Tag Archive | "university of maryland"

Maryland AD Anderson shoots down rumors of Stanford departure

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Maryland AD Anderson shoots down rumors of Stanford departure

Posted on 16 July 2012 by WNST Staff

The San Francisco Chronicle reported Monday that University of Maryland Athletic Director Kevin Anderson had interviewed for the same position at Stanford University.

After confirmed reports indicated he was set to take the job Monday afternoon and that “contract details” were being discussed, it looks as if Anderson himself denied that report and said that he is committed to staying at Maryland, via a statement from the school, via ESPN.com

“I am not in discussion nor have I been with Stanford University regarding their open athletic director position as I am committed to being the director of athletics at the University of Maryland. My focus and energy are committed to working to enhance the student-athlete experience and the competitive and financial success at the University of Maryland. We have just begun the transformation of the athletic department and I look forward to seeing this through.”

Anderson has been rumored to be of interest to the Cardinal for almost a month but declined he had talked to the school about their opening in a June interview with The Diamondback. Former Stanford AD Bob Bowlsby left Palo Alto to become the new Big 12 commissioner in May. The Chicago Tribune reported over the weekend that Northwestern AD Jim Phillips had been Stanford’s favorite to replace Bowlsby but he declined the offer.

Anderson is nearly two years into a five year deal he signed in College Park after serving in the same capacity at the United States Military Academy (Army) since 2004. He replaced polarizing former AD Debbie Yow, who had accepted the same position at North Carolina State University. Anderson is originally from the Bay Area and previously worked as a fund raiser at Stanford. He graduated from San Francisco State University and also worked in the athletic department at the University of California (Berkeley).

Anderson has been scrutinized in College Park for his decision to fire popular football coach Ralph Friedgen in 2010 just months after his arrival and hiring Randy Edsall to replace him instead of popular choice Mike Leach. Anderson was praised for helping former basketball coach Gary Williams through his retirement process, but was scrutinized further for failing to lure University of Arizona basketball coach Sean Miller to the Terrapins, instead hiring former Texas A&M University coach Mark Turgeon.

Most recently Anderson has overseen the process of eliminating seven varsity sports due to budgetary concerns.

Neither school announced the move, and the Chronicle quickly took down the report off the front page of their site.

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Maryland’s Tate, Gilman’s Kiser named to Butkus Award Watch Lists

Posted on 16 July 2012 by WNST Staff

CHICAGO – (July 16, 2012) – The 28th annual Butkus Award® selection process to honor the nation’s best linebackers begins today with announcement of the collegiate and high school pre-season watch list.

Each watch list contains 51 candidates, honoring the now-retired professional jersey number of Dick Butkus, who is regarded by NFL Films as the best defensive player in football history.  The selection panel is comprised of 51 coaches, evaluators and journalists, coordinated by Pro Football Weekly.

The Collegiate Butkus Award watch list includes 51 candidates from 38 universities.  Manti Te’o of Notre Dame is the only returning finalist, after having won the inaugural High School Butkus Award in 2008.  Jarvis Jones of Georgia is a returning semi-finalist.

The High School Butkus Award watch list includes 51 candidates from 50 high schools across 22 states.  Florida (8), Ohio (5) and Texas (5) have the most prep players on the watch list.

Candidates in addition to those appearing on the watch list may be considered for the Award.

Semi-finalists will be named October 22, finalists November 20, and winners will be notified on or before December 4.  The Professional Butkus Award winner will be announced in January 2013. Winners will be featured in a television special a week before the Super Bowl.

2011 Butkus Award winners:

       Professional: Tie.  DeMarcus Ware, Dallas Cowboys, and Terrell Suggs, Baltimore Ravens.

       Collegiate: Luke Kuechly, Boston College, the NFL’s ninth overall draft pick by the Carolina Panthers.

       High School:  Noor Davis, Leesburg High School, Fla., now at Stanford University.

The Butkus Award was expanded in 2008 to honor linebackers at three levels while helping spread the word about Butkus’ I Play Clean™ initiative which encourages teens to eat well, train hard, and play with attitude instead of resorting to steroids and related drugs.  More information is available at www.iplayclean.org or at www.facebook.com/i.play.clean.

The Butkus Award, www.thebutkusaward.com or www.facebook.com/51.butkus, is presented by the Butkus Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization. It is part of the National College Football Awards Association, a coalition of the major collegiate awards. More information is available at www.NCFAA.org.

COLLEGIATE WATCH LIST:

  • Denicos Allen, Michigan State University
  • Dion Bailey, University of Southern California
  • Steve Beauharnais, Rutgers University
  • Chris Borland, University of Wisconsin
  • Jonathan Bostic, University of Florida
  • Arthur Brown, Kansas State University
  • Jonathan Brown, University of Illinois
  • Max Bullough, Michigan State University
  • Jamie Collins, University of Southern Mississippi
  • Ja’Gared Davis, Southern Methodist University
  • Zaviar Gooden, University of Missouri
  • Jeremiah Greene, University of Nevada
  • Khaseem Greene, Rutgers University
  • Alanzo Highsmith, University of Arkansas
  • Gerald Hodges, Penn State University
  • DeVonte Holloman, University of South Carolina
  • Andrew Jackson, University of Western Kentucky
  • Jelani Jenkins, University of Florida
  • A.J. Johnson, University of Tennessee
  • Nico Johnson, University of Alabama
  • Christian Jones, Florida State University
  • Jarvis Jones, University of Georgia
  • Uona Kaveinga, Brigham Young University
  • A.J. Klein, Iowa State University
  • Jake Knott, Iowa State University
  • Cameron Lawrence, Mississippi State University
  • Travis Long, Washington State University
  • John Lotulelei, University of Florida
  • Brandon Magee, Arizona State University
  • Michael Mauti, Penn State University
  • Lerentee McCray, University of Florida
  • Kevin Minter, Louisiana State University
  • Nick Moody, Florida State University
  • Damontre Moore, Texas A&M University
  • Sio Moore, University of Connecticut
  • James Morris, University of Iowa
  • C.J. Mosley, University of Alabama
  • Trent Murphy, Stanford University
  • David Nwabuisi, Northwestern University
  • Sean Porter, Texas A&M University
  • Keith Pough, Howard University
  • Kevin Reddick, University of North Carolina
  • Douglas Rippy, University of Colorado
  • Etienne Sabino, Ohio State
  • Shane Skov, Stanford University
  • Kenny Tate, University of Maryland
  • Bruce Taylor, Virginia Tech University
  • Manti Te’o, University of Notre Dame
  • Chase Thomas, Stanford University
  • Cornelius Washington, University of Georgia
  • Tom Wort, University of Oklahoma

HIGH SCHOOL WATCH LIST:

  • Alex Anzalone, Wyomissing High School - Wyomissing, PA
  • Josh Banderas, Lincoln Southwest High School - Lincoln, NE
  • Eric Beisel, Rockwood Summit High School - Fenton, MO
  • Al-Rasheed Benton, Shabazz High School - Newark, NJ
  • Nigel Bowden, Central High School - Macon, GA
  • Buddy Brown, Williamstown High School - Williamstown, NJ
  • Sean Constantine, Bellevue High School - Bellevue, WA
  • Chans Cox, Blue Ridge High School - Lakeside, AZ
  • Deoundrei Davis, Cypress Woods High School - Cypress, TX
  • Michael Deeb, American Heritage College Prep School - Plantation, FL
  • Garret Dooley, Rochester High School - Rochester, IL
  • Dajuan Drennon, Timber Creek High School - Sicklerville, NJ
  • Victor Egu, De La Salle High School - Concord, CA
  • Brooks Ellis, Fayetteville High School - Fayetteville, AR
  • Reuben Foster, Auburn High School - Auburn, AL
  • Ben Gedeon, Hudson High School - Hudson, OH
  • Jermaine Grace, Miramar High School - Miramar, FL
  • Nigel Harris, Hillsborough High School - Tampa, FL
  • James Hearns, Lincoln High School - Tallahassee, FL
  • Deon Hollins Jr., Fort Bend Marshall High School - Missouri City, TX
  • Darrien Howard, Chaminade Julienne High School - Dayton, OH
  • Michael Hutchings, De La Salle High School - Concord, CA
  • Trey Johnson, Central Gwinnett High School - Lawrenceville, GA
  • Melvin Jones, Washington Marion High School - Lake Charles, LA
  • Walker Jones, Evangelical Christian High School - Cordova, TN
  • Shane Jones, Moeller High School - Cincinnati, OH
  • Cameron Judge, Oaks Christian High School - Westlake Village, CA
  • Peter Kalambayi, Butler High School - Matthews, NC
  • Tim Kimbrough, Warren Central High School - Indianapolis, IN
  • Micah Kiser, Gilman High School - Baltimore, MD
  • E.J. Levenberry, C.D. Hylton High School - Woodbridge, VA
  • Courtney Love, Cardinal Mooney High School - Youngstown, OH
  • Michael McCray, Trotwood Madison High School - Trotwood, OH
  • Daniel McMillan, First Coast High School - Jacksonville, FL
  • Mike Mitchell, Prestonwood Christian Academy - Plano, TX
  • Dorian O’Daniel, Our Lady of Good Counsel - Olney, MD
  • Johnny O’Neal, West Laurens High School - Dublin, GA
  • Nick Ramirez, Lees Summit West High School - Lees Summit, MO
  • Doug Randolph, Woodberry Forest High School - Woodberry Forest, VA
  • Duke Riley, John Curtis Christian High School - River Ridge, LA
  • Isaac Savaiinaea, Punahou High School - Honolulu, HI
  • Jaylon Smith, Bishop Luers High School - Fort Wayne, IN
  • Reggie Spearman, Simeon Academy - Chicago, IL
  • Matthew Thomas, Booker T. Washington High School - Miami, FL
  • Stacy Thomas, Gulliver Prep High School - Miami, FL
  • Cameron Toney, Huntsville High School - Huntsville, AL
  • Gerald Turner, Goose Creek High School - Goose Creek, SC
  • Corey Vereen, West Orange High School - Winter Garden, FL
  • Brett Wade, Kennedale High School - Kennedale, TX
  • Paul Whitmill, Bastrop High School - Bastrop, TX
  • Tim Williams, University Laboratory High School - Baton Rouge, LA

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Maryland AD Anderson elected NACDA President

Posted on 10 July 2012 by WNST Staff

CLEVELAND, Ohio – University of Maryland director of athletics Kevin Anderson will become president of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) for 2012-13, the association announced Tuesday.

Anderson was elected to the post in conjunction with the 47th Annual NACDA Convention, which was held June 22-28 at the Hilton Anatole Hotel in Dallas, Texas. Anderson replaces UCLA director of athletics Dan Guerrero, who served as President in 2011-12.

“I am honored and humbled to serve as NACDA President for the upcoming year,” said Anderson. “I would like to salute Dan Guerrero for his outstanding leadership over the past 12 months, and I hope to build on his work to further our profession over the next 12.

“NACDA had a tremendous convention again this year in Dallas with record-breaking attendance, and I look forward to continuing that trend for the 2013 convention.”

NACDA, now in its 48th year, is the professional and educational association for more than 6,500 college athletics administrators at more than 1,600 institutions throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. More than 2,200 athletics administrators annually attend the NACDA Convention. Additionally, NACDA administers 13 professional associations, including seven for the separate business units that report directly to the athletics directors.

– Terps –

 

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Terps add Australian kicking prospect Craddock

Posted on 05 July 2012 by WNST Staff

Craddock named top Australian kicking prospect in class of 2012

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Continuing an aggressive and exciting recruiting year, punter and place-kicker Brad Craddock has signed a financial-aid agreement to play for the University of Maryland, head football coach Randy Edsall announced Thursday.

Craddock, a native of Adelaide, Australia, was a four-sport athlete in high school and learned to punt playing Australian Rules football. He was rated as the top Australian kicking prospect in the class of 2012 by Chris Sailer Kicking.

Maryland head football coach Randy Edsall said, “Brad is an extremely talented kicker and punter with a very strong leg and excellent hangtime and distance with his kicks. We are excited that Brad has decided to come to the University of Maryland to continue his academic and athletic career. Having had experience with an Australian punter previously, I felt that Brad would be a great fit based on film and recommendations of our kicking and International contacts. We look forward to having Brad with us when our team reports to camp on August 5th.”

Craddock began playing Australian Rules football at age eight and also played soccer, tennis and ran track for his high school, Tabor Christian College. He spent the last year-and-a-half training with OzPunt, an Australian punting, kicking and holding academy.

He will have all four years of eligibility available at Maryland.

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Ricardo Young officially transfers to Maryland

Posted on 28 June 2012 by WNST Staff

Young, a transfer, will practice with the team in the fall, be eligible in 2013

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Quarterback Ricardo Young has committed to play for the University of Maryland, signing a financial-aid agreement, head football coach Randy Edsall announced Thursday.

Young, who attended Iowa Western Community College this past spring and University of New Mexico in the fall of 2011, will join the Terps for preseason practice, which begins Aug. 6. He will not be eligible to play until 2013 when he will be a redshirt junior.

Young is coming back home, having starred at H.D. Woodson High School. He was named the 2009 Washington, D.C., Player of the Year and the Gatorade State Player of the Year.

“It’s nice to add Ricardo to the team,” Edsall said. “I recruited him while I was at UConn, so I’m familiar with him as a person. He’s also a tremendous athlete and football player. We’re glad he’s decided to come back home and be part of the excitement that is building around the program.”

Young was a three-year starter at Woodson. He passed for 2,461 yards and 24 touchdowns as a senior to earn first-team All-Met honors from The Washington Post. After the 2009 season, he was listed as the No. 21 dual-threat quarterback in the country and the No. 3 player in the District of Columbia by Rivals. He was ranked the No. 48 signal-caller in the nation by Scout.com.

He threw for 3,089 yards and 31 touchdowns, as well as rushing for 780 yards and 11 scores as a junior.

Young signed a National Letter of Intent in 2010 with Virginia Tech and spent that season redshirting as a scout team quarterback. He was a member of the 2010-11 Atlantic Coast Conference honor roll.

He sat out last year at New Mexico due to NCAA transfer rules.

- Terps -

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New Four Team Playoff Improves Terps’ National Championship Chances

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New Four Team Playoff Improves Terps’ National Championship Chances

Posted on 26 June 2012 by andrewtomlinson

College football fans had their prayers answered when the new four team playoff system was announced Monday and University of Maryland Terrapins fans should be even more excited, as the playoff helps increase their team’s shot at a National Title.

When people talk about the football playoff system, many think about how it will give the Boise State’s and Houston’s of the world a shot at actually making it to the National Championship game. The truth is though, it could help schools in the smaller major conferences just as much. It gives teams in the ACC and Big East a chance to have a shot at earning their own title, despite having a hard time breaking into the elusive top-two in the polls.

The Big Ten, Big 12, Pac 12 and SEC are viewed as superior conferences compared to the Big East and ACC and that perception isn’t going to change. Whether it is true or not, the general belief in college football is the schedules of the other conferences are just harder than that of the ACC. While the the big four conferences have their fare share of teams like Indiana, Washington, Kentucky and Kansas, many think the ACC is too saturated with teams like Virginia, Duke, North Carolina, Boston College and Wake Forest. It causes ACC team’s to suffer in the BCS rankings, as well as in the AP and USA Today polls.

What this playoff sets up for a school like Maryland though, is a scenario that sees them go undefeated or only suffer one loss and, despite having the same record as one of the more powerful conferences, still have a shot at the title. In the past, a team from one of the power conferences would get the nod over Maryland, simply because of strength of schedule. Now though, the bigger conference teams may still get the higher votes, but it could still leave Maryland in the important top-four and with a shot at the championship game.

People will always moan about who is chosen to play in the games, but no matter what someone will be upset when only four teams make the playoff. What this system does is level the playing field for a football program, like the Terps’, to not be knocked out of the running for a championship simply because they play in a conference many believe is weaker.

Is it a perfect system? Not by any means, but what it is progress, something college football hasn’t made in a long time.

This system doesn’t take effect until 2014, which could be the first year Maryland has a real shot at challenging the big boys if all goes according to Randy Edsall’s plan. They are still going to have to work for it and will still most likely have to go unbeaten to even smell one of the four spots, but this system does give the Terps an advantage it didn’t have before.

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Baum, Schwarzmann Tewaaraton winners

Posted on 31 May 2012 by WNST Staff

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2012 – The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced Peter Baum of Colgate University and Katie Schwarzmann of the University of Maryland as the winners of the 12th annual Tewaaraton Award, presented Thursday at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse players in the United States.

Colgate didn’t enter the season on the national radar, but Patriot League Offensive Player of the Year Peter Baum ensured the Raiders quickly emerged as contenders. Baum took off after an early-season move to attack and terrorized defenses with his hybrid style. The nation’s scoring leader broke eight school and conference records and led Colgate’s second-ranked offense to a school-record 14 wins and its first-ever NCAA tournament victory.

The Portland, Ore., native is the first men’s Tewaaraton finalist and winner from west of the Mississippi, and the first in Colgate history. The junior ended the season with 97 points (67 g, 30 a), tying Duke’s Matt Danowski (2008) for the most ever by a men’s Tewaaraton finalist.

The winner of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) Lt. Raymond J. Enners Award for Outstanding Player of the Year, Baum was also named to the USILA All-America first team and earned All-Patriot League, All-Patriot League Tournament (tournament-record 18 points) and Academic All-Patriot League honors. His 5.39 points per game and 3.72 goals per game both led the country.

Baum currently ranks second in Colgate and Patriot League history with 130 career goals and fifth in program history with 176 career points. His 67 goals and 97 points this season rank sixth and 13th all-time in NCAA history. He is the first Patriot League representative and the seventh attackman to receive the men’s Tewaaraton Award.

A returning finalist in her junior season, Katie Schwarzmann continued to make her mark in Maryland’s record book. The ACC Offensive Player of the Year was a threat between the lines and ruled the fast break. Schwarzmann finished 2012 first in the ACC and second nationally in goals (72), while ranking second on the Terrapins in points (94), ground balls (31), draw controls (52) and caused turnovers (17).

A three-time Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) All-American and three-time All-ACC performer, Schwarzmann was a member of the 2011-12 U.S. women’s national team. The Sykesville, Md., native joins Jen Adams (2001) and Caitlyn McFadden (2010) as the Terps’ Tewaaraton winners.

Schwarzmann scored in every game this season and boasted eight games with five or more points. Her 72 goals ranked fifth in Maryland single-season history. The ACC Championship Most Valuable Player tallied a tournament-record 11 goals in three games while leading the Terrapins to a fourth straight ACC crown. She was also named to the NCAA Championship All-Tournament team.

Schwarzmann is the fifth women’s Tewaaraton winner in ACC history, the third women’s winner from the state of Maryland and the eighth midfielder to receive the Tewaaraton award on the women’s side.

“Every year, there are 10 worthy candidates and it is a credit to Peter and Katie that they have been recognized as the most outstanding players this year,” said Jeffrey Harvey, chairman of The Tewaaraton Foundation. “We are thrilled to have them join this elite list of those who have received the Tewaaraton Award.”

The five men’s finalists were Baum, Duke University midfielder CJ Costabile, University of Massachusetts attackman Will Manny, Loyola University attackman Mike Sawyer and University of Virginia attackman Steele Stanwick.

The five women’s finalists were Schwarzmann, University of Florida midfielder Brittany Dashiell, University of North Carolina attacker Becky Lynch, Northwestern University midfielder Taylor Thornton and Syracuse University attacker Michelle Tumolo.

Finalists were selected from a pool of 25 men’s and 25 women’s nominees. The selection committees are comprised of 12 men’s and 10 women’s current and former college coaches.

For more information on the Tewaaraton Award, visit www.tewaaraton.com. Like and follow The Tewaaraton Foundation at www.facebook.com/tewaaraton and www.twitter.com/tewaaraton.

About The Tewaaraton Foundation

First presented in 2001 at the University Club of Washington DC, the Tewaaraton Award is recognized as the pre-eminent lacrosse award, annually honoring the top male and female college lacrosse player in the United States. Endorsed by the Mohawk Nation Council of Elders and US Lacrosse, the Tewaaraton Award symbolizes lacrosse’s centuries-old roots in Native American heritage. The Tewaaraton Foundation ensures the integrity and advances the mission of this award. Each year, the Tewaaraton Award celebrates one of the six tribal nations of the Iroquois Confederacy – the Mohawk, Cayuga, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca and Tuscarora – and presents two scholarships to students of Iroquois descent. To learn more about The Tewaaraton Foundation, visit www.tewaaraton.com.

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Title drought continues for Maryland after loss to Loyola

Posted on 28 May 2012 by WNST Staff

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. - After a back and forth battle in the first half that saw two Terrapin leads and three ties, the University of Maryland men’s lacrosse team fell to top-seeded Loyola 9-3 Monday in the NCAA title game in front of 30,816 at Gillette Stadium.

Junior Jesse Bernhardt, redshirt sophomore Mike Chanenchuk, and junior Kevin Cooper scored all three of Maryland’s goals in the first 20 minutes of the game, but the Greyhounds (18-1) took a two-goal lead before halftime they would not relinquish.

Jesse Bernhardt put the Terrapins on the board first with 9:34 to go in the first quarter. He went coast to coast down the field for the score after sophomore Michael Ehrhardt forced a Greyhound turnover. Bernhardt did the rest, scoring on a low shot in transition from the right alley.

Loyola tied it up just under five minutes later with a shot by Davis Butts from Chris Layne. Eric Lusby gave the Hounds their first lead at 2-1 with an unassisted goal with 1:55 remaining in the first quarter.

Chanenchuk tied the game up with 12:12 left in the second quarter. He came around the cage and shot under the stick of Loyola’s Josh Hawkins for the Terps’ second goal.

Less than 90 seconds later, senior Joe Cummings found Kevin Cooper in the middle of the box to send a straight shot into the back of the net for a 3-2 Maryland lead.

With 9:22 to go in the first half, Loyola’s Pat Byrnes tied the game back up with an unassisted score. Loyola took ahold of the lead with just under six minutes to go when Mike Sawyer scored off a pass from Layne to make it 4-3. Two minutes later, the Greyhounds extended their lead to two with an unassisted goal from Phil Dobson.

Loyola led 5-3 at the break, then made it a 6-3 lead with 10:12 to go in the third quarter with an unassisted goal by Justin Ward.

Lusby pushed Loyola’s lead to four with 11:12 left in the fourth quarter. Layne picked up his third assist of the day on the play. Lusby scored his third and fourth goals of the game in the final five minutes to make it a 9-3 final score.

The Terps took 19 of their 29 shots in the second half, including 12 in the fourth quarter and six in the final 3:45, but their stretch of unlucky shooting continued.

Sophomore goalkeeper Niko Amato finished with eight saves, while Loyola’s Jack Runkel finished with six. Four of Runkel’s saves came in the second half to hold the Terps off.

Joe Cummings, Drew Snider and Jesse Bernhardt were named to the NCAA All-Tournament team.

Maryland ends the season with a 12-6 record on the season.

The game marked the end of a remarkable run for seven Maryland seniors: Joe Cummings, MJ Leonard, David Miller, Pat Morrison, Tim Shaeffer, Michael Shakespeare and Drew Snider. The 2012 senior class compiled a 47-22 (.712) record during its time in College Park, brought the Terps their first ACC Championship since 2005 and took the team to back-to-back NCAA title games for the first time since 1997 and 1998.

Game Notes:
• With today’s 9-3 loss, Maryland is now 19-2 all-time vs. Loyola.
• The Terps are now 1-1 all-time vs. the Greyhounds in the NCAA tournament and 1-1 in the Final Four.
• Maryland is now 2-9 all-time in the finals of the NCAA tournament.
• Second-year head coach John Tillman has led the Terrapins to the NCAA Championship game in both of his first two seasons in College Park. He owns a record of 25-11 (.694) and an NCAA Tournament record of 6-2 at Maryland.

-Terps-

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Greyhounds top Terps for first ever NCAA title

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Greyhounds top Terps for first ever NCAA title

Posted on 28 May 2012 by WNST Staff

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. – The Loyola University Maryland men’s lacrosse team checked off a lot of firsts throughout the 2012 season, and the Greyhounds capped their magical season with another on Memorial Day at Gillette Stadium.

Loyola won its first-ever NCAA Men’s Lacrosse Championship and the first national title in the school’s Division I history. The Greyhounds set a record for fewest goals allowed in an NCAA Championship Game, defeating the University of Maryland, 9-3.

“I thought Saturday was a pretty cool day for the Greyhounds. But, today is special,” said Charley Toomey who became the first coach to win an NCAA title in his first trip to the NCAA Semifinals. “When I look at my locker room, I’m just so proud of them. They’ve handled every situation with dignity and class this year. Coming back on short preparation to play a tough Maryland team, a physical Maryland team, they responded in a big way to give Loyola our first National Championship.”

Eric Lusby was named the Championship’s Most Outstanding Player after scoring four goals in the title game and setting a tournament record with 17 in four games. He also ends his season with a school-season record 54 goals, surpassing teammate Mike Sawyer who set the record two games ago and finished the year with 52.

Four Greyhounds joined Lusby on the All-Tournament Team: Josh Hawkins, Joe Fletcher, Scott Ratliff and Jack Runkel.

The Greyhounds trailed on two occasions during the game, 1-0 and 3-2, but after Maryland’s Kevin Cooper scored at 10:40, Loyola did not allow a goal for the remaining 40-minutes, 40-seconds of the contest.

Loyola’s win capped a season that it started outside the national Top-20 after concluding 2011 with an 8-5 record. The Greyhounds’ 18 wins set a program record, and Loyola became just the ninth team to win an NCAA Division I title since the first Championship in 1971.

The team is also the second in Loyola history to win a national crown, joining the 1976 men’s soccer side that won the NCAA Division II title.

Maryland took a 1-0 lead 5:26 into the game when Jesse Bernhardt caused a turnover and went the distance to score. The Terrapins (12-6) held Loyola scoreless for more than four more minutes, but Davis Butts broke through for the Greyhounds, scoring on a bouncer from nine yards out after taking a feed from Chris Layne.

Lusby pushed Loyola in front at the 1:55 mark in the first quarter, spinning free from a defender to dump in his first goal of the game.

Maryland, however, scored two in a row in the first five minutes of the second quarter to take brief 3-2 lead. Mike Chanenchuk got loose curling around the crease and scored at 12:12, and Cooper’s goal off a Joe Cummings feed made it 3-2 with 10:40 left in the frame.

The Terrapins’ advantage, however, did not last long as Pat Byrnes dodged around a defender from goal-line extended on the right side, putting a low-to-low shot around Maryland goalkeeper Niko Amato 1:18 after Cooper’s goal.

Layne then found Sawyer open about seven yards out, and Sawyer put a low-to-low shot into the net at 5:57 to put the Greyhounds up for good.

With 3:57 to go before the half, Phil Dobson came down the right side and ripped a shot to make it 5-3 at the break.

From that point, it was the defense’s turn to take over. Maryland took 19 shots in the third and fourth quarters, but Loyola did not yield a goal. Runkel made six of his seven saves in the second half in goal for the Greyhounds.

“Jack was tremendous this week, but that is what we see of him in practice every day,” Toomey said. “I felt like he got his first save, and that started things off right.”

Runkel was quick to credit the defense in front of him.

“A dream come true to play with these guys,” he said. “They give me shots that I want to see. I’m a lot better up top seeing shots and saving them.”

The close defense of Fletcher (2 ground balls, 1 caused turnover), Reid Acton (3, 2) and Dylan Grimm (1 gb) and rope unit of Ratliff (5, 2), Hawkins (2, 2), Pat Laconi (1 gb), Kyle Duffy and Kevin Moriarty led the way in front of Runkel.

Justin Ward scored the only goal of the third quarter,wrapping around the crease and depositing a high-to-high shot into the goal at 10:12, making Loyola’s lead 6-3.

The fourth quarter offense, then, belonged to Lusby.

He took a Layne pass and whipped a hip-high shot for a goal with 11:12 on the clock, and he made it an 8-3 Greyhounds lead with 5:07 toplay when Layne worked the ball to Sawyer, and Sawyer found Lusby alone on the top right side, and he scored from eight yards in front of the crease.

Lusby scored his record-setting goal with 3:45 left on the clock after Maryland had called a timeout to set up a ride.

Butts carried the ball around a double team for the Greyhounds, and then when he appeared to be trapped near the top of the box, Butts split the defenders and raced toward the goal. He sliced a pass in front of the crease to Lusby who finished his fourth goal of the afternoon.

“I just got hot at the right time,” Lusby said of his 17-goal outburst in the Championships. “I knew going into the tournament, my shot was a little off. I kept missing the cage, so I knew I wanted to shoot for net. But I have to give credit to all the other guys in the offense. From the middies to Davis Butts and Pat Byrnes, all those guys.”

“They were dodging hard all weekend and drawing slides and giving me all the opportunities I had. And, Mike Sawyer drawing all the attention on his side of the field. When I had the opportunity to shoot andscore, I wanted to make sure I made it count.”

Lusby opened the Championships with three goals and two assists against Canisius, and he then scored five goals with two assists in a Quarterfinal win over Denver. Saturday, he tallied five goals and a helper in the Semifinals against Notre Dame, leading to his four-goal performance in the title match.

He eclipsed the previous record of 16 goals set in 2006 by Virginia’s Matt Ward and tied a year later by Duke’s Zach Greer.

Lusby’s 17 goals came on 40 shots, and his 22 points were just three shy of tying the Championships’ record set in 1977 by Cornell’s Eamon McEneaney and tied in 1987 by Cornell’s Tim Goldstein.

The Greyhounds, who had made one previous appearance in the Division I Championship Game (1990 when Toomey was a co-captain and starting goalkeeper) and one in the Division II title contest (1981), joined Cornell, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Maryland, North Carolina, Princeton, Syracuse and Virginia as teams that have won Division I titles.

“For our alumni, for our past presidents (Rev. Joseph Sellinger and Rev. Harold Ridley), for our current president (Rev. Brian Linnane), (Assistant Vice President/Director of Athletics) Jim Paquette, for (Athletic Director Emeritus) Joe Boylan, (Executive Vice President) Susan Donovan, the people (who) have supported us for so many years to allow this team to be what it is, I’m just so happy for those people,” Toomey said.

“This is a special group of guys. This is a special group of young men that fought through a lot of things this year to put themselves in position, and they stood tall on the biggest day.”

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Your Monday Reality Check-Best team all season ending up winning title

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Your Monday Reality Check-Best team all season ending up winning title

Posted on 28 May 2012 by Glenn Clark

It’s a particular shame Monday’s NCAA lacrosse Championship Game was in Foxborough instead of right here at M&T Bank Stadium. It would have been a special celebration of a beloved game in Charm City.

Instead, Memorial Day became a special celebration of a deserving champion at Gillette Stadium.

I was at Ridley Athletic Complex Saturday, March 10 to see the Loyola University Maryland Greyhounds face the Duke Blue Devils. The Hounds had gotten off to a nice 4-0 start at that point in the season, reaching double digit goals in every game and holding their opponent to single digits in every game as well.

The issue at that point was the competition. Home wins over Delaware and Towson and road victories at Bellarmine and Michigan did little to convince anyone the Greyhounds were on the cusp of a breakthrough campaign.

It changed that day.

Star attackman and eventual Tewaaraton Award finalist Mike Sawyer put on an absolute clinic for Charley Toomey’s team, scoring six goals and leading the Hounds to a 13-8 win over the Devils. The Hounds were actually ranked ahead of the Devils in one of the recognized college lacrosse polls, but the victory still had the feel of an upset, as Duke was viewed as a legitimate national title contender.

From the opening whistle, it was apparent the Hounds were the more focused, determined squad. The 13-8 final didn’t even necessarily reflect the nature of the game, as Loyola held a 12-5 advantage after three quarters and appeared to let up late. The win came just after Toomey installed Jack Runkel as his starting goalie ahead of Michael Bonitatibus, a move that he would not have to reconsider at all the rest of the season.

On that day at Ridley Athletic Complex, the Loyola Greyhounds became more than just a team with a capable combination of scorers (Sawyer and graduate student Eric Lusby). They became more than just a fun team to watch. They became a legitimate threat to make a run to the Final Four.

Two and a half months later, they found themselves there. It wasn’t a fluke. It wasn’t a run of good fortune. It wasn’t about bad luck for other teams. It wasn’t about an easy schedule.

This Loyola team proved that for the 2012 NCAA lacrosse season, they were unquestionably the best team in the country.

In Monday’s NCAA Championship Game, the Hounds dominated the University of Maryland in a way that perfectly encapsulated their entire season. They showed an incredible ability to score goals at times, but also showed that their midfield unit was as capable as their attack. Their wings battled for balls when face-offs appeared to be lost. Their defense was SUFFOCATING, preventing even a single goal from Maryland for a stretch of more than two and a half quarters, stifling a unit that had tallied 16 just two days prior against those same Duke Blue Devils. On top of all of that, Runkel was spectacular for a second straight game.

They left no doubt not only about who was the best team on Memorial Day Monday, but who was the best team in the country. They were a deserving #1 seed and they worked to become a deserving national champion.

A deserving national champion that didn’t play a single game on television until the postseason.

They lost just one game along the way, an overtime heartbreaker to a fine Johns Hopkins squad. They won THREE games over ECAC rival Denver University, two of those wins coming in the Mile High City. They recorded a win over every team that reached Memorial Day weekend.

Lusby and Sawyer now have name recognition, but the work of Runkel, Scott Ratliff, Chris Layne, Josh Hawkins, Pat Byrnes, Davis Butts, Justin Ward, Joe Fletcher, Nikko Pontrello, Patrick Fanshaw, Kevin Ryan, Phil Dobson, Sean O’Sullivan, Dylan Grimm, Pat Laconi, Kevin Moriarty and J.P. Dalton were deserving of having their names typed in a column like this as well.

Loyola becomes the smallest school to ever win a national championship in lacrosse. The title is the first and only Division 1 title in any sport for the school. The team was unranked before the season started. Toomey was able to accomplish the feat after being on the losing end as a goalie in the school’s only ever run to the National Championship Game back in 1990. Lusby broke the record for most goals in a single NCAA Tournament in the process.

The word amazing keeps coming to mind.

The title drought continues for the Terrapins, as they have not held the trophy since 1974. John Tillman has been to the title game twice in his two seasons in College Park, but the inability to win the big one will now already become a topic of conversation for the Terps’ alumni and fan base. They were a remarkably young team this season and will likely be right back in the title picture a year from now. It won’t help the sting of a Championship Game loss, but they showed many signs of being a team on the verge of greatness.

Loyola however was the definition of greatness. They were exceptional. And perhaps they even earned a measure of revenge for the city of Baltimore on the field where the Ravens saw their season end months earlier in the AFC Championship Game.

Eh…they were the best lacrosse team in the country. We’ll be more than happy to have that in Charm City.

-G

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