Tag Archive | "Sports"

Updates and helpful hints for next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar

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Updates and helpful hints for next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar

Posted on 17 June 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

While in the process of putting together as many details and helpful hints as possible for our next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar, I’ve been going through some old blogs and media information that I’ve dispersed over the years here at WNST.net.

All of the details of our Baltimore Sports Media Superstar search and competition are now a click away if you want to be a contestant: http://wnst.net/wordpress/wnst/the-2012-baltimore-sports-media-superstar-search-is-underway-at-wnst-net/

This recent blog is very thorough and should answer all of your questions and most of your concerns. I sincerely hope you join the competition and begin your first blog today! This weekend has been active with participation and questions and entries to nasty@wnst.net.

Please do not send docx files as attachments. I’d appreciate all resumes in a pdf or .doc format for sharing purposes.

Also, our hashtag for the competition will be #WNSTBSMS and all Twitter activity should include this easy 8-digit shortcode for WNST Baltimore Sports Media Superstar.

If you want some extended reading, helpful hints and some of the WNST philosophy (and reality) please see my “State of Baltimore Sports Media” series from January 2010 here:

Part 1: Where Do You Get Your Info and Whom Do You Trust In Baltimore Media?

Part 2: How Does WNST Measure Up To Other Baltimore Media?

Part 3: Content and Distribution: Sharing Is Caring

Part 4: Power of Partnership: Flogging The Flag

Part 5: What Is The Future Of Sports Media In Baltimore?

And my three-part update in May 2011:

Part 1: What WNST Stands For In Local Media

Part 2: Journalism is dead…but not at WNST

Part 3: People Ask Me All The Time, “How Big Is Your Stick?”

These blogs are almost a “handbook” and should make the position and our needs at WNST.net even more clear. But, granted, it’s going to take you a few hours to read it and years to digest it but the more you know and understand about the local sports media industry the greater your chances of success.

I wish someone would’ve given me a handbook back in 1992 ;)

As a bonus, here’s Part 3 of my Loyola lecture on women, video and mobile streaming in 2012…

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Here’s what your local “sports media personality” needs to know in 2012

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Here’s what your local “sports media personality” needs to know in 2012

Posted on 15 June 2012 by Nestor Aparicio

It was so much easier when I was growing up, this sports media thing. First, you learned how to write and then you went to some journalism or “communications” college or university, you did an internship and then sent resumes out and you got your dream job and lived happily ever after.

And maybe you got a gold watch if you hung around at the newspaper or TV station for 25 years or more?

Here at WNST.net this summer, we’re extending an open offer to any Baltimore sports fan who wants to be the next Baltimore Sports Media Superstar via our competition. All of the info is here…

The harsh reality of media and new media in 2012 is that it’s an all-encompassing commitment of time, experience and continuing education that makes a local personality or entity relevant as breaking news, information, analysis and the games themselves fly by in real time with your mobile device with you at all times.

And that’s just the content side.

Here’s a speech I gave to a Loyola Sports Marketing class in May 2012. This is Part 1 in a series about my current thoughts on the state of Baltimore sports media and the industry as a whole:

If you can’t sell your own personal brand – by bringing in audience, engaging them, adding value to their life experience and adding expertise or analysis that people care about – you will NOT be successful in the new media world.

If no cares to be your audience – or in this era that would be “opt in” or “follow” or “subscribe” — then no one will be available to stimulate the commerce necessary that ultimately will pay your salary via local sponsorship dollars..

In the old days it was easy – there were three TV channels, a few radio stations and a newspaper or two. Whoever the local program director or editor hired was all that the public got and all that you’d ever get from the “inside” of a sports team. The competition for those scarce jobs and the outstanding pay via expensive local television news ads fueled by automotive dealers and local advertisers was all coveted. And the public in Baltimore essentially had three choices for the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. news – WBAL, WMAR and WJZ. There were two newspapers – The Sun and The News American. And sports radio didn’t exist except for Charley Eckman screaming bloody murder about some local issue on the Johnny Walker show on WFBR.

That was the entire world of Baltimore sports media in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

And the only ones who really did it the “new world” way were Coach Eckman and Tom Davis, who bought and sold their own “in-show” advertising and made far more money than most radio “talking heads” did and certainly more than the folks at The Sun or The News American.

All of the TV and newspaper people were part of a larger ensemble and staff. The radio sports talk guys needed to fight for audience and those radio stations needed hosts who garnered real traffic and real new business for local sponsors and advertisers.

This is the world I lived in on local AM radio from 1992 until 2006, when tens of thousands of you crashed my webpage and my email with traffic from all over the world after the initial “Free The Birds” walkout and showed me a new world of WNST.net on the internet.

In the new media world, if you can’t sell your own brand as a sports media expert then how can a local sponsor or business owner trust that you can help them sell pizza or cars or beer?

The reality is that I’m in college every day at WNST.net. The college of life, emerging media and business in 2012 and how it relates to the changing ways of sports fans’ consumption of information via mobile devices in real time.

It’s taken two decades but I’ve finally figured out why I went to college back in the 1980’s. All of those beers at Jay’s off campus at the University of Baltimore and all of those evening classes about Marshall McLuhan — it’s all finally paid off. All those classes with Julie Simon and discovering the roots of communication and theory of how the “medium is the message” and emerging “global village” has changed the world in the last decade since the internet has extended our FCC towers at what was formerly a “little AM radio station” at WNST-AM 1570 and brought video and words and statistics and instant feedback into the realm of the palm of our hands via mobile via WNST.net.

I’ve finally figured out the value of my University of Baltimore education and Corporation Communications degree – it just took me 20 years!

While I’m not going to be donating to UB anytime soon – or anytime that the name of Peter G. Angelos

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Glenn gives Courtney Upshaw the Bama Ozzie quiz

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Glenn gives Courtney Upshaw the Bama Ozzie quiz

Posted on 28 April 2012 by WNSTV

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Bernard Pierce apologizes to Glenn for 5 TDs vs. Maryland Terps

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Bernard Pierce apologizes to Glenn for 5 TDs vs. Maryland Terps

Posted on 28 April 2012 by WNSTV

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Ripken & Teixeira bring Cal Sr. charity event to Baltimore

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Ripken & Teixeira bring Cal Sr. charity event to Baltimore

Posted on 10 February 2012 by WNSTV

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Live from Indy: Former Terps QB Zolak dishes on Brady, Boston & Flacco

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Live from Indy: Former Terps QB Zolak dishes on Brady, Boston & Flacco

Posted on 30 January 2012 by WNSTV

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Live from New York: Nestor examines future of sports media and technology

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Live from New York: Nestor examines future of sports media and technology

Posted on 09 November 2011 by Nestor Aparicio

I’ll be live blogging all day from the Sports Business Journal “Sports Media & Technology” Conference 2011 in New York.

This is my fourth year live covering this event, which shapes the way WNST.net moves to serve Baltimore sports fans in a better and more interactive way. I’m always learning about life and work and business and marketing and technology.

Today will be a fun day of discovery.

Follow along with me on Twitter as well @WNST.

*******

The first panel is about “TV Everywhere”…it’s about how we as sports fans can access our cable television and programming that we’re already paying for in our homes and get it delivered to our mobile devices.

I’m finding this more fascinating every day. We ALL pay Peter Angelos for MASN and Orioles games in the summer. We pay him a LOT of money for this “right” to have Major League Baseball in our living rooms, bedrooms, mancaves, etc.

So, next April, try to get that same game that you’re already paying for on your mobile device.

(Here’s a hint…you CAN’T)

Some people are starting to see the hypocrisy in this model across all cable television networks.

The topic here today is “When will you cut the cord” and move to a mobile or tablet (IPad) as a preference for consuming sports content and live programming.

Here’s question of the moment: Do you think we’ll ever abolish the monthly cable television bill and be able to buy our favorite websites/platform/content ala carte and have it delivered to whatever screen we’re watching — mobile, tablet, old-school television?

Also, what sets sports aside from all other kinds of television and content programming is that it’s almost instantly disposable, unlike sitcoms, movies, reality television that has an afterlife for reruns and re-distribution. Other than watching last Sunday’s Ravens win over the Steelers, most Ravens fans don’t go back and watch past games over and over again. Except for ESPN Classic and the rare NFL game you’d wanna watch again during the week, live sports programming is worthless after the game ends.

****

The topic now has moved to 3D television and how it will impact sports. I saw the first-ever 3D screenings of an NFL game and it was amazing but I don’t know anyone who has a 3D set and I’m not really sure what programming they’re actually watching and how often they’re putting on those funky glasses.

Have you ever seen an NFL or college football game in 3D?

It’s superbadass…but feels very inaccessible to me.

These executives here today are trying to figure out if there’s a demand for it in the future and how it would make money.

*********

The late morning panel is the one I’m most fascinated about today in New York — “Independent Digital Media Outlets — Leveraging Sports Content”

It’s a panel that includes the leaders of SB Nation, Bleacher Report, The PostGame, etc. Several of these people, I’ve known for a number of years and I respect the national platforms they’re building and trying to galvanize local bloggers to create content.

In my opinion, most of the “amateur” content is just that — amateur content.

I’ve always tried to make WNST.net content “expert” or “insider” content, not just someone in a basement writing about sports as a fan. Having done this for 27 years, I can tell you that there’s an ocean of differentiation between a real journalist and sports writer or broadcaster and someone who is a  fan writing without perspective, intelligence and experience that I as a self-considered expert care to read.

If your opinion has no sources, no background, no true expertise, I have no interest in reading it.

And I think it shows — the analysis of a truly seasoned sports expert who is working as a journalist.

What do you think of amateur content that is “packaged” as expert opinion on websites?

And do you find yourself returning to these kinds of sites often?

Bleacher Report?

SB Nation?

Yahoo Sports?

The PostGame?

Grantland?

Big Lead Sports?

Shannon Terry of 247Sports just said it all: “Can we hire the best sportswriters and talent in the industry and attract new readers, users to our website and platform?”

That’s what we’ve tried to do at WNST.net and that’s what the national players are doing…

Another great Terry quote: “The internet exposes you…are you aggressive, accurate, timely, relevant?” The internet and the users will tell you whether you are. Facebook and Twitter will give you an honest evaluation of your relevance.

*******

At least I know I’m thinking the right way at WNST.net.

Every panelist is talking mobile for sports media technology. Many platforms are getting 30% of their traffic from Iphone & Droids. They are debating the value of overinforming on Twitter or Facebook vs. getting direct traffic via their website. Using social media as a breadcrumb and then finding sponsors and advertisers to support the platform so they can afford to pay talent and content creators.

Very interesting day thus far…lots of food for thought.

I’m always trying to find better ways to bring instant Baltimore sports news and information to your on your phone. If you have any feedback for how you use WNST, please drop me a note: nasty@wnst.net.

 

MORE TO COME ALL DAY FROM NEW YORK…

 

 

 

 

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In Memoriam of my dear friend Papa Joe Chevalier

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In Memoriam of my dear friend Papa Joe Chevalier

Posted on 05 June 2011 by Nestor Aparicio

In a former life, I used to be “Nasty” Nestor Aparicio. And even though I don’t talk about it much or brag on as I probably should, I was a nationally-syndicated sports talk host on 425 radio stations across the United States back at the turn of the century. And every night when I was done my four hours of laughs and conversations, I handed the baton to a far better man than I named “Papa” Joe Chevalier.

Chevalier died yesterday at the age of 62 in Las Vegas from the complications of a stroke he suffered in March.

Papa Joe was a simple man. He’d always come booming into the offices about 90 minutes before his show and always with a hearty laugh and always penning his opening monologue and script on a legal notepad and rehearsing it on those who would hear him. Sometimes, I’d run into the bathroom to take a leak at the 5:40 break and he’d forever be trying out some one-liner on me or engaging me in sports talk – even if it was calling the Ravens “jailbirds” or digging some fun at something Baltimore-related.

Papa Joe Chevalier was old school – and I mean that in the most complimentary way possible. He KNEW sports. He KNEW gambling. He KNEW the mentality of big business in sports and where the money came from. He was no fraud when it came to sports knowledge. He was the real deal!

Because I broadcast the majority of my shows from the second story bedroom at my house on Springhouse Circle in White Marsh, I didn’t get to see Papa Joe every day. But I heard his show every day because my station here at WNST-AM 1570 in Baltimore carried his show even before I ever met him or knew him. And the really sad part is that because we always crossed shifts, I never really got to go out for a beer after work in Chicago with him other than at work functions, when he truly held court with the staff of young producers. Everyone in that building liked Papa Joe.

He would always send me outta the studio when his shift would begin with a standard phrase: “I love ya, kid!”

And I think he did, too, even when I was on the backend of a few “Bite Me Wednesday” segments, which was his “airing of the grievances” and beefs.

My unique “broadcast from Baltimore” contract language created a scenario for him that opened the door for him to do shows back in his adopted Las Vegas. So my negotiating and hardcore “I’m not leaving Baltimore” stance with management at SNR bought him some leeway that he loved.  And it seemed like he was in Vegas every weekend so I never got to go to Wrigley Field or Comiskey Park with him but that would’ve been a real hoot.

That Sporting News Radio circle of people in Chicago was really a wonderful team of  great sports fans in retrospect. It was truly like a WKRP family of people, most of whom I really, really LIKED. I would start naming names but because they’ll all wind up reading this it I want to be careful not to leave anyone out. But there are at least a dozen people whom I keep in very regular contact with because I liked them so much and those memories are so dear to me as I learned a lot about the big corporate world during that period of my life when big money and agents were trying to “make Nasty Nestor a star.”

Chevalier, however, didn’t really care whether he was a “star” or not. He was a quirky old bird, indeed.

Our programming leader Matt Nahigian would implore “Papa” Joe to simply say his name before and after every break – a very typical, simple radio request that allegedly helped Arbitron ratings and “brand familiarity” but Chevalier wanted no part of it.

“I do the damned show every night,” he would squeal. “They all know who the hell I am!”

And who was he? A throwback – a real old-timer from Pittsburgh whose Steelers’ swagger didn’t play so great with me during those years because the Ravens won the Super Bowl on Jan. 28, 2001 when I was sitting in the national sports talk chair and I really had the upper hand on him every time during that fragile period in the Baltimore-Pittsburgh wars of two centuries. Anytime the Pirates and Orioles would come up he’d start pretending to blow the whistle of Omar Moreno’s wife to drive me nuts. And he’d routinely play “We Are Family” and send it as a “shout out” to me on national radio.

And while most of my angst against Pittsburgh and all people from Pittsburgh is legendary, I can honestly say his ribbing never bothered me because it was part of the beauty of our friendship.

We bet a dinner at Bern’s Steakhouse in Tampa on the radio every time the Ravens and Steelers played and he lost a LOT. And he never, ever paid up! And for that I’m really, really sad! I would’ve loved a three-hour dinner talking sports with Joe over some sloppy steaks and red wine and we probably would’ve slipped upstairs for a café and a nightcap of ice cream and whiskey amidst conversations of Clemente and the Robinsons, Unitas and Bradshaw. And that would’ve been one helluva sports conversation, he and I — especially if we had added a few drinks and some microphones.

I found out he died late Saturday night from my pal Bernard Bokenyi on Facebook via this Las Vegas newspaper obit and writing about him makes me feel good and brings a smile to my face. Just thinking about the fuss we’re all making over him would make him bristle.

He was a really neat old guy and I never spent a moment with him that I didn’t enjoy. And his audience was immense, loyal and loved his charm. He created a fan “Bill of Rights” during the baseball strike of 1994 and had people all over the country send in baseball cards that he destroyed.

He was a man of the people and he was truly the same dude in real life as he was on the radio. Full of loveable bluster and an unending source of sports information!

In a media world fraught with frauds, phonies, liars, cowards and fools he was a man who had knowledge, integrity, an incredible sense of humor and we had a mutual respect that was unusually genuine.

I really LIKED Papa Joe. And he really liked me. It was a cool relationship and one that I probably didn’t cultivate or appreciate quite enough.

I hadn’t talked to him in a few years but I loved that old man. And I’m going to miss him and his soft voice. He was a really good man!

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William Donald Schaefer

Posted on 21 April 2011 by Shawn Credle

This past Monday, the city of Baltimore, and the state of Maryland, lost a true icon in city and state politics.  William Donald Schaefer meant so much to many of the citizens of this state, where he served as mayor of Baltimore for 16 years, Governor for 8 years, and Comptroller for another 8 years.  He dedicated his life to the people.  And the people loved him for it.

One visual that I will always remember was seeing him, in a old-style bathing suit, in the seal pool of the then-brand-new National Aquarium.  But, seeing things like that is what made the people love him.  And he loved the people.  He defended the city of Baltimore everywhere he went, especially when dealing with the city’s sports teams. 

During his tenure as Mayor, Schaefer would engage in conflict with Robert Irsay, the owner of the Colts.  Irsay demanded that improvements be made on Memorial Stadium.  When that didn’t happen, Irsay moved the Colts to Indianapolis.  It was a crushing blow to the city of Baltimore, and an even more crushing blow to Schaefer.  But, he wouldn’t stop.  And while Art Modell moved the Browns to Baltimore during Parris Glendening’s reign as Governor, the groundwork was laid down by Schaefer.  He successfully assisted in engineering another NFL team to come here, as well as lead the way for Oriole Park at Camden Yards to be built (to ensure that the Orioles would not leave also).  He knew how much the city loved its’ teams.  And, once again, he fought to do something that make the citizens happy.

Making citizens happy.  That’s what Schaefer did, even if he managed to make some other politicians upset.  Projects like the Aquarium, Harborplace, the Light Rail, and more are just a few projects that help change the city.  As far as sports is concerned, both the Orioles and the Ravens owe a lot of graditude to Schaefer.  Take a minute to imagine Baltimore without the Orioles and Ravens.  If it wasn’t for the dedication of William Donald Schaefer, we may have had to deal with no football on Sundays, and no baseball during the summer. 

Rest in Peace “Willy Don!”  And thank you for your 50 years of public service.  The Baltimore sports fanatics are forever in your debt.

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When Sports Really Don’t Matter

Posted on 09 January 2011 by Marty Mossa

We “live” and “die” sports.  What an interesting clique. Most people don’t, but I do know people who really do live and die with sports. 

In light of the tragic events that unfolded in Arizona yesterday, we really need to put sports into perspective.  Although Drew Brees and Peyton Manning both walked away losers yesterday; the sun still rose for them this morning. They still have their family and friends.

But such is not the case for the families of six people who attended a “congresswomen’s corner” town hall meeting yesterday in Arizona.  Congresswomen Gabrielle Giffords was conducting a town hall meeting when a crazed gunman open fired and shot 20 people, killing six of them.  One of the dead was a nine year old girl who was interested in government.  Ironically she was born on September 11, 2001, and was the granddaughter of Dallas Green who guided the 1980 Philadelphia Phillies to a World Title. 

 This tragic event must remind us that sports are for entertainment, and it doesn’t matter whether the Ravens win or lose today.  Sports are for fun, and don’t affect our lives like real life events like yesterday’s shooting in Arizona.

 

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