Tag Archive | "terrell suggs"

Tucker highest rated Ravens in EA Sports’ Madden 15

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Tucker highest rated Ravens in EA Sports’ Madden 15

Posted on 04 August 2014 by WNST Staff

EA Sports unveiled the player ratings for their upcoming “Madden 15″ release Monday. Thanks to BaltimoreRavens.com for compiling the ratings in an easy to digest photo…


The highest overall rated Raven is kicker Justin Tucker (93), with guard Marshal Yanda and defensive tackle Haloti Ngata just behind (92 each). The only other players rated in the 90′s are cornerback Lardarius Webb and linebackers Elvis Dumervil and Terrell Suggs, who all received ratings of 90.

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Rookie defensive end Urban lost for season due to torn ACL

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Rookie defensive end Urban lost for season due to torn ACL

Posted on 31 July 2014 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — After being carted off the field with a severe right knee injury, Ravens defensive end Brent Urban learned he will be lost for the season due to a torn anterior cruciate ligament.

Head coach John Harbaugh confirmed the specifics of the injury following Thursday’s practice, describing it as “a clean tear” to reporters. Urban will be placed on season-ending injured reserve after being selected in the fourth round of May’s draft.

“He’s been through this before. He tore his other ACL about five years ago,” Harbaugh said. “He fought through a bad ankle injury his senior year at Virginia and rehabbed that and got back really quick, obviously, in the offseason here. It’s a tough break. It was just a situation where one guy was blocking another guy, and the knee just buckled on him.”

The Ravens had expectations for Urban to become an immediate contributor in the defensive line rotation, potentially serving as the primary backup to veteran Chris Canty at the 5-technique defensive end spot. Urban’s injury likely opens the door for second-year lineman Kapron Lewis-Moore to receive more reps.

A day after being injured on the same play as Urban, defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan sat out Thursday’s practice with lingering back spasms, but Harbaugh expected him to return to action “soon.”

Linebacker Daryl Smith (groin) and cornerback Lardarius Webb (back) while linebacker Terrell Suggs and defensive tackle Haloti Ngata were given a day off to rest. Smith was absent from his second straight practice while Webb has been sidelined since last Friday with back spasms.

Inside linebacker Albert McClellan returned to practice after missing Wednesday.

Wide receiver Jacoby Jones and running back Justin Forsett were both on the field during the opening portion of practice but appeared to be receiving the day off. Forsett observed the rest of the running backs going through individual drills while Jones did some work at the Jugs machine while the wide receivers participated in drills.

Other offensive players absent included guard Will Rackley (concussion-related symptoms) and wide receiver Jeremy Butler (groin).

Defensive tackle Terrence Cody (hip surgery) remains on the active physically unable to perform list.

The Ravens were working in helmets, shells, and shorts on Thursday.

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Steve Smith’s expectations realistic in coming to Ravens

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Steve Smith’s expectations realistic in coming to Ravens

Posted on 23 July 2014 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Steve Smith has talked plenty about motivation this offseason but is also grounded in reality as he officially begins his first training camp with the Ravens on Thursday.

Understandably having a chip on his shoulder over being released by the Carolina Panthers after spending the first 13 seasons of his career in Charlotte, the 35-year-old wide receiver is looking to prove he still has plenty left in the tank to help the Ravens, but there are no predictions of a 1,300-yard season or a return to the Pro Bowl. His motivation is shaped by perspective with an eye toward the end of his career knowing nobody wins the battle with Father Time.

“You can never perform at as high a level at 35 that you did at 25,” Smith said. “My job is to go out there and catch what’s catchable and have fun doing it. [I don’t want to] really concern myself too much on the ‘what-ifs’ and ‘Should I be here?’ or ‘Should I be there?’ The things that I’ve experienced in my career, honestly, they’re not going to get any better, and the reason why is because my perspective is different. Hopefully, I will accomplish better things statistically, but I’m living the dream.”

It’s difficult to predict what to expect from Smith in terms of production on the field as his yards per catch average has decreased from 17.6 in 2011 to 16.1 in 2012 to 11.6 last season, which was his lowest mark since 2007. The 5-foot-9, 195-pound wideout has depended on speed on the outside for much of his career, but he will need to reinvent himself as more of a possession receiver to thrive in Gary Kubiak’s offensive system while Torrey Smith and Jacoby Jones provide two stronger outside options in the vertical passing game.

The University of Utah product turned in an excellent spring, catching nearly everything thrown his way and running crisp shorter routes whether working outside or in the slot. Smith downplayed how long it will take to build a rapport with quarterback Joe Flacco — simply explaining he’ll catch anything that should be caught — but also recognizes he doesn’t have to be the primary focus of the passing game like he was for more than a decade with the Panthers.

“I understand there are going to be times when I’m the premier receiver,” Smith said, “and there are times that I need to clear through for Torrey or Jacoby or Marlon [Brown]. You have to be able to be efficient in any offense; you’ve got to understand in every play what your role is.”

Of course, the Ravens’ motivation in signing Smith to a three-year, $11.5 million in March went beyond the number of passes he’ll catch as the offense lacked vocal leadership and swagger last season following the trade of veteran wideout Anquan Boldin. Smith has already shown he isn’t afraid to stir the pot as he mixed it up with cornerback Lardarius Webb during last month’s mandatory minicamp.

He’ll need to be productive on the field to authentically establish himself as a leader, but the early returns suggest both sides of the ball have benefited from his competitive fire during practices. It’s a reputation that was well known to the Ravens long before the veteran stepped foot in Owings Mills this spring.

“We get another defensive guy playing offense with Steve coming over,” linebacker Terrell Suggs said. “This is one guy last year [who defensive coordinator] Dean Pees told us not to anger, and it was a preseason game. The goal was to do our time and get out of there. It’s great to have him on our team.”

Smith’s ability to rebound from an underwhelming 745-yard season a year ago will go a long way in determining whether the Ravens can substantially improve their 29th-ranked offense in 2013. He doesn’t need to be a 1,000-yard receiver, but the veteran will be asked to catch shorter passes and help move the chains on third down, an area in which the Ravens ranked only 20th last season.

The longtime Panther knows his career is winding down but thinks he’s found the ideal place to fit his personality.

“I’m lucky to even be here,” Smith said. “After you hit 35, you should be with a walker and all that stuff. I’m just happy to be playing ball and have the opportunity to play in a conference where it’s smash-mouth football, and I’m going to fit in perfectly [with] that.”

Pierce, Reid ready to go

The Ravens will conduct their first full-squad workout on Thursday morning and enter the summer with a short injury report as running back Bernard Pierce and offensive lineman Jah Reid both participated fully in Tuesday’s workout.

Pierce has now been cleared after undergoing offseason shoulder surgery while Reid was sidelined with a calf injury in the spring.

“These two days they both looked good. They both looked fine; they have no problems,” coach John Harbaugh said. “There are some full-speed-type drills out there, not contact, but the speed of it, and they had no problems. We’ll work them through the first two days. Thursday and Friday are both full speed, but they’re not full contact, so that’ll be another chance for them to take the next step that way. I don’t anticipate any problems.”

Defensive tackle Terrence Cody is the only veteran with a clear injury concern entering camp as he’s still recovering from offseason hip surgery. Harbaugh said the fifth-year lineman is progressing, but there is no clear target date of when he’ll return to the practice field.

Dumervil grateful for opportunity provided by Bowlen in Denver

With Wednesday’s news of Pat Bowlen stepping down as owner of the Denver Broncos due to Alzheimer’s disease, Ravens linebacker Elvis Dumervil offered his support after spending the first seven seasons of his career in Denver.

“He helped impact my life [and] my family for generations to come,” Dumervil said. “He was a great guy. He always asked about my health, and when I was out for the year [in 2010], we talked a bit. He was always great to me, and I was always grateful for that. When I heard about the news, it was a sad day for that.”

 

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Suggs applying tough lessons from last season to bounce back in 2014

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Suggs applying tough lessons from last season to bounce back in 2014

Posted on 18 June 2014 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs spent a decade chasing the elusive Super Bowl glory he finally tasted at the end of the 2012 season.

But he couldn’t have imagined how difficult it was going to be defending that championship following the retirement of Ray Lewis and the free-agent departure of Ed Reed, leaving the Ravens without two Hall of Fame players and leaders who were the heart and soul of the organization. Of course, a myriad of reasons explained an 8-8 season in which the Ravens missed the playoffs, ranging from a porous offensive line and nonexistent running game to an otherwise-solid defense that struggled to create turnovers and get off the field in the fourth quarter.

Suggs and his veteran teammates said all the right things last season when asked how they’d possibly replace the leadership void created by the departures of Lewis, Reed, and other veterans, claiming there were more than enough voices ready to handle the changes. But the 31-year-old linebacker acknowledged Wednesday it was not only “very agonizing” to miss the postseason for the first time since 2007 but also draining going through his first season without two men who’d been older brothers to him for the first 10 years of his career.

“I had those older guys around to build, and it was a period of adjustment,” Suggs said. “It was weird, and it transpired onto the field — not having those guys there. But, the most [important] thing we can learn from last year about those guys not being there is those were once-in-a-lifetime guys — Ed Reed and Ray Lewis — and all we can be is ourselves. They’re not going to come walking through the door to help us win another championship. All you can be is yourself, and that should be enough.”

Even though Suggs posted double-digit sacks for the fifth time in his career in 2013, his play down the stretch didn’t help the Ravens’ push for a sixth straight trip to the postseason as he collected only one sack in the final eight games, leading many to speculate he was playing hurt. His 10 sacks were enough to earn him his sixth invitation to the Pro Bowl, but his play against both the run and pass deteriorated at an alarming rate with four games in which he posted one or no tackles.

With the Ravens needing a win over the Cincinnati Bengals in Week 17 to sneak into the playoffs, Suggs and fellow pass-rusher Elvis Dumervil combined for one tackle and zero sacks in a 34-17 loss that resulted in the Ravens staying home in January. Asked to reflect on his up-and-down season at this week’s mandatory minicamp, Suggs didn’t hide behind what could have been the convenient excuse of saying he was hurt.

“One of the things was you get a little cold and you gain a little weight,” said Suggs about the second half of the season. “I probably put on a little too much weight down the stretch there. But that was one of my big focuses going into this year. Definitely, if I keep my weight down, I can have a strong finish. I think I was pretty much healthy.”

Head coach John Harbaugh went out of his way to praise Suggs for his conditioning level upon reporting to Owings Mills earlier this week. The veteran linebacker likes the changes made to both sides of the ball, citing the positive vibe created by the hiring of new offensive coordinator Gary Kubiak.

The linebacker also complimented the free-agent signing of veteran wide receiver Steve Smith, who isn’t afraid to ruffle some feathers like he did during Wednesday’s practice when he got into a scuffle with cornerback Lardarius Webb. It’s the kind of attitude that was lacking on the offensive side of the ball last season following the trade of wide receiver Anquan Boldin.

“It’s good to have that. We had it a few years ago in 81,” Suggs said. “And it’s good to have that fire back on that side of the ball, [to] have somebody who will go out there and jab back with us and compete.”

In addition to acquiring Smith and a few other veterans such as center Jeremy Zuttah and tight end Owen Daniels, the Ravens spent a large portion of their offseason re-signing their own players, including a four-year contract extension for Suggs. The deal did provide short-term relief in lowering his 2014 salary cap figure from $12.4 million to $7.8 million, but general manager Ozzie Newsome made a $16 million gamble in guaranteed money that Suggs’ second half last season was more of an aberration than a preview of what’s to come for a linebacker entering his 12th season.

So, who is the real Suggs at this stage of his career? The man who looked like a Defensive Player of the Year candidate while accumulating nine sacks in the first eight games last year or the worn-down player who failed to set the edge against the run and provided little pressure on the quarterback down the stretch?

The truth is likely somewhere in the middle, but Suggs appears determined to prove he’s closer to the player he was in the first half of the 2013 season based on what kind of shape he was in upon arriving at the team facility this week. And he made it clear he’s recommitted to just being himself after struggling to adjust to life without Lewis or Reed for the first time in his NFL career.

“You’re going to always have something to prove when you’re playing this game,” Suggs said. “You never want to hit your cruising altitude; you always want to be ascending with your game. You can always get better.”

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Lewis-Moore only new absence during Wednesday’s minicamp practice

Posted on 18 June 2014 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The Ravens continued to have excellent attendance at their second day of mandatory minicamp as only five players were missing from the field on Wednesday.

Defensive end Kapron Lewis-Moore was not present after leaving practice the day before with what appeared to be a left hamstring injury. He joined defensive tackle Terrence Cody (hip surgery), offensive linemen Jah Reid (calf) and Parker Graham (undisclosed), and wide receiver Kamar Aiken (lower leg) as non-participants on Wednesday.

Coach John Harbaugh said Tuesday that Reid’s calf strain continues to improve and that the fourth-year lineman will be ready for the start of training camp. Cody isn’t expected to return until camp.

Running back Bernard Pierce (shoulder surgery) once again took part in individual drills and is on track to be cleared fully by the start of camp in late July.

Asked if he was pleased with the conditioning level of veterans such as Haloti Ngata and Terrell Suggs who were not present for the previous three weeks of voluntary organized team activities, Harbaugh did not express any specific concerns in getting his first look at them this week.

“It’s hard to evaluate all that, but I’m certainly not disappointed in anybody,” Harbaugh said. “They all look good. If I was going to single a guy out, it would probably be Terrell Suggs. He can give you the numbers, but I’ll tell you this — the numbers were very good. You can tell he’s been working really hard.”

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The latest #WNSTSweet16 is a laughing matter

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The latest #WNSTSweet16 is a laughing matter

Posted on 25 March 2014 by Luke Jones

Championship trophies tarnish and the details from box scores fade from memory over the years, but the way our sports figures made us feel is never forgotten as this week’s #WNSTSweet16 examines some of the biggest sports personalities to grace the Charm City with their presence.

This week’s list is not only open to local athletes but managers, coaches, broadcasters, and even super fans who gained notoriety from their unique personalities. Many were known as goofballs because of their naturally-comedic traits while a few may have qualified through actions that merely came across as humorous in the eyes of others.

There are no statistics for humor on which to rate these individuals, but there’s no shortage of goofballs who still resonate with the local community years after their time in the public eye — and even on this earth, in some cases — has come to an end.

With April Fools’ Day only a week away, we honor the #WNSTSweet16 local sports goofballs who were as memorable for their personalities as anything else they accomplished:

Continue to next page for No. 16

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B&B Big Story Banter: Rice and Suggs

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B&B Big Story Banter: Rice and Suggs

Posted on 22 February 2014 by Brett Dickinson

By: Brett Dickinson and Barry Kamen

BK: The Baltimore Ravens are in off season mode. The Baltimore Orioles are still reporting to Sarasota for spring training. Despite these facts, the Baltimore area dominated the sports headlines this week; equal parts good, with equal parts bad. I want to start the banter with the Ravens already answering their biggest question of the off season, signing OLB Terrell Suggs to an extension that lowers his current salary cap number by $4 million, and will allow Suggs to finish his career where it all started.

Mr. Dickinson, what is your take on the parameters of the contract that T-Sizzle received, and did the Ravens make the correct decision by bringing him back?

BD: Personally, many people already know that I am not a fan of Suggs, because of his off-field transgressions.  But I also believe that he has been overrated by the general public for several years now, even when he won the Defensive Player of the Year award in 2012.

Suggs has a tendency of disappearing for not just plays, but games at a time. None was more evident than the final nine games of the season last year, recording one sack in that span.  For a player being paid hefty money to attack the QB, he is simply not consistent enough to garner such lofty contracts.

His sack totals are elevated, as he has a tendency to have big games against inferior offensive tackles (he recorded 3 of his 10 sacks against the Dolphins last year, and that was before they traded for Bryant McKinnie).  The same went for his peak season of 2012, where out of his 14.5 sacks, 9 came in three games.

Add in his off-field issues, with domestic violence charges and the government collecting retrieving his arsenal of assault weapons from his home and I do not think he has earned an extension. More importantly at 31, his best years are already behind him and for a team trying to retool, that little over $3 Million could be used elsewhere.

The Seahawks laid the blueprint on how to build the franchise in the 2010’s, by adding a bevy of highly skilled role players, surrounded by key stars at key positions.  They had one of the greatest defenses ever, without spending big money on a single pass-rusher.  Instead adding depth throughout their roster, they were able to dominate the entire league.

Ozzie has a problem awarding players for past performances, which has led to the Ravens living in cap hell for years now.  That will only continue if he does not learn that it is better to cut ties with a player one year too early, rather than one year too late.

 

So Barry, speaking of cutting ties, what is the general reaction to the Ray Rice Saga and how should the Ravens (and the NFL) respond? Should (and will) he be on the roster come September?

Ray Rice and FianceBK: Shock. Sadness. Disappointment. Those three words can sum up how the Ravens Nation feels following the arrest of their once beloved running back. Prior to this season, Ray Rice had been a pillar of stability, both on and off the field. Rice’s production, coupled with his strong anti-bullying campaign, made him impossible to dislike. After a disappointing 2013 season in which Rice averaged just 3.1 yards per carry and 4 touchdowns, many wonder if Rice’s days of being one of the top running backs in the league are over.

I cannot help but wonder if there is a connection between Rice’s disgruntled work life and his personal life. There is no excuse for ever striking a woman. And when that woman is already the mother of your child and set to be your wife, more questions have to be asked. The Baltimore Ravens have had their fair share of legal issues to deal with over the years (namely Ray and Jamal Lewis in separate incidents), but I do not think that Rice can repair his image in Baltimore.

From a business perspective, it makes little sense for the Ravens to cut Rice, who would still be owed $14 million in guaranteed money from the contract he signed in 2012. However, the Ravens do not have a choice at this moment. The video (seen here) of Rice dragging his unconscious fiance out of the casino elevator is not the entire story, but it says enough.

With Gary Kubiak as the new offensive coordinator, the Ravens can draft a running back and tell the media that they were the best player available who happened to fit Kubiak’s scheme. I do know a guy who would fit in really well here… Terrance West

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ESPN’s Van Valkenburg believes Rice’s reputation may never recover

Posted on 19 February 2014 by WNST Audio

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Ravens, Suggs reach contract extension through 2018 season

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Ravens, Suggs reach contract extension through 2018 season

Posted on 16 February 2014 by Luke Jones

(Updated: Monday 2:30 p.m.)

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — With the start of free agency less than a month away and the Ravens hoping to clear more salary cap space to address a number of needs, the future of outside linebacker Terrell Suggs has been resolved with the veteran having a reasonable chance to finish his career in Baltimore.

And that’s exactly the way he wanted it.

“That is definitely the message,” Suggs said. “That’s the plan I see unless Ozzie [Newsome] has a trick up his sleeve. That’s definitely it. Sizzle will be a Raven for life.”

According to multiple outlets, the general manager and Suggs’ agent, Joel Segal, reached a long-term contract extension that reduces his $12.4 million cap figure to $7.8 million for the 2014 season and gives the six-time Pro Bowl selection and 2011 Defensive Player of the Year the opportunity to complete his career with the team that drafted him in 2003. Suggs was entering the final season of a six-year, $62.5 million contract signed in 2009 and was owed a $7.8 million base salary this season before receiving a four-year, $28.5 million extension that includes $16 million in guaranteed money.

Suggs will reportedly now receive an $11 million signing bonus with a $1 million base salary in 2014 and a $4 million guaranteed salary for the 2015 season. The extension totals four years and $28.5 million, but the Ravens will have the necessary flexibility to escape the deal after 2015 should Suggs’ production drop significantly as he enters his mid-30s.

“We’ve tried to put together a deal that’s a win-win for the player and for the organization,” Newsome said. “Now, whether he plays two years or three years, we have a mechanism to be able to deal with the salary cap that would make it friendly for us and friendly for Terrell.”

Newsome made it clear at the start of the offseason that the Ravens would look to adjust Suggs’ contract status in hopes of not only providing cap relief but to keep him in Baltimore beyond 2014. Had the sides not reached an agreement, it was possible that the Ravens would part ways with the 31-year-old in a manner similar to how they traded veteran wide receiver Anquan Boldin last winter.

Rebounding from an injury-plagued 2012 season, Suggs began last season looking like a Defensive Player of the Year candidate by recording nine sacks and 60 tackles in his first eight games but struggled in the second half of the season, collecting only one sack and 20 tackles in the final eight contests. That late-season decline and his advancing age likely made the possibility of hitting the open market less appealing to the 2003 first-round pick, who has 94 1/2 sacks in his 11-year career.

In looking back at the second half of the season, Suggs admitted there were times in which he was trying to do too much and not playing withing the structure of the defense.

“Don’t try to do so much of everybody else’s job,” Suggs said. “Let the coverage be itself, play the play, trust the play that’s being called and just be Sizzle. I think I was probably, down the stretch, trying to do too much. As one game went by, as two games went by, it was just like, ‘Alright, I need to get a sack. I need to get a sack,’ and I stopped letting the game come to me.”

The Ravens can now shift their focus to left tackle Eugene Monroe and tight end Dennis Pitta, who are regarded as their top unrestricted free agents to re-sign before the start of free agency on March 11. Prior to the news of an extension for Suggs, the Ravens had just under $12 million in cap space, but that didn’t exclude addressing any of their exclusive-rights or restricted free agents.

Without offering names, Newsome acknowledged that the Ravens have entered discussions regarding additional contract extensions, but the completion of the Suggs contract provides consolation in not only knowing he’ll be a member of the Ravens defense in the foreseeable future but the flexibility to address significant needs on both sides of the ball.

“What it does is just allow us to have the opportunity to pursue some of our own guys, but also be prepared for when free agency opens on March 11,” Newsome said. “If there are some players that are attractive to us, then we can pursue them.”

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Building offense around Flacco only offseason priority that matters

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Building offense around Flacco only offseason priority that matters

Posted on 09 January 2014 by Luke Jones

The uncertain future of linebacker Terrell Suggs and the decision to retain assistant Juan Castillo were topics that understandably garnered the most attention at the Ravens’ season-ending press conference on Wednesday.

But it was something owner Steve Bisciotti said that laid out the top priority of the offseason as Baltimore tries to bounce back from missing the postseason for the first time in the John Harbaugh era. In fact, it’s the only objective that really matters if the Ravens hope to climb to the heights they reached 11 months ago anytime soon.

Bisciotti has always acknowledged his opinions on football-related matters shouldn’t — and usually don’t — hold as much weight as those of general manager Ozzie Newsome and Harbaugh, but that hasn’t stopped the 53-year-old owner from publicly calling for more accountability from his employees in the past as former head coach Brian Billick and former offensive coordinator Cam Cameron learned years ago. That’s what made his answer over how concerned he was about the underwhelming play of quarterback Joe Flacco so telling as it spelled out what the Ravens must do this winter.

There was no over-the-top comment about needing more of a return on the $120.6 million contract he forked over to the 28-year-old quarterback last winter, even though the Ravens will certainly expect a much better Flacco in 2014. Yes, Flacco must improve, but so must Newsome, Harbaugh, Castillo, offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell (if he does indeed return), Ray Rice, the offensive line, and everyone else with a stake in the Baltimore offense next season and beyond.

“When you look at these guys who have been coaching in the league and have had success in the past and you look at our players that have had success in the past, if we could have fixed it, we would have,” Bisciotti said. “I certainly expected more in the second half of the season. As interrelated as the running game is to the play-action pass and the execution of the offensive line, trying to divide up the blame is something I’m really not much more qualified than you guys are to do. But, when you have a short window of failure that comes out of the blue, the key is not to make wholesale changes.

“I know that Ray Rice was limited this year, and Bernard Pierce was limited. And, if they had been better, then maybe the offensive line would have performed better. Obviously, if the offensive line were blowing open holes, then maybe [Rice and Pierce] could have achieved more with their physical limitations. And, if that had worked a little better, then I think Joe would have performed a little better. All the things, the numbers that are so striking to me to find yourself in the bottom five in offense in almost every category is again something that — had we not had a [good] history in the last five years – then I would probably demand wholesale changes. But I think you have to be careful to not to look in a vacuum and decide you have to throw out the baby with the bathwater, and [you] let people get healthy, let these guys work together for another year, add some people to the team in the draft and free agency.

“I think it’s safe to say that we’re going to look at the offense with the same fine-tooth comb that we looked at the defense last year. I think you’re going to see a lot of changes in personnel and how we approach that. I’m pretty proud of the defense for being able to retool on the fly, and I’ve got the same amount of confidence with these guys in building the offense.”

The final few sentences of his drawn-out answer said everything you need to know. Yes, the Ravens must address Suggs’ $12.4 million cap number, find a free safety, and tinker with various parts of their defense and special teams, but building a better supporting cast around Flacco is paramount. Last offseason saw Newsome focus solely on revamping a below-average defense while allowing the offense to suffer as a result, a perplexing strategy considering the Ravens had just won a Super Bowl with their offense doing the heavy lifting.

Fixing the offense won’t be easy as the dynamic pass-catcher the Ravens covet doesn’t just grow on trees and the organization doesn’t exactly have a stellar history of developing — or even finding — many quality wide receivers in their 18-year history. Adding bulk on the interior line is a necessity, but potentially finding three quality starters — if the Ravens are unable to re-sign Eugene Monroe to remain with incumbents Marshal Yanda and Kelechi Osemele — will be a daunting task. Flacco’s $14.8 million cap figure in 2014 will indeed be an obstacle — just like the large numbers currently held by Suggs, Haloti Ngata, Lardarius Webb, Rice, and Yanda — as Newsome tries to use limited resources to infuse the offensive side of the ball with more talent.

But the Ravens must build a better supporting cast around their quarterback, whether you think Flacco is a potential Rolls-Royce or only a Mustang in the hierarchy of current NFL quarterbacks. He’s proven he has the ability to take the franchise all the way to the top, but he can’t do it alone as last season so painfully showed. A record-setting contract understandably brought high expectations, but it didn’t suddenly change his ability or who he is as a quarterback.

Making some difficult decisions such as parting ways with Suggs and sacrificing some ability defensively may be necessary to create sufficient cap space in order to add more dynamic offensive pieces. The Ravens have no choice but to take giant leaps forward offensively in the increasingly offensive-minded NFL.

Flacco did not have a good year in 2013, and he must own his share of the blame just like anyone else involved. But the Ravens didn’t set him up to have a strong season following an offseason trade of Anquan Boldin and the retirement of veteran center Matt Birk without adequate replacements behind them. That coupled with unforeseen injuries to the likes of Dennis Pitta, Rice, and Osemele left too much to overcome.

From the Suggs financial decision to improving the offensive line and running game, nearly all offseason moves will be tied to the theme of doing what’s best for Flacco so the Ravens can get the most out of their steep investment.

It’s fair to expect much more from the quarterback, but only if the front office, coaching staff, and supporting cast hold up their end of the bargain as well.

Even after handing Flacco the richest deal in franchise history last year, Bisciotti could recognize that simple truth on Wednesday.

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