Yankee Conference Defensive Player of the Year (1982-83).

Tom Ehrhardt, Rhode Island-Quarterback-
Named First Team All-America in 1985…Named Yankee Conference Player of the Year, First Team All-Conference, and First Team All-New England in 1985…Member of the URI Hall of Fame.

Curtis Eller, Villanova-Linebacker-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1991-92) and was named National Defensive Player of the Year by The Sporting News in 1992…A three-time First Team All-Conference, he twice earned Yankee Defensive Player of the Year honors.

Richard Erenberg, Colgate-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1983…Broke 12 Division I-AA records…Selected as ECAC Player of the Year in 1983…All-time leading rusher in Colgate history…Two-time recipient of the Andy Kerr Award signifying Colgate’s MVP (1982-83).

Don Griffin, Middle Tennessee State-Safety
-1985 First Team All-America and Ohio Valley Conference Defensive Player of the Year…Three-time First Team All-Conference selection…Recorded 210 tackles, 13 career interceptions, and held school record for interceptions in a game (3).

Don Hass, Montana State-Halfback-
Two-time First Team All-America and First Team All-Conference selection (1966-67)…Set or matched seven conference records…Holds nine school single-season rushing records, including 1,460 yards in a season.

Conway Hayman, Delaware-Offensive Guard-
Named First Team All-America in 1970…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1969-70)…Led team to two conference titles and three Lambert Cup Eastern Championships.

John Hill, Lehigh-Center-
Named First Team All-America in 1971…Recipient of Football Roundup Magazine’s College Division Exemplary Player Award…Named First Team All-ECAC and New York Times All-East in 1971.

John Huard, Maine-Linebacker-
Two-time First Team All-America and First Team All-Conference selection (1965-66)…Led Maine to its first postseason game, the Tangerine Bowl in 1964.

Rene Ingoglia, Massachusetts-Running Back-
Finished career ranked second all-time in FCS history in TDs (54) and as school’s all-time leader in rushing (4,624) and carries (905) among others…First UMass player to average more than 100 ypg rushing in career.

Garry Kuhlman, Delaware-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-America and All-ECAC selection (1980-81)…His 1979 team led all Division I-AA teams in scoring with 35.5 points and 405.5 yards total offense per game.

Steve McAdoo, Middle Tennessee State-Offensive Lineman-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1991-92)…Earned Third Team All-America honors by the Associated Press in 1990…Three-time First Team All-Conference pick.

Bill McGovern, Holy Cross-Defensive Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1984…Led the nation in interceptions (11) in 1984…Set Division I-AA career interception record with 24…Two-time All-ECAC performer (1983-84)…Named 1984 team captain.

Robert Morris, Georgetown-Defensive End-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1973-74)…Member of the Georgetown Hall of Fame and the National Slavic Honor Society.

John Ogles, Austin Peay State-Fullback-
Named First Team All-America in 1966…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1965-66)…One of two players to have jersey retired at Austin Peay…Member of the Ohio Valley Conference and APSU Athletic Halls of Fame.

Chris Parker, Marshall-Running Back-
1995 First Team All-America pick…Member of 1992 national championship team, leading MU back to national title game in 1993 and ’95 (national runner-up)…Recorded 31 games with at least 100 yards rushing en route to finishing career with 5,924 rushing yards and 68 touchdowns.

Michael Payton, Marshall-Quarterback-
1992 First Team All-America selection and Walter Payton Award winner…Led Herd to 1992 National Championship and appearance in 1991 national title game…Two-time Southern Conference Player of the Year…Passed for over 10,000 yards in career.

Martin Peterson, Pennsylvania-Offensive Tackle-
Named First Team All-America, First Team All-Conference and First Team All-ECAC in 1986…His teams won three conference titles.

Charlie Pierce, Central Florida-Punter / Placekicker-
Named First Team All-America…Career record holder at UCF for punts (173), punt yardage (7,111) and points scored (297)… Helped UCF to FCS playoffs in 1993.

Michael Renna, Delaware-Defensive End-
Two-time First Team All-America, All-Conference and All-ECAC selection (1988-89)…Delaware’s Outstanding Senior Male Athlete in 1990…Finished career as the 10th leading tackler in school history with 205.

Kirk Roach, Western Carolina-Placekicker-
Three-time First Team All-America selection (1984-86)…Four-time First Team All-Conference pick…Holds five Division I-AA kicking records, 10 conference records and 18 school records…Missed only one extra point in four years.

Terry Schmidt, Ball State-Defensive Back
-Named First Team All-America in 1973 when he set a single-season school record with 13 interceptions…Team MVP as a senior…Played in the Coaches All-America Game and the East-West Shrine Game.

Larry Schreiber, Tennessee Tech-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1969…Set an NCAA record for most career rushes with 877…Set six conference records…Currently ranks second on the conference all-time rushing list with 4,421 yards.

Steve Schubert, Massachusetts-Wide Receiver-
Named First Team All-America in 1972…Averaged 81.9 yards receiving per game in 1972, which ranks fourth on the school record list…Holds school record for average yards per catch in a season in with 20.1 in 1972.

Joe Skladany, Lafayette-Linebacker-
Named First Team All-America in 1981…Lettered four years and was named team Rookie of the Year in 1978…Twice named Lafayette Player of the Year…Member of the Lafayette Hall of Fame.

Leonard Smith, McNeese State-Cornerback-
Named First Team All-America in 1982…Two-time All-Southland Conference selection…Named conference Defensive Player of the Year in 1982…Named McNeese MVP and Louisiana Defensive Player of the Year in 1982.

Tom Stenglein, Colgate-Wide Receiver-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1984-85)…Two-time First Team All-ECAC, pick (1984-85)…Colgate’s all-time leader in receptions in a game (12), season (67) and career (144).

Freddie Thomas, Troy (formerly Troy State)-Defensive Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1986-87) and helped lead Troy State to the National Championship in 1987…A two-time First Team All-Conference pick, he was named team captain in 1987.

Markus Thomas, Eastern Kentucky-Tailback
-Finished career ranked third all-time in FCS history in rushing (5,149)…Two-time Ohio Valley Conference Offensive Player of the Year who led team to two conference titles…52 career rushing TDs.

Billy Thompson, Maryland Eastern Shore-Defensive Back
-1968 First Team All-America selection…Four-year letterman, who was named team MVP as a senior…Three-time CIAA All-Conference selection…1984 UMES Hall of Fame inductee.

Lee White, Weber State-Fullback-
Named First Team All-America and First Team All-Conference in 1967…Rushing and scoring champion of the Big Sky Conference in 1967…Member of the Big Sky Silver Anniversary Team.

John Zanieski, Yale-Middle Guard-
Named First Team All-America and First Team All-Ivy League in 1984…Selected as the team’s MVP in 1984…Finished second on school’s quarterback sack list with 21.

2014 DIVISION II PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Anthony Aliucci, Indiana (Pa.)-Quarterback-Named First Team All-America and Harlon Hill Trophy runner-up in 1991…Named team MVP, he led the nation in pass efficiency in 1990…Guiding his team to three playoff appearances, he threw for over 7,300 career yards.

William Campbell, Western State (Colo.)-Defensive Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1978-79)…Set school record for interceptions in a season with seven in 1979…Led the team in tackles his senior year with 84.

Peter Catan, Eastern Illinois-Defensive End-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1979-80)…Member of the 1978 Division II National Championship team…Holds school record for quarterback sacks in a game (six), season (21) and career (47).

Bruce Cerone, Emporia State (Kan.)-End-Two-time First Team All-America selection (1968-69)…Ranks second in NCAA Division II history in career touchdown receptions (49), fourth in career receiving yards (4,354) and ninth in receptions (241).

Steve Cockerham, Akron-Linebacker
-Two-time First Team All-America selection (1976-77)…Concluded career as the school’s all-time leader in tackles with 715…Led Akron to 1976 Division II Championship Game.

Tom Collins, Indianapolis (Ind.)-Defensive Back
-Named First Team All-America in 1985…All-time college football leader in career interceptions (37), representing all levels of the NCAA.

William Dillon, Virginia Union-Free Safety-
Three-time First Team All-America selection (1980-82)…Tallied 16 interceptions in 1983.  1983 Black College Player of the Year…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection and Player of the Year (1981-82).

Jim Ferge, North Dakota State-Linebacker / Def. Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-America and All-Conference selection (1967-68)…Named conference Most Valuable Lineman in 1968…Selected as team captain and MVP in 1968.

Bernard Ford, Central Florida-Wide Receiver-
Named First Team All-America and 1987 Harlon Hill Trophy Finalist…Ranks in Top 10 of 14 UCF records, ranking first in receiving yards in a season (1,403), all-purpose yards per game (188) and average yards per catch in career (21.8).

Chris George, Glenville State (W.Va.)-Wide Receiver- 
Two-time First Team All-America selection and four-time WVIAC pick…Led GSC to Division II National Playoffs in 1993 and ‘94…Member of two conference championship teams and held nine national records by career’s end.

Darwin Gonnerman, South Dakota State-Running Back-
Two-time First Team All-America and All-Conference selection (1967-68)…Led conference in scoring and rushing in 1967…Named conference Back of the Year in 1968…Set 13 school records during his career.

Don Greco, Western Illinois-Offensive Guard-
Named First Team All-America in 1980…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection – winning the conference’s Lineman of the Year award in 1980…A 1980 team captain, he was twice named Western Illinois’ MVP.

Pat Hauser, Cal State-Northridge-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-America and All-Conference selection (1982-83)… Four-year starter and letterman.

Bobby Hedrick, Elon-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1980…Ranked second in NCAA history in career rushing yards (5,604), among all divisions, at career’s end (behind only Tony Dorsett).

Chris Hegg, Truman State (Mo.) (formerly Northeast Missouri State)-Quarterback-
Named First Team All-America and AFCA Division II Player of the Year in 1985…Two-time conference Offensive Player of the Year (1984-85)…Still holds eight conference records.

Louis Jackson, Cal Poly S.L.O.-Running Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1978-80)…Member of the 1980 Division II National Championship team…Holds school records for yards rushing in a career (3,444), season (1,463) and game (267).

Gary McCauley, Clarion (Pa.)-Tight End-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1980-81)…Member of two conference title teams…Holds school career receiving records for receptions (135) and receiving yards (1,736)…Four-year starter.

Ed O’Brien, Central Florida-Placekicker-
Named First Team All-America…UCF record holder for career field goals made (50), field goals attempted (77) and longest field goal made (55 yards)…Helped UCF to 1987 Division II Semifinals.

Gary Puetz, Valparaiso-Offensive Tackle-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1971-72)…Three-time First Team All-Conference selection…Made first team All-Conference as a placekicker as well in 1972…Earned team’s MVP award.

Bill Royce, Ashland (Ohio)-Linebacker-
Named First Team All-America…Two-time MWIFC Defensive Player of the Year…Recorded 366 career tackles, including 71 sacks… Helped Ashland to four-year team record 33-10-1.

Gary Wichard, LIU-C.W.Post (N.Y.)-Quarterback-
Named First Team All-America, ECAC Player of the Year and team captain in 1971…Played in the 1972 Senior Bowl…Set school records in career passing yards (5,373), touchdown passes (41) and total offense (5,642).

Jerry Woods, Northern Michigan-Defensive Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection and All-Conference pick (1987-88)… Returned 89 punts for 1,129 yards, a 12.6 yard average…Returned kickoffs for 1,475 yards, a 24.9 yard average and current school record.

2014 DIVISION III PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

John Bothe, Augustana (Ill.)-Center-Named First Team All-America in 1988…One of three finalists for the 1988 NCAA Division III Player of the Year Award…Three-time First Team All-Conference selection (1986-88)…Helped Augustana to a 45-3-1 record.

Sean Brewer, Millsaps (Miss.)-Defensive Lineman
-Three-time First Team All-America selection (1990-92)…Set school record for most career tackles, currently ranks second.

Vin Carioscia, Franklin & Marshall (Pa.)-Offensive Tackle-Two-time First Team All-America and First Team All-Conference selection (1981-82)…Named First Team All-ECAC in 1982.  A four-year letterman and a three-year starter.

Ray Condren, Gettysburg (Pa.)-Running Back-
Two-time First Team All-America, All-ECAC and All-Conference selection (1983-84)…Finished second in rushing in Division III in 1984…Named ECAC Division III Player of the Year in 1984.

Al Dorenkamp, Central (Iowa)-Linebacker-
Named First Team All-America in 1974…Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1973-74)…Captained Central to a perfect 11-0 mark and the Division III National Championship in 1974.

Chuck Downey, Stony Brook-Safety-
1987 First Team All-America selection…Recorded 239 tackles and 13 interceptions on defense…First player in Division III history to achieve 1,000 yards on both punt and kickoff returns in a career…Currently holds 12 NCAA Division III records and 23 school records.

Blake Elliott, Saint John’s (Minn.)-Wide Receiver-
Two-time First Team All-American and winner of the 2003 Gagliardi Trophy…Two-time MIAC Player of the Year… Led SJU to 2003 DIII national title and owns 29 school records.

Rick Fry, Occidental (Calif.)-End-
Two-time First Team All-America and All-Conference selection (1976-77)…Was the NCAA annual champion for receiving in 1976-77 and set four NCAA receiving records…Member of the Occidental Football Hall of Fame.

Ed Kelley, Hampden-Sydney (Va.)-Defensive End-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1974-75)…Three-time First Team All-Conference pick (1973-75)…Led the defensive unit that gave up only 10.8 points per game in 1975.

Fran McDermott, St. Mary’s (Calif.)-Defensive Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1979-80)…Played in the 1981 Japan Bowl.  Four-year starter and letterman…Holds school records for most interceptions in a career (21), season (8) and game (4).

Kenneth Murawski, Carnegie Mellon (Pa.)-Linebacker-
Named First Team All-America in 1981…Named First Team All-Conference in 1981 and Second Team in 1980…Two-time team defensive captain…Totaled 243 career tackles and nine interceptions.

Alonzo Patterson, Wagner -Running Back-
Two-time First Team All-America selection (1981-82)…Finished fourth on the NCAA leading rusher list for all divisions in 1981, leading Division III with 1,487 yards…Three-time ECAC Player of the Year (1980-82).

Gerry Quinlivan, Buffalo-Linebacker-
Named First Team All-America in 1984…Two-time First Team ECAC Upstate New York selection and team captain (1983-84)…Four-year starter and letterman…Two-time Most Outstanding Linebacker (1983-84).

2014 NAIA PLAYER CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Marlin Briscoe, Nebraska-Omaha-Quarterback-1967 First Team NAIA All-American who ranks third all-time at UNO with 5,114 passing yards…Set 22 offensive records by career’s end… Three-time All-CIC selection.

Mark Cotney, Cameron (Okla.)-Defensive Back-
Named First Team NAIA All-America and All-Conference in 1974…Amassed 132 career tackles and seven interceptions in two seasons at Cameron.

Karl Douglas, Texas A&M-Kingsville-Quarterback-
Led Javalinas to back-to-back NAIA national titles in 1969-70 as well as four consecutive conference championships…First player to be named most valuable back in the NAIA game in consecutive years.

Duane Fritz, Chadron State (Neb.)-Punter-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1975…Led NAIA II and the conference in punting in 1975…Averaged 42.3 yards on 65 punts in 1975.

Ron Hausauer, Jamestown (N.D.)-Offensive Guard-
Two-time First Team NAIA All-America and First Team All-Conference (1980-81)…Four-year letterman…Member of the Jamestown College Athletic Hall of Fame.

Lynn Hieber, Indiana (Pa.)-Quarterback-
Two-time First Team NAIA All-America selection (1974-75)…Won the Division II Total Offense crown in 1975…Selected as ECAC Division II Player of the Year, First Team All-East and First Team All-ECAC in 1975.

Terron Jackson, Missouri Southern State-Offensive Tackle-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1972…Member of school’s Athletic Hall of Fame.

Randy Page, Central Oklahoma-Quarterback-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1983 and earned Second Team NAIA All-America honors in 1982…Led UCO to an NAIA National Championship in 1982…Broke 14 school records.

Dave Pomante, Whitworth (Wash.)-Defensive Lineman-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1981…Two-time All-District selection…Set school records with 20 sacks in a season and 35 in a career…Led team with 117 tackles as a senior.

Bobby Saiz, Adams State (Colo.)-Quarterback-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1989…Passed for 10,169 career yards and 87 touchdowns…Averaged 251 yards per game in total offense…Led team to No. 1 NAIA national ranking in 1989.

Ed Smith, Bethel (Kan.)-Wide Receiver-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1985…Three-time First Team All-Conference selection (1984-86)…Holds 13 school records…His 47 career touchdown receptions were two short of the national record.

Brad Tokar, Westminster (Pa.)-Running Back-
Named First Team All-America in 1990…Two-time First Team NAIA All-America selection (1988, 1990)…Led Westminster to two NAIA Division II National Championships…Westminster’s all-time leading rusher with 5,269 career yards.

Jay Wessler, Illinois College-Running Back-
Named First Team NAIA All-America in 1979…Three-time member of the NAIA District All-Star Team…Three-time team MVP (1978-80) and Illinois Athlete of the Year (1979-81).

Mike Wiggins, Iowa Wesleyan-Punter-
Named First Team All-America in 1987 and NAIA All-America in 1986 and 1987…Named National Punting Champion for the NAIA in 1987.

2014 DIVISIONAL COACHES CANDIDATE CAPSULE BIOS

Bill Bowes-New Hampshire (1972-98)-Won more games than any coach in Yankee Conference history…Claimed 11 conference titles and was a multiple winner of the District I Coach of the Year award…He was the recipient of the Distinguished Contribution to Football Award by the New Hampshire Chapter of the NFF.

Paul Durham-Linfield (Ore.) (1948-67)-
His team won seven conference championships…Named 1962 NAIA Coach of the Year…Was the athletics director at Linfield while coaching…Member of the Oregon Sports, Helms Athletic and NAIA Football Coaches Halls of Fame.

Jim Feix-Western Kentucky (1968-83)-
Named Kodak College Coach of the Year for Division IV in 1973 and 1975…Won or shared six conference titles…Three-time conference Coach of the Year (1973, 1978, 1980)…The winningest coach in school history…Charter member of the school Athletic Hall of Fame.

Howard Fletcher-Northern Illinois (1956-68)-
Coached unbeaten NCAA College Division and NAIA National Championship team in 1963…Led NIU to three conference titles (1963-65)…Inducted into the NIU Athletic Hall of Fame…Was the runner-up as Kodak College Division Coach of the Year in 1963…Made three appearances in the Mineral Water Bowl.

Ross Fortier-Minnesota Moorhead (formerly Moorhead State) (1970-92)-
School’s all-time winningest coach…Led his team to seven postseason playoffs and nine conference championships…Led 1981 team to unbeaten regular season and number one ranking in the final regular season poll…Member of the NAIA Hall of Fame.

Morley Fraser-Albion (Mich.) (1954-68)-
Led Albion to five conference championship and was named the Small College Coach of the Year in 1964…Coached one All-America, five conference Players of the Year and 65 first team All-Conference selections…Was a Commander in the U.S. Navy during WWII…Received the Distinguished American Award from the Michigan Chapter of the NFF.

Frank Girardi-Lycoming (Pa.) (1972-2007)
-Led Lyco to two national championship appearances and led team to 13 Middle Atlantic Conference championships…Boasts 11 Division III playoff appearances and is one of only 15 coaches to ever win 250 games at one institution…12-time MAC Coach of the Year who coached 10 First Team All-Americans and 217 First Team All-Conference players.

Rudy Hubbard-Florida A&M (1974-85)-
Captured back-to-back national championships, 1977 and 1978, including the inaugural NCAA Division I-AA National Title in 1978… Led A&M to back-to-back SIAC championships.

Art Keller-Carthage (Wis.) (1952-82)-
Named FWAA College Division Distinguished Coach in 1982 and four-time NAIA District Coach of the Year…Member of the NAIA District 14 Hall of Fame…Won eight conference titles and compiled three 14-game winning streaks…Member of the Carthage Hall of Fame and received the President’s Medal of Honor.

Glenn Killinger-Dickinson (Pa.) (1922), Rensselaer (N.Y.) (1927-32), Moravian (Pa.) (1933), West Chester (Pa.) (1934-41, 45-59)-
Winningest coach in West Chester history…Member of the College Football Hall of Fame as a player and the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame…Had only one losing season in 37 years as a head coach.

Larry Korver-Northwestern College (Iowa) (1967-94)
-Led Northwestern to two National Championships, 14 playoff appearances and 212 victories in 28 seasons on the sidelines…Twice named NAIA National Coach of the Year, he has coached 32 players to All-America status.

Dick Lowry-Wayne State (Mich.) (1974-79), Hillsdale (Mich.) (1980-96)
-Won seven conference championships at both schools and earned five births in the NAIA national playoffs winning the National Championship in 1985…He was voted NAIA Coach of the Year in 1982 and was conference Coach of the Year six times.

James Malosky-Minnesota Duluth (1958-97)
-Winningest coach in Division II history at time of retirement…Led teams to nine  conference championships…Named NSIC, MIAC and/or NAIA Coach of the Year 13 times…Produced 33 winning seasons in 40 years at UMD.

Don Miller-Trinity (Conn.) (1967-98)-
Recorded 28 winning seasons out of 32…Retired as the all-time winningest Division III football coach in New England history (now second)…Four-time NESCAC Coach of the Year and 1993 New England Division II/III Coach of the Year…Team recorded best record in NESCAC seven times.

Jerry Moore-North Texas (1979-80), Texas Tech (1981-85), Appalachian State (1989-2012)-Led Mountaineers to three consecutive FCS national titles from 2005-07 and boasts FCS record of 13-straight postseason victories in contiguous years (2005-08)…Most wins in school history who posted 10 SoCon championships…Only DI coach to win AFCA Coach of the Year honors three years in a row.

Charles Murphy-Middle Tennessee State (1947-68)-
Captured seven Volunteer State Athletic Conference Championships…Won seven Ohio Valley Conference Championships…Named Ohio Valley Conference Coach of the Year in 1965.

Jim Ostendarp-Amherst (Mass.) (1959-91)-
Named UPI Small College Coach of the Year in 1964…Selected as the New York Football Writers Division II/III Coach of the Year in 1984…Captured 13 Little Three titles…Named AFCA/Kodak New England Coach of the Year in 1961 and 1964.

Forrest Perkins-Wisconsin-Whitewater (1956-84)-
At the time of his retirement, he ranked second on the active wins list on the Division III level…Named NAIA Coach of the Year in 1966…The all-time winningest coach in conference and school history.  Captured 11 Conference titles.

Bill Ramseyer-Wilmington (Ohio) (1972-90), Virginia’s College at Wise (1991-2001)-
Three-time District Coach of the Year…Seven Hall of Fame inductions, including NAIA Hall of Fame (1997)…Coached his teams to a winning season in 24-of-30 seasons…Coached Wilmington to an NAIA National Runner-Up in 1980…Coached 70 All-Americans.

Dwight Reed-Lincoln (Mo.) (1949-71)-
Teams won three conference titles…Coached 93 All-Americans in four sports…The football stadium at Lincoln University was named for him.

Pete Schmidt-Albion (Mich.) (1983-96)
-Teams won nine MIAA championships (seven outright), five NCAA Division III playoff appearances and the 1994 NCAA Division III National Championship… 1994 AFCA National Coach of the Year.

Clyde “Buck” Starbeck-Northern Iowa (1936-42, 1945-57)-
Captured seven conference championships in 10 years…Went 31 consecutive conference games without a defeat…Member of the University of Northern Iowa Hall of Fame.


Jim Tressel-Youngstown State (1986-2000), Ohio State (2001-2010)-
Led teams to nine national title game appearances, winning four FCS championships with Youngstown State and one BCS championship with Ohio State…Led Buckeyes to six Big Ten titles and coached 73 First Team All-Americans during career…Two-time Eddie Robinson National Coach of the Year, winning one at the FBS and one at FCS level.

John Whitehead-Lehigh (1976-86)-
Named Division II Coach of the Year in 1977 and Division I-AA Coach of the Year in 1979…Captured the 1977 Division II National Championship…Runner-up in the 1979 Division I-AA National Championship.

Alex Yunevich-Alfred (N.Y.) (1937-41, 1946-76)-
Had six undefeated teams…His team was 1971 Lambert Bowl Division III champions of the East…Named Small College Coach of the Year in 1956 by the Washington Touchdown Club and same in 1971 by the NY Football Writers.

Allen Zikmund-Nebraska-Kearney (formerly Kearney State) (1955-71)
-His teams won 11 conference titles…Nine of his players were named NAIA All-Americas and 67 made All-Conference…Member of the NAIA Hall of Fame.

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SP FBN BENGALS RAVENS

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Ravens Need A Leader

Posted on 05 January 2014 by Tom Federline

The City of Baltimore and Ravens fans were spoiled. We have been spoiled since the Ravens came to town and Game One of September 1996. The guy that secured the middle linebacker position and posed as a motivational speaker for 17 seasons, spoiled us. You are not going to replace a Ray Lewis in one year. You are not going to replace a Ray Lewis in two years. Ray can be replaced, everyone is replaceable. It’s a matter of who and how the team adapts to their approach. What seperates leaders from the average person is communication, passion and the ability to reach a performance level that 99% of the population simply cannot attain. There just aren’t that many Ray Lewis’ out there. So Ravens don’t lose him.

Now Ray-Ray wasn’t running solo in providing the leadership role on the field. He had a little help along the way. How about starting with Art Modell. Then how about some other notable teammates; Jonathan Ogden, Matt Stover, Micheal McCrary, Ed Reed, Matt Birk, Derek Mason, etc. Feel free to add to the list. Did anyone see any consistent leadership qualities from any current Raven on the field this year? How about the sidelines? How about up in the Owners Suite? The Ravens use to have leaders, they all gone.

Week by week it became more apparent – no one was going to step up and take the reigns Ray Lewis had left on the wagon. You would think at the very least, the coach would attempt to take command. Yeah right. You would think at the very least, the rewarded 20 million dollar per year quarterback, would step up into that role. Flacco is a winner, he is not a leader. You would think that in the year following a championship season, there would be player candidates graciously accepting a move into that role. Yeah right. Most of the Ravens games this past year were embarassing. The Ravens finished 8 – 8 and in my book, they should have been 3 – 13. Nice way to follow up a Super Bowl win, huh?

Did they actually, beat any team this year? I can think of one. And really up unitl 2:30 left in the first half, that game was typically sloppy and up for grabs. The Ravens finished that game by beating the Houston Texans, Game 3 of the season, 30 – 9. Luckily, I was there to witness it. It just so happened Ray Lewis was in the house, also. It was Ray Lewis Day – he was getting inducted into the Ravens Ring of Honor. Hmmmmm, convincing win with Ray in the house – interesting. The Ravens were a mediocre to poor team this year. After getting fed up watching the Ravens ineptness, I would turn the station and witness the majority of other NFL teams actually moving the ball with confidence and wondering to myself – Why can’t the Ravens do that?

The Ravens year of 2013 was definately a ride of “Good Times/Bad Times” – Led Zepplin). 2013 started off “Good”, but ended up “Bad”. The Super Bowl Run/Ray Lewis’ last ride, was better than good – it was awesome. The 2013 regular season was challenging to watch. They were lucky to survive without losing face. Actually they did lose face, right out of the gates – Game 1 vs. Denver. The season was a bust. Thirty-three minutes of the Texans game and two minutes five seconds of a Vikings snow game. The rest, was a waste of time. There were some positives: Justin Tucker, Marlon Brown, Justin Tucker, Daryl Smith, Justin Tucker, Jacoby Jones, Justin…..ok, dig the reoccuring theme? The kicker was as close as the Ravens got to a Leader.

Ok, you win the Super Bowl and the team gets dismantled. So who do you rely on? Front office? Yes, do your job and replenish. Coaches? Yes, that should go without saying. Did any of that happen? No. The Front office blows it, recogmize and correct next year. The Coach doesn’t step up – that’s a big problem. The guy who rode Rays coat-tails, did not step up. When Flacco did not step up, when Suggs did not step up, when Rice did not step up, somebody had to and nobody did. Come on, John Horribaugh, you maybe paid the least compared to star players, but it is your job to at least get those overpaid steroid boys to show up and perform.

The Ravens need a leader or two on the field and they need a leader on the sidelines. Right now, they have neither. Gut checks are in order, (along with a revamped offensive line). Candidates: Defense – Elam. Offense – it has to be Flack Nut. Coaching? – I’m not a John Horribaugh fan, never have been. Can the Ravens get his brother Jim? Now there’s a coach in my book.

We were spoiled. The only game the Ravens actually WON, Ray Lewis was in the house. Hmm???? Hey Ray, whatcha ya gonna do when you get done playing TV analyst? Let’s start out with Director of Player personnel and Motivational Speaker, then linebackers coach and Inspirational speaker, then defensive coordinator and Motivational speaker. Then by that time, hopefully you would have mentored somebody to take over the reigns. Who knows? There just may come a day, when Ray Lewis on the sideline again. If not on the sideline, get him under a lifelong contract as part of the organization. Front office….. step up! Nobody else did.
T-minus 53 days until O’s first Spring Training Game.

D.I.Y.
Fedman

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Reed’s firing in Houston gives Ray Lewis even more value

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Reed’s firing in Houston gives Ray Lewis even more value

Posted on 13 November 2013 by Drew Forrester

Add Ed Reed to the long list of ex-Ravens who left Baltimore for a different pasture and wound up looking foolish.

And, while doing so, Reed also stuck another feather in the career cap of Ray Lewis, who knew when his time had come and refused to do the one-time money grab like Reed and others have done.

Ed Reed embarrassed himself in Houston.  Ray Lewis went out like a world beater in Baltimore, holding up the trophy and telling  the city he loved them on a Tuesday afternoon last February.

Reed now joins the club occupied by guys like Ed Hartwell, Adalius Thomas, Bart Scott, Tony Weaver and plenty more.  A few years from now when they all have their summer reunion of “The Guys Who Left Baltimore And Weren’t The Same”, Dannell Ellerbe and Paul Kruger can share jokes with Reed about how they got paid and got laughed at when the well went dry quickly after they arrived in their new city.

It’s fair to note that Reed was at the end of his career when he left Baltimore for a one-time heist in Houston.  A lot of others left here in their prime to try and “cash in” and wound up doing so — only to see the grass WASN’T greener on the other side.  That said, a Hall of Famer getting $15 million for three years and not making it to Thanksgiving isn’t something to put on your career resume.

Ray Lewis, Super Bowl win or not, wouldn’t have been retained by the Ravens after the 2012 season.  None of that mattered, of course, once “52″ announced his retirement last December, but had Ray wanted to continue playing into ’13 and beyond, some team – the Texans perhaps – with the thought they were “one guy away” would have ponied up money for the Hall of Fame linebacker.

Ray’s career ended the way he wanted it.  In Baltimore.  As a champion…with no regrets about playing a half-dozen games for the Dolphins or Cowboys or Redskins before Father Time brought him into the office on a Tuesday in November and told him to pack his bags.

Ed Reed’s career ended on Tuesday when a 2-7 team told him to get out — and keep the money he stole from them.

He’ll be a Hall of Famer, of course, and every highlight the NFL Network shows in 2019 or 2020 will have him making plays in purple, not in that incredibly gorgeous Texans helmet he wore for a weekend or two, but Ed Reed took the money from Houston and gave them nothing in return.

He might as well have worn a bandit’s mask to practice in Houston.  When he practiced, that is.

Ray Lewis never, ever did that.

One guy was smart enough to know his playing days were over — and he ended it on his terms.

One guy didn’t care about anything except getting paid one more time.  He won on that account.  But he lost another battle with Ray Lewis along the way.

Ray was always just a little better, a little more popular and a little more valuable to the Ravens than Ed Reed.

A fact Ed proved for a final time yesterday when the Texans kicked him out.

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Does John Harbaugh’s style need changing?  It’s a fair question…

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Does John Harbaugh’s style need changing? It’s a fair question…

Posted on 05 November 2013 by Drew Forrester

Football players can’t change much, but a coach sure can.

Can John Harbaugh change?

Should he?

Will he?

Those are all fair questions now as the Ravens are in the midst of only their second 3-game losing streak in Harbaugh’s outstanding 6-year run as Baltimore’s NFL coach.

First, let’s get this straight from the start:  In and of itself, a 3-game losing streak is NOT a reason to panic.  It’s NOT a reason to change the great things you’ve done.  And it’s NOT incumbent upon one person to say, “I’ll fix this whole thing…”

That said, when you’ve been around for five-plus seasons, any significant bump in the road – and a 3-game losing streak, to a high-level franchise like the Ravens, is SIGNIFICANT – has to be looked at by the head coach as an opportunity to evaluate himself and his work.

I hope John is doing that today in Owings Mills.

Anyone who has read my work here or listened to my radio show knows what I think about John Harbaugh.  For the record, again, I’ll simply say this:  John is an outstanding football coach.  He’s an equally outstanding “man”.  He’s a champion.  And, of course, he still has plenty to learn in his profession.

I’ve been around athletes for the last thirty years of my life and one thing I can say for sure is that players rarely change their own style.  They can’t, really.  They are what they are.  If you’re a striker in professional soccer and you’re a right footed player with little or no ability to play left-footed, you’re always going to be a player that goes to his right and uses his right foot to pass or shoot the ball.  The same goes for a basketball player who’s a “right sided” player.  You’re going to your right, virtually every time, and that’s just the way it goes.  You do what got you there, for lack of a better term.  Football players are the same.  Their style is their style.  Some of that is predicated on things outside of their control — size and speed are two factors — but for the most part, a pro football player is going to use the tools that got him there in the first place.

Coaches are different.

They can change.

That doesn’t mean they have to undergo a wholesale change that comes across as “obviously phony”.

But, a coach who’s soft can develop a new, stronger edge and a coach that’s known to be a drill sergeant can soften his edges and  learn to be more accomodating with his players.  The most obvious NFL example of the latter is Tom Coughlin in New York, who has worked hard over the last five years to listen more and yell less.  It’s worked, of course.  He’s a 2-time Super Bowl champion and likely headed for the Hall of Fame someday.

I’d ask John Harbaugh to go through the same self-evaluation as Coughlin did five years ago.

I’m not TELLING John to change.  That’s not the point of this.

I’m simply suggesting to the coach that now, season six of his tenure, might be the time to carefully evaluate his style to see if it still works with this group of players he has in Baltimore.

One thing I know for sure.  If John Harbaugh thinks his style can be tweaked, improved or altered and doing so would help the team win, he’d surely consider doing it.  Another thing I know without hesitation:  No one on the football team or football staff wants to win more than Harbaugh.  No one.  He’d sell his mother to win a football game.  And then he’d pay double to get her back afterwards.  He wants to win, badly.

Then again, the players want to win, too.  How you get them to win, though, is the challenge.  As someone in the Ravens organization said to me last week, “We have an interesting collection of players.  Some of the veterans need an ass-kicking and some don’t.  Some of our young players get it and some of them don’t.  Usually, the vets don’t need to be reminded to take every snap seriously and the kids do, but our locker room is a unique blend of guys, for some reason.”

One of those veteran players who needed an ass kicking got it last week.  Michael Huff was sent packing after three months of showing little desire to do anything except pick up a paycheck.  Marcus Spears was also let go, but that was much more about his degenerative knee condition limiting him, physically.  Cornerback Asa Jackson returns this week after his 2nd run-in with the league’s Substance Abuse Policy.  He’s on life number eight of his nine lives in Baltimore.  Will he take advantage of it or will he fall from grace the way most people in Owings Mills assume he will?

And, how does John Harbaugh go about his own business now, dealing with a locker room that’s reeling with three straight losses and has both sides of the ball stinking it up at crucial times during the games?  A fractured locker room is a bad locker room.  Once the offense and defense start taking up sides, you’re in big trouble.  I can only guess there’s an element of that existing right now at 1 Winning Drive, but that atmosphere likely exists in most locker rooms of 3-5 teams.

This, again, is on Harbaugh’s shoulders right now.

Is he working with a depleted roster, minus eleven critically important players from a season ago?

Absolutely.

If you suddenly re-inserted these jerseys in the Ravens locker room, would the team be a lot better?  Dennis Pitta, Ray Lewis, Ed Reed, Bernard Pollard, Cary Williams, Brendon Ayanbedejo, Anquan Boldin, Matt Birk, Bryant McKinnie, Paul Kruger and Dannell Ellerbe.

Answer, of course:  Yes.

But, that was then, this is now.  Those guys are gone.  And this new edition of Ravens football might not react to the head coach the way the championship team did a season ago.

Is John just going with his style because it’s his style or is willing to look at himself and say, “For this team, now, I might need to change the way I do things?”

More bible verses?  Or less bible verses?

Harder practices?  Lighter practices?

More hugs to the special team players…the fringe guys?  Or less hugs and more questions like “Are you ever going to be good enough to start in this league?”

More critical analysis of his coaching staff?  Longer days?  Shorter days?  More “come to Jesus” meetings with position coaches who see their own struggling game in and game out?

More thorough review of John’s own in-game style and strategy?  More of a gambler?  Less of a gambler?

I don’t know the answers to any of those questions and I’m not suggesting any, honestly.

I’m merely asking the coach if his style, the one that has made him a champion, is etched in stone and non-negotiable?

Or, like the truly GREAT coaches in all sports, can he re-invent himself and use his strengths to mold a new character that changes with the seasons and the players he leads?

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Loss of a dozen starters has really hurt the Ravens

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Loss of a dozen starters has really hurt the Ravens

Posted on 22 October 2013 by Drew Forrester

Everywhere I went on Monday, the question was basically the same:  ”What’s wrong with the Ravens?”

A few folks who asked that of me quickly followed up with, “You shouldn’t be this bad a year after winning the Super Bowl.”

Well, what’s wrong with the Ravens is, in fact, a by-product of winning the Super Bowl in New Orleans last February.

The 2013 edition of John Harbaugh’s team isn’t the same one that won the title in 2012.  Simple, right?  Well, yes, it sort of IS that simple, actually, even though people are always trying to find the “hidden secret” or “untold story” of the team.

Try this simple exercise for a second.  You’re going to have to put your pre-conceived negative opinions of John Harbaugh, Joe Flacco and Ray Rice on the side for a moment, because this little game won’t work if you can’t do that.

OK…ready?

I want you to rewind your brain all the way back to last January.  The Ravens have just finished 10-6, won the AFC North, and get to take on the Colts in the first round of the playoffs.  If they win there, their “prize” is a trip to Denver to take on a Peyton Manning team that rocked you in Baltimore a month earlier.  And, if you’re somehow fortunate enough to get past the Broncos, the last remaining hurdle between you and the Super Bowl is a visit to Tom Brady’s house in Foxboro.

Still with me?

OK — the week before the Colts game, a crippling virus races through the Ravens locker room and these ten players are deemed OUT for the remainder of the playoffs:  Anquan Boldin, Matt Birk, Dannell Ellerbe, Ed Reed, Ray Lewis, Paul Kruger, Brendon Ayanbedejo, Bernard Pollard, Cary Williams and Dennis Pitta.  Add Bryant McKinnie to the mix after Monday’s trade and that makes eleven key players gone. (Keep in mind, as much as people like to beat up McKinnie, the Ravens are 0-2 since they jettisoned him to the bench in favor of Eugene Monroe.)

Could the Ravens have won four straight games in January and February without those eleven players a year ago?

Honestly?

Of course not.  They wouldn’t have moved past Indianapolis in the first round of the playoffs given those ten starters missing the game due to the mythical “virus” I described above.

Well — of those eleven players I listed, nine of them were STARTERS from a year ago who haven’t played a single down for the Ravens this season.  McKinnie played 5 of 7 games before they sent him packing on Monday afternoon.

Of the players listed above, only Dennis Pitta remains on the roster, and he’s injured and was unavailable through seven games of 2013.

If you’re looking for the biggest reason why the Ravens are 3-4 at the bye, you just saw ten of them above.  There are, generally speaking, 22 “starters” in any game.  Ayanbedejo wasn’t technically a starter, but he WAS a special teams ace, so I deem him to be an important cog in the machine.  So, ten starters – out of 22 – are gone.  That’s not quite 50%, but it’s a huge chunk of quality missing that needed to be replaced.

(Please see next page)

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Jim Irsay said nothing wrong this week

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Jim Irsay said nothing wrong this week

Posted on 17 October 2013 by Drew Forrester

It’s remarkable how hilariously “obvious” the media can be in this country.

This Jim Irsay-Peyton Manning saga is a perfect example of that statement.

Someone asked Irsay a question about Manning.  He answered it.  He said nothing wrong — and far be it from someone in Baltimore to defend an Irsay.

It’s unreal these days how you’re not allowed to “speak the truth”, even when asked an “obvious” question like the one Irsay was asked about Manning.

And then, when the media does ask an “obvious” question, they ridicule the reply and pimp it as “disrespect” to sell newspapers or magazines or get you to watch or listen to a certain program on the air.

The reality in Indianapolis?  For as great as they were in the Manning era, the Colts underachieved on the field when you go back and look at the totality of their successes.

More reality?  Much like the Ravens did with Ray Lewis in Baltimore, the Colts handed over their franchise to Manning and said, “Do with it what you want…”  And, of course, Manning was sensational in Indianapolis, like Lewis was here in Charm City.

The reality about Ray Lewis, like Manning, is that his time in Baltimore wasn’t “perfect”.  But, it was certainly substantial enough for all of us to admit the obvious — without Ray Lewis in purple from 1996-2013, the Ravens franchise isn’t where they are today.  The same can be said in Indy.  Without Peyton Manning, the Colts aren’t where they are today.

All that said, Jim Irsay was simply telling the truth when he said – paraphrasing – “you like all the numbers and scoring but what you really want are more rings.”

That’s all true.

It was code word for:  ”We sold our soul for Peyton and gave him as many offensive toys we could…and while we piled up a bunch of points and made the games exciting for our home fans, that one-sided philosophy didn’t translate to multiple titles.”

You can almost flip the sides of the ball and say the same thing for the Ravens and Ray Lewis during his time here.  The Ravens did get a second title with Ray in the fold, but he was essentially a part-timer with a bad arm and deer antler spray on his breath by the time the final whistle blew in New Orleans last February.  Ray, though – much like Peyton – pulled more than his fair share of the weight when he was in Baltimore.  And the club responded by giving him the keys to the franchise.  When Ray spoke, everyone listened…and rightfully so.  Lewis earned that sort of respect with his play on the field and his leadership in the locker room, but the one-sided approach in Baltimore – defense over offense – only produced two Super Bowl trips from 1996 until the end of the 2012 season.  From ’99 through ’11, the one sided approach in Indy produced the same number of trips to the Super Bowl as the Ravens had — two.

Reality — In Indianapolis, they brushed up against greatness a lot when Peyton Manning was there but weren’t quite successful enough overall.  One Super Bowl ring proves that.

And there was nothing at all wrong with the way Jim Irsay commented on it.

He told everyone the obvious, anyway.

When you win one, you want two.

If you win two, you want three.

And so on.

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Flacco fires back at Lewis’ criticism of Ravens leadership

Posted on 25 September 2013 by Luke Jones

(This blog brought to you by Atlantic Remodeling. Visit www.atlanticremodeling.com to learn about their Red Cent Guarantee!)

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Starting quarterback Joe Flacco wasn’t the first to defend the Ravens’ current leadership in response to former teammate Ray Lewis’ criticism earlier in the week, but his words rang the loudest on Wednesday.

Responding to Lewis’ comments made on ESPN questioning the team’s current leaders in the aftermath of the party bus altercation that resulted in wide receiver Jacoby Jones being smashed in the head with a champagne bottle early Monday morning, Flacco defended the team’s recent track record when it comes to off-field behavior and downplayed how much leadership can influence what players do away from football.

“It is what it is. Ray knows better than that,” Flacco said. “Things happen. I think we’re usually a pretty good team with stuff like that. If you look around the league, there are probably a lot of leadership problems then. So, like I said, Ray knows better.”

No charges were filed and there is no evidence to suggest any player who attended left tackle Bryant McKinnie’s birthday celebration committed any crimes, making the story inconsequential in Flacco’s eyes.

Coach John Harbaugh addressed the incident with the entire team on Monday, warning the players of the dangers of being out in public late at night.

“When you get the information of what happened, it just is what it is,” Flacco said. “You laugh about it, kind of. It’s funny some of the things that we deal with. I don’t really have too many comments on it, because they’d all be taken the wrong way and out of context. But it’s not really an issue.”

While Flacco stood his ground and took Lewis’ comments to task, linebacker Terrell Suggs took a more apologetic stance for the man he teamed with the defensive side of the ball for a decade. Suggs suggested Lewis’ words were taken out of context even though he was on camera speaking freely in response to the news of the incident.

It’s possible that Suggs only read the transcript of Lewis’ words or wasn’t familiar with what Lewis actually said, but the Ravens had to know questions would be asked of Suggs on Wednesday.

“I guess it’s something that I’ll have to hear him say,” Suggs said. “We all know the media can ‘word-play’ [and] misconstrue things. We texted Ray this morning. It’s one guy’s opinion. Like I said, we don’t know what was actually said. You can never take anything for face value. If he says it in front of a camera, it’s a different thing.”

Understandably, Suggs shares a closer relationship with Lewis than Flacco does, but his response to his longtime teammate’s criticism didn’t have near the impact of the stance taken by the quarterback.

A transcript of Lewis’ comments from Monday night are below:

“We talk about the transition of losing so many guys, a guy like myself and Ed Reed and other guys that are based off leadership. I’ve said it earlier: ‘Where would the leadership come from?’ Because the leadership is being strong in the locker room and winning games. Listen, talent sometimes can win you games. But when you talk about what’s going on off the field, that’s the most important place where leadership steps up.

“When you think about the Baltimore Ravens and the transition that they went through, they’re missing leadership right now. When you have an incident like that, the first thing a leader is going to do is find some way to dissolve everything that’s going on and actually dissolve it before it comes to that type of head or even gets to that point.

“When you talk about the Baltimore Ravens, they’re going to have to refocus and find some quick leaders in that locker room very quickly.”

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MobTown Sports Beat Monday Ravens Roundup

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MobTown Sports Beat Monday Ravens Roundup

Posted on 23 September 2013 by Thyrl Nelson

 

The Ravens improved to 2-1 on the season yesterday with a one-sided, 30-9 win over the Houston Texans. After the way that the Texans handled the Ravens last season, there were a number of reasons to be concerned beforehand. Truth be told, I had a much worse feeling about what might happen against Houston than I did before the beat down the Ravens suffered in Denver in Week1. Hindsight however is 20/20, so here’s a quick rundown of what we know now after the Ravens latest victory:

5. Justin Tucker is Back on Track

…for now at least. Maybe it was the reception that Billy Cundiff received from the Ravens faithful last week that had Tucker out of sorts. Maybe it was just the presence of Cundiff in the building that infected Tucker’s right foot last Sunday. Regardless, Tucker made enough big kicks in his rookie year to have some equity built up with fans. That equity though wouldn’t have lasted through too many 0-for-2 performances like he had last week vs. Cleveland, especially if those misses began to cost the Ravens games.

While concern over the kicking game was mild at most, it was nice to see Tucker get back on track with a 3-for-3 game against the Texans, hitting from 28, 45 and 43 yards. Even though the two from 40+ came in late, low leverage situations, any concerns fans had about the Ravens kicking game can be shelved…for now.

4. Dirty Birds

After struggling with penalties last year, the Ravens still appear to have some work to do in that regard. The 2013 Ravens have 20 penalties for 181 yards through 3 games, including 10 for 87 yards in yesterday’s affair. Despite their most penalized performance of the season vs. Houston, the Ravens still managed to win the “penalty battle” as the Texans racked up 14 for 113 yards.

3. Cheering for Laundry

On the day that Ed Reed returned to Baltimore as a member of a new team, and Ray Lewis returned to be honored by the Ravens, it was the guys who suited up in their places that stole the show. James Ihedigbo picked up 9 tackles, 2 for a loss along with 2 defended passes and simply seemed to be everywhere while covering Ed Reed’s old spot. Daryl Smith, playing in Ray Lewis’ former domain plucked a Matt Schaub pass away from a waiting Owen Daniels, and at a time where the Ravens offense was struggling to make hay, made some on his own, hustling it 37 yards to pay dirt.

For all of the Ravens off-season pick-ups, Daryl Smith might have been the least heralded. He was grabbed on the same day the Ravens visited the White House and his signing went basically under the radar. If he continues to play like he did on Sunday, he could be the team’s most impactful addition. It’s also pretty encouraging that his big play came defending a tight end, which has been an issue for the Ravens of late.  

2. Doss is a Boss

What more can you say about a guy who was shown the door by the team when they pared down to their final 53 men, only to come back with an emphatic impact? Life out of football, brief as it may have been, seems to have brought out the best in Tandon Doss who is making the most out of his second chance with the Ravens. Maybe in the coming weeks Doss can become more a part of the Ravens passing game, and finally show fans those hands we heard so much about from the team about throughout his first 2 seasons. It’s not like the Ravens offense couldn’t use a pair of hands that they can trust between the hash marks.

1. Who Says Joe Flacco Can’t Act?

While Joe Flacco’s increased, post-Super Bowl public profile has led to some pretty clunky performances as a pitchman in various commercials, Flacco’s acting skills were on full display yesterday. After last season’s debacle at the hands of the Texans, JJ Watt and the rest of the Houston pass rush broke the huddle with their ears pinned back more often than not on Sunday. Flacco used that aggression against the Texans inducing 5 encroachment or defensive offsides penalties on the anxious Texans defense.

Elsewhere in the AFC North

The Bengals picked up a big win and remain tied with the Ravens at 2-1 atop the division. For now at least, it’s shaping up to be an interesting battle between these 2 for the division. They’ll meet again in Week 17 this year, maybe with something actually on the line this time.

The Steelers looked really bad to start against the Bears on Sunday night, but showed some real resilience closing the gap from 24-3 to 27-23. It looked like Pittsburgh had really found their resolve in the face of an 0-3 start. In the end though, their comeback attempt was little more than a chance for Ben Roethlisberger to cough up the ball in a late critical situation…it’s kind of their thing.

Leave it to the Browns to all but announce that they’re going into full tank mode by trading RB Trent Richardson and skipping right over Jason Campbell on the depth chart to 3rd stringer Brian Hoyer to replace injured starter Brandon Weeden, and then pick up a win on Sunday. There are even reports that the Browns are shopping receivers Josh Gordon and Greg Little. Of course the Browns can’t even tank right. If they had only known that the best way to win was to actually try to lose, they could have saved themselves and their fans years of heartache.

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