Tag Archive | "ripken"

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Ripken says Gwynn “Hall of Fame ballplayer but more importantly wonderful man”

Posted on 16 June 2014 by WNST Staff

Statement from former Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken on the death of Tony Gwynn:

This is an extraordinarily sad day. Tony was a Hall of Fame ballplayer but more importantly he was a wonderful man. Tony always had a big smile on his face and was one of the warmest and most genuine people I have ever had the honor of knowing. Like all baseball fans I will miss him very much and my thoughts are with his family today.

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Nationals select Ryan Ripken in 15th round of MLB Draft

Posted on 07 June 2014 by WNST Staff

Nationals conclude 2014 MLB First-Year Player Draft

The Washington Nationals concluded the 2014 MLB First-Year Player Draft on Saturday afternoon, selecting 30 players to round out this year’s draft class.

Over the course of the three-day draft, the Nationals selected 21 pitchers (seven left-handed pitchers, 14 right-handed), four catchers, 10 outfielders and five infielders.

Among the players the Nats selected Saturday was first baseman Ryan Ripken (Gilman) out of Indian River State College in Florida.

Ripken is the son of former Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame SS Cal Ripken. The younger Ripken was drafted by the Birds in the 20th round of the 2012 Draft before passing on the opportunity to accept a scholarship to play baseball at South Carolina.

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Ripken’s mother safe, suspect in custody after attempted carjacking

Posted on 15 October 2013 by WNST Staff

ABERDEEN, Md. (AP) — Police say a man with a handgun approached baseball great Cal Ripken’s mother in a bank parking lot in Maryland and demanded her car, but she activated a key alarm and he left.

Authorities say 75-year-old Vi Ripken wasn’t hurt Tuesday and a suspect is now in custody.

Police spokesman Lt. Frederick Budnick says Ripken entered the bank afterward to alert authorities in her hometown of Aberdeen, north of Baltimore.

The spokesman says charges are pending. He didn’t immediately identify the suspect.

Last year, Vi Ripken reported being kidnapped at gunpoint from her Aberdeen home. She returned unharmed 24 hours later. No one has been arrested in the case.

Hall of Fame infielder Cal Ripken played in 2,632 consecutive games in a 21-year career with the Baltimore Orioles.

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Ripken to be honored by Louisville Slugger

Posted on 17 September 2013 by WNST Staff

Cal Ripken, Jr. to Receive 2013 Living Legend Award from Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory

Baseball’s “Iron Man” to accept award in Louisville on November 8th

Louisville, KY – September 17, 2013 – Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory will honor Baseball Hall of Famer and Baltimore Orioles great, Cal Ripken, Jr., with its 2013 Living Legend Award on Friday, November 8th. Ripken, Jr. will be recognized during a special ceremony that kicks-off the 10th Annual Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Auction.

“Cal Ripken, Jr., has always been an inspiring ambassador for baseball and really knew how to wield his Louisville Slugger bats,” said Anne Jewell, Executive Director at Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.  “He is a true class act, a consummate teammate and one of the hardest working men in baseball.  We’re excited and honored to recognize him with our 2013 Living Legend Award,” she said.

One of the true legends of baseball, Cal Ripken, Jr., began his professional career in 1978, made it to the majors in 1981, and quickly set a new standard for shortstops. Big, strong, and durable, he displayed power at the plate, grace in the field, and unrivaled perseverance.

He earned AL Rookie of the Year honors in 1982, won the MVP award in 1983 and 1991, and received a Gold Glove in 1991 and 1992. In 1995, Cal broke Lou Gehrig’s major league record for consecutive games played (2,130). Cal voluntarily ended his streak on September 20, 1998, after playing 2,632 consecutive games.

Using a Louisville Slugger P72 model throughout most of his 21-year career, Ripken amassed 3,184 hits, including 431 home runs. He holds many major league records, including most home runs by a shortstop and highest single season fielding percentage by a shortstop (.996). He retired from baseball in 2001 after 21 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles.

Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007 with the third highest voting percentage in history, Cal Ripken, Jr., is baseball’s all-time Iron Man.

After his playing career, Ripken, Jr., has experienced great success off the diamond.  He is a best-selling author, TV analyst and President and CEO of Ripken Baseball, Inc., a company whose mission is to grow the game of baseball at the grassroots level.

Ripken Baseball owns and operates Ripken Experience youth complexes in Aberdeen, MD. And Myrtle Beach, SC. In addition, the company owns two minor league teams and Ripken Sports, a full-service design and build company that helps communities and organizations achieve their sports facility dreams.

Cal and his family established the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, in memory of their father.  The Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation helps to build character and teach critical life lessons to disadvantaged young people residing in America’s most distressed communities through baseball and softball themed programs.

“It’s a tremendous honor to be presented with Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory’s Living Legend Award.  To be recognized by Louisville Slugger and included in the company with past award recipients is very special,” said Ripken, Jr.  “Louisville Slugger has been a long-time partner of the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation and I appreciate all they do to support the Foundation in its goal to help our nation’s disadvantaged youth.  I am eagerly looking forward to accepting the award in Louisville this fall.”

Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory has produced a limited edition P72 model collector bat autographed by Ripken, Jr. Only 100 signed bats are available and the cost is $250 per bat, which includes two tickets to the invitation-only Living Legend celebration. Proceeds from the sales of these special bats will benefit the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation. For more information or to purchase a bat, please call 502-588-7271 or email giftshop@slugger.com.

Past recipients of the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Living Legend Award are Tony Gwynn (2012), Johnny Bench (2011), Ernie Banks (2010), Hank Aaron (2009), Frank Robinson (2008) and Ken Griffey, Jr. (2007).

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Ripken, St. Agnes partner to save Cardinal Gibbons property

Posted on 20 April 2013 by WNST Staff

Saint Agnes and Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation Save Historic Field, Hospital Reveals New Proposed Master Plan for Former Cardinal Gibbons Property 
Partnership with Ripken to enable preservation of the field where the legendary Babe Ruth honed his baseball skills
Baltimore, Md. — April 19, 2013 — Saint Agnes Hospital and the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation are teaming up to save the field on which Babe Ruth played as a young man. The partnership is part of Saint Agnes’ vision for the former site of Cardinal Gibbons School, which the hospital purchased from the Archdiocese of Baltimore in 2012. The 32-acre site will soon become a mixed-use development, featuring green space, community services, recreational facilities, and grand housing, which will provide affordable housing to grandparents who are raising their grandchildren.
“Our vision is to create a community asset unlike any other,” says Bonnie Phipps, president and CEO of Saint Agnes Healthcare. “The vision for Gibbons Commons was to create an innovative plan consistent with the needs of Southwest Baltimore, ensuring the health and spirit of our community continues to grow. Honoring the past, we are partnering with key community members like the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation to ensure the creation of an environment that is respectful to those who left their fingerprint on this community. We are delighted to have Cal and his team on board, and we look forward to driving the plan for Gibbons Commons and this historic baseball field to fruition together.”
The field will be positioned on the exact site where the legendary slugger played baseball in the early 1900s, with home plate in the same location as it was when Babe played there.
The partnership between Saint Agnes and the Cal Ripken, Foundation was a natural fit, as both organizations share a similar commitment to community. With a goal of building Youth Development Parks across the country to provide at-risk youth clean, safe places to play and learn, the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation has been able to complete 14 of these parks to date.
Cal Ripken, Jr., Baseball Hall of Famer and co-founder of the Foundation, joined Saint Agnes at their Annual Caritas Gala on Saturday, April 13th to announce and share the plans for the field. He shared, “Baseball is deeply rooted in Baltimore’s history and it’s an honor to be part of one of the most historical sites in the sport. This field, consistent with the mission of the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, will inspire so many young people, and it will help educate them about leadership, work ethic, responsibility, and healthy living. We are looking forward to making the field a great place for youngsters to have fun and to connect with these vital life lessons.”
For more than 160 years, the Gibbons site has transformed the lives of thousands of young people. As the site of two Catholic institutions, the land has been home to many boys, serving as the foundation to grow into powerful, spiritual and giving men. The site first served as the Saint Mary’s Industrial School for Boys (1866-1950), a Catholic school and orphanage. St. Mary’s most notable alumnus was Babe Ruth, who arrived there in 1902 at the age of 7 and was a resident for the next 12 years. It was there that he honed his skills at baseball that later made him a legend in the sport.
Saint Mary’s successor, Cardinal Gibbons School opened in 1966 and was renowned as a powerhouse for academics and athletics in southwest Baltimore. The school closed in 2010. Many of those alumni are part of the Saint Agnes Medical Staff, and the hospital has been working closely, in partnership, with the alumni community as it continues to build on the vision for Gibbons Commons.
Gibbons Commons will be built on historical ground. It is inspired by the Orders of Brothers who served the students there and by the legacy and vision of the Daughters of Charity who founded Saint Agnes in 1862.
“We are fortunate to have strong relationships with the community at large and those groups and individuals who have been so dedicated to preserving its legacy,” states William Greskovich, VP of Operations and Capital Projects at Saint Agnes. “Gibbons Commons will build upon that legacy to create a hopeful, healthy future for our community.”
Greskovich added that plans for Gibbons Commons are currently under review by Baltimore City and that the organization is thankful for the strong relationship with the City with aligned goals of improving the health of our communities.
The Saint Agnes Foundation in partnership with the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, shared their joint fundraising goal for the development of Babe Ruth Field at Gibbons Commons is $1.5 million, of which $1.4 million has been raised.  Fundraising is being managed by the Saint Agnes Foundation.
About Saint Agnes Hospital
Founded by the Daughters of Charity in 1862, Saint Agnes Hospital is a 296-bed hospital currently completing a $200 million-plus expansion emphasizing patient safety in a high quality healthcare environment. Saint Agnes is the oldest Catholic hospital in Baltimore, Maryland and is a full-service teaching hospital with residency programs in medicine and surgery. The hospital’s key institutes include the: Cancer Institute; Cardiovascular Institute; Maryland Metabolic Institute; Orthopedic & Spine Institute; Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery; and The Bunting Health Institute for Women & Children. Saint Agnes opened the first Chest Pain ED in the world more than 30 years ago, and continues to expand and grow its Emergency Services. www.stagnes.org
About the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation
The Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation uses baseball- and softball-themed programs to help build character and teach critical life lessons to underserved youth residing in America’s most distressed communities. Founded in 2001 by members of the Ripken family in memory of their patriarch Cal, Sr., the Foundation works to create programs that positively impact at-risk youth through active community partnerships with America’s most successful youth service organizations. The Ripken Foundation uses the baseball and softball field to help teach life’s critical lessons such as perseverance, loyalty, nutrition, hard work and leadership to young people residing in disadvantaged communities. In 2012, the Foundation impacted more than 154,000 youth in 47 states around the country through Badges for Baseball and have completed 14 youth development parks, with plans to build 50 over five years.
www.ripkenfoundation.org

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Reaction to the passing of Orioles manager Earl Weaver

Posted on 19 January 2013 by WNST Staff

“Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball. This is a sad day for everyone who knew him and for all Orioles fans.

Earl made his passion for the Orioles known both on and off the field. On behalf of the Orioles, I extend my condolences to his wife, Marianna, and to his family.”-Orioles owner Peter Angelos, via a team release.

“Every time I look at an Oriole, it’s going to be missing a feather now without Earl.“-Orioles manager Buck Showalter 

“Earl was such a big part of Orioles baseball and personally he was a very important part of my life and career…and a great friend to our family. His passion for the game and the fire with which he managed will always be remembered by baseball fans everywhere and certainly by all of us who had the great opportunity to play for him. Earl will be missed but he can’t and won’t be forgotten.”-Cal Ripken Jr. 

“I would say that Earl Weaver had the greatest impact on me as a baseball player-more than anyone else. He was tough to get along with and only cared about winning, but he is the reason why Oriole baseball is what is today. Earl was a genius and a Hall of Fame manager, and the closest that’s ever got to that is the man we have right now in Buck Showalter.”-Former Orioles catcher and MASN broadcaster Rick Dempsey.

“It’s a sad day for Orioles fans and all of baseball. Earl certainly was one of the greatest managers. To me, his greatest strength was his ability to get his players to focus on playing the game on a daily basis. The results were many wins, and a Hall of Fame career.”-Former Orioles OF Ken Singleton, who played for Earl Weaver from 1975-1982.

“O’s and MLB family lost a great leader yesterday. Earl Weaver wasn’t blessed with height but if u measured his HEART he was a 7 footer.

The man lived a great life. I think it should be a celebration. 82 years is a remarkable feat.”-Orioles OF Adam Jones

“[Earl] was a strange, intense but unforgettable man…a big part of my youth.”-Broadcaster and longtime Oriole fan Roy Firestone.

“It’s a sad day, obviously. Earl was a terrific manager and I have to be grateful that Earl was with us for the Legends Series and we got a chance to spend time with him for every single statue ceremony unveiling. He is terrific. His simplicity and clarity of his leadership and his passion for baseball are unmatched. He’s a treasure for the Orioles and we are so grateful we had the opportunity to work with him this year.”Orioles Executive VP of Baseball Operations Dan Duquette

“Really sad to hear about that today.  He meant a lot to this city and to this organization.  You wouldn’t want to be anywhere else for today to spend all day with Oriole players and thousands of Orioles fans just to remember everything about him.”Steve Johnson, Orioles Pitcher

“It was the perfect relationship. We won, he was tough, we got our World Series checks. It worked…you don’t ever forget an Earl Weaver. And not just if you were an umpire. Fans, players, everyone…Earl was about winning and that was what he did.

It’s a sad day for any of us that knew Earl but it’s also a sad day, I think, for anybody that has been involved with Orioles baseball. We were lucky to have him here because he did end up in the Hall of Fame. He managed some marvelous teams. But I think now we all share the pain of him being gone.

Earl never wanted to be your friend because I think he thought it would detract from his ability to be a manager.  But the one thing he did want to do — he let you know that he was loyal to you by putting your name in the lineup. You can’t really ask for much more than that.

One of the great stories is Mike Flanagan came up to me and said ‘One year you had pitched 5 innings. It was your second or third time out at spring training and you were running foul line to foul line. He (Earl Weaver) called me over to the bench and said you see that guy out there? And Mike said you mean Jim Palmer? He said yes, just do what he does and you will be fine here in the big leagues’. Mike would always tell me that and I almost wanted to call Flanny to tell him that Earl had passed away. But he (Earl Weaver) said if you do what he does things are going to take care of themselves. Couple of years ago up at the Hall of Fame, the night before the induction I told him that story and said one of the biggest compliments you ever paid me, not directly to me, was what you told Mike Flanagan.  He looked at me and said I just didn’t tell Flanagan, I told everybody…” -Former Orioles Pitcher Jim Palmer

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Baltimore Co Executive wants residents to support orange Thursday

Posted on 04 September 2012 by WNST Staff

Kamenetz Declares Thursday “Orange You Pumped?” day in Baltimore County

All County Citizens and Employees Encouraged to Wear Oriole Orange to Work

Towson, MD (September 6, 2012) – Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz may be attending the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, but he is tuned into ESPN, keeping track of Orioles’ late season charge to overcome the Yankees and win the division.

Getting caught up in Oriole Magic, the County Executive declared Thursday, September 6 “Orange You Pumped?” day in Baltimore County.  “I can’t think of a better day to paint the town orange than this Thursday,” said Kamenetz.  “Baltimore County’s resident Iron Man Cal Ripken will have his statue dedicated early that evening and the Orioles will begin a four-game series against the Yankees with a golden opportunity to shock the baseball world.  I hope everyone will wear orange to work that day, and I hope that later that night Camden Yards will be a sea of orange.  You just have to love Buck and this team.  It’s a different hero every night.”

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John Carroll, Gilman Claim MIAA Basketball Titles

Posted on 19 February 2012 by WNST Staff

Featuring a young back-court which gained experience and confidence throughout the 2011-12 basketball season, No. 6 John Carroll overcame a pair of regular season losses to No. 4 Mount St. Joseph, rising up to stop the Gaels, 44-41, in the MIAA A Conference Championship Game, Sunday at UMBC.

In winning its second MIAA A crown, John Carroll (26-6 overall), which defeated St. Frances Academy in last year’s title game, is the fourth consecutive team to go back-to-back, joining St. Frances (2008-09 and 2009-10), Towson Catholic (2006-07 and 2007-08) and St. Joe (2004-05 and 2005-06).

The Patriots nursed a narrow lead much of the game and closed out the win by sinking 8-of-10 free throws in the fourth quarter.

Patriot senior star Jared Jones scored a game-high 17 points, including 11 in the second half.

“From the beginning of the year, we decided we were going to win another championship.  Our back-court had disappeared to college and nobody thought we had a chance to make it,” said Jones.  “Last year was a little bit easier with two senior back courts.  I was in there and we were a dominant team.  This year was harder with young guards and less experience.  It was a great year.”

John Carroll led 22-16 at the half, but St. Joe (23-6) scored seven of the first nine points of the third quarter to pull within one.  Phil Lawrence capped the burst with a steal and a coast-to-coast drive for a rim rattling one-handed jam.  John Carroll responded with an 8-3 run to go back on top, but the Gaels got a basket from Kameron Williams and a long three, at the third quarter buzzer, from Charlie Jones to pull within one, 33-32, as the fourth quarter got underway.

Lawrence then scored in the opening seconds of the fourth quarter to put St. Joe in front, 34-33.  It was the Gaels’ first lead since early in the first quarter.  It was also their last.

Two free throws from Rodney Elliott pushed JC back in front, igniting a 7-0 run which gave the Patriots a 39-33 lead.  In that flurry, junior Mike Owona took an inside feed and rose for a monster two-handed jam.

Williams, St. Joe’s leading scorer, only had one field goal in the contest and finished with just five points.  He did keep the Gaels alive, however, with three free throws after getting fouled on a shot from beyond the arc.  That made it 39-36, but St. Joe could get not closer.

Kyle Doran and Booth each hit three three-pointers for St. Joe to finish with nine points each.  That matched Lawrence’s nine points as the three shared team-high scoring honors.  Mike Owona finished with eight for John Carroll and Justin Jenifer had seven for the Patriots.

John Carroll head coach Tony Martin indicated that his team was motivated by its earlier losses to St. Joe and they worked hard to change the result.

“I thought our kids came in very focused.  We had an outstanding practice yesterday, a really good film session, and our kids believe they should have won the last one,” said Martin.  “It’s a great rivalry these last couple of years.”

The rivalry may have at least one more renewal this season, as the Patriots and Gaels will enter next week’s (Feb. 24-25-26) Baltimore Catholic League Tournament at Stevenson University as the favorites to reach the finals.  Both squads also have the inside track to receive one of the two guaranteed bids the BCL will receive to the Alhambra Catholic Invitational Tournament in March.

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Ripken & Teixeira bring Cal Sr. charity event to Baltimore

Posted on 10 February 2012 by WNSTV

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The Orioles will be better next year — and more new lies after The MacFailure

Posted on 28 September 2011 by Nestor Aparicio

Our cool, growing (and still free!) sports media company had another great B2B-Business To Business event last week in Towson with @CoachBillick and an old friend and reader of WNST.net approached me and asked the eternal Orioles question:

“So, Nasty, I’ve read all of the issues regarding the Orioles and Mike Flanagan and Andy MacPhail and Free The Birds, but what are we as fans going to do? You need to offer solutions…”

Well, virtually every human being I’ve spoken to over the last three years – and I still have a ton of friends in upper management at Major League Baseball and all over the league — has concurred: this just isn’t going to change on the field as long as Peter Angelos is involved in Baltimore baseball ownership.

But, of course, I came to that conclusion five years ago when I did the original Free The Birds rally and campaign because in my mind – and time has proven me correct – this was long past the point of no return with the local community and most people of integrity within the baseball community in 2006.

And what I’ve come to realize is that this REALLY bugs the hell out of my internet critics – the fact that I’ve been right and honest and accurate all along.

I don’t think it took any “orange Nostradamus” or 19 chapters and 75,000 words worth of my book to predict that this civic nightmare would continue given Angelos’ tactics, mindset, age and propensity through his 82 years on the planet to want to fight with people. He sues people for a living.

I knew a long time ago that it was getting worse and not better. I knew it was going to become an easy $50 million annual profit center given the deal that Angelos negotiated with Major League Baseball once the Washington Nationals were hatched. I wanted to believe he was telling the truth in 2006 but he clearly wasn’t honest and indeed got the “last laugh.”

But I must say my worst fears of where this sick tale was going in 2006 never really factored in the possibility that Mike Flanagan would be committing suicide five years later in the middle of a fifth consecutive last-place season.

But I’m not at all surprised that the team has finished in last place every year since Free The Birds.

And I’ve now spent four full years without a press pass for this last-place debacle and sick civic disgrace while the team’s head of baseball operations runs away from me at public functions when I ask a few questions.

I’ve been asking myself for a month how the Orioles are going to handle this offseason of obvious unparalleled despair. Despite the kid gloves Captain Profit Andy MacPhail has been treated with here by his local media co-workers who are disguised as journalists — his tenure here is now complete and was a large, profitable “MacFailure” .

He’s slithering out of town in the dead of the night after changing exactly NOTHING about the Baltimore Orioles in real terms, other than the profit line. Oh, and there’s the spring training home in Sarasota that was 15 years overdue – and now another publicly-aided profit center — I don’t see anything about the farm system, the future or the current state of the roster that’s appreciably better than before.

I know this much: four years, four last-place finishes. That’s the record. It is what it is.

The whole franchise stinks.

What happens to Buck Showalter is anyone’s guess but word is he’ll be the new poobah in charge of “baseball operations” at 10:07 p.m. after Red Sox playoff magic leaves the Charm City – and all that really means is that he’s the next victim who will make a few million and go back to where he came from (in this case Dallas) a few years later with a tainted resume and some more losses and evenings of angst.

Of course, if he really thinks Angelos is committed to winning a World Series, angst is only the beginning.

Just 13 months ago Showalter said he knew what he was getting into with Angelos

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