Tag Archive | "sandy"

surfing safety OC

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Surfs Up

Posted on 30 October 2012 by Tom Federline

RUKM? First of all, do not ever try this. Hurricane/Tropical Storm/Superstorm “Sandy”, done walloped the mid-atlantic and during her display of power, provided some opportunities for thrill seekers down the ocean. Thrill seekers? More like death wish on a board. The pictures available on the Internet from Ocean City, Maryland are amazing, devastating, cool and heart wrenching all at the same time. When I saw the pics of these boys taking advantage of a “once-in-a-lifetime” event, (there’s those Talking Heads again), I first shook my head and said “Crazy—–Nutballs”, then immediately after said – “what an intense rush.” The superstorm wreaked havoc on the entire eastern 1/3 of the country and evidently also provided some angry surf challenge for a few of the “brave” locals. 

I cannot surf. I tried once in my younger years, but for some reason did not pursue it. As much time as I spend in the ocean, you would have thought I would be all over it. I can water ski, knee – wake – and boogie board. I enjoy body surfing the most. Then finally I bought myself some “Fins” and discovered a whole new ballgame. I can actually cut the wave, ride in the barrel and semi-survive. I just haven’t  taken the time to have someone teach me the long board. Maybe that goes on the “Bucket List”. After viewing some of these shots during “Sandy”, I saw more evidence of maybe why I have used my better judgement. I do have to give props to these guys in the pictures. Here’s my stretch of surf lingo – How “stoked” those boys must have been to experience those ”drops” off those “bombs” and survive. When you hear them say – “Killer Wave”, they mean it…………literally.” The Ocean” – (Led Zepplin), ALWAYS lets you know who is in charge. Mother Ocean shows no mercy.

How cool it must have been to experience that kind of surf in your own backyard. Cool, but extremely dangerous. Obviously those talented young men were quite the seasoned vets. I’ll even give them credit for an attempt at ”safety”? In their slideshow, they did have a ”spotter/tow-in” on a jet ski. These pics were labeled as taken on Sunday. Those boys got guts (to put it lightly). Taking positive advantage during a negative situation. Monster surf, heck large swells, are  NOT for the meek, inexperienced, once/twice a year foam boarder.  

Ocean City took a hit. How much of a hit, is yet to be determined. I do not believe another inlet was formed. But there is serious flooding and property damage. A wake up call to all of those who care to heed the warning. That island down there is pretty fragile. Take an airplane ride next time you visit. Even just a Para-sail and you’ ll see a birds eye view of a vacation destiny ripe for disaster. “Sandy” packed quite a punch. It appears OC absorbed a few rough rounds but remained standing.

Hopefully those young lads didn’t take on to much of a “Wipeout” – (The Safaris). I remember as a kid watching the surfing championships from The Pipeline at Oahu’s North Shore in Hawaii on ABC’s Wide World of Sports. I remember as a kid wishing I could experience that ride. I remember going down da ocean hun for vacation and spending 8 hours a day on my “rubber/blow-up” raft and chewing my chest all up, to where it was raw. I always wondered if OC would ever experience those kind of waves and if it did how would it survive? Well the OC Surf was up Saturday, Sunday and yesterday. Not to Pipeline extremes, but for a few brave souls during “Sandy” – those boys will have stories for a lifetime. ”That’s just extremely tight – dudes.”

D.I.Y.

Fedman 

 

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We interrupt this radio station to bring you Hurricane Sandy

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We interrupt this radio station to bring you Hurricane Sandy

Posted on 30 October 2012 by WNST Staff

Yes, we’re one of the many without electricity in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Please enjoy all of our WNST Programming via our Buy A Toyota Audio Vault, our blogs and videos here at WNST.net. And follow us on Twitter @WNST for all of the latest news and information in the aftermath of the storm.

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Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

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Moose memories and “Welcome Home” for wise deserter of Birdland

Posted on 23 August 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

As Mike Mussina makes his triumphant return to Baltimore this weekend for the Orioles Hall of Fame activities it’s certainly a thought-provoking time to be a long-time observer and fan of the franchise.

Sure, the Orioles are once again relevant — playing meaningful and exciting games every night — which harkens to the days of 1996 & 1997 when “Moose” was an integral part of the magic of being an Orioles fan every fifth day during the zenith of Camden Yards’ passion and Inner Harbor energy.

Mussina has been gone from Baltimore – except for three visits a year in New York Yankees pinstripes – for 12 years now. So long ago that time has seemingly dimmed the glory of his deeds and his departure serves as a truly seminal moment in the awfulness of the Orioles franchise under the stewardship of Peter Angelos since 1993.

In the 1970’s it was routine for the Orioles to lose players to owners, markets and franchises that had more wealth, population and revenue. Many members of the franchise “Hall of Fame” and “Oriole Way” stalwarts left like Mayflowers in the middle of the night for greener pastures including Don Baylor, Bobby Grich, Reggie Jackson, Wayne Garland and Doug DeCinces and later Eddie Murray, Mike Boddicker, Mike Flanagan, B.J. Surhoff and Mike Bordick were all dealt away to save cash and get younger players.

But in the 1980’s and 1990’s, replete with a fan base from six states that pumped unprecedented money into the franchise and reached into the state’s funds to build Camden Yards and turn Baltimore into a spigot for Major League Baseball profitability, the Orioles never lost a player they wanted to keep.

Not until they lost the best player and pitcher of his generation of Baltimore baseball when Mike Mussina wore the “turncoat” label and bolted for the New York Yankees.

After the 2000 season, tired of three years of losing and Angelos’ low-balling and obvious meddling and mismanagement, Mussina simply took the advice of his agent Arn Tellem and played out his option and walked. On Dec. 7, 2001 after years of eschewing the notion of playing in big, bad New York he signed a six-year, $88.5 million deal to play for the Evil Empire.

I’ll share my many personal memories and my friendship with Mussina later in this blog but I can remember the surreal nature of watching that press conference from The Bronx from Chicago’s Sporting News Radio studios with my jaw open. It was the definitive signal that quality Major League Baseball players simply didn’t want to be in Baltimore anymore and it had little to do with crab cakes or the American League East.

Mussina was thought to be “irreplaceable” at the time and 11 years later time has borne out that diagnosis.

Mussina left the Baltimore Orioles because the owner stunk. He knew it and everyone in baseball knew it.

So, Mussina will finally return and don Orioles colors this weekend for the final time and he’ll find a few fresh statues on the veranda, a team in the midst of its first pennant run in 15 years and a seemingly soulless shell of a former love affair for baseball in Baltimore.

There’ll be plenty of empty seats and shoulder shrugs at his mostly sweet and sour induction into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame this weekend. Certainly a worthy candidate if there ever were one, Mussina’s time as a starter for the Birds is only eclipsed by the deeds of Jim Palmer, who as I’ve said many times is the greatest (and most underappreciated) Oriole of all time by any measurement.

Palmer let loose with a haughty pronouncement on a MASN broadcast earlier this week in promoting this weekend’s festivities. “The Moose is going to Cooperstown – at least I hope. He’s got 270 wins,” said Palmer, who went on to proclaim that in the steroid era to win all of those games and Gold Gloves and remain a “clean figure” in the needle witch hunt of the Mitchell Report should get him a Hall of Fame ballot punched in 2014.

For “real” Orioles fans, he’ll always be known as the Benedict Arnold of the modern generation for leaving the

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