Tag Archive | "Wallace Loh"

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Maryland President Loh announces school to lend money to athletic department

Posted on 14 August 2013 by WNST Staff

Dear University of Maryland community:

I am pleased to inform you that the final report of the President’s Commission on UMD and Big Ten/CIC Integration is available at president.umd.edu/commissions/B1G.  This report will guide our University’s transition into this athletic conference (on July 1, 2014) and its academic counterpart (Committee on Institutional Cooperation, on July 1, 2013).

Implementation of the Commission’s recommendations will (1) advance the excellence and reputation of UMD, (2) better support our student-athletes to perform at the highest level in their studies and in athletic competition, (3) ensure the long-term financial health of Maryland Athletics, and (4) allocate some of the Big Ten revenues to support UMD’s academic mission and need-based student financial aid.  I have accepted these four principles that undergird the Commission’s recommendations.

I highlight the following actions:

• Some of the new revenues expected from the Big Ten will provide our student-athletes with expanded support for academics, training, sports medicine, and nutrition.

• Some of these new revenues will be allocated to support the University’s academic priorities and student financial aid.  These allocations are expected to grow to at least $1 million annually.  Effective immediately, I have redirected $500,000 annually in other non-state revenues, previously budgeted for Maryland Athletics, to fund expanded mental health counseling services for all students.

• After Maryland Athletics achieves financial stability, half of its excess revenues will be used to repay its debts and the other half will be set aside to build its financial reserves.  This is to ensure that Maryland Athletics, which is a self-supporting enterprise, will never again be in a position where it has to cut teams.

• The men’s outdoor track and field team will be restored with the full allotment of scholarship support.

• The Commission left open the possibility of reinstating other teams in the future.  Any reinstatement review will be informed by the aforementioned principles of the Commission.

• UMD will produce high-quality academic, research, and athletic programming for the Big Ten Network that reaches some 80 million households in the U.S. and abroad.

There is more that I would like to do, and plan to do, to support athletics, academics, and student financial aid.  At this time, however, I am constrained by the Atlantic Coast Conference’s withholding of UMD’s rightful athletic revenues, which are the main funding source for our athletic programs.  Maryland Athletics now must borrow from other UMD (non-state) funds for operating expenses during our remaining time of ACC membership.  While I cannot comment specifically because litigation with the ACC is underway, I can say that our long-term planning has taken into account these issues.  I am resolved to shield our student-athletes from any permanent impact.

Joining the Big Ten is about academics as well as athletics.  I am pleased to report that many of our faculty, students, and staff are already participating in CIC programs on education, research, technology commercialization, libraries, student government, student affairs, and campus safety.  They have been warmly welcomed by their counterparts in this consortium of top-ranked flagship and AAU research universities.  Joining this “super-university” will advance UMD’s academic mission.

I am grateful to the 23 members of the Commission and to the additional faculty, staff and administrators who supported the Commission’s work during its six months of data gathering, deliberations, and public forums that resulted in the excellent report.  These members represent key constituencies: University Senate, undergraduate and graduate student government, UMCP Foundation Board of Trustees, Alumni Association, Student-Athlete Advisory Council, Terrapin Club, and M-Club.  My special thanks to the co-chairs, Linda Clement (Vice President for Student Affairs) and Barry Gossett (vice-chair, University System of Maryland Board of Regents).

I welcome your comments at president@umd.edu.

Thank you for your continued support of the University of Maryland.

Sincerely,

Wallace D. Loh
President

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President Loh says Big Ten move in “strategic interest” for Maryland

Posted on 19 November 2012 by WNST Staff

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND TO JOIN THE BIG TEN CONFERENCE

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The Big Ten Council of Presidents/Chancellors (COP/C) announced unanimous approval today for the University of Maryland to join the Big Ten Conference effective July 1, 2014, with competition to begin in all sports for the 2014-15 academic year. The University of Maryland also looks forward to joining the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), a consortium of world-class research institutions dedicated to advancing their academic missions.

“Today is a watershed moment for the University of Maryland,” said university president Wallace D. Loh.  “Membership in the Big TenConference is in the strategic interest of the University of Maryland.  It will not only ensure the financial vitality of Maryland Athletics for decades to come, but the extensive opportunities in the CIC for collaborations with our peer AAU and flagship universities in education, research, and innovation will boost the University of Maryland’s ascendancy in academic excellence.”

“The Big Ten Presidents and Chancellors are pleased to welcome the University of Maryland to the Big Ten Conference,” said COP/C Chair and University of Iowa President Sally Mason.  “The University of Maryland is one of the premier public research universities in the country and represents a natural alignment with our other member institutions.  Their top-ranked academic and athletic programs will be a tremendous addition to our conference.”

“Today is a historic day for both the University of Maryland and for Maryland Athletics,” said director of athletics Kevin Anderson. “The Big Ten is an outstanding conference comprised of flagship research universities. Our new peers share our pursuit of both athletic and academic excellence.  We are thrilled to join the Big Ten and look forward to beginning this next chapter in Maryland Athletics starting in 2014.”

In order for an institution to be admitted to the Big Ten Conference, it must submit a written application, which must then be approved by at least 70 percent of the Big Ten COP/C.  The University of Maryland formally submitted an application to join the Big Ten Conference Monday morning. The Big Ten COP/C then met via conference call and unanimously approved UMD’s application.

“The Big Ten Conference is excited to welcome the University of Maryland beginning with the 2014-15 academic year,” said Big Ten Commissioner James E. Delany. “Maryland is a tradition-rich institution with a history of academic and athletic excellence. They’re a great fit and we look forward to a great future.”

About the University of Maryland:  The University of Maryland is the state’s flagship university and one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities. Ranked No. 19 among public universities by U.S. News & World Report, it has 30 academic programs in the U.S News Top 10. UMD is one of only six universities in the world with top 25 programs in Computer Science, Engineering, Economics and Business, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Physics and Social Sciences, according to the Academic Ranking of Worldwide Universities.

About the Big Ten Conference: The Big Ten Conference is an association of world-class universities whose member institutions share a common mission of research, graduate, professional and undergraduate teaching and public service. Founded in 1896, the Big Ten has sustained a comprehensive set of shared practices and policies that enforce the priority of academics in student-athletes’ lives and emphasize the values of integrity, fairness and competitiveness. The broad-based athletic programs of the 12 Big Ten institutions sponsor 298 teams competing for championships in 25 official conference sports, 12 for men and 13 for women. Big Ten universities provide in excess of $136 million in athletic scholarship aid to nearly 10,000 men and women student-athletes, the most of any conference. For more information, visit www.bigten.org.

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I’m not as hellbent against potential Big Ten move as some of you

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I’m not as hellbent against potential Big Ten move as some of you

Posted on 17 November 2012 by Glenn Clark

Drew Forrester is right.

(You better make sure you pocket that one away for the future there, Forrester.)

He wrote Saturday morning here at WNST.net that if the University of Maryland were to jump ship from the ACC to the Big Ten (or B1G if you will), the move would be made entirely based on money.

He’s right about that. Of course, as it always is with Drew-he’s not right about everything.

Drew also said such a move would “stink…plain and simple.”

I’m not buying that whatsoever. I know he isn’t either.

Maryland to the Big Ten rumors have been reheated in recent days, and it appears as though this time there’s the actual bite that has been missing during previous rounds of rumors. In fact, a detailed ESPN.com report said Saturday school President Wallace Loh and Athletic Director Kevin Anderson were directly involved in negotiations.

The single biggest reason why a move like this WOULDN’T happen would be the $50 million exit fee the ACC is charging for a member institution to leave, but there’s monetary incentive for the B1G to be willing to help there.

Should the B1G be able to lure Maryland (and Rutgers as reports have indicated the league would also like to add), they would immediately open up three top 30 markets for likely pickup of the Big Ten Network (New York, Washington and Baltimore). Adding these three markets would prove quite lucrative for a league who created the first ever 24-7 sports television network.

That fact has been deemed understandable by most fans, but what some have struggled to understand is why Maryland would want to give up money-making basketball games against the likes of Duke and North Carolina.

Perhaps Saturday’s football game should teach you a lesson.

To understand why the move would make sense for Maryland, you must first be willing to accept a simple fact. No matter how important basketball is to your program, football is the money maker at (damn near) every major Division 1 university.

Let that sink in.

Maryland needs football revenue. It’s why they’re rotating through many different Under Armour uniforms right now. They’re hoping that with actual healthy players in the near future, they might be able to win games under Randy Edsall. If they do, that will go a long way to helping the program make money. In the meantime, their most lucrative opponents at Byrd Stadium include the likes of Virginia Tech and Florida State.

And thanks to this picture posted by InsideMDSports.com Saturday, here’s what we’ve learned about the lucrative nature of a game against Florida State…

There is no guarantee that a late season game against an Ohio State or Penn State or Michigan or Wisconsin would be significantly better attended than Saturday’s game given the dreadful state of the Maryland program after losing FOUR quarterbacks. But if THIS is as good as the ACC has to offer in football, what really is there to lose by making the jump?

There absolutely WOULD be something lost in basketball with a move to the B1G. Games against Duke and North Carolina have been perhaps the most significant athletic events the school has hosted in the last decade. That said, the conference has been a watered down mess outside the two power programs, and replacing Duke and Carolina with games against Michigan State and Indiana annually (or biannually) doesn’t sound like a terrible consolation prize. Games against Ohio State Wisconsin could serve as replacements for what would have been gained from the pending additions of Pitt and Syracuse to the ACC.

But Maryland’s reason for interest in jumping ship to the Big Ten is still much more tied to football, and namely the Big Ten Network.

The thought process is quite simple. Every Big Ten football game played every year is on television.

I want you to think about that.

Every single game is on television…not ESPN3.com.

That value cannot be dismissed in making a determination for the University of Maryland. Even the early season games against the likes of James Madison or Florida International would actually air on TV in (presumably) almost every home in the area and in other Big Ten markets, which would now include the crucial recruiting areas of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Every single game would also be available for viewing parties of alumni groups in bars and restaurants in those same markets.

Does that make sense?

On top of that, every program aired 24 hours a day, seven days a week on BTN serves as very affordable advertising for the athletic department and university as a whole.

If Maryland makes the move to the B1G, it will ABSOLUTELY be all about money.

It will NOT however “stink”.

Everyone knows (including Drew) that the only thing that actually matters in college athletics is money.

That’s “plain and simple.”

-G

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